etition
in the
dift
••
Rob Tolleson
Yokohama
congratulates
the
winners.
Frontier
500
Rob
Tolleson and Bill varnes
1st-Class
1-2-1600
,
SCORE/HDRA
overall Points Leader
Jim Dizney and Mike McCrory
1st-Class
9
Chuck Cuy and Rhonda Walsh
1st-Challenger
Class
SNORE
250
Jerry Leighton
1st-Class
10
1st overall
for
two
years
straight
& fastest lap
Tom
Koch
1st-Class
1.and 3rd overall
Cregg Symonds
1st-Class
2 and 2nd overall
Rob
Maccachren
1st-"class
0-2-1600
Mike Taylor
1st-Class
5-1600
Larry
carban
1st-Challenger
Call
TOH-Free
1~800-423-4544
From California 1-800-221-8744
Eastern
_
Canada
1-800-387-4924
western
Canada
1-800-663-8464
Y720
Volume 2 Number
11
November
J985
In
This
Issue
•••
Editor-Publisher
Jean Calvin
Associate
Publisher
Brad
Goodrow
Controller
John
Calvin
Contributors
Darlene
Bozeman
Leonard
Day
Daryl
D.
Drake
Winnie
Essenberg
Homer
Eubanks
Tom
Grimshaw
Dennis
Henneberg
Martin
Holmes
Danny
McKenzie
Brenda
Parker
David
R
yskamp
Wayne
Simmons
Judy
Smith
John
Sprovkin
Joe
Stephan
Trackside
Photo
Enterprises
Art
Director
Larry
E.
Worsham
Typesetting
&
Production
Michelle's
Typesetting
Services
Printing
N
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SNAPSHOT
OF
THE
MONTH •••
I
I
FEATURES
Page
Porsche 961 Rally Car
...
.
..........
.
..........
.
....
8
Off
Road Championship Gran Prix Finale . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
VORRA
Dayton 300
......
.
..
.
...
.
......
.
...
.
..
.
..
14
Score Canada at Thetford-Mines
...........
..
. .
.....
.
16
A.D.R.A. Snowflake
Buggy
Bash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Baja Bob by David Ryskamp
..........
.
....
.
........
20
Dixie Autocross at Flint, Michigan
....
.
..
..
.........
.
22
Budweiser Forest Pro Rally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Hodag
50
in Wisconsin . .
....
.
.....................
25
Racing through Muck and Mire in Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 7
The 16th Annual SNORE 250
.....
.
........
.
.......
28
Rally
of
1000 Lakes
.......
. . . .
~
...
..
..
.
.........
. . 31
Gravelrama XV
.........
..
...
.
....................
32
100 Miles
of
Sandy Creek, Alabama
........
.
..
.
.....
33
Mile High Racing Near Denver
......
.
.........
..
....
34
Arizona River
Run
'85
....
.
....................
.
...
39
DEPARTMENTS
Snapshot
of
the
Month
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Soap Box by Russ Biswell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Trail Notes
........................................
4
Happenings
.................................
·. . . . . .. . 5
Side Tracks by Judy Smith
...........................
6
BFGoodrich 6-50 Club
Report
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Christmas Goodies Galore
.....
,
....................
35
Good
Stuff Directory
..........
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36
Classified Ads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Index to Advertisers
..........
·
.....................
38
ON
THE COVER -
Coming
straight
at
the
camera
over
a nasty
jump
at
the
Orange
Show
Fairgrounds
in
San
Bernardino,
CA,
is
a
championship
winning
Toyota
pickup.
For
the
third
year
running
Toyota
trucks
have
captur~d
the
Manufacturer's
Cup
Challenge in
the
Grand
National
Pickup
category
of
Mickey
Thompson's
Off
Road
Championship
Gran
Prix
stadium
series.
The
title
is
the
result
of
the
combined
efforts
of
builder
Cal
Wells
and
his Precision
Preparation
crew,
principal
drivers
Ivan
Stewart
and
Steve
Millen,
whose
main
event
victory
pulled
out
the
title last
September,
and
Toyota
Motorsports
headed
by Les
Unger
~
Congratulations
to
the
whole
gang.
Color
Photography
by
Harold
Crawford
of
Trackside
Photo
Enterprises. ·
/\~
DUSTY
TIMES
THE
FASTEST
GROWING
OFF
ROAD
MONTHLY
IN
THE
COUNTRY!
!
1 year -
$12.00
2 years -
$20.00
3 years - $30.00
Take advantage
of
your subscription bonus
•••
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(Form
on
inside
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-1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Name
----------------------------
"A
re y
ou
s
ure
off r
oad
racers
sta
y in
sh
a
pe
this way" says
Ed
Robi
n
son
,
President
of
the Valley O
ff
Ro
ad
Rac
ing
As
soc
iat
io
n. At t
he
V
ORRA
Day
to
n 3
00
in
northern
Neva
da
, R
obin
son gets
th
e
che
c
ke
red flag early in
th
e
ra
ce.
He
was reduced to riding his
you
ng
da
u
ghter's
bic
ycle
for
tran
sporta
t
ion
at the ev
en
t, aft
er
lo
an
ing the engine
out
of
his well t
_hrash
ed Baja Bug _
to
Jo
e Falloon,_
who
blew
his race
eng
i
ne
while
pr
erunnin
g.
Ha
ppily
1t
was a mce day, a
nd
Ed
got
a
li
ttle
extra
exercise.
Pho
to by
Jo
e Stephan.
DUSTY
T
IMES
will fea
tu
re
pi
c
ture
s
of
similar
"funnies"
or
woes on
th
is page
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mon
th. Send us
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apshot
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er for
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Dusty Times
Novemb
er
1985
Page 3
-
----
---"
Soap Box •••
By
Russ
Biswell
SCORE OFFICIALS
ASSOCIATION
As
an
active
member
of
the
SCORE
Officials
Association,
I
feel
that
a
reply
to
recent
criticism is in
order.
I
have
been
asked
by
the
Association
to
pen
this
letter
on
its behalf.
The
criticism I
refer
to
was
directed
toward
the
way we
handled
the
SCORE
T
urbowash
World
Championships
in
August.
While
many
of
the
more
experienced
hands
stayed
away,
prefering
desert
racing
and
checkpoints
to
short
course
racing,
the
many
new
faces
made
up
for
inexperience
with
genuine
enthusiasm.
Under
staffing
in
most
areas is
not
an
excuse,
but
a
result
of
a
limited
number
of
passes
to
get
on
the
track.
Because
of
this,
some
members
of
our
volunteer
organization
were
forced
to
purchase
tickets
and
spectate,
or
just
stay
home.
I
trust
this
situation
will
be
remedied
next
year.
Moving
along, I will
address
our
accusors
in a
chronological
order.
In
the
September
issue
of
DUSTY
TIMES,
Judy
Smith
in
her
Side
Tracks
column
addressed
the
problem
of
racers
pulling
into
the
infield
area
after
their
race
was
over
and
proceeding
onto
the
end
of
Thompson's
Ridge
to
return
to
the pits.
She
stated
that
a
course
marshall
should
have
been
stationed
in
this
area
with
radio
communication
with
start
/ finish
to
hold
up
the
drivers
until
the
slower
vehicles
had
cleared
this
section,
thus
preventing
an
unsafe
condition
.
While
such
is
not
always
the
case,
this
time
I
must
agree
with
Judy.
As
ohe
of
three
people
in
charge
of
the
entire
infield area,
accompanied
by
my
wife
Jan
and
Bill
Wick,
I
just
about
ran
my
feet
off
trying
to
cover
the
area
from
the
asphalt
to
the
esses
on
one
side
and
the
last
third
of
Thompson's
Ridge
on
the
other.
We
were
also
in charge
of
the
photographers
who
insisted
on
compromising
both
their
safety
and
our's
by
getting in
the
way;
some
even
crossing
the
course
during
a race.
Not
all
the
photographers
were
that
stupid,
SCORE
PARKER 400
February
1,
1986
1st
Event
of
the
SCOREIHDRA
Points
Series
Limited
number
of
entries
will'
be
accepted
-
Call
SCORE
Headquarters
-
818/889-9216
Page4
just
enough
to
spread
our
attention
even
thinner.
To
my
knowledge,
the
only
S.O.A.
member
with any
means
of
communication
with
start
/
finish
and
the
tower
was
Marvin
Maxwell,
current
S.O.A.
President,
from
his
rolling
command
post.
At
the
meetings
before
the
race we
inquired
.
about
radios
and
were
told
we
wouldn't
need
them.
·
Judy,
you
,
have
my
word
that
next
year
we
will
have
communication
at
strategic
locations,
.
and
a
potential
problem
area
will be
monitored.
In
the
September
SCORE
News,
John
Elkin
descibed
how
one
of
their
photographers
was
standing
behind
a
barricade
when
it was
struck
by a race
vehicle.
The
barricade
was
sent
aloft,
narrowly
missing said
photographer.
Another
photog-
rapher
in
an
unsafe location?
He
does
accuse us
of
not
paying
attent
-:i
on,
and
of
handling
sjtuations
in a
confusing
and
sloppy
manner.
Since
he
did
not
give specifics
to
address,
I will
welcome
his
future
letter
or
pnor1e call
to
me
to
discuss the
problems.
If
it's
worth
writing
about,
it's
worth
talking
about,
eh
John?
In
his
October
issue
of
On
Dirt
Motorsports,
Lou
Peralta
made
a
couple
of
vague references
to
the
poor
performance
by
us.
To
Lou
I
make
the
same
offer
as
Mr.
Elkin:
Drop
a line
or
call me;
we'll talk
about
it.
.
l\e
be
en saving
the
best
(
worst)
for
last. I
refer
to
a letter
in
the
October
issue
of
DUSTY
TIMES.
"Big"
John
Files
decided
to
attack
not
only
our
performance,
but
also
our
intelligence.
He
stated
that
we
took
our
time
righting
over-
turned
vehicles.
I'll tell
you,
"Big",
that
no
one
in his right
mind
is going
to
run
out
in
front
of
a
bunch
of
racers
who
won't
slow
for
flags
or
emergency
personnel
on
a
muddy
track.
You
refer
to
John
Gable's
rollover
in
the
esses.
Here
you
make
two
errors.
You
stated
that
fuel was
pouring
out
of
the
rear
of
the
truck.
While
your
intention
was
to
criticize
the
S.O.A.,
you
actually accused
Mr.
Gable
of
a safety infraction
pertaining
to
fuel filters, vents,
and
check
valves ( rule
CR20
from
the
1985
SCORE
rule
book).
All
personnel
present
were
more
than
smart
enough
to
operate
the
extinguishers
supplied
to
us
by
Mickey
Thompson
.
Unfortunately,
the
extinguishers
lacked
both
service
tags
apd
gauges
to
monitor
their
state
of
charge. Several were
found
to
be
inoperative.
Unfortunately,
a
moment
of
need
is
not
the
time
to
make
this
discover~.
After
the
carburetor
fire ·was
extinguished,
the
rollover
crew
was
unable
to
roll his
truck
uphill
over
the
berm
while
standing
in
ankle
deep
mud.
Had
·
your
attention
span
not
expired,
you
would
have seen
the
tow
truck
having
equal
d i
fficulty.
A
combined
effort
was necessary
to
right
th
e big
Ford.
You say
that
a
Jeep
pulled
down
onto
th
e
asphalt
from
the
ridge with fuel
pouring
from
the
back
.
Are
you
accusing
another
racer
of
a safety violation,
or
tfle
safety crew with gross stupidity? I
was
among
those
who
checked
out
the
vehicle in
question
when
it
pulled
off
the
course.
From
your
vantage
point
100
yards
distant,
you
mistook
muddy
water
from
the
puddles
along the
bottom
of
the
ridge. I assure
you
that
we were in a
much
better
position
than
you
to
judge
the
seriousness
of
the
situation,
since
muddy
water is
not
included
in
any
combustible
liquids
list
that
I
know
of,
"Big".
