I . .
Spencer Low
and
Goodyear Wrangler
mdials
make
a lasting.imp ssion at
the
season
opener. · ·
Over
1,000
years
ago,
near
the
course of
this
year's Parker
400,
ritual-
istic Indian carvings or ''intaglios'' were
woven onto
the
Southwest desert
floor.
'
.
puring
this
year's SCORE/HORA
season opener, protection for these
"Silent Giants
of
the
Desert" was pro-
vided by
the
Federal Bureau
of
Land
Management. ·
But
the
drivers' protection from '
the rugged Great Mojave.
and
Sonoran
Deserts was provided by their trucks
.
and
their tires. . · .
For Goodyear driver Spencer
Low,
his Nissan Hardbody took
on
the
deep
silt, the cracked rock,
and
won
the
race
on
the
very same tires you
can
buy:
Goodyear
Wr~gler
radials.
They're
the
same tires
that
helped
Spe cer
win
the
Class 7S Champion-·
shi'
and
the
.Mµi.i-Metal Challenge
Ch~pionship
for
the
last two con-
secutive years. · " .
· I The tires
thc3,t
a:re
.design~d to take
on
~
he
toughest terrain. The toughest
conditions.
So no
matter
what
kind
of
truck
you own, get
the
tires
that
will
d·ig deep,
bite
hard
and
get you·
through.
· · ·
Goodyear Wrangler radials.
They'll quickly,give you-a.whole
new
impressiori of off-road driving .
..
GOODfi'EAR
...
,,
. . . !
Take
me
home. The quick
w.ay.
,
1
.
Volume 4 Number 3
March
.1987
,
.,
In
This
.
Issue
•••
Editor-Publisher
Jean Calvin
Associate
Publisher
Brad Goodrow
Associate Editor
Richard K. Schwalm.
Controller
John Calvin
Circulation
:.
Jerry Lawless
Traffic
Frank McCombs
Contributors
Darla Crown
Leonard Day
Daryl D. Drake
Winnie Essenberg
Homer Eubanks
Tom
Grimshaw
Dennis Henneberg
Martin Holmes
Danny McKenzie
Brenda Parker
David Ryskamp
Walt Schwalbe
Wayne Simmons
Judy Smith
John Sprovkin
Joe Stephan
Darlene Thackston
3-D Photography
Trackside Photo Enterprises
.
Art
Director
Larry
E.
Worsham·
Typesetting
&
Production
Michelle's Tv,pesettin~ Services
THE
OfflCIAL
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•••
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FEATURES
Page
Score
Parker
400'
...
.
.......
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..........
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....
..
.....
12
Oktoberfest
in
Kitchener
.....
.
.....................
24
SNORE
Conservation
Award
........
.
.........
.
.....
27
Stadium
Racing in
San
Diego
..
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........
. . .
..........
30
·
Glen
Helen
Rallycross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34
Ice Racing
..
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......
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.......
;
..
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..
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36
Paris-Dakar
Rally
Raid
...................
..
........
-
40
WCS
Monte
Carlo
Rally . .
.............
. .
...
.....
.
..
42
1987
Range
Rover
..........
.
.....
...
·
....
.
.....
.
...
43
New
Pickups: Mazda
and
Chevrolet
.........
.
........
.
44
Carson
City
Rally
History
..............
..
. . :
....
,· . . .
45
HDRA
Gold
Coast
300
'-
Entry
List -
Map
..
. .
.....
. . . .
46
Score
Great
Mojave
250
Preview
...........
...
.......
55
DEPARTMENTS
Snapshot
of
the
Month
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
.
Soap
Box
by
Judy
Smith
..
•.
.........
...
........
, . . . . 4
Happenings
...
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Tech
Tips
by
Bill Savage .
....
.
........
..
............
10
Trail
Notes
.......................
..
·
.....
..
.......
10
Side
Tracks
by
Judy
Smith
..........................
11
Dr.
Downshift
Report
.................
.
............
26
The
Losers
by
Judy
Smith
.................
.
.........
39
Pit
Team
·Register
and
Repo
rts . .
............
.
........
48
California
Rally Series
by
Lynnette
Allison
............
48
Good
Stuff
Directory
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Classified
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.....................................
54
Yokohama
6-50
Club
..............................
55
Inde
;z
to
Advertisers
..........
·
........
'.
...........
55
ON
THE
COVER-
Jim Stiles had his bright red Raceco flying at the
Parker 400, and he drove alone to
fly
into the finish line the Class
IO
·
I I winner, beating
46
others
in
class ·and taking a· quick ninth overall
as
well. The sleek ·white Class 2 Chenowth driven
by
Bob and Rob
Gordon established a record at Parker. Not' only did the father and son
team win Class 2 and overall car honors, they also.led the Class 2 sweep
of
overall positions, beating the motorcycles for absolute first overall.
Color Photography
by
M:uk Chen and Harold Crawford ofTrackside
Photo Enterprises.
DUSTY
TIMES
THE
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GROWING
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ROAD
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•••
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IL
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"Shoot, Clem, these brand
new
tires
were
suppos~d to grip the trail, not put
us
sideways
to the horizon". This "Roll-by-Four" shot
was
taken
by
Lee
Perfect during the Fireworks
250 near Barstow, CA. The spectator truck
was
righted with help from bystanders, and
scant damage
was
done.
On
a more serious note, the
access
for spectators to off road races
is
becoming more and more limited. And, the
very
real threat to
any
kind
of
access
by
motor vehicles to off road trails
in
California
is
described
in
the Soap
Box
column on the
next
page
. Please read
it,
and do follow your own choice
of
action to
be
taken on this.very
serious land closure attempt now pending
in
the U.S. Congress.
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."
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Dusty
Times
March
1987
Page
3
Soa'-
Box
•••
The Disappearing Desert
By
Judy Smith
.Alan
Cranston
is at it again.
Last year Senator
Cranston
(D
),
California, tried
to
implement a
proposal
to
create
4.5
MILLION
ACRES
of
new wilderness areas
in
the California desert.
The
planned bill failed.
But,
Cranston
has now made
some small changes to the
proposal, and he's trying again
in
the 100th Congress. This plan,
put
together
by
the conserva-
tionists
of
California, ( such
organizations as 'the Sierra
Club,
the
Audubon
Society,
and
similar groups) takes the existing
plan, which took the B.L.M. five
years
to
survey and create, and
enlarges
on
it drastically. For
example, in addition
to
the 4.5
million acres-that would be new
wilderness areas,
another
1.5
million acres would become part
of
the National Park System. As
it
is
proposed,
Cranston's
new
bill would double the wilderness
area
in
the California desert from
that designated by the B.L.M.
plan.
Recently, a group
of
off
roaders
who
are concerned
about
this proposed bill
in
Congress
met
with Kathy Lacey, Senator
Cranston's
legislative assistant,
in
his Los Angeles. office,
to
see
the
proposed
map
of
the new
wilderness areas and hear some
of
the Senator's views
on
the
plan.
His
views
apparently
coincide with those
of
the
.conservationists and environ-
mentalists,
who
created and
presented this plan. They
feel
that the B.L.M.
didn't
designate
enough wilderne_ss areas in the
desert,
and
that many
more
acres
are eligible for the wilderness
designation.
The
B.
L.M.
field
men,
including Jim Moses
of
the
Barstow office who was present
at the meeting, feel that their plan
is
working and in place, and they
don't
have the personnel to
handle it effectively as it is. They
wonder how it will be possible
to
police all the new areas if this
plan becomes a bill
and
is
passed
by Congress. . -
Sal Fish, Score President,
who
was also in attendance at the
meeting, pointed
out
that
while
the desert
is
a favorite weekend
and vacation area for thousands
of
people, they are just the folks
who
don't
have the
hours
to
spend defending its boundaries.
Sal made the
point
that the well
organized
and
well
paid
personnel
of
groups like the
Sierra
Club
have
an
easy time
getting Mr.
Cranston's
attention,
while the average desert user,
with an eight
hour
day
job
and
family concerns,
can't
spend
hours
trying
to
convince a
senator
that
he really
shouldn't
close
off
his favorite
spot
in the
desert. ·
Bob Renz, who
is
a business
~an
as well
as
an
off
road racer,
4uestioned the future
of
such
areas
as
Barstow
and
the
California side
of
the
Colorado
River,
in
the Parker area. He foars
that if this proposal
is
accepted,
the
RV
areas will be forced to
close, and that will create great
West Coast.Distributor
fOfl
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ROAD
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Mc
Kenzie
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DEALER
INQUIRIES
INVITED
Page
·4
financial . hard.ship
it:i
areas that
depend
on
recreational vehicle
users for a source
of
income. He
predicted
that
many
small
industries which depend
qn
RVs
would fail, causing a spreading
circle
of
economic failure. Renz
said
that
he
felt'
some
sort
of
economic impact study should
be
done
before Senator
Cranston
asks for the implementation
of
the plan.
Many members
of
the group
felt
that
these new wilderness
areas closed
off
many acres
of
desert to people who had
no
way
to travel
without
some
sort
of
motorized vehicle. They asked
how
the elderly
could
be
expected to hike into the
Turtle
Mountains, for example,
or
how
a handicapped person was
to
get
into
the wilderness with no
vehicle.
Some
questioned
whether families with small
children would be able
to
use the
wilderness areas, because
of
the
impossibility
of
traveling
on
foot
or
horseback with kids.
The
impracticability
of
traveling
in
·
the desert
on
foot for the many
months
of
extreme temperatures
in
the year was also discussed.
One
area
in
the
El
Paso
Mountains
. which was
to
be
closed
to
vehicular traffic
is
a
favorite hunting area. Jim Moses
pointed
out,
that while no roads
or
trails
show
on
the rhap
of
the
plan ( which was made and
copyrighted by the Sierra Club,
incidentally), the whole area
is
criss-crossed by trails a.nd roads
which
do
not
show. Part
of
the
official
designation
of
a
wilderness area
is
that it does
not
contain roads
or
routes
of
travel.
Lewis McKee, ( the Phantom
Duck
of
the Desert who worked
so hard to restore the S-arstow
and Vegas race), poit'lted
out
that
one
area, marked
to
be reserved
as
wilderness
by
the conserva-
tionists' plan, was directly under
a
corridor
used by the military
for practice low altitude jet
flights: All along . the stretch,
which
is
near Barstow, jets are
not
only permitted,
but
expected
to
fly
at altitudes
as
low
as
60
feet, and
as
fast
as
400
miles per
hour. McKee questioned the
compatibility
of
a low altitude jet
flight pattern with a wilderness
camping area.
He
also pointed
out
that
some areas to
be
named
as
wilderness abutted practice
bombing ranges.
Charlie Engelhart, from the
L.A.
County
Sheriff's office,
questioned tne feasibility
of
maintaining
adequate
police
protection in these new areas. He
stated that
in
some desert areas,
where the local law enforcement
agencies cooperate, and respond
to a call on the basis
of
whoever
is
closest, whether it be city police,
Sheriff
or
B.L.M. Ranger, the
average time
to
answer a call now
is
90
to
180 minutes. Engelhart
feared that with
more
and larger
wilderness areas, the length
of
response time would
be
even
greater. .
MS. Lacey explained
that
the
conservationists
had
moved
many
of
tlie
borders
set
up
by the
B.L.M., bringing them right
out
to
the roads
or
highways
that
run.
alongside the wilderness areas.
Moses explained that when the
B.L.M. has set their boundaries,
they had deliberately moved
them back from the roads and
highways for a couple
of
reasons.
March
1987
One
is the fact
that
if
the
we
don't
want~
many acres
of
wilderness
borders
right
on
the desert
to
disappear from public
highway, folks will
not
have an access.
Write
to him, Senator
approach,
or
a place to park their
Cranston,
Senate
Office
vehicles,
or
a
spot
to
set
up
their Building,
Washington,
· D.
C.,
camper, before taking
off
into 20510, and
don't
forget to let
the wilderness
on
foot.
