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THE MATCHSTICK MAGAZINE ISSUE 002

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THE MATCHSTICKAmnesty Canada’s Arts & Human Rights MagazineIssue 002Created by and for youth, The Matchstick promotes human rights activism through the creative imagination of young artists around Canada.

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MastheadThe Matchstick is Amnesty Canada’s Arts & Human Rights magazine, dedicated toraising awareness of human rights violations and sharing the perspective of younghuman rights activists who speak through their craft.Issue 002 features visual arts and poetry submissions from Canadian artist/activistsunder 25 and two guest essays curated by Amnesty International Canada.We offer you The Matchstick as a reflection of youth human rights advocacy today anda creative archive of global solidarity. Saadet Serra HasilogluLiterary EditorKyo LeeLiterary EditorMegan BaileyLayout EditorLaila JafriEditor in ChiefRachel LimCreative DirectorArishi MaisraVisual Arts EditorMiranda MonahanWeb DesignerIssue 002

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Medium: digital using Procreate and PhotoshopDimensions: 18” x 24”Year: 2021'Tender' is a reminder that queer people of colour deserve to experience and seerepresentation of themselves in healthy relationships. Tender can be interpreted as bothtender, the state of vulnerability, and tend-er, someone who cares for the world aroundthem. Tender looks at the softest moments and says, this is where all forms of lovecome from. This piece is a love letter to queer love, platonic love, romantic love, andfriendships. Kyla Yin James (they/them) is an illustrator and designer whose work is inspired bymythology, the unconscious, subcultures, speculative fiction, and sociopolitical systems.Their work is filled with symbolism that creates surreal and speculative scenesquestioning the status quo.002TenderKyla Yin JAMES

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Return from OlympusMisha Reza

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The cursor blinks for the length of my coarse, frozen breath as I plot the escape of these wordsThe cursor blinks for the uprightThe upstanding, the grand vertical columns of our new world with its new languageWhere grief is unspoken and offered to new gods in return for everything, all the timeNow I am racing to escape it, now I try to get to the point, unravel the solution, outrun thisticking wrongI cannot let go of the worldHer horizons crossed by lines rising up, reaching down, borders cut with blood and stale airI am trying but I cannot name her wounds like I could beforeWhen my rage cracked forwards like a nameless dawn, drowned by a storm, a cloud dense withfear and fierceAgainst their high glittering thronesI cannot let go of the world to strike them anymoreI know my body now as half poison half antidoteTo the rivers that flow like prayerTo the winds that play by reasonTo the soil that teaches time, birds that stretch the skyWild mother, your eyes are my window to the moonForget the stars, I wish upon you.002Return from OlympusMisha Reza

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'Return from Olympus' is a response to the climate crisis and an ode to land defenderswho fight for change and justice. This piece is a critique of the uncommon patiencepreserved for wealthy people and corporations; it challenges the socially and morallyfractured institutions through which climate injustices are committed. The poemreflects on the willful ignorance and directionless desires of the rich few who interruptthe balance of the Earth at the expense of many. 'Return from Olympus' also recognizesthe continuous re/formation of our planet and the layers of geographical storytellingwithin this process. Ultimately, this piece speaks to an internal feeling of dissent thatcomes from and returns to a place of love; it calls for a determined fight for climatejustice - of nourishment and power restored to a planet that must be protected. 002Return from OlympusMisha RezaMisha Reza (They/Them) is a poet based in Canada. Her writing is driven by a deepregard for the natural world and interprets the ways in which people perceive andinterpret the socio-ecological environments they occupy. Misha is devoted to the causeof climate justice and the protection of women's rights across the world. She holds aBachelor's Degree in Environmental Science and is interested in learning more aboutsustainable construction/re-construction of affordable housing. Misha’s poetry isinspired by the beauty and complexity of the world people share with each other as wellas the many living things that sustain life.