Since
you
demonstrate
your
expertise
on
how
to
run
a race in
y'
our
instructional
paragraph,
your
guidance will
be
welcomed
at
next
year's
race.
An
orange
vest, a yellow flag,
and
all
necessary
credentials
will be
reserved in
your
name
so
you
will
have
the
opportunity
to
back
up
your
words
and
show
both
the
S.O.A.
and
the
racing
commun-
ity
how
it
should
be
done.
In closing
my
reply
to
your
letter, I will offer
one
suggestion.
You
give title as Pit
Coordinator
for
Checkers
Off
Road.
This
would
lead
one
to
believe
that
the
organization agrees with,
your
inaccurate
observation
and
poor
judgement.
The
Checkers
members
I
polled
not
only
were
unaware
of
your
letter
prior
to
its
publication,
they
unanimously
disagreed with
yoµr
opinions
.
Most
were angered
at
the
blemish
you
have
placed
-
on
the
reputation
of
such
a vital
and
respectable organization.
I was
commissioned
to
write
this reply
by
the
membership
of
the
SCORE
Officials Associa-
tion
at
the
general meeting held
October
2,
1985,
and
do
so
with
their
blessing.
Any
interested
parties
are
welcome
to
contact
me
,vith
their
views.
I
thank
Jean
Calvin
and
the
folks
at
DUSTY
TIMES
for
affording
me
the
space
to
set
the
record
straight.
P.S.
If
you
find
yourself
near
Mike's
during
the
Baja
1000,
stop
in
and
say
"hello"
:--
I'll
take
the
time
to
chat.
Thank
you Russ for a «'ell
documented tale
of
trying
to
do your
job
at
the Rit•erside races, «'here it
al1:mys
seems
to
be tough getting the
·right
hand
«'orking «'ith the left
hand
in such a big area for a closed
course race.
We
agree
that
your
group does a super
job on the desert
races,
U'here
no doubt you bring all
your
o'U'n
e4uipment
to
the far flung
outposts
on
the race course.
DUSTY
TIMES U'ould «'elcome any forum
about imprcwing the state
of
off
road
racing, a
'.
,port
«'e
l<we
and
aim
to
support «•ith this publication.
Volunteers are
i1wited
to
climb on
their
"Soap
Box"
and
fill this space
U'ith their thoughts about U'hat
is
good
and
«
hat
is
not
so
good about
the state
of
off
road racing.
We
U'ould U'elcome some discussion
011
the state
of
the
Pro
Rally Series as
«'ell. Call
or
«'rite
DUSTY
TIMES
U'ith your ideas for a Soap Box
column,
and
get
on
the scfiedule.
November
1985
Trail Notes •••
THE
SOUTHERN
NEV
ADA
OFF
ROAD
. ENTHUSIASTS have
joined
forces with
Sun
world
International
Airways
and
Holiday
I
nn
to
make
the
final race
of
the
1985
Yokohama
/
SNORE
series
an
event
to
at
tend.
The
Sun
world
Airways
/
SNORE
Blackjack
100
on
November
23
will give racers a
chance
to
compete
for
a vacation
for
two
in
San
Francisco.
The
top
three
finishers
in
every class,
except
Challenger, will get
the
opportunity
to
draw
for
the vacatio·n trip, a little icing
on
the
cake
for
what
has
been
SN
ORE's
mos
t
successful racing season in
many
years.
There
is
a
good
possibility t
ha
t
Sunworld
Airways will
continue
to
be involved in the
1986
series.
Winners
of
the
vacation will
fly
Sunworld
to
Oakland
International
Airport,
the
closest
airport
to
downtown
San
Francisco,
then
take
the
.Bay
Area
Transit
to
the
beautiful
Holiday
Inn
in
Union
Square,
right in
the
heart
of
San
Francisco,
for
a
three
day,
two
night vacation.
Along
with
Sunworld
Airways,
the
Holiday
Inn
Hotel
&
Ca
sino, a
nd
Yokohama
Tires,
Snore
has
welcomed
many
other
major
supporters
in
1985,
including Bud Light
and
General
Tires.
Snore's
final
event
of
the
1985
series,
the
Sunworld
Airways/SNORE
Blackjack
100,
will
be
held
just
outside Las
Vegas, Nevada.
For
entry
information
write
SNORE,
P.O.
Box 4
394,
Las
Vegas,
Nevada
89106
or
call
the
SNORE
Hotline,
(702)
452-4522
.
THE
UNIROYAL
ONE
LAP
OF
AMERICA RALLY will
be
held
on
May 3
to
11 in
1986.
Uniroyal
Tires
recently
announced
its
continuing
sponsorship
of
the
unique
8500
mile
road
rally.
The
date
was
moved
from
March
to
May
next
year
to
assure
the
use
of
many
challenging
mountain
roads
that
were closed
for
the
winter
during
the
1984
and
1985
One
Lap
of
America
runs.
Starting
and
finishing
in
Detroit,
MI,
the
1986
rally will visit
many
of
America's
leading race
tracks,
and
stop
in
Laredo,
Texas
at
Uniroyal's
proving
ground,
There
will
be
more
Time/Speed/Distance
sections
next
year
on
the
route
that
generally circumnavigates
the
perimeter
of
the
United
States.
The
route
is
kept
secret
until
the
entrants
leave the starting line.
Uniroyal's
continuing
involvement
in
the
nine day
endurance
rally is a
major
part
of
the
company's
effort
to
publicly
demonstrate
the
performance
capabilities
of
Uniroyal's
latest passenger
and
light
truck
tires.
Teams
interested
in
entering
the
1986
rally
should
contact
Brock
Yates
at
Box
241,
Wyoming,
New
York
14591.
DESERT SERIES
COUNTDOWN
FOR
1985.
While
the
Score
Baja
1000
has
yet
to
happen
as we go
to
press,
the
. final
event
in
the
first ever
combined
HD
RA/Score
Series is
coming
up
fast,
and
the
drawing for starting
positions
is
coming
even
sooner,
on
November
1.6,
1985,
for
the
HDRA
Frontier
250.
The
race
course
will
start
and
finish
about
15 miles
south
of
Las
Vegas
at
Sloan,
and
it
will
be
four
laps
of
about
60
miles
of
course
for
all
classes.
The
Frontier
Hotel
will
be
awarding a
bonus
of
$100
in each class
for
·
the
fastest lap.
Just
$100
gets
your
name
in
the
drawing, which will
be
held
on
Saturday,
November
16,
1985
in
the
Americana
Room
of
the
Frontier
Hotel
in Las Vegas.
The
Frontier
250
will
happen
on
Saturday,
December
7, with
the
first
Class
1 car away
at
9
a.m
.
Send
your
deposit
to
HDRA,
961
West
Dale
Ave., Las Vegas,
NV
89124
and
get
the
full skinny,
course
map
and
all
the details
on
the
schedule
for
the
race.
SMITTYBILT, INC.
is
expanding
their
facilities.
Smittybilt,
maker
of
top
quality
truck
bars
and
tube
bumpers
for
mini,
mid
and
full size
trucks,
broke
ground
last
August
on
a new,
5,000
square
foot
building
to
be
used
for
warehouse
/
shipping
and
a
new
main
office.
However,
the address will
remain
the same,
2124
North Lee Ave., South
El
Monte,
CA
91733, and so does the
phone
number,
(818)
442-1788.
THE GOODYEAR OFF
ROAD
SUPPORT
TEAM
has
a
somewhat
different
schedule
from
their
normal
operation
during
the
SCORE
Baja
1000
this
year.
The
Goodyear
Support
Team
truck
will
not
be
in
contingency
row
on
the
Thursday
of
the
race week in
Ensenada
.
The
truck
will
beon
the
way
to
the
course
near
Santa
Ynez
to
be
in place
for
competitors
during
the
race.
However,
a few
of
the
Support
Team
members
will
be
available
during
the
contingency
hours
for
any
information
or
assistance
you
might need.
If
any
of
the
Goodyear
Team
members
need
the
truck
to
carry
tires
to
the
pit
location,
contact
Paula
Simms
at
(714)
993-
7
448
fast
to
coordinate
details
before
the
Baja
1000
starters.
If
you
would
like
to
know
how
to
be
a
part
of
this team,
and
realize great savings
on
Goodyear
W rangier Radial Tires,
just
call
Gary
Wicke
at
(714)
,
524-1200.
PRO RALLY ENTHUSIASTS will
be
sorry
to
hear
that
the
well
produced
Toyota
Olympus
Rally has
not
been
included
in
the
eleven events
counting
for
the
World
Championship
in
1986.LastJuly
the
Olympus,
out
of
Seattle,
ran
as a
prototype
event
and
a
candidate
for
World
Championship
status
in
1986.
But,
the
FISA
schedule
is
printed,
and
of
the
eleven events listed, eight
are in
Europe,
and
one
each
in
Africa,
New
Zealand
and
Argentina
.
While
everyone, including
the
European
observers, praised
the
Olympus
last year,
it
is possible its low
entry
was a
factor
in losing
America's
bid
to
hold
a
World
Championship
event. ·
Next
year
on
the
World
Championship
series
for
both
drivers
and
manufacturers,
seven
of
the eleven events will
count
towards
a title,
and
one
rally
must
be
outside
Europe.
Other
changes
concern
the
familiar
Groups
B,
A
and
N.
These
have
been
renamed
for
1986
as
Sports
Cars,
Touring
and
Production.
111
the
works
are
categories
for
Group
S, Special Rally Cars,
and
Group
C,
Prototype
Sports
Cars.
The
former
Group
A
Production
class will
have extra
freedom
to
strengthen
suspensions.
THE
OFF
ROAD
EXPOSITION
AT
INDIANAPOLIS is
the
latest
entity
from
the
active efforts
of
Mickey
Thompson,
and
co-producer
Dick
Wells.
The
all inclusive
off
road
exposition
is
an
added
attraction
to
Mickey
Thompson's
first
Off
Road
Championship
Gran
Prix
of
1986
at
the
Indiana
Hoosier
Dome.
The
product
show
will
happen
on
the
same
date,January
23-
25,
as
the
race.
The
expo
is
adjacent
to
the
race site
and
pit
area in
the
same
·facility.
It
will
be
the
first
double
feature race
and
show
under
one
roof.
Exhibits will
include
all
types
of
motorcycles
and
snowmobiles,
along
with
accessory
equipment,
and
feature light
trucks,
four
wheel
drive
rigs
for
street
and
competition,
buggies,
ATCs,
and
an impressive array
of
products
for
virtually everything
that
.runs
off
road.
Information
on
,
the
Expo
is
available
from
lnternational
,
OffRoad
Exposition,
4340
Campus
Drive,
Suite
202,
Newport
Beach,
CA
92660,
or
phone
(714)
756-9052.
More
TRAIL
NOTES
011 page 9.
Dusty
Times
1985-1986
HAPPENIN~_
•••
_
A.D.R.A.
Arizona Desert Racing Association
1408 East Granada
Phoenix, AZ
8500
6
(
602)
252-1
900
Decem
ber
7,
1985
9th Annual Sonoita
to
Rocky Poi
nt
Hare
'n
Hound
Sonoita, Mexico
January 11,
1986
Annual Awards Banquet
Phoenix, AZ
AMSA
American
Motor
Sports Association
P.O. Box 5473
Fresno,
CA
93755
(209)
439-2114
AMERICAN
OFF
ROAD
RACING
ASSOCIATION
John Ohanesian
P.O. Box 31811
Phoenix, AZ
85046
(602) 867-4769
B
AN
ZAI OFF
ROAD
CENTER
Bryan Christensen
2 729
No
.