With
the
Senator
Pete
Wilson,
same
new
borders,
campers
with
address,
know
your feelings
as
h
· k well. ·
motor
omes
or
pie
up
campers,
Our
sincere thanks
to
our
star
or
horse trailers, are forced to
h
erch right by the side
of
.the columnist Judy Smith
for
her
re/><irt
on
this
meeting-
u•ith
an
Alai1
ighway. Moses also said it f''
L_.
seemed sensible
to
have the CranS
to
n
sta
1er
on
Ferrruary
1 1
·
boundaries represent the area as
We
«·c.>re
nor
ahle to
heg-,
huy
or
et'C.'ll
· h steal a
ma/>
for
reproduction,
hut
it' was actually used
..
In
ot
er this
la1ul
"rah
is
a hi"
<me,
anJ
it
words, the
B.L.M
. drew the " "
boundaries
more
or
less at the «·ill close foret
c.>r
a
g-reat
many
furthest
point
to
which
a
po/>ular
and
lrmg-
standing- areas
for
t•ehicular
recreation
in
the
·
motorized recreationist would
choose
to
go. They picked the California
desc.>rt
.
Thc.>re
are
25
million
acres
of
fedc.>ral
la1ul
natural
stopping
point
for
f h
vehicles, 'and drew their lines managed
hy
the Department
O
t e
there.
lntc.>rior
in
California, and a
goodly
when
asked
why
the
/>ortion
is
already
in
u·ildemess
recreational vehicle users were desil{nation or u•ithin the National
h
Park System.
Slicinl{
off
anothL'T
six
not
asked for their
input
on
t e million
acres
isahil{hunk. Ifthehill
1987 version
of
the bill, (S
7)
l{OL'S
throu!{h
you
could find
your
MS. Lacey said, ·
"Then
it would
only
t
ieu
· o[Death Valley through a
not
have been the conservation-
tour
hus
u·
ind.ou
·, and
the
same
for
ists'
proposal."
She also said, Joshua Tree, scheduled w add
245
"We
do
not
expect the bill
to
thousmul
acres
to
the area wul
pass
in
just this form." She also
hecome
a National Park.
mentioned that-three similar bills With
the
financial and
lohhying
are
in
the planning stages
in
the I
su/>/)(Jrt
from eiwirnnmenta
ist
House
of
Representatives.
And,
u'iou/>s
amilahle,
this
type
of
hill
she stated
that
Cranston
wants a "
lu
could easily
pass
this
year,
wit
,ur
proposal from
other
groups also. an amlanche
of
lettL'TS
to
.Congress,
MS. Lacey told the group
of
not
just
· to Cranston;
«·ho
is
a/read)'
off
roaders that the Senator and committed to
this
hill, but
to
the committee presenting the California's Junior Senator
Pete
proposal
are willing
to
cooperate Wilson and
your
man
in
the House
to
change areas
of
the plan when
of
Representatiws.
it becomes necessary.
As
an
Ei•c.'11
if
you
don't
lii
e
in
example,
she
spoke
of
a certain California,
«'Tite
to
your
oim
part
of
the plan
that
contained
SC.'IWWrs
wul
ref>resencatii•es
in
within its boundaries,
part
of
the Congress. It «·ill take a
floor
mte
in
aqueduct
which brings drinking
hoth
houses
to
get
this land
!{rah
water
to
Los Angeles.
The
scheme through
the
/micess and
into
aqueduct was
underground
at
la«:.
Rememlx.>r,
the people hehinJ
that point, and the conserva- this hill
are
never satisfied,
they
tionists reasoned
that
it
wouldn't
alu•ays
«•ant
more
land. Their
disturb
the wilderness.
(Appar-
··
slogan might
udl
he
-~ . Today
ently those
who
drew lines
on
the California - Tomcnw«·
the
L'lltire
map had no hands
on
experience ·
USA!
So,
educate
your
three
in
the desert
or
in
survey work . .
re/JTesentatii
es
in
Congress to
your
Ed.) But the folks responsible for
fedinl{s
on
recreational
use
of
Jmhlic
the maintenance and upkeep·
on
lands. It could
helJ>
def eat this hill
the aqueduct,
th,e
Los Arigeles nou
·,
and et
ery
year
it
«·
ill
he
Department
of
Water
and
introduced until Cranstoi1
is
mted
Power,
didn't
like the idea
of
no
our
o( office or retires.
access.
If
some
sort
of
problem
We
are smdinl{ a
cof>y
of
this
occurred
in
the aqueduct system,
issue
of
DUSTY TIMES
to
ewry
a · blockage
or
a leak, they memherof the 100th Congress, anJ,
couldn't
get to them with
motor
if
just
a small
J>L'TCL'llta!{e
of
them
vehicles
or
excavate
in
the area.
read
the Soap
Box
column, the effort
So, the boundary was
~oved
to «·
ill
/>ay
·off. Follou·
u/J
yuurself,
put
the aqueduct outside the indii•idual
lettc.>rs
haw
far mme
wilderness
borders
. . im/wct
on
/>oliticians
than
form
. MS. Lacey says there may be letters,
anJ
the:y
Jo
make a
hody
other
things, such as mines
or
count
of
letters.
other
privately owned land,
that
Also
note
th
e National Wiliilife
fall
within the boundaries. They Federation's award
to
SNORE
on
are hoping that people will come
pal{
e
27.
forward
to
tell them
about
these Send
your
letter
to
your
·senators
problems, and
no
doubt
they and Representative
hy
name, The
would if they knew what was Senate Office Building, Washing-
happening.
ton,
D.C. 20510, and House
of
When
asked how marw acres Representatives
Office
Building,
of
the desert would be left
open
· Washington, D.
C.
205 r5, and
do
it
to the recreational vehicle user, no«,
the
clock
is
tickinl{.
Remember
MS. Lacey
said
there would be
th
e saying "Eternal Vigilance
is
the
four million acres,
out
of
the 25
Pric
of
Freedom".
million. Lewis McKee said
that
Volu11teersarei1witedtoclimbon
the
open
area would, in fact, be
th
e
ir
''
Soap
Box'' and fill
this
space
less than
one
half
of
one
percent
with
their thoughts about what
is
of
the total.
l{Ood
and «hat
is
not
so
good
about
It
is
important
that
we get the
th
e state
of
off
road
racing-.
message
to
Senator
Cranstqn
Call
or
«'Tite
DUSTY TIMES·
that we are willing to share the «·
ith
your
ideas
[or
a
Soap
Box
desert with
other
users,
but
that
column
, and
get
on
th
e schedul
e.
AffENTION
DESERT
RACERS
DUSTY
TIMES
has
contingency money posted at all Score and
HDRA
desert races. Check
it
out
on contingency
row
- Two
different
classes
each
event.
Dusty Times
ILEII
HAIIIS
111S
IFF-11111111
.
PIii
AT
JACK
IIIPIY
SJAIIII.
·
1986
marked
the
most
succes~ful year
in
Mazda
truck
racing _
· history. So it shouldn't
come
as a
surprise
that
Glenn
Harris
wasted
little
time
securing
Mazda's first
win
of
the
1987
season
in
San
Diego.
Unleashing
the
Mazda
B2000's.270 rotary-driven horsepower, Harris
flew· off
the
starting
grid,
grabbed
the
lead
and
never looked back.
Obviously,
Harris
and
the
California
Gold
Racing Team have
their sights
set
on
what
lies ahead. I
Another
11
ldi::t
ua
successful year for
Mazda
in
1987.
~
1987
·
HAPPENINGS
•••
A.D.R.A.
Arizona Desert Racing Association
P.
O.
Box
34810
Phoenix, AZ
85067
(602)
252-1900
April 11
Penasco Twilight
250
Sonora, Mexico
July
18
High Country 150
Flagstaff,
AZ
September
5-6
Snowflake
Buggy
Bash
Snowflake,
AZ
October
17
Penasco 150
Sonora, Mexico
December 5
Sonoita to Rpcky Point
Sonora, Mexico
AMSA
American
Motor
Sports Association
P.O. Box 5473
Fresno,
CA
93755
(209)
439-2114
BAJA PROMOTIONS,
LTD.S.A.
Lou Peralta
P.O. Box 241
Van Nuys,
CA
91303
-
(818)
340-5750
October
9-11
Carrera de los Campeones
San Felipe, B.C.
1987
BRUSH
RUN
POINTS SERIES
P.O.
Box
101
Crandon,
WI
54520
(715)
478-2115 /
(715)
478-2688
June
27-28
.Spring Run 101
Crandon,
WI
September
4-6
Brush
Run
101
World
Championship
Crandon,
WI
CALIFORNIA RALLY SERIES
Lynnette Allison
2001 Oakland Hills Drive
Corona,
CA
91720
(714)
736-1442
March 22
Carlsbad Rallycross
Carlsbad,
CA
Page
6
April 10-12
High Desert Trails
Ridgecrest,
CA
May 2-3
Rim
of
the
World
Rally
Lancaster,
CA
May30
Glen Helen Rallycross
#2
San Bernardino,
CA
..
August
22-23
Prescott Forest
Ra_lly
Prescott,
AZ
August
(TBA)
Glen Helen Rallycross
#3
San Bernardino,
CA
September
26-27
Cliffs
of
Gorman Rally
Gorman,
CA
December
5-6
East
of
Indio VII
Indio,
CA
FAST CAMELS
P.O.
Box
526
Indio,
CA
92202
April
24-26
33rd
Annual Fast Camel
4WD
Cruise and Barbecue
Indio,
CA
FORDA
Florida
Off
Readers
Drivers' Association
5349
Hansel Ave., C-1
Orlando, Florida
32809
(305)
851-6245
FLORIDA OFF
ROAD
RACING
ENTERPRISES
P.O.
Box40
Inverness,
FL
32651
(813)
933-7947
(904)
726-6560
FUD
PUCKER
RACING
TEAM
250
Kennedy,
#6
Chula Vista,
CA
92011
(619)
427-5759
August
8,
1987
Superstition
250
IV
Ancient Dry Lake Bed
El
Centro,
CA
October
3,
1987
200
Mile Plaster City Blast
Plaster_ City,
CA
December
31,
i
98
7
150 Mile Dunaway Dash
El
Centro,
CA
GORRA
Georgia
Off
Road
Racing Assoc.iation
Box 11093 Station -A
Atlanta,
GA
30310
(
404)
927-6432
March 5
50
miles
Cordele~
GA
April 5
100
miles
Alabama
April26
Winder, GA
June 7
100
miles
Alabama
June
28
Winder, GA
July
26
Cordele,
GA
·
August
23
Winder, GA
September 13
100
miles
Alabama
September 2 7
Cordele,
GA
October
25
Winder,
GA
November
28
250
miles
Cordele,
GA
December 5
Annual Banquet
GREAT WESTERN
POINTS SE~IES, INC.
Ron Knowlton
831 So. Jason ·
Denver,
CO
80223
(303)
722-5537
May'.3
Raceland
Denver,
CO
May
24
Gordon, NE
June 7
St. Francis,
KS
June
21
· Raceland
Denver,
CO
July
19
Raceland
Denver,
CO
August
8-9
St. Francis,
KS
·.
August
30
·
Raceland
Denver,
CO
September
20
Raceland
Championship -
SC
Denver,
CO
ROD
HALL'S
GHOST
TOWN
ADVENTURE
2150
Hunter Lake Drive
Reno; NV
89509
(702)
786-6748
(open
to
Dodge 4x4s only)
June 18-21
3 Day Trail Ride
Lake Tahoe, NV
March
1987
HORA
High Desert Racing Association
12997 Las Vegas Blvd., South
Las
Vegas, NV
89124
(702)
361-5404
March 6-8,
1987
Gold Coast
250
Las
Vegas, Nevada
May
7-10,
1987
Mint
400
Las Vegas, NV
July
3-5,
1987
Fireworks
250
Barstow, CA
September
11-13,
1987
Craig/
Hi
Desert
300
Craig,
CO
December 5,
1987
Desert Series Awards Banquet
'
Las
Vegas, NV
HIGH
PLAINS OFF
ROAD
RACING
ASSOCIATION
Darla Crown
P.O. Box 83
Wall, South Dakota
57790
(605)
279-2245
August
16
Gumbo
Buttes
Baja
Pierre, S.D.