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The climate crisis has approached a dangerous edge: floods wipe out thousands,farmlands are destroyed by droughts, forest fires are rushing across the planet, speciesare at the edge of extinction and the defenders of precious land and water discovertheir work is a death sentence in a world committed to the accumulation of wealth andpower by any means possible. ‘Morning Star’ is a tribute to the environmental activistsand defenders as a sign of gratitude for their bravery and spirit which will nurture andilluminate on our planet in even the darkest moments of a future that is hanging on athread.The two pieces are intended to be showcased as a pair: one signifying a future where wehave a rich planet full of biodiversity to protect, the second a possible future withoutthe protective powers of our planet but the light of those who try to defend andpreserve it. Bita Shourideh (she/her) is a high-school student in Vancouver interested in publichealth and community building. She views art and activism as inseparable companionsand uses her own work as a means to express her feelings about the world. Bita hasbeen painting since she was 5 years old and is currently practicing with oil paints anddigital art. Though she has always loved working with colours and different mediums ofexpression, she began to pursue art seriously due to the works of an Iranian artist,Arghavan Khosravi. Khosravi’s works inspired Bita to combine her love for art with herconcern for climate and the people defending it.002MorningstarBita shourideh

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Kyo leecoreopsis: the american dream

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a new life broods inside the lipsof the coreopsis: its scent swims across the oceanfinds the dying & sells its dreams. sticky whispers:come to america. you are hungry. you wadeacross an unsplit ocean on the search for the promised land.your only float line, the stem of the flowerthat you hold between your teeth like nitro under the mines. you reach the land. you are hungry.your fingerprints are gone. washed away in the ocean.english is a cockle on your tongue that bites back. america is a permanent temporary home. you sacrifice& sacrifice & sacrifice. you decay into the soilthat feeds the flower. when yellow petalsopens its lips there is no promised landonly desert. only dark red stains spilling outwards, tickseed biting at your skin until you are infected with america & all of its dreams.002Kyo leecoreopsis: the american dream

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“coreopsis” aims to display the harmful perceptions portrayed by the modern-dayAmerican Dream and its impacts on refugees, migrants and displaced peoples. Itreflects on the inner and outer conflicts that occur in the search for success in aforeign land, from economic inequality, linguistic discrimination, loss of identity,assimilation and more. The poem incorporates true events from the early AmericanDream and connects it to the ethos’ modern presence. “coreopsis” speaks to thesuffering and survival of a Diaspora and hopes to enlarge knowledge and empathytowards the subject.Kyo leecoreopsis: the american dream002Kyo Lee (she/her) is a youth social activist, writer and, dare she say, poet based inOntario, Canada. Her literature has been recognized by the Legislative Assembly ofOntario, the Poetry Society of the UK, the League of Canadian Poets, the ScholasticWriting and Arts Awards and more. Kyo’s writing is often inspired by her ownexperience as a 2SLGBTQ+ Asian woman. She aims to use literature as her voice ofactivism and believes that it is a powerful tool of advocacy that amplifies the unheardand crafts experience into art. Therefore, she attempts to approach her art from ananti-oppression and intersectional view. To Kyo, writing is a voice, a form of self-confession, and of course, a magical power. She loves sunrises more than anything andshe names all her houseplants.

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002/My Mother in Metaphors/Heba khan

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I. The ocean of mercyBrittle metacarpals wrenching forgiveness out of a crimson dungeon for the unapologetically unremorsefulwill be my fatal flaw.My shallow empathy,mere shackles on my ankles and I drown in a sea of misery. The only thing that will set me free,is submerging myself in the ocean of my Mother's infinite mercy,performing an ablutionin these sacred saline waves,hoping to absolve the sins of the unforgivable.II. The window and the light My mind is a dark room,out of which there is no escape.Monsters, voices, demonsobliterate my existencebut then the versesmy Mother recites in hymnsecho in my ears as hummed prayers,make me a pilgrim,seeking the Light,teaching me the essence of hope,infusing my soul with fragrant optimism. 002