62nd
Omaha
, NE
68104
(all events
at
Riverfront
Motorsports Park)
BERRIEN
AUTO
CROSS SERIES
Coordinator - Gil Parker
7406
S. 12th St.
Kalamazoo,
MI
49009
(616) 375-1233
December
7,
1985
4x4 Christmas Party &
-Berrien Autocross Series Banquet
Holiday Inn
Northbrook, IL
Tickets (312) 479-9186
COBRA
RACING
P.O. Box 19407
Oklahoma City,
OK
73119
(405) 232-4231 - (405)
685-3450
(All
off
road races will be held at the
59th
& Douglas track, Oklahoma
City.) ·
FORDA
Florida
Off
Readers
Drivers' Association
5349
Hansel Ave., C-1
Orlando, Florida
32809
(305) 851-6245
November
3
Brevard Co.
Off
Road Park
Sharp
es
, FL
December 1
Brevard Co.
Off
Road Park
Sharpes, FL
January
5,
1986
Florida State
Fairgrounds Speedway
Tampa, FL
February 2,
1986
Citrus Co. Speedway
Inverness,
FL
March
21-23,
1986
Florida
400
Crowder Pits
Tallahassee,
FL
Dusty
Times
FUD
PUCKER
RACING
TEAM
250 Kennedy,
#6
Ch
ula Vista, CA 92011
(619) 427-5759
August
9,
1986
Superstition 250 Ill
GORRA
Georgia
Off
Road
Racing Association
Box 11093 Station -A
Atlanta,
GA
30310
(404) 927-6432
GREAT
WESTERN
POINTS
SERIES, INC.
1507 South Lincoln
Loveland,
CO
8053
7
CORRA
(303)
669-4460
DORRA
(303)
429-1949
RMORRA
(303)
597-8239
WKR
(913)
332-3402
HDRA
H
igh
Desert Racing Association
961
West
Dale Ave.
Las Vegas,
NV
89124
(702) 361-5404
December
6-8
Frontier
250
Las Vegas, NV
January 11,
1986
SCORE/HD
RA
Awards Banquet
Anaheim Hilton
Anaheim, CA
March 7-9,
1986
Laughlin Desert Challenge
Laughlin,
NV
July
4-6,
1986
Fireworks
250
Barstow, CA
September
5-7,
1986
Frontier
500
Las Vegas, NV
December
5-7,
1986
· Frontier
250
Las Vegas, NV
HODAG50
Information (715)
362-6550
IOK
FOUR
WHEELERS
P.O. Box
36
Cleves,
Ohio
45002
(All
events staged at
the club grounds
in
Cleves,
Ohio)
MANUFACTURERS'
CUP
SERIES
Angus Motorsports
Number
One
Main St.
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(7
02)
386-2110
December
21-22
United States Rally
Las Vegas, NV
MICKEY
THOMPSON'S
OFF
ROAD
CHAMPIONSHIP
GRAND
PRIX
Mickey Thompson
Entertainment
Group
53
Woodlyn
Lane
Bradbury,
CA
91010
(818) 359-5117
January
25
,
1986
Hoosier Dome
Indianapolis,
IN
February
8,
19
86
Silver Dome
Pontiac, Ml
February
22,
1986
Jack Murphy Stadium
San Diego, CA
March 15,
1986
Astrodome
Houston, Texas
March
22,
1986
Tentative
Texas Stadium
Dallas, Texas
April
1986
King Dome
Seattle,
WA
July 19,
1986
L.A. Coliseum
Los Angeles, CA
Addit
io
nal dates
in California
TBA
MORE
Midwest
Off
Road
Racing Enthusiasts
P.O. Box 181021
Fort
Worth
, TX
76118
(817) 577-1102
ORSA
1920
Crown Ave.
West
Sacramento, CA 95691
(916)
372-4257
POST
Pennsylvania
Off
Road
Short Track
Shark Saxon
RD
#3, Box 9
Towanda,
PA
18
848
· (717) 265-3076
PRO
CAN
AM
SERIES
Pro Can
Am
Racing Inc.
P.O. Box 323
Seahurst, Washington
98062
(206) 242-1773
(503) 620-0313
January 18,
1986
Awards Banquet
Space Needle Restaurant
Seattle,
WA
SCCA
PRO
RALLY SERIES
Sports Car Club
of
America
6750
Emporia St.
Englewood,
CO
80112
(303)
779-6625
December
6-8
Carson City
International Pro Rally
Carson City, NV
SCORE
Score International
31356
Via Colinas, Suite 111
Westlake Village,
CA
91362
(818) 889-921(i _
November
8-9
Baja 1000
Ensenada, B.C., Mexico
Janua-ry 11,
1986
SCORE
/
HD
RA
Awards Banquet
Anaheim Hilton
Anaheim, CA
January
31,
February 1-2,
198
6
Parker
400
Parker,
AZ
April
4-6
,
1986
Great Mojave
250
· Lucerne Valley,
CA
June 6-8,
1986
Baja
Internacional
Ensenada, BC, Mexico
August
15-17
Score
Off
Road
World
Championship
Riverside ,International Raceway
Riverside,
CA
November
6-9,
1986
Baja
1000
Ensenada
to
La
Pa
z,
Mexico
SCORE
CANADA
390
Chemin
Du
Lac
Lery, Quebec,
J6N 1A3, Canada
(
514)
692-61
71
November
9,
1985
Annual Awards Banquet
Salon 76
Montreal Olympic Stadium
Montreal, Quebec
More
Ha
ppenings on page -
_
THE
ORIGINAL
GAS
PRESSURE
SHOCK
ABSORBER
WINNERS
ON BILSTEIN
SPEAK FOR
THEMSELVES
Ivan Stewart
1st
Place, Class 7
Mint 400
"Never before have I
had
so much con-
fidence in
a shock. After
extensive testing and
numerous races on the
same set
of
Bi/steins, I
am very pleased by
their excellent perfor-
mance and reliability."
November 1985
Ray
Aragon
1st
Place, Class
10
Laughlin Desert
Challenge 1984
"We
finished 2nd at the
Cal City 12-hour
in
1983,
1st
in Class
10
at
the
Parker 400
1984,
and
1st
in
Class
10
at
the
Laughlin
Desert Challenge
1984
all
on
the same set
of
Bi/steins with no failures."
Jerry Leighton
1st
Place, Class
10
Fireworks 250 1984
"The shocks worked
super; no such thing as
broken
or
leaking
shocks with Bi/stein."
Jim Wright
1st
Place, Class 2
Mint 400
"By far the most impor-
tant parts
on
any off-
road vehicle are the
shocks. Using Bi/steins
is like cheating."
For further information and
special off-road applications
contact
Tom
Hoke
at
BILSTEIN Corporation of
America,
11760
Sorrento
Valley Road, San Diego, CA
92121
. 619/453-7723.
®
'
R-2000
CAACAA<.
"'°""""'
Page5
Side Tracks •••
By
Ju
dy
Smith
As
the fall season progresses
and
the
Baja 1000
comes
around
again,
old
Baja racers find
themselves reminiscing
about
past
races.
Thanks
to
its
romantic
location
and
its long
history,
the
1000
has
no
end
of
good
stories.
This
month
we've
got
some
from
the
"Wet
and
Wild"
'76
event.
The
course
for
that
one
was
to
start
in
the
odoriferous
wash
that
cuts
through
Ensenada
and
empties
into
the
beach
just
north
of
the
Convention
Center.
Then
it
went
up
to
Ojos
Negros, · El ·
Rayo,
Nuevo
Junction,
and
back
down
ahrough
San
Felipe,
up
across
Diablo
to
Mike's
and
then
hack in
to
Ensenada.
Up
at
the
top
of
that
first wash,
where
there
is
now
a
dam,
there
was
at
that
time
a river
of
sorts,
and
the
race
course
wandered
through
its generally not-very-
wet
bed
here
and
there.
Race
day was
to
be
Friday
that
y~ar,
and
on
Thursday
night,
with all
the
cars neatly
tucked
into
the
walled-in
impound
on
the
side
street
down
behind
the
Pemex
station,
everything was
ready
to
go.
Tall
Charlie
and
his
minions
guarded
the
gate,
and
the
solid
walls
made
impound
seem secure.
During
the
night
it
started
to
rain.
It
went
on
and
on
, waking
the racers
from
time
to
time,
and
as
they
drifted
off
back
to
sleep, .
most
would
wonder
whether
Diablo
was going
to
get wet again,
and
did
they
remember
how
to
find
the
road
around
it
in
case it
did.
In
the
morning
it was still
raining,
Ensenada
was a
swamp,
and
the
rumors
began
to
fly.
We
heard
that
there
were
four
feet
of
water in the
river
bed
behind
the
under-construction-dam,
where
the
course
was
supposed
to
go.
We
heard
that
the
race was
cancelled; we were
told
it was
snowing
at
Checkpoint
1
(El
Rayo).
When
the
drivers
showed
up
at
impound
to
get
their
cars,
Tall
Charlie
would
not
release
them
for the drive
to
the
start
line.
This
was
more
than
a little distressing,
because
the
runoff
from
the
rain
was funneling directly
into
the
impound,
and
those
nice
sturdy
walls
kept
it
from
running
off
as
rapidly as it ran in.
The
water
level was
at
about
eight inches
and
rising. Charlie was
adamant
that
if
anyone
took
his car
out
of
impound
it
would
be
disquali-
fied.
Meanwhile,
Sal
Fish
had
discovered via
radio
that
it
had
indeed
snowed
at
El Rayo,
and
also
at
Nuevo
Junction.
The
river
did
have
too
much
water in it
to
be
fordable,
and
the
first
part
of
the
course
was going
to
have
to
be
scrubbed
.
While
Sal tried
to
decide
what
to
do,
the
racers
sat
in
impound,
watching
the
garbage
of
Ensenad
a float by,
and
the
steam
was rising
from
hot
exhausts
which were
now
being
lapfed
by
the
water.Tall
Charlie
stil
did
not
have
the
o.k.
to
release us,
but
he
did
take
pity
on
a
clutch
of
chickens
penned
in a
small
structure
in
the
lot
,
and
he
turned
them
loose
so
they
could
escape
the
flood.
A massive traffic
jam
had
built
out
in
the
street
as
bikers
stood
around
leaning
on
their steeds
and
pit
crews milled
about,
wondering
if
they
should
take
off
for
their
assignments
or
not.
The
apparel
of
the
day was garbage
bags, with Jeff
Hibbard
a
notable
standout
in a flowered
pink
shower
curtain.
Finally,
word
came
that
the
race
would
have
to
be
started
in
Ojos
Negros,
and
we were all
to
get
there
however
we
could.
A
bedraggled
horde
of
racers finally
steamed
out
of
the
impound,
making
waves
around
Charlie's
thighs,
and
headed
up
the
hill, all
mixed in with
pit
traffic
and
spectators.
When
they
got
to
Ojos
. Negros,
the
grand-daddy
of
all
traffic
jams
had
been
created.
As
pit
vehicles
and
motor
homes
pulled
off
to
the
side
of
the
road
they
got
stuck,
so
they began
to
park
on
the
very edge
of
the
highway.
Ojos
Negros
suffered a
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Page6
massive
"grid-lock".
In
the
Dozens
of
cars
had
tried
to
meantime,
a frantic Sal Fish take
the
trail
they'd
pre-run
discovered
that
he
had
no
radio
across the
dry
lake,
only
to
bog
contact
with his
checkpoint
down
in
the
mud.
Many
used
up
personnel
in El Rayo. their clutches trying
to
get
The
bikers
were lined
up,
unstuck.
Some
got
lost trying
to
wrapped
in garbage bags
and
find a way
round,
and
one
of
revving
the
ir
motors
when Fish
them
ran
head-on
into
Doc
'
finally gave up. Race cars were
Sauers
in his single seater. Brian
strung
all along
the
highway
from
Skipper
and
Kirk
Cartwright
Ojos
Negros
back
to
the
stuck
the
two
seater
of
Bob
Ensenada
dump,
tangled
up
in
Gordon
and
were
there
for
the
the biggest traffic jam Ensenada
duration.