October
24
Last Chance
Baja
Wall,S.D.
GLEN HELEN
OHV
PARK
P.O. Box 2937
San Bernardino, CA
(714)
381-4454
or
(714)880-1733
March
22,
1987
Short
Course Race
June 14,
1987
Short
Course Race
September 2 7,
1987
Short Course Race
IOK
FOUR
WHEELERS
P.O
. Box
36
Cleves,
Ohio45002
(All
events staged
at
the club grounds in
Cleves,
Ohio)
MIDWEST OFF
ROAD
CHALLENGE SERIES .
Tommy
Bowling ·
Rt.
6,
Box
833G
Midland, TX 79702
(915)
332-1537 -
(915}
fi63-9154
· March 7 I ·
El
Paso, TX I
April 4
Big
Spring, TX
May30
Freedom,
OK
'
June
27
Albuquerque,
NM
August
1
. Freedom, OK
September 12
Albuquerque, NM
October 3
Big
Spring, TX
November
7
El
Paso, TX
M.O.R.E.
3513
North
West
Loop
820
Fort
Worth,
TX
76106
(81
7)
625-884 3
MICKEY
THOMPSON'S
OFF
ROAD
CHAMPIONSHIP
GRAND
PRIX
Mickey
Thompson
Entertainment
Group
53
Woodlyn
Lane
Brad
bury, CA
91010
(818)
359-5117
March 21
Silverdome
Pontiac, MI
March
29
Hoosier Dome
Indianapolis, IN
May 2
Rose Bowl
Pasadena,
CA
June
20
or
27
Kingdome
Seattle,
WA
September
26
Sam Boyd Silverbowl
Las Vegas, NV
October 10 ·
LA.
County Fairplex
Pomona,
CA
NORTH
AMERICAN
RALLY
CUP
April
25-26
Rocky Mountain Rally
Calgary, Alberta
John Sim
(403) 272-0605
June
5-7
Susquehannock Trail Rally
Wellsboro, PA
John Robinson
(716)
223-1369
July
3-4
Rallye Baie Des Chaleur
New Richmond, Quebec
Donald LeBlanc
(418)
392-6120
July
10-12
·
Da~tmouth Highlands Rally
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
Clarke Paynter
(902) 435-3948
August
21-23
Sunriser
400
Forest Rally
Columbus,
OH
Dick Paddock
(614)
87602277
September 4-5
Rally~
of
the Voyageurs
North
Bay,
Ontario
. Dave Carlin
(705)
_474-8007
September 11-13
Mackinaw Trail Rally
Traverse City,
MI
Kelly Brandt
(616)
374-7176
October
2-4
Ojibwe Pro Rally
Grand Rapids,
MN
Bob Nielsen
(612)
776-4471
October
9-11
Defi Ste.~Agathe
Ste.-Agathe Des Monts, Quebec
Andre
Lavigne
(514)
747-3663
October
28-November
1 ·
Press on Regardless
Houghton,
MI
Dick Cole
(313)
685-2853
November
21-22
Rally
of
the Tall Pines
Pe'tersborough, Ontario
Ross
Wood
(416)
876-1492
Dusty
Times
OLYMPUS
INTERNATIONAL
RALLY
John
Na
ge
l
P.O.
Box
4254
Tumw
ater,
WA
98501
(206)
754-9717
June
25-29
WRC
Olympus International
Olympia,
WA
OFF
ROAD
RACING
ASSOCIATION
OF TEXAS
1421 L
ee
Trevino,
D-1
El
Paso, TX 79935
(915)
594-8266
March 7
Sun Clty
Baja
150
El
Paso, TX
November
7
Red Sands 150
El
Paso, TX
O.O.R.R.A.
Okl
ahoma
Off
Road
Racing Association
Larry Terry
9220
N.E. 23rd
Oklahoma
Ci
t
y,
OK 73141
(
405)
769-5491
(All races located at Freedom, OK)
Vic Brurnham
Fr
ee
dom Chapter President
(405)
621-3428
April
24-25
O.O
.R.R.A. 150
May
29-30
· Badlands 200
. July 10-11
Moccasin Creek 250
August 1
Freedom
300
October
16-17
O.O.R.R.A. 150
ORSA
Randy Miller ·
407 G Street, Suite F
Davis, CA
95616
(916)
756-9938
(916)
756-6399
Short Course &
Sa
nd Drags,
all eve
nt
s at Sacramento
Racew
ay,
Sacramento, _CA
POST
Penn
sy
lv
a
ni
a
Off
Road
Sh
ort
Track
Shark Saxon
RD #3,
Bo
x 9
Towan
da
, PA 18848
(717)
265-3076
All events in Monroeton,
PA
at the
intersection
of
Rou
tes
414
& 220.
May
16-17
June
27
r
28
July
25-26
August
29-30
September
26-27
October
10-11
PRO
CAN
AM
SERIES
Pro Can Am R
aci
ng Inc .
P.
O.
Box
323
Seahurst, Washington 98062
· (206) 242-1773
(503 ) 620-0313
March
20-21
250
miles
Richl
an
d,
WA
May
23-25
Y errington 250
Yetrington, NV
Dusty
nmes
.
June
19-20
250
miles
Richland,
WA
July
24-25
400K
Ashcroft,
BC
September
18-19
Millican 400
MiHican
Valley;
OR
SCCA PRO RALLY
SERIES
Sports Car Club
of
America
P.O. Box
3278
Englewood,
CO
80
155
(303) 694-7223
I
· May
14-17,
1987
Centennial Pro Rally
Westcliff,
CO
June
5.7
;
1987
Susquehannoc~ Trail
Wellsboro, \ A
June
25-29
Olympus International Ra
ll
y .
Ol
ympi
a,
I A
July
24-25,
~
987
Arkansas Tr~veler
Little Rock,IAR
August
21-23,
1987
Sunriser Forest
Chillicothe, F H
September
11-13,
1987
Mackinaw Trail Ra
ll
y
Traverse Cit
y,
MI
October
2-4
Ojibwe Ra
ll
y_
Grand Rapids,
MN
October
i9-31,
1987
Press On Re
ga
rdless·
Houghton, MI
November
13-15,
1987
Wild West Ra
ll
y
Tacom
a,
WA
SCCA DIVISIONAL
PRO
RALLY SERIES
April
10-12
Hi
gh Desert T
ra
il
s
Ridgecrest, CA
Ray
Hocker
(619) 375-1028
. May 1-3
Rim
of
the World
· ·. . Lancaster,
CA
Mike & Pa
ul
a Gibeault
(619) 375-
870
4
May 9
Lake
Win
ona
Little Roc
k,
AR
Janet Mitcham
(501) 666-5093
May
23
Paris
by
Ni
ght
Paris, TX
Ro
ge
r Gibson
(214) 644-3946
July
25
Arkansas Traveler
Little Rock,
AR
Jane
.t
Mitcham
(5
01)
666-5093
A smart
new
oll
rdter
...
desq!lled
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High
Flow
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lubricant
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Die
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polished
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. ·
-
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.·
I
ntroducing the strongest,
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These
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Best
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I
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,,..-
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Stainless
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Medium-woven,
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...
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-
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(800) 554-3533-or
(800)
2.31-9137
1822A.E.
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CA
93291
March
1987
.
Page 7
'
'
1
.J
Additional
. .
HAPPENINGS
•••
SCCA
continued
August
22-23
Prescott Forest Rally
Prescott,
AZ
Rob Cherry
(602)
778-6489
September
26-27
Cliffs
of
Gorman
Gorman, CA
Gary English
(714)
497-4670
SCORE
Score International
31356
Via Colinas, Suite 111
Westlake Village,
CA
91362
(818)
889-9216
April
3-5,
1987
Great Mojave 250
Lucerne Valley, CA
June
5-7,
1987
Baja
Internacional
Ensenada, B.C., Mexico
August
14-16,
1987
·
Off
Road
World
Championship
Riverside, CA ·
November
6-8,
1987
Baja
1000
Ensenada, B.C., Mexico
December
5,
1987
Desert Series Awards Banquet
Las
Vegas, NV
.
SCORE
CANADA
390
Chemin Du
Lac
Lery, Quebec,
J6N
1A3, Canada
(514)692-6171
SCORE
SHOW
P.O.
Box
6819
Burbank,
CA
91510
(818)
768-2914
June
26-28,
1987
10th Annual Score Show
Anaheim Convention Center
Anahefm; CA
SILVER
DUST
RACING
ASSOCIATION
P.O.
Box
7380
Las
Vegas, NV 89125
(702) 459-0317
SNORE
Southern Nevada
Off
Road Enthusiasts
P.O.
Box
4394
Las Vegas, NV
89106
·
(702) 452-4522
June
13,
1987
Twilight Race
Las Vega·s, NV
July
25-26,
1987
Midnight Special
Las Vegas, NV
September
25-27
Snore
250
Las Vegas, NV
October
31
Yoko Loco
Las Vegas, NV
December
5
Black Jack
200
·
Las
Vegas, NV
Herrington
·
Control~
Patented Sealed
Distributor
.-
System
ELIMINATES
DUST
&
MOISTURE
PROBLEMS
IN
YOUR
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Available
for
ALL
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..
Page
8
INSTALLS EASILY
$69·.95.
· See us
at
Contingency
Row
GOLD
COAST
300
PACIFIC-COAST SALES
(805)
646-0749
TONY
H
0
ENSEL, Rep.
DEALER
INQUIRIES
INVITED
S.O;R.R.P.
Speedway
Off
Road
· Racing Productions
Bernie Weber
P.O.
Box
402
Temple, Texas 76503
(817) 773-3548
STADIUM
RACING,
U.S.A
Marty Tripes
228 Faxon Drive
Spring Valley, CA
92077
(619)
463-0654
April
17
Ascot Park
Gardena, CA
May
15
Ascot Park
Gardena, CA
July
18
El
Cajon Speedway
El
Cajon, CA
November
28
(Location TBA)
SHORT
TRACK
OFF
ROAD
ENTERPRISES
FORMULA
DESERT
DOG
SERIES
. S.T.O.R.E. Co-Ordinator:
Gil Parker
7406 So. 12th St.
Kalamazoo,
MI
49009
(616)
375-1233
May
23-24
Memorial
Day
100
Lake Geneva
Ra
ceway
Lake Geneva,
WI
June
19
Chicago Classic
Santa
Fe
Speedway
Chicago, IL
June
27-28
Spring Ruri
101
Crandon,
WI
July
4-5
Sugar Camp Challenge
Sugar Camp,
WI
..
-
July
18-19
,.
Off
Road 100
Bark River,
MI
July
26
General Tire Sprints
Macon Coun~y Fair
Decatur,
IL
August
22-23
(Location TBA)
September
5-6
.
Brush Run
101
Crandon,
WI
_
September
19
Dixie Autocross
Birch Run,
MI
October
3 :,
Indian Summer Sprints
·.
Lake Geneva Raceway
Lake Gen:eva, WI
SUPERCROSS, INC.
Gateway
Plaza
180 Newport Center Dr
.,
Suite 270
Newport Beach, CA 9266Q
(714)
760-1606.
SUPERIOR OFF
ROAD
DRIVERS
ASSOCIATION
Terry Prevost
1006 Cardinal Lane
Green
Bay,
WI
54303
(
414)
434-9044
May
23-24
Memorial '87
Dresser,
WI
March 1987 ·
June
6-7
Oft
Road Race
Antigo,
WI
June
20-21
Off
Road Race
Land-O-Lakes,
WI
(tentative)
July
4-5
Off
Road Challenge
Sugar Camp,
W1
July
18-19
U.P.