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III. The bird and its flightAren't all daughters born in cages,wings severed at conceptionin this cultural prison,dishonourable expectations burdened on our shoulders but my Mother carries these mountains on her vertebrae,that calamities converted to ashes from which she rose, a dove — became the flagbearer of serenity so we could salvageour remaining sanity;so that all her foremothers and granddaughters could rest in peaceIV. The city and its historyGrief has a resilient past —a city is never created outside of war. The mortar of skyscrapers is always crimson sandstone drawn from aquamarine vessels.My Motherland is colonized by storming troops of sorrows,camouflaged in the trenches.A city only existsas a haunted tale of partitionand yet, as harrowing a history that battles beget, borne of the bloodshed is the fertile land of dreamsand fragile opportunities. 002

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V. The tower and its strengthThe minarets testify to ignorance and in their oblivion, still call me home to salvationeven when the wind denies me entrance.The strength of my Mother's spine is derived from her ancestral narrativewhere her Mother birthed migrationbefore her first offspring,in a winter that did not spare these god-forgiven towers.Beware, prodigal daughters, you will be idolized as the epitomes of sacrifice but let not the earth-shattering criesof your Mothersdrown in their hollow noiseand remember this truth — Divine;beneath your feet lie the gates of paradise.002

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My Mother in Metaphors is a multiverse of metaphors to represent all Mothers — thewomen in our lives who have birthed us, the foremothers that have reincarnated in us,the mother figures who have encultured us, and the Motherland whose soil andnarratives we are molded from and woven with. This poem advocates for the roles thatwomen have embodied and their right to exist and have agency unapologetically. Forcenturies, women have been epitomized as the source of all sacrifices and empathy andthrough this poem, I hope to capture the strength and glory of all the women who havepaved the path for us and demand justice for them, for us and for all our futuregenerations of daughters. /My Mother in Metaphors/Heba khan002For Heba Khan, poetry is a form of protest, a declaration of existence, and a way toreclaim the spirit of all the strong women who came before her. Heba writes aboutwomen who have paved the path ahead of her for the sake of inscribing an integratednarrative into the fabric of history. She views poetry as a harbor for the grief andresilience that reflect her perception of the word. A ‘Jill’ of many trades, Heba hopesone day to become a master of each skill. After all, if the writers don't dream big, whowill?

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To Your LandSara k.

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To your land,I owe the lowered sky,a glaring closeness to godTo your land,Which grants the true meaning of distanceTo your land,That rises from the waters of ashen dreams I credit the music of convictionTo your land,sacred seer of being, I find each road a favourfor each wound redeemedTo your land To go on To go on and on and onTo go on and on and on and punctuate only with prayer002To Your LandSara k.

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This poem is a tribute to the late Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish and hispoem “To our Land” that touched the hearts of so many and strengthenedpublic solidarity for the Palestinian cause. Despite being forced to live inwhat is best described as an open air prison, being subject to discrimination,violence and dispossession by the state of Israel, the Palestinian peopleremain models of strength immense perseverance. “To your Land” is amessage of love and dedication for the Palestine remembered by our elders.002To Your LandSara k.Sara K. is an artist and fierce advocate for climate action and refugee rights.She is motivated by the spirit of all the women in her life and is inspired bythe teachings of activists who came before her. Sara enjoys making playlistsfor her friends and family and spends most of her free time drawing andreading.