John
Howard
inched
and
environs
had
ever seen.
Ojos
out
by
drying
off
his wires, going
Negros
was
obviously
too
small forward a
foot
or
so,
then
drying
to
stage all
the
race cars, even if
off
his wires, moving forward a
they
could
manage
to
get there. foot,
and
so
on.
Jackie
Thomison
So
the
lack
of
communication
rigged a
"dead
man's"
winch
with El
Rayo
cli.nched it,
and
Sal with
two
posts
and
a
strap,
to
get
decided
there
would
be
no
start
her
Class
11
car
unstuck.
on
Friday.
Racers
on
their
way
to
That
year there
had
been
three
Ojos
Negros were
suddenly
trails
to
get
to
the
top
of
Diablo
.
astounded,
and
a
bit
relieved,
to
One
ran along
the
hills
to
the
east
see
others
on
their
way
back
to
of
the lake,
one
ran
around
the
Ensenada.
As
they
heard
what
rim,
just
on
the
edge
of
the
lake,
had
happened,
the
race cars
and
the
last was
the
traditional
peeled
out
of
the
line
and
headed
trail straight across
the
middle.
back
toward
dry
clothes
and
Pre-runners
had had
to
bypass
warm bars, leaving
the
motor
the
lake
entirely
early
on,
homes
and
trailers
to
dig
because an
autumn
storm
had
themselves
out
as
best
they left
the
lake
under
water.
As
it
could.
dried
some, it
became
possible
to
The
Bahia
bar
had
its biggest use
the
rim
road,
and
the
last day
crowd
in
history
. as everyone
or
so
before
this race a few
hardy
headed
there
to
find
out
what
souls had managed
to
go all
the
was
happening.
And
the
rumors
way across the
damp,
but
fairly
flew
again.
The
race
was
solid, middle.
Now
,
of
course, it
canceled; it was
postponed
for was wet again.
two
weeks
; it
would
start
Our
share
of
the
course
that
tomorrow;
and
there'd
be
an year was
to
include
that/art
of
announcement
at
3
p.m.
Four
the
road,
and
we
worrie
about
o'clock
came
and
went,
and
the
finding
the
rim
trail, with which
street
outside
the
Bahia
and
in we were least familiar.
Sure
front
of
the El
Cid
( wherein Sal enough,
just
before
we got
to
the
Fish
and
his
committee
were
bottom
ofDiablo
the
sun
had
set,
making
their
momentous
it was
dark,
and
our
generator
decision)
teemed
with racers was failing
{but
we
didn't
know
awaiting
the
word.
Finally,
at
that
then)
so
our
lights were dim.
6:20,
Sal
stepped
out
on
the
We
missed '
the
rim
trail,
and
balcony
to
make
his
big
were
on
the
road
to
the
hills
announcement.
The
race was
on
before
we
knew
where we were.
for
Saturday
morning
.
The
It was
at
least
not
flooded,
and
we
course
would
be
rerouted
muddled
through,
nearly in
dark,
around
the
river
bed
out
of
daring
to
use
only
one
dim
Ensenada,
the
staging area
would
headlight.
That
trail intersects
not
be in
the
wash,
and
the finish the gr.aded
road
that
angles
off
line
would
be
outside
Ojos
the lake,
up
near
the
top.
As
we
Negros,
but
otherwise
it
would
turned
on
to
it
and
headed
down
be
the
same race.
toward
Diablo, a
lost
race
truck,
Meanwhile,
on
the
other
side many lights blazing,
particallyran
of
the
peninsula, the
San
Felipe us
off
the
road,
and
caused us
to
police
had
come
out
early in
the
stall. Since we were fairly late
and
day
and
made
all the pits in
the
El
on
a little used
part
of
the
course,
Chinero
area pull
up
stakes
and
and
now
had
no
battery, we
move.
They
were afraid
of
the
figured
that
was
the
end
of
it,
and
possibility
of
a flash
flood.
It started gathering firewood.
never
happened,
and
later in
the
Suddenly,
we
realized
another
day
the
crews gradually
moved
race
car
was
coming
up
the
hill
back in.
They
were
never
quite
toward
us,
headed
the
wrong
sure
whether
the
race was going way.
We
flagged
him
down,
told
to
happen
or
not
.
And
the
pits in
him
he
was
lost
and
told
him
the outlying areas,
some
with
no
we'd
show.him
where
the
course
radio
communication,
wer
.e was
if
he'd
give us a
push.
It was
mystified
when
no
race cars came Dave Rogalia,
and
since
he'd
on
Friday as expected.
Some
pits, been leading Class 9
when
last
with
other
commitments,
packed
he'd
checked,
he
was
only
too
up
and
went
home
late
Saturday,
happy
to
be
led back
to
the
race
leaving big gaps in coverage for
course.
Down
on
the
trail again,
some
racers. Rogalia left us
to
fumble
our
way
All the cars managed
to
get
to
along in the
dark.
The
car
now
staging
from
their
various
wouldn't
run
with the light
on,
so
overnight
parking
spots,
and
the
we were really in
the
dark,
trying
race
got
itself going in
good
order
to
make
our
way
to
our
pit
in
on
Saturday.
As
expected,
there
Matias.
But
the
uphill sand got
was water,
and
there
was
mud
all us,
and
the
single seater finally
along
the
way. quit, using its last gasp
of
energy
Down
in
Chinero
where we
to
pull
off
the
side
of
the
trail
and
waited,
the
cars were later than
park.
Minutes
later a
pickup
expected,
and
when
the
first
car
went
by,
honked
to
sa·y
"Hi",
came
through,
to
everyone's
and
Bill
Stroppe,
the
passenger,
astonishment
,
1t
was
not
a single radioed ro his
crew
to
pass
the
seater,
b'uttheClassS
BajaBugof
word
that
we
were
stuck
and
Don
and
Doug
Robertson,
two
needed
help.
The
word
"help"
was
somehow
misfnterpreted.
The
word was
passed
that
we were
hurt
and
in
need
of
help.
Th
e exaggerations ·
grew
and
soon
the
tory was
that
-
we were unable
to
get
out
of
the
car;
that
we
had
rolied the car
and
now
hung
upside
down
in it,
unconscious.
{C
ooler
heads
would have realized
that
no
other
racer
would
have
driven
by a
situation
like
that.)
And
dow
n in
Chinero,
Joyce Parnell was
told
that
we
had
been
taken
to
the
hospital
in- Mexicali, in
bad
shape.
In reality
we
were scrabbling
around
,
in
the
wash trying
to
gather
up
enough firewood
to
make
a fire, because it was
darned
. cold.
We
stood
and
waved
at
every
car
that
went
by,
to
be
sure
they saw us
and
would
tell
our
crew where we were,
and
indeed,
Al
Rogers
had
delivered
our
stuck
stub
within a
half
hour
of
the
car's
demise.
Our
crew
soon
struggled
down
the
wash,
towed us
to
the
highway
and
began trying
to
make
the
car
run.
But back in
Chinero
others
feared
for
our
health,
and
when
Doc
Sauers
limped
in {literally,
his toes
broken
and
ribs
cracked
from
that
head-on)
they
persuaded
him
that
we needed
medical
attention
up
near
Matias.
So
he
supertaped
his
ribs,
drafted
his co-driver, Rick
Mears,
to
drive,
and
they headed
up
the
road
(still
dirt
in those
days) in his
truck.
When
they got
to
Matias they
found
us, healthy
and
well
and
trying
to
get
the
race
car
going
again.
We
were
surprised
to
learn
of
our
supposed
emergcµicy,
and
then,
once
he'd
expressed his relief,
Doc
went
on
to
tell us
that
his
ride
up
the
road
with Mears
at
the wheel
had
been a real thrill.
He
expressed
the
opinion
(shared
by
us)
that
Mears
would
be
an Indy
driver
some
day.
In spite
of
some
very
expert
help
we never
did
get
our
car
going again,
and
very nearly lost
it for good
when
it
broke
loose
from
its chain as it was being
towed
back
to
Ensenada.
We
searched for
20
minutes, finally
found
it, nearly
unharmed
in
the
deep
brush,
chained
it back
to
the
tow
truck,
and
got it safely
home.
In its inimitable way the race
muddled
on.
And,
true
to
style,
the
officials
changed
the
announced
site
of
the
finish.
For
·
some
reason never
known,
it
was
moved,
during
the
race,
to
a place
some
miles
further
on
down
the
road.
Racers
got
to
the
expected
finish,
throught
they
were
throu
gh,
and
had
to
go
on.
Some,
who'd
planned
their
gas
consumption
precisely,
had
to
bum
gas,
or
wait for
their
crews
to
show
up
and
give
them
a
shot
of
fuel
so
they
could
make it
to
the
end.
Many
got lost between
there
and
the
new
finish,
but
generally, they
made
it in,
relieved
that
this
one
was finally
over.
Ivan
Stewart
won
in
his single
seater,
Walker
Evans
had
won
Class
2 in
his
truck,
the
Robertsons
won
Class
5,
and
Rogalia
and
his co-driver
Frank
Snook,
did
go
on
to
win Class 9 .
Brian
Skipper
and
Kirk
Cartwright
sat in the
mud
in
Laguna Salada,
battery
dead,
until
two
o'clock
the
next
afternoon.
San
Diego resid
ents
who
had
the
-
Now
we get
to
the
point
of
this
advantage
of
knowing
the
course
adventure. His message was
around
Laguna Salada very well.
forwarded
in a variety
of
ways.
___________
_;...
____________
_
November 1985
Dusty
Times
BFGOO'DRICH
6-50
CLUB
REPORT
Corky McMillin Leads
the Quest for the Gold
through
Tonop
ah
in
good
shape,
but
the
Badenoch's
car
was seen
no
more.
In
the
Challenger
group,
Dave
Girdner
and
Roy
Perfect
did
well
through
Beatty,
but
they
too
vanished
beyond
that
point,
still
earning
the
fourth
place
trophy.
over
Henry
Arras
who
has
213
poin
ts
.
Jim
Temple,
who
was a
no
show
at
the
Frontier
500,
has
a
total
points
count
of
168,
tagged by
Andy
Devercelly
at
161
points.
Rounding
out
the
top
eleven
are ·
Dave
Girdner
with
158
points,
Frank
Snook,
133,
Gene
Hightower,
124,
Bob
Renz,
123,
and
Stan
Parnell
with
105
points.
These
top
points
grabbers
represent
an
interesting
mix
of
classes.
There
are a
pair
from
Class 2, a
pair
from
Class
1,
and
a
pair
from
Class
5-1600.
The
others
are in
Class
10, Class
4,
Challenger, Class 3
and
Class
5.
presented
sometime
during
the
1985
combined
High
Desert
and
Score
awards
banquet.
At
the
present
time
that
gala affair is
scheduled
to
happen
on
January
11 in
Anaheim,
CA,
possibly
at
the
Hilton
Hotel.
Don't
feel left
out
if
you
are
not
really in
contention
for
the
top
three
spots.
We
are
working
hard
on
some
merchandise
prizes
for
the
other
top
points
finishers,
and
we will have
more
on
that
subject
later
on
in
the
season.
The
HORA
Frontier
500
was
the
seventh
stop
on
the
nine
race
BFGoodrich
6-
50
points
series
for
1985.
In
the
event
which
saw
only
35
percent
finishing
ratio
amo
ng
the
car
entries,
the
mature
drivers
in
the
6-50
ranks
came
in
strong
with
a
50
percent
finish
ratio.
Fourteen
known
6-50
drivers
started,
and
seven
of
them
finished in
20
hours
or
less.
One
more
also finished, slightly
out
of
time
,
however.
It
shows
that
experience
really
counts
when
the
race is
both
extra
long
and
extra
tough,
as
the
Frontier
500
was
this
year.