Off
Road 100
Bark River,
MI
August
1-2
Hodag 50
Rhinelander,
WI
August
22-23
Brown County Fair
Challenge
DePere,
WI
(tentative)
September
19-20
Colorama 100
Sugar Camp, WI
VORRA
Valley
Off
Road R
aci
ng
Association
1833 Los Robles Blvd.
·Sacramento,
CA
95838
(916)
925-1702
March 1
General Membeship &
Rules Meeting
Paul Bun
ya
n Lodge
Sacramento,
CA
April
12
Short
Course Race
Prairie City
OHV
Park
Sacramento,
CA
May
3
Long Course Track
Prairie City
OHV
Park
Sacramento,
CA
May
23-25
Yokohama/VORRA
350
·
Yerington, NV
June
20-21
Virginia City
200
Virginia City, NV
July
11
Stadium Type Race'
Sacramento Raceway
Sacramento,
CA
August
1
Stadium Type Race
Sacramento Raceway
Sacramento, CA
September
5-6
Yerington/
VORRA
250
Yerington, NV
October
10
Champ\onship Stadium Race
Sacramento Raceway
-Sacramento, CA
November
1
1987 .Championship Race
Prairie City
OHV
Park
Sacramento, CA
WHEEL TO
WHEEL,
INC.
P.O. Box 688, Dept.
4W0R
Banci;oft, Ontario, Canada
KOL
IC0
-
(613)
332-1766
(613)
332-4128
August
1-2
Brighton Wheel to
Wheel Weekend
Brighton Speedw_
ay
Brighton, Ontario
August
14-16
Bancroft's Canadian
4x4 Challenge
Bancroft
1
Ontario
WESTERN OFF
ROAD
RACING
ASSOCIATION
19125 -
87A
Ave.
Surrey, British Columbia,
V3S 5X7, Canada
. I
(604)
576-6256
April
12
Ashcroft, B.C.
· May
16-17
Kamloops, B.C.
May
31
Mission, B.C.
June
26-28
Sand Drags Only
Mission, B.C.
August
16
Mission, B.C.
September
5-6
Kamloops, B.C.
October
10-11
Ashcroft, B.C.
FIA
WORLD
RALLY
CHAMPIONSHIP
March
10-15,
1987
Port Wine Rally
Estoril, Portugal
April
1(>-20,
1987
.Safari Rally
Nairobi, Kenya
May
7-10,
1987
Tour
de
Corse
Ajaccio, Corsica
May
30-June
4,
1987
Acropolis Rally
Lagonissi, Greece
June
25-29,
1987
Olympus Rally
Olympia,
WA,
USA
July
11-14,
1987
New Zealand Rally
Auckland, New Zealand
August
2-9,
1987
Argentine Rally
Buenos Aires, Argentina
August
26-30,
1987
1000 Lakes Rally
Jyvaskyla, Finland
September
22-26,
1987
Ivory. Coast Rally
Yamoussoukro, Ivory Coa_st
October
11-17,
1987
San Remo Rally
San Remo, Italy
November
22-26,
1987
RAC Rally
England
ATTENTION
RACE ORGANIZERS
Lise
you
r
coming
ev
encs
in
DUSTY
TIMES
free!.
Send
you
r 1987
sc
h
edule
as
soon
as
possible
for
!iscing
in
this
c
olumn.
Mail
your
race
orrally
schedule
to:
DUSTY
TIMES,
533
z Derry
Ave
.,
Suite 0 , Agoura, CA
91301.
WANT
A
BRAND
NEW
CLASS
2
RACECO
FOR
$100?
The race car will
be
raffled off at the
Mint 400 drawing on April 8. The
winner also gets a free entry to the
Mint 400. Tickets are
$100
each
.
and
only
200
tickets
will
be
sold
.
The
High
Desert
Racing
Associa-
tion
is
handling
the
raffle
.
Make
you
·r
check
payable
to
K.
Roderick,
but send
your
entry to H.D.R.A.
Raffle, 12997
Las
Vegas Blvd.,
So.
,
Las Vegas, N'i/ 89124.
Call
HORA
for
more
information
;· (702) 361-
5404. -
Dusty
Times
y
0
K
0
Mike
Lesle
and
John
Johnson,
Class
7
4X4
1
Yokohama$
best
··
conquer
Arizonas
worst.
Yokohama
followed
up
their
phenomenal
1986
season
of
six
Class
Points
Champion-
ships
with
seven
Class
wins
at
the
season
opening
Parker
400
SCORE/HORA
race
in
Parker,
Arizona.
Yokohama
off-road
tires
were
on
the
Class
7
4x4
Jeep
,,
Comanche
of
Mike
Lesle
and
John
-
Jim Stiles,
Class
10
Johnson.
It
proved
.
to
be
an
astonish-
·
.
ing
victory
because
this
new
truck
was
completed
with
lit-
erally
no
test
time
just
prior
to'
the
race.
In
Class
14
·
modified
four-wheel-drive
trucks,
Giti
Gowland
and
Jerry
Miller
drove
their
Yokohama
equipped
Toyota
to
a
trouble-free
win.
Their
Yokohamas
held
up
Without
a
problem
for
the
duration.
·
The
1986
Overall
Points
Champion,
Jack
Ramsay,
started
1987
with
all
intentions
of
repeating
as
champion.
Despite
back
pain,
M -o
T
0 R
H
A
M
A
Giti
Gowland
and
lJ
erry
Miller,
Class
14
Ramsay
took
one
of
the
toughest
,
aces
of
the
day
in
his
Class
1/2-1600
Yokohama
team
Bunderaon.
.
Class
10
turn
_
ed
out
another
victor
on
trouble
free
Yokohamas.
Jim
Stiles
drove
the
distance
himself
to
wrap
up
this
win.
Yokohama
shod
vehicles
also
took
Challenger
Class
with
'
Rick
Minga,
Class
1
with
Steve
Sourapas
and
Dave
Richardson,
Steve
Sourapas
Class
l
and
Dave
Richardson
and
Class
5-1600
driven
.
by
Carl
Haynes
and
Robert
Whitted.
These
three
victories
added
to
an
incredible
final
vic-
tory
total
of
.
seven
.
These
seven
class
winners
all
had
one
thing
in
common.
When
contending
with
Arizona's
worst,
they
chose
off-road's
best.
·
Yokohama.
,
For
more
information
about
what
Yokohama
can
do
for
you
write
lJS
at,
Yokohama
Tire
Corporation,
P.O
.
Box
4550,
601
S.
Acacia
Boulevard,
Fullerton,
CA
92631.
>,rvoKOHAMA
What the world's best have
in
common.
-
© 1987 Yokohama
Tire
Corporation
s
p
0
R
T
s
Tech
Tips
By Bill Savage,
HORA-SCORE
Technical Director
The
feeling
you
get
when
you
are in
the
winner's
circle
is
not
too
different
from
the
way
you
feel
when
you
look
at
a
piece
of
work
you
just
turned
out
that
is
really gocxi.
You
enjoy
a special feeling
when
you
think
about
all
the
other
people
who
had
something
to
do
with
making
it a
good
job,
not
just
you
but
a
lot
of
people
working
together.
Just
like
that
driver
on
the
victory
stand,
thinking
about
his
crew
and
his
sponsors
and
the
manufacturers
who
produced
his
race
machine
and
the
many
volunteers
who
did
something
to
help
along
the
way.
Those
same
feelings
occurred
to
us
after
the
SCORE
Parker
400,
where
we
tried
a
new
tech
,
inspection
system
for
the
first
time.
We
did
it
to
cut
down
on
the
lines
that
always
back
up
from
the
inspection
station
and
to
give
us
a
chance
to
get
a
closer
look
at
limited
class cars.
We
wanted
to
catch
obvious
problems
before
the
race
and
save
those
big
headaches
later,
when
racers
go
into
jeopardy
of
being
disqualified.
Tech
inspection
worked
as
well as we
could
have
hoped
at
Parker.
First,
we
pre-teched
on
a
couple
of
weekends
before
the
race
to
catch
the
bad
problems
so
they
could
be
fixed in
plenty
of
time.
Then,
at
Parker,
we
divided
·
the
tech
inspection
stations
into
two
groups,
one
at
the
city
yard
for
limited
classes
and
the
other
at
the
park
for
unlimiteds
.
For
the
limited
classes we
concen-
trated
on
1-2-1600,
5-1600
and
Challenger.
The
result
was
everything
went
smoother,
lines
were
shorter
and
we
caught
things
that
could
have
meant
disqualification
after
the
race
for
SQme
racers.
By
concentrating
on
limited
classes
all in
one
place
we
could
see
constructors'
mistakes
more
easily.
For
their
help,
we'd
like
to
thank
all
our
crew,
the
city
workers
who
helped
out
-
they
put
up
a special fence in
the
city
yard
and
stayed
till we
were
done
before
locking
up
at
night
-
and
the
folks
at
Saguaro
Chevrole
,t,
who
made
things
go
so
smoothly
for
us
in
post-race
inspections.
To
all
you
stock
class
competitors,
I'd
like
to
urge
you
to
pay
close
attention
to
the
word
"stock."
We
all
have
our
interpretations,
especially
when
it
comes
to
working
with
rule
books,
but
my
definition
of
stock,
if
you
want
to
avoid
trouble
in
tech,
is
"the
way
the
part
was
delivered
from
the
factory."
That
means
no
cutting,
grinding,
folding,
denting,
slicing
or
making
any
other
modifica-
tions,
unless
the
rule
book
allows
it . .
I'll give
you
an
example.
At
Parker
we
had
two
motors
built
by
the
same
builder
in
Class
1-2-
1600
·
that
had
slightly
altered
intake
manifolds
.
The
,
tube
that
carries
gas
to
the
cylinders
has
a T
assembly,
and
there
was
a
dentin
the
bottom,
apparently
to
assist
the
flow
of
gasoline.
Now,
both
·
were
stock
manifolds.
The
rule
says
no
internal
modifications,
and
in
the
opinion
of
the
builder
there
were
none,
because
the
dent
was
made
·
on
the
outside.
But
the
dent
made
on
the
outside
caused
the
internal
modification.
We
allowed
this
builder
to
keep
the
alteration
for
Parker
only,
but
told
him
he
would
have
to
come
to
the
rest
of
the
races with a
truly
stock
manifold.
Challenger
Class
competitors:
Intake
manifolds
cannot
be
altered
as
allowed
in
1-2-1600
and
5-1600,
where
the
intake
manifold
becomes
too
long
and
can
be
shortened
to
fit
the
motor.
It is legal
to
remove
heat
riser
tubes
and
aluminum
cast
around
stock
manifolds.
Cool
tin
can
be
located
under
the
cylinders
.
Stock
cylinder
shrouds
may
not
be
cut
or
modified.
You
can
put
a
breather
tube
on
the
valve
cover,
modifying
the
tin
a
minimum
to
allow
for
this.
Class
5-1600
builders
have
noted
that
the
rule
_calling
for
a
minimum
of
42
cc in
the
head
has
disappeared
from
the
rule
book.
If
you
have
wondered
about
it, it
was
deliberately
deleted
to
make
5-1600
engine
rules
the
same
as
1-2-1600 rules.
Class
11
rules
are
the
same,
except
they
require
stock
exhaust
systems.
Last
issue
we
asked
for
suggestions
about
spindles
and
trailing
arms
for
1-2-1600
and
5-
1600,
but
we
haven't
heard
from
anybody
yet.
We
noted
that
one
car
builder
had
taken
it
on
himself
to
·
survey
1-2-1600
competitors
at
Parker,
but
he
hasn't
reported
anything
to
us
yet.
When
he
does,
we'll
give
you
a
report.
TEAftn
SANDWINDER
CHASSIS
CHALLENGE
CLASS
WINNER
-
BUDWEISER
250
f&
1v
t~~h
lt.l;~
-,~
CHASSIS
FOR
ALL
CLASSES
CALL
FOR
DETAILS
714-825-0583
714-888-2703
241
So.