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Medium: digital using Procreate and PhotoshopDimensions: 18” x 24”Year: 2021Our oceans and seas are burning because of the greed of the powerful and theirrefusal to divest from the fossil fuel and arms industry. The same waterways arecrossed by millions of refugees looking for safety, only to find another war zonecreated by the intolerance of those on land. Split in four to reflect hownormalized this two-fold cruelty has become now-- each injustice feeding theother --- the red spikes through the water and land represent a sea and shorechoked with borders, fences and the blood of innocent families and children.When looking at scenic landscapes of water and mountains, it is difficult not tothink of the borders imposed on those fleeing dangerous conditions and the manydimensions of injustice that many countries exert on them. Sara K. is an artist and fierce advocate for climate action and refugee rights. Sheis motivated by the spirit of all the women in her life and is inspired by theteachings of activists who came before her. Sara enjoys making playlists for herfriends and family and spends most of her free time drawing and reading.EnsnareSara k.002

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Industry, Police, and MMIWG2S in Wet’suwet’en Yintah Jennifer Wickham is a member of Cas Yikh (Grizzly Bear House) in the Gidimt’en(Bear/Wolf) Clan of the Wet’suwet’en people. She currently lives in Gidimt’enyintah in what is now known as northern British Columbia and is the MediaCoordinator for the Gidimt’em Checkpoint. Jennifer is currently co-producing/co-directing the documentary film “Yintah” about the Wet’suwet’en fight forsovereignty. She loves to bead, write and spend time with family. She dreams offreedom for her people and bright shiny futures for all the young people!

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Guest EssaysThe Wet’suwet’en people have lived in what is now known as northern BritishColumbia, Canada since time immemorial. We have governed and maintained22,000 km2 of land through careful monitoring and through balancing a reciprocalrelationship with the land. As a matrilineal society, our governance system is rootedwith our women, and it is from our mothers that we get our house membership. Ourpractice of cultural transmission, which includes our duty to protect the land, wasintentionally broken by the government by its forced removal of our people from theyintah (land). All the historic and ongoing violence of colonization has beenperpetrated with the singular intention of having unfettered access to our territoriesand resources. As confirmed in 1997 by the Supreme Court of Canada case,Delgamuukw—Gisdaywa, our rights and title as Wet’suwet’en people have neverbeen extinguished. The day after this decision was announced, the government andindustry schemed ways to circumvent the decision in order to ensure their ongoingaccess to our yintah. As reported by The Narwal: “Internal emails, memos and confidential briefing notes also show that, immediatelyafter the Delgamuukw decision came down from the Supreme Court of Canada onDec. 11, 1997, B.C. government officials discussed tactics to fight land rights withlegal challenges, to curb direct action or litigation by First Nations and to use federalmoney intended for the healing of residential school survivors to make treatynegotiations more attractive.“Today, this violence continues as mega-projects such as gas and oil pipelines areforced onto and throughout our lands as our laws and systems are disrespected, ourwomen are victimized, and as our people are criminalized for upholdingWet’suwet’en laws. In December 2018, Gidimt’en, one of the five clans of theWet’suwet’en Nation, took control of access to our territory by erecting theGidimt’en Checkpoint. This was done to stand in solidarity with the Unist’ot’enhouse group for the protection of our sacred headwaters Wedzin Kwa (also knownas the Morice River), our main salmon spawning river with water so pure we stilldrink directly from it.Industry, Police, and MMIWG2S in Wet’suwet’en Yintah