In
Class 1
there
were
three
starting
drivers
of
record
over
50
years
of
age,
and
one
finished,
Bob
Renz.
With
Dick
Clark
co-
driving
the
Raceco, Renz
came
in
a
sparkling
fifth in class
and
an
impressive
ninth
overall. Gregg
Symonds
had
his
ORE
powered
by
Porsche
humming
all
the
way
to
Beatty,
but
not
much
further
down
the
trail
the
clutch
died
on
co-driver
Jake
Fogg,
also
a
6-50
driver.
Luck
was
not
riding
with
Frank
Snook
at
this race,
as
his
Raceco
expired
in
the
first few
miles. .
The
pair
of
older
guys
in
Class
2
covered
thems
elves with g
lory
,
and
both
finished
well.
Len
Newman
and
co-a.river Mike
Gaughan,
did
a terrific
job
in
their
Bunderson
to
bring
the
Barbary
Coast
entry
home
third
in
Class 2,
with
so
me
problems
along
the
way,
Points
leader
going in,
and
still
the
6-
50
points
leader,
Corky
McMillin
and
his
son
Scott
had
woes all day. But,
th
ey
got
the
Porsche
powered
Chenowth
home
fifth in class,
giving
Corky
enough
points
to
maintain
the
6-50
lead,
with
just
two
races
to
go.
How
ever,
McMillin
has
one
DNF
so
far
and
has
been
in all
the
races,
and
only
the
best
six
of
the
nine
events
listed
for
the
series
count
for
year
end
points.
Corky
may
end
up
having
to
discard
a race
with
a
lot
of
points,
which
could
change
the
final
picture.
In
Class
1-2-1600
C.W.
Dunham,
with
Sam
Dunham
co-
dri
ving,
got
the
Bunderson
around
for
a finish, eighth
in
class
on
a long, long
journey,
17½
hours.
Gene
and
Kirby
Hightower
had
tough
sledding in
Class 3.
The
y
had
some
serious
down
time
late in
the
race,
and
sad
to
say,
they
arrived
at
the
finish line
about
20
minutes
too
late
to
gain
an
official finish.
But
they
did
finish
the
course
in
the
Jeep
CJ7
and
wo
n
the
class.
Things
didn
't
go· a
ny
better
for
Vern
Roberts
in h
is
Class 4
Jeep
Honcho.
While
he
and
Bill
Donahoe
struggled a~ound
the
·
course,
they
ran
out
of
time
to
·,
make
an
official finish a lso,
but
they
took
second
place
money
in
Class 4
Among
the
Baja Bugs,
Stan
Parnell
got
his
Class
5
to
Beatty,
but
the
car
s
uccumb
ed
to
mechanical
ills
before
the
next
checkpoint.
In
Class
5-1600
Jim
Dunn
was
out
of
the
race early
on
the
course.
In
Class 8
the
6-50
finisher was
Stan
Gilbert,
who
brought
Charlotte
Corral's
Ford
Dusty
Times
around
in fine ·
style
to
finish
fourth
in
the
class
that
saw
half
the
starting
trucks
finish.
In
Class
10
our
one
finisher
was Jack Irvine.
At
one
time,
with
Kit
Trenholm
co-driving,
the
Raceco
was leading
the
class.
But,
the
reports
are
that
Irvine
ran
out
of
gas
just
a few miles
short
of
the
finish line.
The
Raceco
eventually
arrived
fourth
in
Class 10. Bill
Herrick,
with
Mike
McDonnell
co-driving,
got
Join
in
the
With
the
Score
Baja
1000,
and
the
season
finale
the
HORA
Frontier
250
still
to
come,
the
points
race
for
the
· gold, silver
and
bronze
is
still very
tight
.
Corky
McMillin
has a
total
count
of
285
points
and
the
lead
right
now.
Having
missed
two
races
and
having
one
DNF,
Jack
Irvine
is
definitely
within
striking
distance
at
239
points.
Now
third
is
Vern
Roberts,
his
215
points
maintaining
a
slim
lead
The
6-50
club
contenders
and
fans
might
like
to
know
that
the
awards
for
1985
will
be
To
find
out
where
you
stand
in
6-50
points,
or
if
you
are
over
50,
a
driver
of
record,
and
don't
know
if
you
are
on
the
list,
send
your
info'
to
Jean
Calv
in,
5331
Derry
Ave.,
Suite
0,
Agoura,
CA
91301.
fuetbMl~Ue
MAIL COUPON
ERIKSSON
INDUSTRIES
,
INC
.
326
W. KATELLA AVE.,
SUITE
4-H
DT
ORANGE,
CALIFORNIA
92667
(714)
538-5878
TODAYI
Experience the
Excitement
of
the
MINT
400
without
thedust
Above photo is prototype.
Actual game may differ slightl
y.
YES!
D Send
me
__
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of
the new
and
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. "MINT
400
OFF-ROAD GAME" for
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My
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for$
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enclosed.
VISA
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Please
allow 4 to 6
weeks
for
delivery.
November 1985
Page
7
The Porsche 961 is
a Space Age
Rally
Car
_
been
developed
specifically for mechanical
control
is
the
throttle
85
octane
fuel,.to give
about
370
pedal!
BHP;
that
is
less
than
the
road
The
special feature
of
the
961
Text
& Photos: version,
about
450
BHP, while is
the
electronic
transmission
Martin
Holmes
the
full
competition
version
will · ·
control.
In
the
same system as
the
give
about
650
BHP.
pro
d
uction
959
, a ce
ntral
Scheduled
to
make
its
debut
·
on
the
production
959
tnotor
all; all
the
exhaust
gasses go
only
Installing
the
water
cooling for
multiplate
fluid
transmission
,
on
the
Egyptian
Pharaohs
Rally, which was
developed
from
the
to
the
left
hand
turbo.
Above
the
cylinder
heads
presented
clut
ch
is
mounted
just
behind
the
late
in
October,
will
be
the
long
956
/
962
racing
units
.
The
flat
that
boost
level, a wastegate
great
difficulty.
-
The
water
front
differential. A
shaft
comes
awaited
competition
version
of
six cylinder
has
four
valve
opens
the
route
to
the
right
hand
radiator,
alongside
the
oil
out
of
the
front
ofa
conventional
the
Porsche
959,
which
in
watercooled
heads, which makes
turbo
and
passes
half
the
gasses radiator, is in
the
front
of
the
car,
Por
s
che
transaxle
unit
and
runs
prototype
group
B
evolution
the
engine taller
and
heavier
than
in
that
direction.
This
system which
means
(icluding a
bre
a
th
er
thro
ugh a
torque
tube
to
·
the
-
form
is
to
be
known
as
the
the
911
units
on
the
Paris-
Dak
ar gives
quick
throttle
response.
pipe}
no
fewer
th
an five fluid fro
nt
differential.
Ther
e is
no
Porsche
961.
This
is
the
first
ever cars.
The
block
fits
almost
The
left
hand
-wastegate
controls
pipes pass
through
the
car,
and
center differential, the Porsche
twin
turbo
rally car,
and
it
is
exactly
into
the
rear
of
a
the
overall
boost
level,
th
e
right
this has involved fitting a false system simply requiring a
clutch
derived
out
of
the
space age
959,
911/930
Turbo,
but
is
about
50
hand
is
responsible
for
shutting
floor
under
the
co-driver's
feet.
to
fe
ed drive
to th
e
front
which
is
probably
the
most
kg. heavier
than
the
911
SC
RS,
off
the
right
hand
turbo.
This
is
The
Pharaohs
cars have
had
extra
differential.
The
trick
is
to
technically
advanced
road
car
yet
the
previous
rally car.
Without
so
effective
that
when
the
engine fuel
tanks
and
spare
wheels
control
the
circumstances
in
:
built.
Two
961s
are
presently
fuel,
the
weight
distribution
of
is
at
idle,
the
right
hand
exhaust
installed,
so
after losing space
to
· which
the
front
axle
is
fed
the
·
.
under
construction,
one
by
the
.
the
961
is
about
40
front/60
does
not
even get warm,
the
enlarged
transmission
tunnel,
load.
,
parent
factory
in
Stuttgart
for rear, similar
to
the
911
SC
RS.
Because
the
right
hand
internal
room
is very limited. ·
The
4x4
rally cars are fitted
'Jacky Ickx
to
drive
and
the
other
The
twin
turbocharging
wastegate
is
in series with
the
The
intercooler
is
mounted
with a steering
column
mounted,
at
Silverstone, England
at
the
system
closely
follows
the
turbocharger,
only
one
exhaust
above
the
engine
outside
the
four
position
lever
just
like
the
workshops
of
the
Rothmans
production
959.
One
turbo
is
comes
from
that
side
of
the
car;
body
,
in
the
space
beneath
the
production
959s.
On
the
Porsche
Rally
Team
for
the
fitted
next
to
each head,
but
each
so
there
are three,
not
four
rear
wing.
The
engine
is
production
cars these settings are
Q;itar
driver,
Saeed
Al
Hajri.
operates
through
one
huge,
exhaust
pipes
coming
out
the
electronically
controlled
by
a
intended
to
cater
to
snow,
ice,
Whereas
the
German
car
will
be
common
iritercooler
which
then
back
of
the
car.
The
engine is
2.8
Bosch
Motronic
system, similar
rain
and
dry
tarmac,
but
for
new,
the
British
built
car is being feeds
both
cylinder
banks.
The
liters ( 4 liter class
after
applying
to
the
Audi
Quattro,
installed in
competition
purposes
the
modified
out
of
the
normally
left
hand
turbo
works
all
the
time
the
1.4
turbo
coefficient),
but
two
boxes;
one
for
the
normal
options
are still
subject
to
aspirated,
non-electronically
and
the
wastegate
for
this
·
turbo
is
the
power
of
the
engine
depends
,
Motronic
ignition
timing
and
experiment.
Each
position
takes
activated
959
driven
by
Jochen
mounted,
as usual, in parallel.
entirely
on
the
instructions
fuel injection
management
and
information
from
different
Mass
on
the
1985
Paris
Dakar
Up
to
a
certain
electronically
coming
from
the
electronic
the
other
concentrating
on
boost
sources, which activate different
Rally.
determined
boost
level,
the
right
control
box.
The
box
being
controls,
both
mounted
behind
operations
of
the
clutch.
In
the
The
engine
of
the
961
is
based
hand
turbo
does
not
operate
at
installed
for
the
Pharaohs
has
the
co-driver's
seat.
The
only
production
"dry"
setting,
the
-----=-------
-
--,--
--
---
--::
--::==
=
==-=----
- - -
iiiiii,
.;.~-
----
--------
-
--
~
sensors
monitor
road
speed
and
These preview
pi
ctures of the P
orsc
he 961
prototype,
an
evolution
version
of
the 959, were taken in the Rothmans
Porsche rally team W?_rkshops at Silverstone, Englari_d
ea
! _
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j n Septembe
r.
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With
New
Safety Equipment From FILLER
Nomex
Dr
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ng
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Fine quality, hand crafted, li
ght
weight
Nomex Racing Boots. Available in black,
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royal blue in sizes 7 thru 13.
$78.00
Page&
November
1985
throttle
position,
so
the
understeer
can
be
altered
by
the
clutch
loadings
at
different
speeds.
In
the
production
"ice"
position
the
sa-
me
se
nsors
activate differ
ent
clutch
settings.
It
is
also possible
to
arrange a
fixed
percent
a
ge
front-
to
-rear
which
take
s away
mu
ch
of the
sophi
stic
ation
of-9
th
er
set
tings,
and
the
perc
e
nta
ge t
orque
splits
can
also
be
varied
by
a
potentio
met
er
on
the
dashboard.
In case
of
electronic failure,
there
is a master cylinder
(rather
like a
hydraulic
handbrake
cylinder)
which
enables
the
front
differential
to
be
manually
loaded
as
req
uired, which can
also
over
ride
the
electronic
system, even when
it
is
working.