Arrowhead
Ave.,
San
Bernardino,
CA
92408
Page
10
That
brings
us
to
another
input
request,
about
how
to
deal
with
4-valve
motors
in
Class
10
for
1988
.
We
have
had
no
suggestions
and
have
nothing
to
report
on
that
subject
either.
We're
anticipating
that
the
manufacturers
will
be
giving
us
input
soon.
,
Any
suggestions
on
these
or
other
subjects,
please
put
them
in
writing
to
me
and
send
your
mail
to
Dept.
HORA-SCORE,
cl o
T-
Mag, 300 N.
Clara
Ave
.,
Santa
Ana,
CA
92703.
We've
had
requests
from
Classes
7S
and
7
4x4
to
raise
the
rear
inner
fender
panels
to
allow
for
more
wheel travel.
We
are
allowing
thefanels
to
be
raised a
maximum
o
one
inch.
But
the
entire
stock
inner
fender
must
be
used,
and
it
must
be
the
stock
configuration
in
width.
F.I.A
. has
done
away
with
its
exciting
Group
B rally cars, a
move
that
has
turned
out
to
be
a
great
opportunity
for
us
in
off
road
racing,
because
we
seem
to
be
a race
arena
of
last
resort
for
these
incredible
cars.
Recently
we
had
a
meeting
.
with
the
people
from
Michelin
and
Peugeot,
who
field
the
team
that
won
this
year's
Paris-to-
Dakar
rally.
The
group
from
France
has
already
gone
to
Baja
to
make
a familiarization
run
around
the
most
likely
course
where
the
SCORE
Baja 1000 will
be
run,
to
check
out
the
terrain.
Our
rule
book
calls
for
Group
B
cars
to
run
in
Class
6,
and
the
only
problem
to
be
addressed
is
the
rule
which
disallows
turbos
. for
other
cars
in
this
class.
(The
turbo
Audi
Quattro
finished
second
in
Class
6
at
the
1986
Score
Baja
1000.
Ed.)
Have
you
ever
known
a
group
of
racers
who
didn't
complain?
So
far
this
year
the
Academy
Award
for
bitching
goes
to
the
new
pol
icy
that
wi
11
cut
down
the
number
of
classes
by
eliminating
those
with
minimum
fields
of
competitors.
Any
class
which
doesn't
have
48
entries
for
the
eight
races (
or
24
in
the
case
of
motorcycles
and
ATVs,
which
only
compete
.in
four
races)
won't
be
around
in
1988.
First,
when
a
class
is
eliminated
it will
be
combined
with
another
class.
There
will
still
be
an
equitable
class .
to
run
.
in,
except
for
those
classes
which
simply
can't
be
combined.
An
example
this
year
is
Class
6S,
whose
champion
could
have
kept
running
in it
one
more
season
but
chose
to
go
in
Class
2
instead.
He
wanted
some
competition
. It
wasn't
fun
running
·
alone,
he
said.
Second,
there
are
seven
races
left,
enough
time
to
stir
up
some
action
from
the
other
competi-
tors
who
haven't
been
racing.
Instead
of
complaining,
which
,
does
nobody
any
good,
the
best
thing
would
be
to
get
more
cars
out.
That
means
more
prize
money
and
more
fun
racing.
You
know
that
if
any
of
the
factory-
heavy
classes
arc
in
jeopardy
near
the
end
of
the
year,
the
factories
will
encourage
more
entries
in
those
classes
to
save tht·m.
Why
wait
for
the
factories
to
save
their
classes,
if
you
can
go
to
work
earlier
to
save
your
own?
March 1987
THE
MTEG
STADIUM
RACE at Pontiac, Michigan will have quite an .
added attraction
to
entice fans out to see the show. Three time Indy 500
winner Al Unser, Sr. will join his son
on
the Enduro Racing Team and drive
the second Jeep Comanche
in
the Grand National Sport Truck events. The Al
Unsers, father and son, will join forces on the same race team for the first time
when they drive,the Jeeps at the Silverdome. While they will be teammates,
they. will comp~te against each other
as
well
as
against the T oyotas, N issans,
Chevrolets, Dodges and Mazdas. Al Sr. will drive the
Turbo
Wash sponsored
Jeep and Al]r. will drive the Stroh's Jeep entry.
1t
should be quite a sight for
the race fans
in
Pontiac on March 21st. ·
SPECIAL ST AGES .FOR THE
ONE
LAP
0F
AMERICA! The world's
greatest long distance rally has been made even tougher with the additipn
of
high speed tests on some
of
America's most famous race tracks and test
circuits. Competitors
in
the fourth annual Uniroyal Goodrich
One
Lap
of
America
will
also
be
required to compete
in
seven challenging road rally
sections along the 8000 mile route. The event starts on April
17
and
will
finish nine days later on. April 26: The start and
fin
_
ish
ceremonies
will
take
place at the
Uniro
1
yal
Goodrich Automotive
Techni!=al
Center
ip
Troy,
Michigan, near Detroit. . '
The field
of
I 50 cars and light trucks
is
split into two classes this year.
Added
is
a Performance Touring Class, that will be required to carry-roll bars
and full safety equ)pment to permit them to compete on the race track
s·ections. The Touring Class vehicles
will
run under the SCCA
ShowroOIT\
Stock rules, and
will
not be required to carry full race track safety equipment.
High speeds are exclusive to the
race
and test track competition. All highway
travel
will
be run at or be
low
the posted speed limits. In the past.three _One
Laps, competitors ha
ve
logged nearly three million accident free miles.
FIRESTONE POSTS'DESERTRACE SERIES CONTINGENCY. The
Firestone Tire and
~ubber
_ Company
will
offer $40,000
in
contingency prize
funds for contestants using Firestone light truck tires
in
the
198.7
desert series
races
sanctioned
by
the
High
Desert
Racing
Association
and
Score
International. Beginning with the Parker
400
race, Firestone will offer$ 1000
to the top Firestone equipped finisher who
is
running on Radial ATX or ATX
Radial 23° light truck tires in each
of
five
classes, The classes are Class 4,
7,
7S, 7 4x4 and 8. The $1000 prize
will
be offered
in
all
five
classes.at each
of
the
series eight races scheduled for 1987.
"We
have been extremely pleased with
th
e successful performance
of
Firestone tires
in
HORA and-SCORE
off
road
competition," said Jerry Kerr, Firestone's director
of
advertising.
"We
are
confident that
our
1987
contingency progtam will 'encourage even
fDOre
competitors to become familiar with
our
line
of
light truck tires."
CORVA
ALERT!!
Th
e California
Off
Road Vehicle Association, Inc.,
reported that late.
in
January
ofl
987
a new bill threatening
off
road activity
has appeared
in
the California state legislature. Assemblyman Jim Costa has
_introduced
AB
354
whi
ch
will
"steal"
five
million dollars from the
Off
Hi
g
hw
ay
Vehicle Fund (Green Sticker Fund) to finance a "rare and
enda
ng
ered species program." For fulr information, call
COR
VA, Bob Ham,
1-
8
00
-237-5436.
NISSAN MINI MINT - The first annual Nissan "Mini-Mint"
is
planned
for Friday, May
8,
and it
is
an
event for street
legal
mini trucks or sport utility
rigs, whose owners
will
get their shot at battling a portion
of
the legendary
Mint 400 course. Entry
is
limited to competitors who have never raced
in
a
HORA or SCORE event. The Nissan "Mini-Mint"
will
feature about 60
miles
of
the grueling Mint 400 terra
in
in
a specially timed event the day before
the Mint 400. Nissan
is
posting a total of$10,000
in
prizes to be distributed to
the to·p finishers. The overall winner
will
receive a cash prize
of$1000.
The
event
is
a great opp0rtunity for the average off roader to take his four wheel
drive vehicle over the Mint 400 course.
With
a
few
safety modifications to the
vehicle, any entrant can experience the
_thrill
of
bouncing over the Nevada
desert, just like the off road racing stars.
"We
are limiting the entries to 100 for the initial eventi'' said
Bill
Correia, truck r11erchandising manager for Nissan U.S.A.
"And
it
is
open to
any mini pickup
or
enclosed sport utility vehicle,' not just Nissans.
We
wanted the enthusiasts who
don't
have the money
to
race
to
get a chance to
drive over the Mint course. And, maybe win something to
boot"
Correia
explained that some
of
the safety requirements
will
include safety belts, a fire
extinguisher and a regulation helmet for b_oth driver and rider. Complete
rules and requirements and entry forms
will
be available from HDRA.
'
"We
want the first time competitor to have minimal costs
in
this e;ent,!'
added Correia.
''
And,
we
want
to
emphasize that this a timed event, not a race.
Excluding safety equipment, the only equipm_ent allowed to be used by the
participants
is
a stop watch and his odometer. Consistency
will
be the name
of
the game." All vehicles
will
'
go
through a special tech. inspection, and ·a valid
license, vehicle registration, and proof
of
insurance
is
r~quired. ·
THE
SCORE
SHOW
will be celebrating its terith anniversary next June
with the tenth annual edition
of
the
Off
Road Equipment Show at the ·
'Anaheim Convention Center. The show
will
be confined to one
ha
'
ll
this year,
so the exhibits will be
in
a more compact area. The Score Show runs from
June 26 through June 28, not that
far
away
on the calendar.
CASABLANCA FAN RACE TEAM.
The
Casablanca Fan Company
has
come
out
in
full force
in
the off road racing world with the introduction
of
its
new Class 8 Chevrolet pickup and
its
Porsche powered Class 2 Raceco. The·
Class8 Chevy
was
built by Hi-Tech Motorsports
in
Temple City,
CA
; head'
ed
by John Kaiser, a familiar name
in
off
road and boat racing. Chief design
engineer Jim Diroff has been building off road racing trucks for some time for
famous racers. The ·truck
is
piloted
by
veteran off ,roaJ· race, driver Don
McCormack, who recently has been racing ,a Class 4 'Dodge. D~n
is
the
General Manager
of
Saguaro Chevrolet
in
Parker,
AZ,
and his
1987
sponsors
include BFGoodrich, American Racing,
Art
CarrT
ransmissions
arid
Saguaro
Chevrolet. The Class 2 Raceco
is
driven
by
John Kaiser and Frank Smith, who
finished ninth
in
class at the Parker 400. McCormack finished.the California
loop before new car woes put him out
of
the r~nning. The team
has
the neatest
big
rig
trailer for summer racing, with a quartet
of
Casablanca fans hanging
from the roof. Bet
it
will
be a popular spot at the summer races.
mgre
TRAIL
NOTES
on
page
45
Dusty
Times
Side
Tracks~
••
By
Judy
Smith
.
As
off
road racing
matures
-, it
has attracted a
number
of
second
generation
racers,
the
most
notable
of
whom
-right
now
is
Robby
Gordon,
son
of
Bob
Gordon,
who
teamed with his
dad
to
win the Parker race
overall. · ·
A casual scan
of
the entry list
at
Parker reveals at least three
dozen
other
families with second
generation racers, and
at
least
two
that
have a third generation
racer.
Some
of
the names are very
illustrious, like Stewart, Mears,
McMillin
and
DeVercelly, and
most
have had some degree
of
success, which explains why
we
can scan the list and pick
them
out
so
easily. But they all have
one
thing in
common;
they're
fathers
and
sons
or
grandsons.
But that may be changing.
We've
had
more
ladies
showing
up
in the entry lists, and
some
must
surely
be
second
generation family members,
but
we
can't
always identify
them
because their names change.
However,
we
learned
of
one
such
team
at
Parker. .
Bob Gray, from Los Gatos,
.California, has been involved in
Coming Next Month ...
off
road for many
ye,1rs,
and used
.
to
race
in
the
1-2-1600
class. He
has a teenaged daughter, Lisa,
who
started pre-running wi
i:h
him when she was 13 years old.
Lisa always enjoyed the pre-runs,
~nd started talking
about
racing
early on.
So
when Lisa got
to
be a
licensed driver, Bob gave
her
a
VW
Thing,
to
drive
to
school,
so
she'd
have lots
of
practice
shifting a Volkswagen.