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Since then, the RCMP have organized yearly militarized raids to forcibly removeWet’suwet’en people from their very own land, including key spokespeople likeSleydo’ Molly Wickham, Gidimt’en clan member, and Howilkit Freda Huson of theUnist’ot’en. This was in direct contravention of the United Nations Declaration onthe Rights of Indigenous People, and the UN Committee on the Elimination of RacialDiscrimination has issued three letters to Canada addressing these, and other,human rights violations.The criminalization of our people goes back to the potlatch ban that was in effectfrom 1884-1951. During this time, Wet’suwet’en governance practices wereoutlawed by the Canadian government within the Indian Act. There were many waysthe government tried to control and eradicate our ways of life through the IndianAct, including creating the reservation system, imposing the governance of chief andcouncil, creating residential schools, and what has been come to be known as the60’s Scoop – the intentional and forceful removal of Indigenous children from theirfamilies and homes and their placement in predominantly white foster homeswithout access to their culture. Many of these colonial tactics were rooted in thebelief that Indigenous people were barbaric, uneducated, and had no religiousbeliefs. These beliefs dehumanized Indigenous people and led to legitimize the theftof their land, resources, and children, under the guise of ‘saving them’. In 2008,then PM Stephen Harper delivered an apology to Residential School survivors,stating, “These objectives were based on the assumption Aboriginal cultures andspiritual beliefs were inferior and unequal. Indeed, some sought, as it wasinfamously said, ’to kill the Indian in the child’.” 14 years on from this formalapology, the same kind of colonial violence that tries to upend our rights, suppressour governance, and menace our community, prevails against us in our daily lives onWet’suwet’en territory.Many of the widespread harmful beliefs that were imposed on to our people werealso taught to generations of non-Indigenous children. These harmful beliefs haveresulted in the systemic failure to end the staggering numbers of missing andmurdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada.Guest EssaysIndustry, Police, and MMIWG2S in Wet’suwet’en Yintah

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“Expert witnesses, institutional witnesses and Knowledge Keepers told the NationalInquiry that resource extraction projects can drive violence against Indigenouswomen in several ways, including issues related to transient workers, harassmentand assault in the workplace, rotational shift work, substance abuse and addictions,and economic insecurity.” Very recently, a former Coastal GasLink employee filed a lawsuit for sexual battery.The Inquiry specifically recommended: “We call upon all governments and bodiesmandated to evaluate, approve, and/or monitor development projects to completegender-based socio-economic impact assessments on all proposed projects as part oftheir decision making and ongoing monitoring of projects. Project proposals mustinclude provisions and plans to mitigate risks and impacts identified in the impactassessments prior to being approved.”The 231 Calls for Justice still have not fully been implemented and it has taken yearsfor the federal government to create a National Action Plan, all the while our womenare still being murdered and going missing. We have received reports of assault andviolence from individual Indigenous women who have worked for the CoastalGasLink pipeline within our territories and supported them in their filing of policereports and choices to take action to protect themselves. Turning to the RCMP toreport assaults is not a reliable option in Wet’suwet’en territory as RCMP are knownto harass and intimidate our women and community members on a daily basis. Since March 2022, there have been hundreds of visits by the Community-IndustryResponse Group (a division of the RCMP) who threaten, arrest, intimidate andsurveil all persons coming and going from the territory who do not appear to beindustry workers. They set up road checks with no clear purpose other than to stopand identify Wet’suwet’en people travelling in their own territory for culturalpurposes. Guest EssaysIndustry, Police, and MMIWG2S in Wet’suwet’en Yintah

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“They have repeatedly been found idling on the driveway of Sleydo’, Gidimt’enCheckpoint spokesperson’s home and have even gone so far as to shine flashlightsthrough her windows while claiming to be ‘checking in’ on her family’s safety. This kind of blatant harassment has extended to the site of our newest project, thebuilding of a balhats (feast hall) at Tsel Kiy Kwa (Lamprey Creek), an ancient villagesite that is a physical embodiment of our governance system on the land. It’s clearthat these are attempts to suppress our forms of governance, cultural practices, andeven frighten our leaders into silence.The fight for Wet’suwet’en sovereignty continues against the face of colonialviolence, with Wet’suwet’en women at the frontlines defending their children’sfutures. Guest EssaysIndustry, Police, and MMIWG2S in Wet’suwet’en YintahEssay image description: Wedzin Kwa is the river at the headwaters of the salmon spawningchannel for all the communities from Wet’suwet’en yintah down to the west coast. She is pureand contains everything needed to sustain life. The Wet’suwet’en people occupying theirterritory on her banks still drink from her. She is the boundary line between Cas Yikh andUnist’ot’en and they both fight to protect her from Coastal GasLink and other oil and gaspipelines that want to destroy her for profit. Image credit: Michael Toledano.