At
this
ti
me
there
is
no
real
decision
on
how
the
systems will
be used in
competition.
The
gearbox
is
a six
speed
unit,
like
t
he
new
Audi.
The rally
car
will
have close
ratio
gears,
and
lower
.f
i
nal
drive
gears
than
the
production
car,
Unlike
the
front
suspension
,
which
apart
from
the
uprights
and
steering angles, is
the
same as
the
959,
the
rear chassis
on
the
961
is
compl
etely different.
Much
longer links are used,
the
mounting
points
for
both
the
top
and
the
_
bottom
rear
wishbones
being a long way inside
the
line
of
the
chassis rails, well '
into
the
engine
compartment.
This
gives
more
travel for
the
same
degree
of
variation
in wheel angle.
The
wheelbase is also
le
ngthen
ed
by
·
about
20
mm,
although
the
engine
position
is unchanged;
this is achieved by angulating the
drive shafts rearwa
rds
.
Coil
springs are
fitted
a
ll
round
,
four
in
the
front
and
t
wo
at
the
rear::.
Th
ere
is
now
nine
or
ten in
che
s
of
su
sp
e
ns
i
on
tra
vel,
about
do
ub
le t
hat
of
th
e old 9 11.
The
do
u
bl
e front
spr
ings even up
th
e loads
on
th
e
front
wish
bone
s,
a
nd
the
double
s
ho
cks give
l
on
ger effective life.
All
four
suspension
uprights
are identical
and
de
signed
to
be
interchange-
ab
le.
S
ee
last column next pag
e,
Dusty
Times
1110,e
•••
TRAIL
NOTES
THE
WESTERN
OFF
ROAD
RACING
ASSOCIATION,
out
of
Vancouver, British
Columbi
a, suffered a low blow recently.
Th
e owner
of
Mount
Cheam Raceway, where the majority
ofWORRA's
events take place,
decided he could
not
cont
i
nue
to
operate the facility for
off
road racing.
WORRA
got the news
just
a week before their September race date, and the
final two events in their series were effectively canceled.
The
club
is
presently
pursuing options
to
find
another
facility for the
1986
season.
WORRA
's
head man, Terry Pritchard, announced
to
the membership;
"We
are
notthe
first group to ha
ve
this happen,
and
certainly
we
are
not
the last.
It
isn't
peculiar
to
our
area,
it
has happened all over
North
America. I
don't
think
that there is any sense trying
to
place blame, it
is
a
phenomenon
of
the
'80s
.
What
we
do
next, we are
not
sure. But, what
we
don
't
do
is
panic
or
get upset.
The best thing
to
do
now
is
to
work
out
a plan
of
action for next year".
Well
said, Terry, and hang in there. Locally
around
LA
we
lost
both
Saddle back
Park and Indian
Dunes
in 1985.
Tokeepuptodateon
WORRAactivitynext
season,
contact
Terry and
Donna
Pritchard,
WORRA,
19125-87 A Avenue,
Surrey, British Columbia, Canada
V3S
5X7.
CALIFORNIA RALLY SERIES NEWS.
The
Cliffs
of
Gorman
Rally
on
1
October
6 was
not
only the final event for the
SCCA
Southern
Pacific
Divisional
Pro
Rally Series,
but
a points
run
for the
CRS
titles too.
Ramon
Ferreyros and Ken
Eklund
ran an excellent rally in
Colorado
on
Saturday,
October
5, flew back
to
Los Angeles and barely made
it
to
Gorman
for the
early Sunday morning
start
.
The
Gold
Rush
Rally win gave
them
needed
divisional points,
and
a third place
at
Gorman
would give
them
the title.
However,
Scott
Child flashed th rough the
Gorm
an stages with an
out
standing
performance over extremely challenging, twisting roads,
and
won the rally
and the divisional title. Ferreyros
and
Eklund
finished sixth and
out
of
the
hunt
.
Only
13
of
the
30
starting cars finished
the
grueling event.
Scott
Child and crew headed for the Press
On
Regardless Pro Rally in
Michigan
to
vie with
other
SCCA
divisional champions for the 1985 National
Divisional
Pro
Rally
Championship
CRS driving whiz
Mike
Whitman
won
the
1984
National Divisional Championship at the
Carson
City International
Pro Rally last December.
The
East
of
Indio V Rally
is
scheduled for November 22-24, with
headquarters
at
the
Best
Western
Date
Tree
Motor
Inn
in Indio.
The
San
Jacinto forests are now
OUT,
but
extended desert and
mountain
stages are
IN.
Mountain
stages
are
scheduled for daylight,
and
the desert stages will be
done
in the dark. East
of
Indio is an endurance event with
220
stage miles.
Roads are newly graded, eliminating some
of
the rockadillo spawning
grounds.
The
rally
is
geared
to
the well prepared vehicle and well organized
,service crew.
It
is a triple
point
event,
and
it opens the 1986
SCCASouthern
,Pacific Divisional season and ends the
1985
CRS
Championship. Call Roger
Allison
(714)
736-1442
for entry information.
Current
CRS points leaders
,are
Lon
Peterson, driver,
and
Jim Love, co-driver,
in
open
class,
and
Mike
Whitman,
driver,
and
Lynnette Allison, co-driver, in stock class. But, the
points are close and the triple
point
Indio rally could
put
any
of
the
top
three
in
each class into
the
championship.
THE
FORD
BRONCO
IS
20
YEARS OLD.
Ford's
industry leading
Bronco four wheel drive personal utility vehicle celebrates its
20th
anniversary during the
1986
model year.
The
original Bronco was introduced
to
the
press in August 1965 and marketed in 1966.
lt
had three
body
styles,
four passenger with a full removable roof, two passenger
pickup
with a cab
roof,
and
an
open
top
doorless roadster.
By
1973 only the version with the
full length
roof
remained.
Th
e Bronco intr
od
uced an inovati
on
in 4 x
4s
with
its
front
coil springs.
The
Bronco was quickly adopted
by
off
road
racers, and
at
one
point
Bill
Stroppe
had an extensive team in major races, including the
celebrated Bronco Special
that
Bill
rode
in while Parnelli Jones won
everything in sight.
The
first full
size
Bronco came along in 1978,
and
in March
of
1982 the
Bronco II downsized wagon bowed
to
the public.
To
celebrate the rig's
birthday, Fo
rd
organized an outing for
int
erested journalists and some
Ford
truck
folks from Ford-Dea
rborn
.
The
route
went over hills and dales in
southern
California, ending
at
the ranch
of
Frank
"Scoop"
Vessels,
who
has
won many races driving a
Ford
pickup. Guests were treated
to
a
most
exciting
mountain trail ride, reverse steering competition, and rides
in
the race trucks
of
Manny
Esquerra and Dave Shoppe.
The
trails and competitions were
put
together by Bill
Stroppe
himself, and Parnelli was
on
hand
with "Big
Oly"
Bronco to boot. It was a keen way
to
toast the Bronco at age 20.
The
newest,
1986
fuel injected Bronco lls were
on
hand
to
drive over the trails, and it
demonstrated their vastly improved power range.
THE
MICKEY
THOMPSON
ENTERTAINMENT
GROUP
has
announced their stadium racing schedule for 1986; check it
out
in
Happenings
on
page 5.
MTEG
also have some exciting
and
perhaps
profit
making news for potential UltraStock competitors.
The
newsletter states
that
MTEG
has a verbal
commitment
from Volkswagen
of
America
to
post
a
po
ints fund for
the
UltraStocks in three categories.
Any
1985
or
1986
VW
bodied car running the complete series with any type
of
engine will earn
$5000
for first,
$1500
for second, and $
1000
for third.
In
addition
to
the
body,
if
the vehicle uses an air cooled
VW
engine, add the following bonus,
$2500
for first,
$1000
for second,
and
$500
for third. And,
if
the
Golf
bodied vehicle uses a water cooled
VW
engine, add the
bonus
of
$5000
for
first,
$1500
for second,
and
$1000
for third.
In
other
words,
it
you win the
points series in UltraStock class with a
Rabbit
powered,
Golf
bodied
device,
you will win ten grand from
VOA
at
the
end
of
the season.
There
is
also a verbal co
mmitment
from
Toyota
Motorsports
to
post
contingency money
on
a
per
event basis for any UltraStock that uses
both
a
Toyota
body
and powerplant.
Th
is
fund
is
$1000
for a win,
$7
50
for second,
and
$500
for third. Negotiations for a
$40,000
points fund for
1986
in the
UltraStock classes
ar
e also underwa
y.
MTEG
is also working hard
on
a points
fund for the
Super
1600
(C
lass 10) category.
Th
ere is
no
mention
of
Class 1
or
Class 7 in the release,
so
perhaps the.
rumors
about
Class 1 being phased
out
of
the series are true.
It
is
a cinch that Class 7 will be
around
hot
and
heavy, with all the factories getting ready for the winter races in the midwest
right
now
.
THE
SHORT
COURSE
1986
RACING
SEASON in
southen
California
is slated
to
open
with a Mike
Goodwin
produced
event at Angel Stadium in
Anaheim.
Goodwin's
Stadium Supercross season opens
on
Saturday, January
18,
and
he plans
to
run
a car style stadium race
on
Sunday,January 19. Classes
mentioned for this event,
on
a course softened from the bike race over night,
would be 10, 1, 7, 5, UltraStocks and ATVs.
More
on
this next month.
Dusty
Times
Additional
HAPPENINGS
SCORE
SHOW
P.O
. Box
6819
Burbank,
CA
91510
(818)
768-2914
June
20-22,
1986
9th
Annual
SCORE
Show
Anaheim
Convention
Center
Anaheim,
CA
SIL VER
DUST
RACING
ASSOCIATION
P.
O.
Box
7380
Las Vegas,
NV
89125
(702)
459-0317
November
16
Silver
Dust
400
Henderson,
NV
SNORE
Southern
Nevada
Off
Road
Enthusiasts
P.O. Box
4394
Las Vegas,
NV
89106
(702)
452-4522
November
23
Sunw
orld
Airways/Snore
Blackjack
100
Las Vegas,
NV
February
22,
1986
Bottom
Dollar
April 12,
1986
Yoco Loco
!
June
zi-:
1986
Twilight Race
July
26-27,
1986
Midnight Special
September
26-28,
1986
SNORE
250
November
16,
1986
Black Jack 100
STADIUM
RACING
,
U.S.A
· Marty Tripes
228
Faxon Drive
Spring Valley,
CA
92077
(619)
463-0654
SUPERIOR OFF
ROAD
DRIVERS ASSOCIATION
460
No
. Beaumont Ave.
Brookfield,
WI
53005
(715)
272-1489
VORRA
Valley
Off
Road
Racing Association
1833 Los Robles Blvd.
Sacramento,
CA
95838
(916)
925-1702
November
16,
1985
1985 Awards Banquet
Red Lion
Motor
Inn
Sacramento,
CA
WESTERN OFF
ROAD
RACING
ASSOCIATION
19125 -
87A
Ave.
Surrey, British Columbia,
V3S 5X7, Canada
(604)
576-6256
ATTENTION
RACE ORGANIZERS
, List your coming events in
DUSTY
TIMES
free.
Send your
1~5
schedule
as soon as possible for listing in this
column. Mail your event schedule
to:
DUSTY
TIMES,
5331 Derry
Ave
.,
Suite
0,
Agoura,
CA
91301.
PORSCHE
961
co
ntinu
ed
The
brake
s are
similar
to the
911
with
st
agge
red
piston
size
calipers
designed
for
enduranc
e
racing.
Both
front
and
rear
brakes
are
mo
unted
on
the
leading
edge.
Tires
for
the
Pharaohs
rally
will
be
205
/
16
in
size,
and
six
inch
wide
wheels
are
being
used
for
this
event,
and
seven
inch
rear
wheels
wi
th
special
center
locks
are
being
considered.