Then
dad
bought
a used
twc)
seat
1600
race car. He got it all
together, ·
and
Lisa, now 17,
teamed with
her
16 year old
boy
cousin,
Chris
Gray,
to
drive a
VORRA
race
in
Carson
City.
Their
fathers rode along, and the
teens had a good race.
They
got
the car
up
into
second place, had
some
distributor
trouble, and
finished
fourth
in
the
class, their
first time
out.
Then
Lisa
started
talking
about
the Parker race, and Bob
decided
to
give it a go. They
got
·
the
car
together, entered Lisa and
Chris
as
the
drivers, with Bob
and
his
brother,
Mike
(Chris's
dad)
riding.
Chris
and Mike started in
California
and
did
just
fine until
HORA
GOLD
COAST
300
SNOR
.E
BOTTOM
DOLLAR
BADLANDS
BAJA
100
BARBARY
COAST
PRO
RALLY
WORLD
CHAMPIONSHIP
SWEDISH
RALLY
·
· ... Plus
all
the Regular Features
they got over
to
the Chemehue~i
Wash,
where a big rock got
two
tires.
They
had
no
jspare
on
their
1600, and limpeq I along for a
long way with flatsl
on
both
front
and
rear, until they found
someone
who'd
let them have a
front
tire.
Then
they
put
that
on
the· rear and
hobb
led the rest
of
the . way.
in
.
to
the
j finish of. the
California side.
Th
r1Y were
about
an
hour
down
by fhen. ·
But the
car
was still
in
good
h
I .
s
ape,
and
after
refueling,
replacing the tires,
and
checking
things over
on
the
down
time,
Lisa was ready for. the re-start
on
time. Bob was riding with
her
.
Everything went l
just
fine
to
Midway, and then they
got
into
the new rough and dirty part,
went a
bout
two
miles and the car
quit
. Bob paid for his ride by
getting
out
to
find
the
trouble,
found
dust
in
·
th
b distributor,
cleaned it
out,
and!they went
on.
As
could
be expected, this
happened a
coupl
t
more
times,
and
then they final'
ly
reached the
end
of
the
stuff
andlsaw a
pit
. Bob
told Lisa
to
pull in, even though
they
didn't
know
the folks.
Now
Bob
hopp
~d
out
of
his
seat and asked the
pit
folks if they
might have an air [hose
to
blow
the
dust
out
of
the
distributor.
·
They
allowed as
ho
lw there might
be
one,
and
one
or
two
said
they'd look
arounc!:I,
but
no
one
was in a great rushl
to
help these
strange_rs
who'd
<Ilropped
into
their laps. Bob tµrned
to
his
daughter
and
said, ''Lisa,
you
stay
in
the car ...
",
and
the
pit
folks' ears perked jup.
The
said,
"Lisa?
Is
that
a girl driving?"
to
go a Jittle extra effort
to
get her
When
Bob told them it was his moving again . . It's
nic:e
for the
daughter, they were galvanized - ladies, i_f a
bit
tough on · the
ihto
action.
They
found
the
air average male driver. If she'd been
hose right away, cleaned the
_in
her cousin
Chris's
fix, with
distributor,
hustled Bob back two flats,
she'd
have probably
into
the car, gave them a push received
two
good tires. It's
not
and
cheered them
on
with a
"Go,
fair, certainly,
but
no
one
ever
Lisa, go!" Bob, new
to
the
world said life was fair.
qf
lady
off
roaders,
was As Lisa and Bob went
on
they
djelighted,
if
a little surprised. had
mor
,e trouble, losing a fan
Now
they charge_d along
in
belt
about
three-quarters
of
the
good shape until they passed the ·way in, which Bob was able
to
fix
next deep sand,
and
as they easily. But then, after crossing
pulled into
the
check
to
get their Shea Road and getting into the
chit, Bob saw the oil light come rocks, they
broke
a spring plate
c
>i
n, and the oil-pressure slid
to
and three shocks.
There
aren't
zero.
So
he told Lisa
to
pull over any pits-allowed
on
that
part
of
t
~?
the
closest
pit
,
which
the
course,
so
no
good
. happened
to
be Larry
Minor's.
samaritans
showed
up
to
hdp
He asked
someone
there
to
check them.
This
time it
took
so
long
to
their oil,
and
was told
that
a valve get things together
that
they ran
chver was missing. Bob figured
out
of
time, and never did get
he'd
have
to
get
out
to
do
back
to
the
start/finish
area and
something,
so
he turned
to
Lisa over the line.
So
Lisa
and
Charles
· apd, once again, said, "Lisa, you became non-finishers. But they
stay
in
the
car."
And
got the same had a
lot
of
·fun, and Lisa even
rea';tion
1
"There's
a girl driving!" had the pleasure
of
passing
Don
'.
'Here's
a valve cover, with a
Adams
when
he
took
a
turn
a
bit
gasket!"
"Here's
the oil!",
"Go!
too
wide.
They're
ready
to
go
Go!"
And
they were back
on
again. ·
t~
eir
way, with a new valve cover Lisa will graduate from high
a11d
five
quarts
of
oil, in
no
time . . school in June,
on
the weekend
~hivalry
still exists in
off
road
of
the Baja
500,
and plans
to
start
pjts. college in "the fall. But
she's
Having
met
Lisa,
who
has a already told
her
family
that
she's
beautiful dimpled smile, .
and
going
to
plan
her
col)ege classes
long
dark
hair, we
know
that
if
around
off
road racing as much
the
pit
folk had seen
her
without
as possible.
And
she's· only the
hh
helmet, they'd have
thrown
first
of
the second · generation
. tijeir best
off
road jackets in-
front
Grays
to
come
along. Lisa has a
of
her
to
help
her
get through the fifteen year
old
sister, Tanya,
silt; a
la
Sir
Walter
Raleigh. But,
who's
all ready
to
get
into
racing,
as it _is, knowing only
that
she's
and
a 10 year
old
brother,
Roger,
f~male,
most
pits will be willing
who
rides desert bikes.
- j
WE
WOULD
LIKE
TO
EXPiRESS
OVR
SINCERE
TH1f:JKS
TO
ALL
OF
THE
PE
Of
LE
WHO
SUPPORTED
U8r
AND
STUCK
BY
US _
THROUGH
TWO
·
YEARS
OF
NQN-FINISHES.
IT
ALL
I
GAM
1E
TOGETHER
IN
1987!
. I I .
..
. . . .
\/VE
.
DID
IT
AT
PARKER!!
THANKS TO:
FAT
PERFORMANCE
SUMMERS BROS.
YOKOHAMA
TIRES
CHECKERS
SWAY-A-WAY
OFF ROAD ENGi NEERING
NORTH AMERICAN RACECO
WRIGHT
PLACE
BEARDS SEA
TS
JUDY
SMITH
AND
EVERYONE ELSE
WE
FORGOT
McKENZJ1s
TRICK GAS
'
D&D
METAL
WORKS
SUPER
aboT
·
I
BILL
VARNES
i
Dusty
Times
March
19~7
THANKS FROM
ALL OF
US
AT
STILES RACING:
JIM STILES
JEFF STILES, SR.
JEFF
STILES,
JR.
JIM WILLIS
Page
11
SCORE
PARKER
400
Bob
Gordon
and
Son
Rob
Beat
the
Bikes
for
Absolute
Overall
Honors!
By
Jean Calvin
Phows:
Trackside
Photo
Enterprises
'
Youngster Rob
Gordon
speeds
past
the red
rocks
in
Arizona
in the Class 2
Chenowth
that he
and
his
dad
Bob
Gordon
drove to the class
victory
and
absolute first overall. fast time
of
the entire race.
The
desert
racing
season
opened
with a massive entry
at
the Score Parker
4DO.
At
419
starters
it
was the largest starting
herd at Parker. since Score
International
took
over the race
in
1974, except for the
421
starters in 1980.
The
entry
limit
of
425 was filled ten days before
registration opened,
but
a dozen
or
so hopefuls went
on
the
standby list. As usual, all standby
enteries made the starting line.
There was an equally large
turnout
of
contingency
donors,
stretching for blocks down the
street in Parker, Arizona.
The
tiny
Colorado
River town was
stretched beyond capacity with
the influx. Many racers and
support
groups were strung
up
and down the river, renting
homes
just
so
they could be
assured
of
getting a meal and a
bed.
Memories
of
the snowy 1985
Parker
400
returned
on
Friday
when
the
contingency
row
opened. Leaden skies and warm
jacket _temperatures greeted the
parade
of
race vehicles that .
moved very slowly through the
rows
of
product
booths,
and
on
across town to the tech and
Junction had
to
conte~d with a
half
dozen California Highway
Patrol cars in the last 20 miles
before the river.
The
'
CHP
enjoyed the bonanza
of
much
heavier than normal traffic and
garnered well over their
quota
of
traffic tickets.
Tickets
of
another
ilk were
also a hazard to the racers. This
year the B.L.M. imposed a
"30
mph
speed
limit"
on
pre-
running, difficult
at
best to
determine since few race cars
or
serious pre-runners are equipped
with speedo_meters.
While
only
one
such citation was made
public,
it
was a heavy one.
Arizona driver Jerry Finney was
caught
on
the course traveling at
"a
high rate
of
speed" by an
Arizona Fish and Game
Warden
.
Finney was
not
only cited for the
infraction,
but
disqualified from
the race by Score.
Reports
of
B.L.M. citations and fines were
legion, and
one
was ludicrous.
Mike
Moore
, running
support
for Roger Mears who was testing
his Nissan
on
Friday, stepped
out
of
his truck
at
a crossing to wave
Mears through,
and
a tissue fell
out
of
his truck. Before
Moore
could get back to his veh,icle, a
B.L.M. officer was there writing
him a citation for littering. This
type
of
harrassment
is
peculiar
only to the B.L.M.
group
that
control
the federal land used for
the Parker
400
. It is
in
sharp
contrast
to
the
cooperation
normally found with the offo::ers
and rangers from
other
B.L.M.
offices in the western states. ·
Race day dawned with clear
skies
and
tourist
brochure
sunshine as the bikes sped away
from the California
start
before
6:30 a.m.
The
cars started two
hours
after the last trike left,
and
it was Mark McMilli~, first away
in Class
1,
at
8:4 7 in the
morning.
The
firial starters, the
Odysseys, cleared the California
start just before noon, a time
when· the bike winners had
already finished their three legs,
and
were
heading
for
a
celebration lunch.
As usual, this ·
report
will
follow the car classes in the
order
they left the
start
line. They
covered 110 miles in California,
trailered close
to
30 miles
to
the
Ariz<
;ma main· pit, fixed things,
and
restarted two
hours
after
their California finish time. In
recent years only the leg (lap)
times are recorded, instead
of
the
former
method
of
timing
through the
on
course check-
points
as well.
Class 1
took
off
with
27
starters
just
about
everbody
currendy_ racing unlimited single
seaters. Because
of
heavy water
runoff, the California course was
rougher than normal,
so
no
record times
wer.e
set this year.
Starting
third,
I van
Stewart
looked good in the Toyota
pickup, first
to
arrive
at
the finish
in two
hours
flat plus 59 seconds,
wid~
the Class 1 lead as well.
Pushing Stewart
..
hard in the
Funco · he shared with Rick
Munyon
was Al Arciero,
in
at
2:01.41. It was tight up front,
as
Rob
MacCachren was third at
2:02.18, and ,
i984
overall car
winner at Parker Bob Shephard
had his new · car fourth at
2:03.02. Rick Nicholson had his
Outlaw
just astern
at
2:03.49,
with last year's winner
Tom
Koch, Raceco, in his
dust
at
2:03.53. A half dozen
more
were
very
close,
but
only
19
completed the first
110
miles.
Contenders
amoung the missing
were
Ron
Brant,
Rob
Gordon,
and
·long
shot
entry
Greg
George/Jerry
Whelchel. Larry
Noel
broke
a link . pin,
but
managed to finish
and
restart in
Arizona.