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Indigenous Women, Girls and Gender-Diverse People Are Humans With Rights. Lynne Groulx is a Métis woman from the Treaty Threehistoric Métis community of Rainy River/Lake of theWoods, and is the Chief Executive Officer for theNative Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC).NWAC is a national Indigenous organizationrepresenting the political voice of Indigenous women,girls and gender diverse people in Canada, inclusive ofFirst Nations on and off reserve, status and non-status,disenfranchised, Métis and Inuit. NWAC was foundedon the collective goal to enhance, promote and fosterthe social, economic, cultural and political well-beingof Indigenous women within their respectivecommunities and Canadian societies.

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For many Canadians, summer’s warmth inspires travel plans: driving alongforested highways, road trips exploring new territories, making pilgrimages toannual reunions. For Indigenous women, girls, and gender-diverse people, travelplans raise significant safety dangers. Canada’s transportation corridors remainground zero for incidents of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls(MMIWG), both solved and unsolved.Investigations into Indigenous deaths and disappearances along highways continue,despite the misperception that the MMIWG crisis has been resolved. While mostCanadians enjoy their human right to bodily security, the continuing genocideagainst the people represented by the Native Women’s Association of Canada(NWAC) means they face a significant risk of harm every single time they travel,especially if they are travelling alone."Indigenous women, girls, and gender-diverse people are left to rely on their owntools and supports as they navigate the continuing safety risks they face.Grandmothers, aunties, cousins, sisters, and mothers all share information witheach other along informal lines, warning against places and people to avoid."In 2021, NWAC developed a map that identifies risk hotspots for Indigenouswomen, girls, and gender-diverse people across the country as part of its SafePassage project. Using MMIWG case data, the map tracks violence intensity zones.It is a vital resource and tool in helping those at risk when making travel decisions.Many Indigenous women who travel this country’s roads are not on leisure trips.Indigenous women, girls, and gender-diverse people may be travelling alonebecause they are fleeing violence, poverty, or other unsafe situations in their homeor community. They may be going to work or a medical appointment in acommunity that has no direct link by public transportation. Guest EssaysIndigenous Women, Girls and Gender-Diverse PeopleAre Humans With Rights.

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The Final Report of the National Inquiry into MMIWG Report released in 2019explains, in depth, the ways colonization increases these risks. Call to Justice 4.8calls “upon all governments to ensure that adequate plans and funding are put intoplace for safe and affordable transit and transportation services and infrastructurefor Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people living in remote or ruralcommunities.” Call to Justice 17.9 calls on Canada to provide safe transportationoptions, such as “safe ride” programs in rural, remote, and Northern communities.These calls have yet to be fulfilled.NWAC’s Safe Passage project is both a response to the continuing MMIWG crisis,and a critical tool highlighting the urgency and importance for Canada to takemeaningful action. We continue to add cases to the database on a weekly basis andthe creation of the map is just one of the actions we are taking while governmentsdither about what to do next. NWAC calls on Canada to begin to take the stepsnecessary to address the 231 Calls to Justice in the MMIWG Final Report.Our recent analysis finds there has been little effort in that regard since the releaseof the Inquiry report. Budget 2021 directs $2.2 billion over five years, but concreteaction items are not separately costed, and provide little information to show howthese funds will help. While we advocate for these concrete steps, we can turn tohuman-rights laws to demand meaningful action. “Human rights laws set the stagefor shifting away the perspectives that devalue Indigenous lives and view them asless important. Laws can recognize and affirm that we are inherently and equallyworthy of the rights to life and safety."Human rights laws, both domestic and international, cannot promise safety forIndigenous women, girls, and gender-diverse people, but they do offer a path tochange the grim reality of the MMIWG crisis. Human rights laws set the stage forshifting away the perspectives that devalue Indigenous lives and views them as lessimportant. Laws can recognize and affirm that we are inherently and equallyworthy of the rights to life and safety as any other Canadian. Guest EssaysIndigenous Women, Girls and Gender-Diverse PeopleAre Humans With Rights.