Tot
al
weight
of
the
Pharaohs
cars
is
about
1400
kg,
which
includes
200
liters
of
fuel
tank
and
the
desert
type
tires
.
It
is
expected
that
the
rally
version
will
be
more
than
200
kg
lighter
in
weight.
With
many
parts
of
the
body
still
using
911
items,
the
961
is
an
amazing
mixture
of
the
new
and
the
old
,
It
may
be
years
before
the
potential
of
this
space
age
model
in
off
road
comptition
can
be
fully
explored.
Consider-
ing
that
the
911
is
still
capable
of
winning
international
rallies
almost
20
years
after
it
was
introduced,
time
seems
to
be
on
Porsche's
side.
Currently
the
car
is
being
prepared
with
the
existing
group
B
rules
in
mind,
but
the
ideas
contained
in
the
car
will
hold
good
in
almost
any
se
t
ohegulations.
This
4
WD
Supe
r
Porsche
just
might
make
a
super
contender
on
the
1986
Baja
1000,
from
Ensenada
to
La
Paz.
Is
Porsche-Audi
paying
atten-
tion?
AffENTION
DESERT
RACERS
DUSTY
TIMES
has contingency
money
posted
at
all Score and
HDRA
desert
races. Check
it
out
on
contingency
row
- Two
different
classes each
event.
Protect your
KC
Daylighters against
flying rocks
& dirt clods, with this new
KC
Chrome Rock Shield (Part No.
7203).
Installs easily in the outer rim
of
all
6"
KC
Daylighters manufactured
since
1970.
Special 'low-profile'
configuration allows
KC
soft covers
to
slip over for maximum protection
during the day.
See your local
KC
HiliTES
dealer for the
new
KC
Rock Shield and
the complete line of
RACE READY OUT OF THE
BOX KC HiliTES
products.
New full line catalog,
just
$3.00.
KC
HilJlES
,
Inc.
Williams,
Arizona
86046
602/635-2607
November
1985
Pagc9
The Grand Finale
of
the· Off Road Championship
By
Homer .Eubanks
Gran Prix Series Photos: Trackside Photo Enterprises
Steve Millen saved the
day
for Toyota in the
main
event, leading from wire to wire,
although
Roger Mears was
just
astern when the
checkered
flag
fell,
giving
Toyota its
third
in
a
row
Manufacturers'
Cup
Challenge.
The
fifth
and
final Mickey
Thompson
Off-Road
Champ-
ionship
Gran
Prix for
1985
was
held
at
the
Orange
Show
Fairgrounds
on
Sept.
14
and
the
show
offered
plenty
of
entertainment
and
' ·excitement
for all in attendance.
Many
times
in a series
one
or
two
individuals
will
dominate
the
competition
throughout
the
season
and
the
championship
will
be
decided
before
the final
round
but
this
was
not
the case here. In any
of
the
classes
the
championship
would
be
decided in
the
final
action,
and
in
most
cases it
could
be
anyone
of
the
top
five in each
class!
In
the
trophy
dash for the
Grand
National
Sport
Trucks
it
was Roger Mears pulling his
Nissan
out
front
but
the
"Lone
Ranger" - Jeff
Huber
let Mears
know
it
wasn't
going
to
be a
picnic.
Sherman
Balch in his
Nissan was battling with Steve
Millen for
third
.
Going
into
the
last lap
Huber
developed
trouble
and
pulled off, giving the picnic
basket
to
Mears.
Sherman
Balch
made it 1-2 for Nissan
and
the
Toyota
of
Steve Millen was third.
Nine
trucks
lined
up
for
the
first
Grand
National heat race
- with Joey
Moore,
Mitsubishi,
and
young
Brent
Smith, Mazda,
beside
him
on
the
front
row. But
as they came
out
of
turn
one
it
was
the
Southern
California
Ford
Dealers Ranger driven by
John
Swift in the lead. Swift,
coming from
the
second
row,
slipped past
Moore
for the lead
Page
10
ancf Brent Smith
took
second
ahead
of
Ivan Stewart, Toyota,
and
Roger Mears, Nissan, was
right
on
Stewart's tail.
With
an
unobstructed
view
of
the track, Swift began pulling a
good lead from
the
pack
and
Brent
Smith
had
his hands full
with -Ivan Stewart. Stewart got
around
before
the
first lap had
ended
and
now
Smith was
fighting
off
Roger Mears.
On
the
second lap Mears
outpowered
the
old
rent-a-Mazda
down
the
back straight
then
set
Stewart in
his sights.
John
Swift's comfortable lead
seemed
to
.
disappear
once
Stewart
and
Mears were
behind
him
but
Swift was driving a
flawless race until he went
too
deep
into
the back
corner
and
wham-o, Stewart
and
Mears
both
rucked inside leaving Swift in
third. Mears
put
the
pedal
down
in an
attempt
for
the
lead
and
the
two were side by side until
Stewart's inside line gave
him
the
lead going
into
the next corner.
Mears wasn't through; he made
an
attempt
on
the
next
corner
but
couldn't
get by.
Then
on
the next
corner
Mears crossed the Nissan
under
Stewart
and
·
pulled
out
the
leader.
Brent Smith in the meantime
was pushing Swift for
the
third
spot. Swift
and
Smith
put
on
a
good
show
until Swift pulled
off
with mechanical trouble.
Smith's
trouble
wasn't
over
yet.
Suddenly,
seemingly
out
of
nowhere,
Steve
Millen
was
knocking
on
the
Mazda's
door
.
Millen
had
trouble
at
the
start
and
had fallen
to
the back
of
the
pack
but
now
he
was pressing for
third place.
When
the checkered
flag came
out
it
was Roger Mears
first
and
Stewart crossed over
second.
The
action then shifted
again
to
·
Brent
Smith
and
Steve
Millen
with
John
Baker,
Mitsubishi, closing in
on
them.
As
they
rounded
the
final
corner
Millen slipped inside
and
just
pulled
the
Mazda for third, Baker
took
fifth
and
Joey
Moore
was
sixth.
In
the
second
Grand
National
heat race
Jon
Lee,
Toyota
and
James
Thomas,
Dodge
sat
on
the
front row with eight
other
drivers anxious
to
get underway.
Frank
Arciero,Jr.,
Toyota,
were
on
the
second
row
beside Glenn
Harris, Mazda,
and
Sherman
Balch, Nissan, and Jeff
Huber,
Ranger, was.on the
third
row.
When
the
green flag flew it was
obvious this was
not
Glenn
Harris' night as
he
was
bumped
into, which
pushed
the Mazda
sideways
but
then
his luck
changed
as
Sherman
Balch
swerved
to
miss
him
but
caught
the left
front
fender sending
the
Mazda back
around.
The
pack
was still
bunched
up
making it
anyone's
race as they switched
back after
turn
two.
Now
things
got a little shady here.
It
looked
like Harris
and
Balch were having
a good side-by-side race develop
with Balch going
into
the
right
hand
turn
on
the
outside
and
November 1985
Harris
was
on
the
inside. Harris all the way
to
the inside
Suddenly
the
Nissan
of
Balch wall.
For
this action Harris was
took
a
hard
right
hand
turn
later
put
back
three
positions for
( steering
broke)
pushing him
and
rough driving,
but
whatever
Frank
Arciero
made an auspicious
debut
in stadium track racing
with
his
longer
desert
truck
; Frank
won
his heat race
by
a
good
margin.
After
a tremendous battle
with
his
brother
Frank,
AIArciero
held
his
Chenowth
together
and
won the
hard
fought
Class 1 heat race
by
inches.
Dusty
Times
happened it made Frank Arciero
ha!)PY
as
he
pulled
out
the
leader.
Jeff
Huber
put
his Ranger in
second
and
Jon
Lee was third.
The
Arciero
and
Huber
battle
went
on
for four laps until
Huber
got his Ranger lip
on
its side
leaving Arciero way
out
in front
of
J
on
Lee, now
in
second.
Huber's
trouble
wasn't
over;
as
he was rolled back over, fire
jumped
out
from
under
his
hood.
Huber
had
the
fire marshal
give the engine a
squirt
then he
jumped
back
into
the
Ford
and
resumed
the
race.
Frank · Arciero
won
his first
Grand
National outing by a long
shot
and
Glenn
Harris had
put
the Mazda across the finish line
second
but
was moved
to
fifth
for rough driving.
Jon
Lee was
the
off
ical
second
place finisher
a
nd
John
Nelson was third ahead
of
Jeff Huber.
Ninteen
of
America's fastest
off
road
pickups lined
up
for
the
main event
that
would decide
top
honors
for
the
season.
With
Roger Mears winning his heat
race
he
was
now
the
leader by
20
,
points
but
the main win
is
worth
40
points
so
Ivan Stewart
and
Steve Millen were
both
within
striking distance.
As the flagman waved his
green flag it was Steve Millen
using his front
row
starting
position
to
take
the
lead. Frank
Arciero tried
to
follow Millen
around
but
was clipped
on
the
rear fender sending
him
sideways
and
out
of
contention. Ivan
Stewart found
the
Toyota
hole
left by Millen for second, arrd
right
behind
him
was
the
Nissan
of
Roger Mears. Mears
and
Stewart were tied for
the
series
lead going
into
this final
round
so
the fans were guaranteed an
exciting race with these two
together. Brent
Smith
pulled his
Mazda
into
fourth
but
was being
challenged by teammate Glenn
Harris, with Sherman Balch
and
Jeff
Huber
all
seeking
his
It started
out
to
be Roger Mears
night
,
as
he
won
the
trophy
dash
and
heat race
in the Nissan,
but
a
slipping
tranny
held
him
to
second
in the
main
;
still
Roger
came away with the Class
7 drivers' title
for
the series.
position. line and
brought
the
Toyota
If Millen ever looked in his
around
for the win and Mears
mirror
all he could see was
the
had
to
settle for second
but
won
reflection
of
his teammate Ivan the series
on
points. Ivan Stewart
Stewart
as
Stewart was all over
took
third
and
Jeff
Huber
Millen and right
on
his tail was worked his way
around
Sherman
Roger Mears.
This
line
up
went Balch for fourth.
While
Ro~er
on
for five
_laps.
Stewart was
Mears
took
the
driv;rs
trying
to
get
around
Millen
and
championship, Millen's main
Mears was attempting
to
pass event victory insured
Toyota's
Stewart
at
every corner. A lot
of
third year in a row victory in the
excitement went
on
but
nothing Manufacturers'
Cup
Challenge.
happened until lap five when In the Unlimited Single Seater
Mears found
the
opening
he
was division the series battle for first
desperately looking for.
Once
place would be decided between
around
Stewart, Mears started five possible candidates. Marty
moving towards Millen. Back in Tripes was ahead
of
Albert
the pack
"the
four"
were
st
ill Arciero by 3
_poin
ts
and
Bob
battling for fourth until Harris
Gordon
trailed Arciero by 9
dropped
out
with a
broken
axle. points, then Frank Arciero was
Brent Smith was holding
on
until 11
points
from
Gordon.
Greg
the Mazda
started
missing
and
George could
do
it
but
would
Sherman
Balch went by for need a lot
of
bad luck
to
happen
fourth.
Now
John
Baker brought
to
the
front
four.
his Mitsubishi
into
contention
With
the
trophy
dash
not
with_ Smith,
but
he fought
off
giving any points,
Al
Arciero and
Baker until
the
last lap, then Tripes decided
to
. let Danny
Baker
got
by.
Thompson
and
Eric Arras take
At
the front
of
the pack Mears their places in
the
trophy
dash.
was still trying
to
get by Millen
When
the racing got underway it
but
found his Nissan transmis- was Frank Arciero jumping
out
sion
slipping
(Mears
later
the early leader
but
things
admitted he forgot
to
turn
on
the
changed
on
turn
two when
dreg
tranny coolers in
the
heat race, George slipped inside for the lead
frying it
and
only had time
to
where he stayed for
the
win.
change
the
fluid). Millen held his
Frank
Arciero
kept
George
~cc--~----~----~,'-,-------
--
------
honest
throughout
the race
but
.
couldn't
find a hole
to
get
around.