Ivan
Stewart
kept
up
his torrid
pace in Arizbna, doing the first
·
round
in 1 :46.30, holding the
class lead by a full minute over
Nick Nicholson .
on
total- time.
With
a 1:44.42
Tom
Koch
moved
up
to
third, only seven
seconds behind Nicholson in a
. real horse race. Arciel'o
dropped
to
fourth, with the Raceco
of
Steve Sourapas/ Dave Richard-
son
about
2.5 minutes back and
picking
up
steam.
The weather was cooling and
jackets were
donned
as the clock
neared 4:30 p.m.
at
the finish
line. The high pitched howl
of
an
unlimited air cooled engine was
heard,
but
it
wasn't
a Class 1, it
was the Class 2
Chenowth
with
Robbie
Gordon
at
the helm, en
route to overall victory.
Fourth
on
the road at the
overnight impound. Late comers A. fresh
red
and
silver
paint
scheme
worked
for
Steve Sourapas
and
Dave
entering
Parker
via
Vida
1 Richardson,
as
they drove the Raceco to the Class 1
victory
at Parker.
Nick
Nicholson
had
a great
day
in his
unique
Outlaw
,
as
he drove
solo
in the
race
and
finished
second
in Class
1,
just over a
minute
behind
.
Page
12
· March 1987
Dusty
Times
te.enager was truly excited when
' he heard that he and his dad had
beaten all the bikes, with a total
time
of
5:24.
33
. His rider-Oerek
Collins spent some trying
to
get
. his land
legs
_back after a wild
96
mile last lap. ·
Al
Arciero had his best day in the desert in a long time, taking the Class 1 Fun co
up front in California and finishing a very close
third
.
..
·
Running very close In Class 1,-Tom Koch had a tire disaster just minutes from
the finish line and d}
opped
to fourth in class in the Raceco.
Danny Letner and Henry
Bergdahl ran second a
ll
day, and
finished second
in
Class 2 and
overall, also beating a
ll
the bikes
with a time
of
5:32.16. Sliding
into
third in class, and third
overall
ahead
of
the
best
m
oto
rcycle time, was the team
of
John Kruger and Julie Appling,
in
with a time
of
5:34
.27. Frank
Arciero, with
Don
Tebbe ridin
g,
had woes on the last
leg
and
dropped
to fourth with the loss
of
over 20 minutes. Moving
up
a
spot
each
leg
, Cam Thieriot and
Greg Lewin were fifth in Class 2
in
the Funco
O.R.E
. scheduled
for retirement now that this team
is
go
ing truck racing.
Only
14
Danny Letner made a great start on the season in the Raceco-Porsche, taking
absolute second overall
and
second in Class 2, ahead
of
all the bikes
on
time.
,::,:.-:
John
Kruger
ran very well in his Class 2 Raceco and he also beat
all
the
mototcycles on time, taking third in class and absolute third overall.
finish line was
the
newly
repainted Class 1 Raceco, back
to
the
Coors
red and silver
colors,
of
Steve Sourapas and
Dave Richard
so
n.
They moved
up
from fifth
to
first in class on
the last tough
leg
in Arizona. This
route was also slower than in the
p~st with the
eli~i
_nation
of
the
htgh speed road
mto
Bouse. It
was replaced with ditches and silt
beds. Sourapas, a last minute
entry in Class 1, was pleased to
be first, taking the victory by less
than a
minute
from
Nick
Nicholson, who arrived ahead
of
the Raceco. Less than another
minute back came Al Arciero/
Rick Munyon, a solid third in an
unusually tight finish in Class
1.
back. Mark McMillin
had
a flat
in
California, and bystanders
changed it for him,
but,
they did
not
ge
t the spare tire
mount
_ completely fastened. So, the
wrecked tire fell
off
in a few miles
and tore the brake line off,
costing time. Mark
kept
going in
the Chenowth
to
finish sixth in
Class
1.
And Ivan Stewart had his
Baja
experience all over again. Just
before Swansea
on
the
last lap a
lower track
rod
pulled
out
of
the
frame.
So
Ivan
had
towaitfo
'
rthe
pit
crew to arrive to weld the
Toyota together in
order
to
finish, in seventh place.
Only
two
more
finished in Class 1, the
Raceco
of
Bob Renz and Dick
Clark and absolute last overall in
cars, ninth in class,. was the
Chaparral
of
Doc Ingram and
Albert Bright. A 6½
hour
first
lap in Arizona did them in and
they finished with only
11
minutes and changJ left
on
the 12
,
hour
time allowance.
Class 2 showed_
up
with a
mob
of
40
starters, and !this class ·was
the star
of
th
e 198f Parker 400,
the
top
three in class all beating
the fastest bike timt As far as we
remember·, it
is
the first time
not
one
but
three cars have beaten
the fastest bike
at
any desert race
where the
motorcydes
and
cars
run
together
on
the same day.
The
swift
Race
t
bok
its toll,
however, with 14 Class 2s
out
of
the show in California.
Zipping in with a
hot
1:57.41,
Frank Arciero,
Jr
. had his Raceco.
in the Class 2 lead
at
one third
distance. Being pushed by a six
cylinder Porsche engine, Danny
Letner
/
Henry
Bergdahl were
next in line, the Raceco doing a
1:59.36,
but
Bob
Gordon
was
right there with a 1:59.51 in his
Chenowth. Rounding
out
the
fast five were
John
Kru
ge
r,
Raceco,
at
2:02.21, and the team
of
Mark Hamilton and Marty
Letner, a
four
time Parker
winner, in a Raceco. Jim and
Mark Temple w:ere next
at
2:06.46,
running
on
thre
e
cylinders.
Th
e
ddwn
time fix
didn't
work and they were
out
on
the first Arizona loop. In fact
another eight were
out
on the
next
leg
.
At
two thirds distance Frank
Arciero held his Class 2 lead,
about
·
five
minutes ahead
of
Danny Letner. In third were the
Gordons, father and
son
. Young
Rob
was
out
of
the
Class 1
·action, so
he
hopped into his
dad's
two seater in Arizona,
but
the intake manifold came loose,
Tom
Koch
had
troubles
on
the
final round.
He
picked
up
a
horseshoe nail in a tire
just
three
miles
from
the
finish. His
attempt to ride it in
on
the flat
failed, and he had
to
stop
and
change the tire himself.
Tom
was
over six minutes
behind
Arciero,
in for fourth in class, even
though he wasn't listed
on
the
first set
of
results. After rolling
the car in California, Frank
Snook
turned
the Raceco over to
Eric Arras, and he climbed from
11th to seventh
.to
finish the-team
in
fifth place, another
11
minut
~s
Frank
Ar
ciero,
Jr
. led Class 2
for
the first two legs in his Raceco, then lost
25
minutes on the last loop
and
dropped to fourth in class.
Dusty
TimeS-
March
1987
which caused an unscheduled
pit
stop
between
Ari
zona laps.
Hanging
on
tight
to
fourth,
John
Kruger was now just over four
minutes behind the Gordons,
and Bob Richey IT
om
Baker
were
up
to
fifth in their Raceco.
Doing an incredible 1 :40.44
last lap, Robbie
Gordon
drove
the first car in any class
to
arrive
at the finish line, barely slowing
down after the
flag
waved,
The
I
.
This
is
the system
run
by
most
off
road race
winners
· Class 2 starters finished the
surprisingly tough route.
A whopping 47 cars started
in
Class
10,
and this bunch also
suffered high attrition with 20
falling
out
in
Californi
a.
Missing
were
r;r
TRl•MIL
BOBC~T
CHROME
DUAL
CAN
BOBTAIL
FOR
BAJA
BUGS
2740
COMPTON
AVENUE
LOS
ANGELES, CALIF.
90011
.
(213)
234•9014
WHOLESALE
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DEALER
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INVITED
Page
13
Steve
and
bon
Barlow
stayed
very
close
n time
all
day,
and
they
came
in
4th
by
bare
minutes
in
the
hef
ry size Class 1-2-1600
contest.
Hometown
hero
Jim
Madison
and
Russ
Mortenson
tried
hard
in
Class 5,
but
this
round
the
swift
team
had
to settle
for
second
place
at
the flag.
Never worse thari fourth in Class 5,
John
Cooiey
arid Mark Fox
move~
up to
3rd
in
Arizona
,
and
stayed there
all
the way to
pay
dirt.
DNFs last season, took third at
6: 18.
11
. Dick an_d Gary Weyrich
moved
into
fourth in a fine drive
at
6:22.00
; just barely ~head
of
another father and
son
team, Las
Vegans
John
and
Ron Ellenburg
whose Raceco was in
at6:22.19
.
It
was a
great
day
for
Stiles
Racing
,
and
Jim
Stiles
went
all
the
way
to take
over
the Class
10
lead
on
the
last
leg
and
win
thi;i
big
class in
his
Raceco.
Jerry
Leighton
had
the Class_
10
lead
with
one
lap to go,
qut
troubles
cost
him
some
20
minutes,
and
his
Raceco
ended
up
second
in class.
Clas~ 8 trucks were
the
first
water pumpers
on
the starting
line with a greatfield
of
24. But,
only one quarter
of
them would
see the checkered flag. Attrition
started early in California: Frank
Vessels blew.a head gasket
on
the
Chevy
on
Thunder
Alley and was
done
for
the day. B.rian.Stewart's
Ford
was
out
when the mounting
brackets
broke
·
on
the
front
1-
beam. Getting a discouraging
start
1
_'
Walker
Evans lost the
power
steering
on
his Dodge
before Rice, then
broke
an axle,
and finally lost oil pressure,
but
he was one
of
· 15 trucks that
~
two time winners Jack
Irvine/Kit
Trenholm
with a
blown engine, Dwight Lundell,
Greg Hibbs/ Mike Julson, Jim
Greenway and many more.
Fast time for the class in
California went
to
Ed
and
Levi
Beard, in a Chaparral, with a
swift
2:08
.08,
but
a lead in Class
10
is
measured in seconds rather
than minutes. Second
at
this
point
was Jerry Leighton, going
solo in his Raceco, with a
2:08.41, closely tagged by Brad
Perso"i-t/Greg Diehl, Dirtrix,
at
2:
08.52.
Fred
Ronn
/
Steve
Tetrick were close
at
2:09.33,
and
Jim Stiles, also solo in his
Raceco, was tight
at
2: 10.01.
Stiles felt he had been leading and
was first
on
the road in
the
class,
when he came into the last
narrow canyon and was b_locked
by an overturned two seater. He
had to get
out
and help right
the
·
car before he could get by, and
figured that cost him the class
lead
on
the first loop.
The Beard, ·Person and
Ronn
entries went
out
on
the first
Arizona lap, and Jerry Leighton
dashed
off
a 1 :48.57 to take the
class lead. But, Jim Stiles had
no
more
traffic trouble and he
did
a
1:48.09, putting him in second
just
over · a minute behind
Leighton.
From
Yuma, AZ,
Richard Binder came back from
problems with a 1:49.29, pulling
up
from sixth
to
third here,
but
his ORBS car failed
on
the last
leg
. Jim Zupanovich pulled up
i"as
NEVADA
Vegas
.
OFF-ROAD
it's
...
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~
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or
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Got
Your
VW
Parts
See
Brian
See
Dave
SAHAH,\
X
2
N . l·,
\'-,TLHN
'-ilHll
1
<,
Locations
fX
z
0
to
:S
I-
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z
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5:
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View
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LOCATIONS
Page
14
March
1987
N
from seventh
to
fourth, then
later
broke
a tie rod end, and
ended
up
finishing 12th.
The
father and
son
team
of
Dick and
Gary W eyrich were into fifth
here in · their Oregon based
Raceco.
The final lap was a
sprint
race
for the front.runners,
and
just
15
Class 10s finished the course. ·
Binder vanished
on
the last
leg.
First
to
arrive,
but
unsure
of
his
position with a starting
number
of
1008, was Jim Stiles. His crew
· was
subdued,
counting
the
minutes
out
for Jerry Leighton,
who
was
#1027,
and Binder,
#
10
31.