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Human rights laws also hold Canadian decision-makers accountable for the actionsthey are taking (or often, not taking) to address violence, especially when it is anongoing, national crisis harming a specific group of people. For example, when theUN Committee on the Rights of the Child reviewed Canada’s human rightscommitments to children earlier this month, they called on Canada to takestronger steps to investigate and provide justice to MMIWG family members.Yet, we face barriers when we try to get help and seek protection from violence.Witnesses told the National Inquiry numerous stories of police ignoring requeststo help locate missing women, hesitancy to call police during domestic violence forfear their children would be taken and violence committed by health careprofessionals. Canada does not honour our human rights when it allows unsafesystems to continue operating. These include systemic discrimination in health,child welfare, and justice systems. In reality, this means that Canada’s continuedfailure to address violence against women is perpetuating genocide.As a result, Indigenous women, girls, and gender-diverse people are left to rely ontheir own tools and supports as they navigate the continuing safety risks they face.Grandmothers, aunties, cousins, sisters, and mothers all share information witheach other along informal lines, warning against places and people to avoid.NWAC’s map is helping them.We do this because we know, from lived experience, the people in power are notmaking decisions and taking actions that prioritize our safety. This must change.NWAC’s Safe Passage project is both a response to the continuing MMIWG crisis,and a critical tool highlighting the urgency and importance for Canada to takemeaningful action. We continue to add cases to the database on a weekly basis andthe creation of the map is just one of the actions we are taking while governmentsdither about what to do next. NWAC calls on Canada to begin to take the stepsnecessary to address the 231 Calls to Justice in the MMIWG Final Report.Guest EssaysIndigenous Women, Girls and Gender-Diverse PeopleAre Humans With Rights.

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Our recent analysis finds there has been little effort in that regard since the releaseof the Inquiry report. Budget 2021 directs $2.2 billion over five years, but concreteaction items are not separately costed, and provide little information to show howthese funds will help. While we advocate for these concrete steps, we can turn tohuman-rights laws to demand meaningful action."Human rights laws set the stage for shifting away the perspectives that devalueIndigenous lives and view them as less important. Laws can recognize and affirmthat we are inherently and equally worthy of the rights to life and safety."Human rights laws, both domestic and international, cannot promise safety forIndigenous women, girls, and gender-diverse people, but they do offer a path tochange the grim reality of the MMIWG crisis. Human rights laws set the stage forshifting away the perspectives that devalue Indigenous lives and views them as lessimportant. Laws can recognize and affirm that we are inherently and equallyworthy of the rights to life and safety as any other Canadian. Human rights lawsalso hold Canadian decision-makers accountable for the actions they are taking (oroften, not taking) to address violence, especially when it is an ongoing, nationalcrisis harming a specific group of people. For example, when the UN Committeeon the Rights of the Child reviewed Canada’s human rights commitments tochildren earlier this month, they called on Canada to take stronger steps toinvestigate and provide justice to MMIWG family members.Guest EssaysIndigenous Women, Girls and Gender-Diverse PeopleAre Humans With Rights.Essay image description: Indigenous women honour and pay tribute to Missing and MurderedIndigenous women, girls, and two-spirit people.Image credit: This image was generously provided by NWAC.

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TAKE ACTIONE N G A G I N G I N A C T I V I S MAmnesty supporters are making the world a fairer place. Because of theactions of individuals, lives have been saved, unfair laws have changed, thewrongfully imprisoned have been released. Your actions make a difference.T a k e A c t i o n T o d a y

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COPYRIGHT © 2022 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL TORONTO ORGANIZATION.Contact Us:info@thematchstick.org@amnestytorontowww.TheMatchstick.org

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COPYRIGHT © 2022 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL TORONTO ORGANIZATION.