In
the
background
Danny
Thompson
managed
to
get
around
Eric Arras and hold
on
for third.
With a
new
trans
arriving
at
the eleventh hour,
Marty
Tripes came from the
midd
le
of
the
pack
to
win
the Class 1
main
and
the series title in his Funco.
In
the
first
heat
race it was
Danny
Thompson
putting his
Funco
out
front
but
he
had
Al
Arciero right
on
his tail
and
behind him was Frank Arciero,
then Stan Rowland.
Then
on
the
second lap
Thompson
made a
fatal mistake
at
turn
two
and
Al
Arciero
darted
to
the
inside for
the lead.
Thompson
recovered in.
time
to
keep Frank Arciero
behind him, close beind him.
Then
on
lap four Frank Arciero
saw his opening and got
around
Always
fast,
Jeff
Huber
had
more
trouble
than he
needed
with
the
Ford
Ranger,
but
came
back
from a
roll
over
and
a fire to take fourth.
It
wasn't the best
of
nights
for
Ivan Stewart who
fought
a lack
of
power
steering
in the main event,
and
he
endfid
up
third
at the flag.
Thompson
and
this
time
the Bean-Tripes misfortune· and
Thompson
was applying the crossed the finish line fifth ahead
pressure.
The
series leader,
of
Tripes.
Marty Tripes had a
bad
start and Sometimes misfortune can be
was back in
the
pack running in turned into a fortune if you are
fifth place. As if things weren't someone like Marty Tripes.
going bad enough for
Tripes,Joe
Tripe's
sixth place finish
in
the
Bean came over
one
of
the
jumps
heat race
put
him
on
the
front
and landed his front wheels
up
row
for the start
of
the main
on
Tripes' engine cage stopping event. Being 20 points down
Tripes dead in his tracks.
The
from Albert Arciero
who
sat
on
two got going again
but
it was
too
the outside second row
must
late
for
Tripes,
unless
the
have made Tripes feel a little
Arciero
brothers
would happen better
about
his finish in
the
heat
to
take
one
another
out
with race ..
When
the green flag came
Frank trying desperately to get by
out
it was Tripes
that
jumped
brother
Al.
into
the lead
and
Jim Fishback,
Albert
and
Frank Arciero were Sr. closed
up
right
behind
him
now putting
on
a good show
as
ahead
of
Bob
Gordon.
The
Frank would wedge his front fourth place shuffler was Frank
wheels inside Albert's car at
Arciero.
The
pack
stayed
nearly every corner,
but
Albert together with
the
main battle
knew his
brother's
tricks and being for second place. Tripes
held him off. Frank's last attempt was begining
to
pull a good lead
came
at
the finish line as he
from
Fishback
whose
main
pulled his
Chenowth
along side
concern
was
keeping
Bob
Albert
close enough
to
feel
the
Gordon
in
third
place.
On
the
breeze
of
the checkered flag fifth lap
Gordon
stuck his front
indicating Albert's win. Danny wheels inside
of
Fishback and
Thompson
was coping with an pulled
out
of
the corner in
ailing engine and Bob
Gordon
second place.
On
the
next lap it
was right
on
his tail waiting for was Frank Arciero's
turn
to
get
his chance
but
the chance never
around
Fishback.
Then
two laps
came
as
Thompson
crossed the later Al Arciero passed Fishback
line in front
of
Gordon.
Jim at the same corner after
the
back
Fishback, Sr.
took
advantage
of
straight, leaving Fishback in fifth
--------------
place.
By
now Tripes who
had
enjoyed a comfortable early lead
was now being closed in
on
by
Bob
Gordon.
With
one
lap
to
go
Frank Arciero
dropped
out
with
engine failure while running a
comfortable third. Bob
Gordon
closed in
on
Tripes
but
time ran
out
as
Tripes crossed the finish
line first, giving him the main
event win and enough points for
the
season
champ
ionship.
Gordon
was second
and
Albert
Arciero finished third ahead
of
Jim Fishback, Sr.
]Q
e Bean
brought
his
Chenowt
h across for
fifth.
In
contention
for the series points, Greg George
won
the Class 1
Trophy
dash
in
his
Funco,
but
luck
deserted
him
in the
main
event.
Dusty
Times
Frank Arciero, Jr.
had
a chance
for
the Class 1 points,
but
an engine failure in
the
Chenowth
late in the main event
put
him
out
of
the hunt.
November
1985
The Super
1600
trophy dash
fielded
Bob
Gordon,
Jerry
Whelchel,
i;r
i;r
Page
11
The Final Overview on the
1985
MTEG
Stadium Series
By
Homer
Eubanks
The
final
event
in the Mickey
Thompson's
Off
Road
Champ-
ionship
:Jrand
Prix series was
the
decision
maker
for nearly every
class title.
The
drivers were
so
close
on
points
in
most
classes
that
the
last
main
event
would
decide
the
top
honors
for
the
season
championships.
One
of
the
highlights
of
the
year in
the
Grand
National
pickup
contests
was
Roger
Mears.
In
the beginning
it
looked
as if
Mears
would
run
away with
the class.
He
repeatedly qualified
his Nissan
the
fastest,
took
most
of
the
trophy
dashes,
heat
races
and
was
the
usual
main
event
winner.
When
the series
moved
to
San
Bernardino,
Mears
began
to
have
power
steering
problems,
and
these mechanical ills
put
the
T
oyotas
of
Steve Millen
and
Ivan
Stewart
out
front
in the
points
chase. However, when the final
flag flew
on
the
main
event
last
September,
it was Steve Millen
who won
the
main
event
, with
Roger
Mears
right
on
his
bumper.
The
drivers
champion-
ship
went
to
Mears
by a few
points
over
Ivan
Stewart,
but
the
coveted
Manufacturers'
Cup
went
to
Toyota
due
to
the
combined
efforts
of
Millen
and
Stewart
all season.
Other
highlights
during
the
year in
the
truck
bashing
took
place
at
the
L.A
.
Coliseum
event
,
where
John
Baker
put
his
Mitsubish
i in the
grandstand
box
seats
and
had
to
be
removed
by
heavy
equipment.
Remember
Maroa
night
at
San
Bernardino,
when
Glenn
Harris
drove
totally
blind
with
the
engine
hood
lying
on
the
windshield
after
a
confrontation
with
anothef
truck.
The
same night
Harris
jumped
his Mazda
over
the
Toyota
of
Steve Millen.
Jeff
Huber
ran
hard
all season,
but
his
Ford
caug~t fire a
couple
of
times, slowing his progress.
Marty
Tripes
won
the
Class 1
Unlimited
title with victory
at
the
final
main
event
in
the
Tracy's
Party
Ice
Funco.
But, all
season long Al
Arciero
and
Bob
Gordon,
plus a
bunch
of
others
were right
on
his
tail
on
the track
and
on
points.
The
whole season
went
with
the
top
five swapping
places
at
every
corner.
One
highlight was Bob
Gordon's
mid-
air
360
at
Pomona.
Gordon
went
off
the
front
jump,
landed wrong
and
the
Chenowth
went
up
and
backwards, landing
on
its tires
and
Bob
drove
onward.
. In the
Super
1600
(Class
10)
contests, Jerry
Whelchel
put
his
Chenowth
out
front
a lot,
but
he
·usually
had
Bob
Gordon
right
there playing
cat
and
mouse.
Page
12
Greg
George was
another
close
player, as was
Tommy
Croft.
With
an average
entry
of
28
cars
in this class the action was always
fierce.
While
Tommy
Croft
won
the last
main
event, Bob
Gordon
was
second
and
Jerry
Whelchel
was
fourth.
The
end
result
was
that
Gordon
and
Whelchel
ended
the season in
an
absolute
tie for the title
on
points,
and
they
are
co-champions.
The
question
is,
who
will wear
number
one
on
their
car next
year?
Vince
Tjelmeland
was
the
top
driver
in the
Uniroyal
·
Ultra-
Stock
GP,
but
only
by
12
points,
some
of
them
earned by winning
the last main event.
General
Tire
teammate
Mark
Hansen
gave
Tjelmeland as
much
trouble
as he
could
manage,
but
was
second
on
points, making it
one-two
for
the
Pontiac
bodied
racers.
Another
guy
that
drove
out
front
or
until
he
broke
was Craig Durfee,
and
he
broke
in
the
wall at the last
event.
Mike
Goodbody
ran hard
all year in his
VW
Golf
bodied
buggy,
and
he
took
third
on
points,
and
the
big
money,
the
five
grand
put
up
by
Uniroyal
for
the
top
finisher in
the
series using
their tires.
Jeff
Elrod
won
the 1-2-
1600
championship
driving
the
Donsco
Hi
Jumper.
Elrod
had
plenty of
com
p
etition
from
Neil
Phillips, and late in the season
from
Rob
Tolleson
who won
a
couple
in his Mirage. Tolleson,
wh
ose
car was
built
for the
Coliseum
race,
would
have been
· a real
threat
to Elrod
had
he
entered
the action earlier.
Things really
got
to
"hopping"
in
the
Odyssey
classes.
For
some
time
Rennie
Awana was
the
man
to
beat in
suspended
class,
but
when
Rory
Holladay
entered
the
picture with
improved
suspen-
sion, he
took
top
honors
over
Awana.
Don
Longnecker
managed
to
tighten his kidney
belt
long
enough
to
stay
out
front
and
with
the
unsuspended
class.
John
Neary was
crowned
King
in
the
ATV
division. A
"big
hoopla"
started
early in
the
season,
and
the
question
was
'will
the
new
four
wheel
ATVs,
with extra stability
and
weight,
be
able
to
compete
with
the
tried
and
true
three
wheelers'?
At
the
final event, only a
couple
of
three
wheelers even showed, as the
new
breed
of
A
TV
totally
dominated
·
the
short
course
action.
Congratulations
go
to
all
that
competed
in the series,
and
especially
to
those
that
earned
the #1 plate.
Winning
against
this caliber
of
competition
makes
-
you
all
true
champions!
p
oints
ahe
ad
of Bob
Gord
on
)
Jerry
Whe
lchel.
Whe
n the flag
went
up
it was
the
front
row
Funco
of
Gary Dillon
that
pulled
ou
t front, b
ut
Jerry
Whelch
el
had
come
from
the
middle
of
the
pack
and
was right
on
Dillon.
Ron
Carte
r
was
behind
Whelchel,
and
Tommy
Croft
filled
the
fourth
spot.
Whelchel
read
Dillon's
every
move
until
the big
dirt
jump
in
the
infield
where he applied the gas
an
d
came o
ut
the
leader. Dillon held
off
Ca
rte
r until the back straight
when
Carter
let Dillon apply
th
e
brakes
first.
Carter's
biggest
problem
was
about
to
occur
,
as
Tommy
Croft
had
caught
Dillon
with
the
door
open
also
and
followed
Carter
around
for
third.
By
now
Whelchel
could
smell the
20
points
waiting for
him
and
was
headed
for
the
finish
line.
Bob
Gordon
was
second
on
points
going
into the race,
and
he
put
his
Chenowth
home
second
in the Class
10
main to tie Whelchel
for
the series title.
Carter
and
Croft
put
on
the
show.
The
two
would
go
into
a
corner
and
usually
the
other
would
come
out
the leader. This
went
on
the
entire race. But
then
some
things can go
too
far,
the
two
went
to
switch
back
on
one
of
the
right
handers
and
they
tangled;
and
while they fumbled
for low gear
Ken
Kazarian
motored
around
for
the
second
spot.
Croft
was
the
first
to
get it
in gear
and
Carter
ended
up
fourth.
On
the
next
lap
Carter
caught
Croft
again
to
swap places
but
Croft
got
around
for
the