Leigh
ton
apparently lost
about
15 minutes
on
the leg, and
the clock ran
out.
The
Stiles
group
whooped it
up
as Jim
had
vowed, after a
1986
season
of
leading, then breaking, that he
would finish this race. He
not
only finished
the
winner, with a
quick
5:49
.26, he was ninth
overall among cars
on
this
horsepower demanding course
with a
1650
cc
FAT
Rabbit
engine. It
is
the first major desert
Class 10 victory for a Rabbit
water cooled engine.
Jerry Leighton salvaged second
in Class 10 with total time
of
6:04
;19, and he was the second
Class 10
at
the finish line.
Moving
up
smartly with each lap,
the team
of
Craig
Watkins
and
Greg Aronson, also plagued with
· finished the Califor:nia leg, down
to
seventh place . .
Out
front in California was
Steve Kell~y, his Chevy doing a
2:
17.38. Keeping him honest,
Dave Shoppe was ab.out five
, minutes back in the Ford with
the
Randy
Salmont
/ Michael
Nesmith
GMC
in his dust, just
22 seconds ·behind.
The
older
Ford
of
Greg
and
Ron
Kishiyama
was five
more
minutes back,
followed by
Joh11
Gable, Ford.
Both Gable and Evans were
out
early in Arizona, Gable with
ignition
failure
and Evans with a
blown
engine.
Despite high oil temperatures,
which did him in
at
,the
Baja
1000, Kelley
continued
to
lead
Shoppe by
about
five minutes
after
the
first
AZ
loop
.
Salmont
/
Nesmith
stayed in
third,
the
Kishiyamas held
fourth, all maintaining a similar
time gap.
The
field was
down
to
seven trucks.
Steve, Kelley stayed
out
front
all the way
to
pay dirt, suffering
from spongy brakes
on
the last
leg. But,
he
won
Class 8 by a
resounding
15
minutes
and
change.
Finishing
second,
typically with some body panels
missing, Dave Shoppe said he
was passing
i;r
Coming
hack
from
troubles
in
California
Craig
Watkins
and
Greg
Aronson
drove
the
Rabbit
powered
Raceco
into
a keen
third
in Class 10
action
.
Dusty
Times
Nissan
starts
tbe
·
newseason
.....
first
· ·
All
last
year-right
up
to
the
seasons
final
off-road
event-
events
such
as
the
Parker
400
mean
more
to
us
than
victory
..
Nissan
Trucks
scored
victory
after
victory.
}:\nd
now,
we
started
_
1he
challenge
of
racing
makes
us
·
push
ourselves
to
the
·
our
victof
y
march
again
at
the
first
ofhoad
event
of
the
year,
lif
it
...
and
then
some!
And
its
the
knowledge
we
gain
from
.
the
Par~er
400.
our
racing
success
thathelps
to
enhance
the
power,
perf
or-
Piloting
his
Nissan
Truck
ove
_r
bone-jarring
terrain,
Spencer
n:iance
...
the
p·
ure
fun
and
pleasure
of
the
cars
and
trucks
we
Low
drove
like
he
was
on
smooth
flattop.
Not
only
did
he
win
build
for
the
street.
Class
7S
(Stock
Mini-Pickup)
by
a
long
lead,
but
he
beat
every
You
can
get
the
same
top
p~rformance
too,
with
Nissans
other
compact
truck
in
every
other
class
entered
in
the
race-
full
line
of
specialized
parts
·
for
racing
vehicles
and
production
!
. I
even
Cla
_
ss
7
with
.
its
exotic
$150,000
machines~
Proving
once
cars.
-
Just
send
.
your
$10
check
or
money
order-do
not
send
again
that
Nissan
Hardbody-tough
trucks
have
the
rugged
cbsh-for
our
tompetition
Parts
Catalog
to:
Nissan
Motor
·
durability
it
takes
to
make
a
real
winner.
·
Corporation
'
in
V.S.A.,
Motorsports
Dept.,
P.O.
Box
191,
Gardena,
Nissan
congratulates
Spencer
Low
on
his
win.
Of
course,
_
CA
90247.
Please
allow
six
weeks
for
delivery.
•~
THE
NAMEISNISSAN
Going
very
well
despite
front
drive
problems
,
Tom
Strong
and
Steve
Broden
kept
the
slick
Chevrolet
in
second
place
all
the
way
in Class
4.
Michael
Horner
and
Greg Foreman
moved
from 7 4x4 ranks
to
Class
14
and
they drove the Chevy S-10
right
into
a fine
2nd
in class.
Randy
and
Rick
Wilson
climbed
steadily
through
the ranks to finish
in
2nd
place
in
Class 5-1600, a very close battle
for
that position.
Dave
Anckner
and
Darrell
Wiggins
started
out
fast,
holding
,
second
spot
in
5-1600
until
the
last
lap,
where
they
lost
a
lot
of
time
and
took
third
.
The
swift
Ford
team
of
Chuck
Johnson
and
Scott
Douglas
survil(ed
a trans faJlure
to
bring
the
Ranger
home
a
strong
second
in Class
7S.
Paul
and
David
Simon
moved
their
Ford
Ranger
from
6th
to
3rd
in
Class 7S
and
go/it
home
in
3rd
place
as
well
,
after
some
troubles
.
Dick
and
Gary
Wey
rich
, a
father
and
son
team,
moved
steadily
up
the
charts
-in
their
Raceco
to
come
in a very
tight
fourth
in Class 10.
- I
r,.,.. Kishiyama in a wash lap· and dropped
to
fourth, still
and they made contact, taking off· · hours ahead
of
-David Westhen
Shoppe's right front fender. The and Russ
Wernimont,
GMC,
Ford
of
Greg and
Ron
Kishiyama who had
over.
. an
hour
on
·
ran reliably into a solid third Herman Meister/ Danny Small,
place,
about
12 minutes back. Ford. After a
lot
of
pit
work, the
Salmont and Nesmith spent an Larry Wilcox/ Dale Sexton Ford
extra 45 minutes
out
on
the last vanished
on
the last lap.
Don't
miss
out!
Order
Your
With
56 starters Class 1-2-
Cff-Road
Racing
1600 continues to be the largest
class
in
desert racing. The field
was
packed
with
potential
winners, and the
mob
of
1600s
were the fifth group to leave the
starting line, one every 30
seconds. Only ten failed to
complete the California route.
When
the dust cleared it was
Bob Scott and Mike Voyles who
..,
led at one third distance in their
homebuilt single seater. They
were only ten seconds ahead
of
1987
CALENDM
Features:
Top
Drivers
Action
Photos
MAJOR RACE DATES
Now
$5.00
Postage
Included
M&M
,ENTERPRISES
5318
Don
Pio
Drive
Woodland
Hills,
CA
91364
Steve
Kelley
had
the
Chevrolet
humming
at
Parker
,
and
he
led
every
lap
in
Class B,
had
scant
trouble
and
won
by
over
25
minutes
,
getting
a
swell
start
on
the
points
. ·
1986 overall' points champion
· Jack Ramsay, with Rick Mills
riding in the Bunderson
that
carried Ramsay to the title.Jack's
new single seater had some parts
delayed because
of
an air
freighter crash,
so
he
took
the
"For
Sale" sign
off
the two seater
and went racing at Parker.
Steve and
Don
Barlow had
their O.R.E. roaring around
California and were about 1.5
minutes behind Ramsay in third.
And, Larry Job, in his
short
course style Interceptor, was
another minute back in fourth,
followed in half a minute by the
Mirage
of
Russ Butow and Ken
Miller
.'
It
was tight
on
time
through the first 20 here.
The Chenowth
of
Morley and
Mike Williams whipped off a
1:55.04 in Arizona to take over
the lead,
but
Ramsay was only 32
seconds behind. Scott/Voyles
slowed a tad and
dropped
to
third,
about
three
minutes
behind Ramsay: 'Having lost his
power steering, Larry Job still
held -fourth, another · minute
back.
Trailing
by
just
five
minutes, Ken Snyder and David
Marini moved
up
to fifth,
followed
closely
by
Peter
McCowen/ Scott Pfeiffer.
His hands blistered, Job
put
Rob
MacCachren, whose Class 1
was
down
and out, in his car for
the
final)oop,
but
Rob
did
not
finish.
flrst
to
the finish line
was
Jack Ramsay in the Bunderson,
but
Jack had started first, and.he
felt he was prob;i.bly second
on
time.
The
Ramsay group stayed
at the· finish line to see some
others arrive. It was exciting,
as
the Scott/ Voyles
#1613
took
the
flag
· with the Williams,
#161'6, right
on
the bumper.
·
Word
came
that
MacCachren
was
out
and Butow was fixing
things
on
course.
It
was
clear that Jack Ramsay
started the season right by
winning the Class .1-2-1600
honors, as he had last year in the
same car, and he has to also be ·
the overall points leader at this
point
. In some pain, after a hard .
landing in Arizona revived a two
week old back injury, Jack ·
Ramsay was elated with the
victory, and
is
looking forward
to the .Gold Coast race in March
_
on
his home turf. Morl_
ey
and
Mike Williams took second
spot,
about
eight minutes
out
of
the
wir:i,
.
but
just 1.5 minutes
ahead
of
Bob Scott and Mike
Voyles. Hauling qack into the
money
on
the last
leg,
Steve and
Don
Barlow
were
fourth,
another three minutes down and
less than two minutes ahead
of
Ken Snyder/ David Marini, who
had two minutes
on
Peter
McCowan/ Scott Pfeiffer.
Baja
winners
Art
Peterson, Roger
Mears,
Jr.
and
Richard
Goldbaum ended
up
seventh,
with down_
t-ime
on
the· first
leg.
In all,
30
of
the resticted 1600
cars finished .
A dozen showed
up
for the
battle in Class 5, all strong
Dave
Shoppe
kept
the Class 8
leader
in
his
sights
all
day
,
but
he
had
to
settle
for
a
comfortable
second
place
in the
Ford
at the flag.
Greg
and
Ron
Kishiyama
had
a fine race
in
their
older
Ford,
running
fourth
in
Cl
_ass 8
through
two
legs,
and
moving
up
to
third
at
the finish.
Page
16
March 1987
Dusty
Times
':
-,,.,
i
.
-.
'
i
'
Larry Ragland had the lead in Class 7 in California,
but
the Chevy
developed terminal front end failure, and Ragland did
not
finish.
. Jerry McDonald has his Class 7 4x4 Chevy S-10 in the lead on the
- first loop, but problems dropped him to 2nd place at the finish line.
running Bugs. After a couple
of
years going their
own
way, Jim
Jeeps are real
crowd
pleasers
off
road, and Buck Griffin and Don
Coffland
drove their CJ 8 to a clean
2nd
place in Class 3 action.
Whee/standing
off
the start, Larry and Karla Martin moved into
second place in Challenge Class in Arizona
and
they finished
second in the Chenowth.
Mike
Schwellinger
s·kips over a
bump
in his Jeep CJ 7, and
he
ended up third in Class 3
by
a very ~lim _margin, just
40
seconds.
Sandwinder
builder
Don Rountree
and
Gary Schnekenburger
did a great job in the
mid-engined
Challenge
car
, taking a strong
third place.
final 96
~ile
dash.
the field.
John
Cooley / Mark Fox
lost time
on
the last miles,
but
were third. Slater/ Henry held
on
in fourth,
hours
ahead
of
Tim
Rodriguez, the final Class 5
finisher.
-Cocores and Doug
White
were
back together, and this team
soon showed they had lost none
of
the magic, either in driving
; ; skill
or
car
prep
. They led the
· · pack into the California finish
with a
2:19.36
time. Second irian
equally tidy Bug were Arizonans
Greg Diehl a'
nd
Mike Longley
with.
2:22.59. Craig Slater
and
Rick Henry were
about
6.5
minutes back in third, with
John
Cooley and Mark
Fox
mere
seconds behind
them
. Parker's