St. Brendan High School
Curriculum Guide
2021-2022
Led by Christ,
who changes our hearts and the world
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Table of Contents
Mission Statement
4
Vision Statement
4
Academies
5
Alpha Program
5
Champagnat Program
6
College Prep Tracks
7
Student Placement
8
General Scheduling Information
8
Evaluation Tools and Protocols
9
St. Brendan High School Graduation Requirements
9
Admissions Policies for State Universities of Florida
10
College Credit Programs
10
Art Department Courses
13
Business Department Courses
23
English Department Courses
28
AP Capstone
33
Mathematics Department Courses
35
Physical Education Department Courses
41
Science Department Courses
43
Social Sciences Department Courses
50
Theology Department Courses
56
World Languages Department Courses
58
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Mission Statement
The mission of St. Brendan High School is to provide its students with an authentic Catholic educational
experience characterized by a safe and diverse environment of academic excellence, mutual respect, and the holistic
development of the individual intellectually, physically, socially, and spiritually.
Teachers and staff are on a journey of professional and personal maturation that enables them to help students
grow in self-awareness and the awareness of our complex and global world. In addition, they help them become
college and career ready in the 21
st
Century through the use of the latest educational resources and the most
cutting-edge technological tools available. Thus, our school community builds its unity through a lived experience
of faith, culture, innovation, and charity.
Vision Statement
To continue leading authentic Catholic education in the United States, St. Brendan High School will:
Provide students with a co-educational experience of faith and charity that meets their human needs and
accompany them on their personal journey of growth in self-awareness.
Guarantee a diverse and safe environment that emphasizes humanity is inherently common, universal, and
unifying.
Implement innovative and interdisciplinary academic programs to guarantee student success in career
development for a global society.
Be at the forefront of the cutting-edge technological evolution in the field of education.
Encourage an athletic philosophy where success is measured through personal growth and fulfillment, and the
body is considered the home of the soul.
Foster meaningful and productive two-way communication with parents, students, faculty, and the community,
understanding that strong school-community partnerships contribute to academic, human, and spiritual
success.
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Academies
Academies are schools within our school which help our students focus on particular areas of interest. Participation
in an academy is optional and available to all students, regardless of program. Academy directors serve as mentors
to help guide students. They help them in particular with their curricular needs and in providing activities that will
enhance their academic and career success. Participation in an academy involves taking courses that are geared
towards the specific field of study. Fieldtrips, workshops, summer courses, and mentoring by professionals in the
field provide academy students a better understanding of their chosen field and the practical application of the
subject matter they cover. Students can choose one of four academies: Medical Sciences, STEM, Law and Global
Business, and Visual and Performing Arts.
Alpha Program
The Alpha Program is an accelerated academic program designed to enable high-achieving and gifted students
attain excellence in academics. The program offers St. Brendan High School’s most challenging curriculum, as well
as summer programs and enrichment activities.
Alpha Program Curriculum Overview
Freshman Year
Theology I
Pre-AP English 1
Algebra I Honors or Algebra II Honors
Pre-AP Biology
AP World History
Foreign Language
Geometry Honors or Art/Computer Science
Junior Year
Theology III
AP Capstone Research
AP English Language
Honors or AP Math
AP Physics or Physics Honors
AP US History
Elective
Alpha students are encouraged to take four years of foreign language, four years of science, AP courses, and
challenging electives as recommended by leading universities. AP Capstone Seminar (10
th
grade) and AP Capstone
Research (11
th
grade) are required courses for Alpha Program students.
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Champagnat Program
The Champagnat Program is designed for students who have specific learning disabilities. The program consists of
both an inclusive model with support, as well as self-contained classrooms for those in need of greater academic
assistance. Instruction in self-contained classrooms is provided by certified special education faculty. Acceptance to
the program is based on prior academic progress, letters of recommendation, psycho-educational evaluation and
diagnosis. All students enrolled in the program must fulfill the 28-credit graduation requirement of the State of
Florida.
Champagnat Program Curriculum Overview
Freshman Year
Sophomore Year
Theology I
English I
Algebra I
Biology I
World History
Spanish I
HOPE
Theology II
English II
Geometry
Physical Science
Art/Principles of Computer Science
Spanish II
Elective
Junior Year
Senior Year
Theology III
English III
Algebra II
Environmental Science
U.S. History
Elective
Elective
Theology IV
English IV
Math for College Readiness
American Government/Economics
Elective
Elective
Elective
The Champagnat Program’s course descriptions are the same as the ones found in the various departments’ listings
but tailored to meet the needs of the students in the Champagnat Program.
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College Prep Tracks
At St. Brendan High School, we strive to meet the educational needs of all of our students to help them become
college and career ready. Students are placed into college prep courses that meet their needs yet are academically
challenging. We strive to prepare our students for success at the college level. Our honors and AP courses are
designed for the advanced student who is capable of learning much beyond the ordinary content of a course and
who assumes the responsibility of working independently. Students are encouraged to challenge themselves by
registering in the AP and dual enrollment courses for which they qualify. Individual course prerequisites are listed
in the curriculum guide.
Curriculum Overview
Freshman Year
Sophomore Year
Theology I
English I, English I Honors
Algebra I, Algebra I Honors, Geometry,
Algebra II
Biology I, Biology I Honors
World History, World History Honors
First year of foreign language
HOPE
Theology II
English II, English II Honors
Geometry, Geometry Honors, Algebra II,
Algebra II Honors, Pre-Calculus, Pre-Calculus
Honors, Advanced Pre-Calculus
Chemistry I, Chemistry I Honors
Second year of foreign language
Art/Computer Science
AP Capstone Seminar or Elective
Junior Year
Senior Year
Theology III
English III, English III Honors, AP English
Language
Algebra II, Algebra II Honors, Analysis of
Functions, Pre-Calculus, Pre-Calculus
Honors, Calculus, Calculus Honors
Physics, Physics Honors, AP Physics 1
U.S. History, U.S. History Honors,
AP U.S. History
AP Capstone Research or Elective
Elective
Theology IV
English IV, English IV Honors, AP English
Literature
Calculus, Calculus AB, Calculus BC, Pre-Calculus,
Pre-Calculus Honors, Advanced Topics in
Math, Math for College Readiness, Statistics
Honors, AP Statistics
American Government/Economics (honors and
AP available)
Elective
Elective
Elective
Students may double up in the following courses: Geometry concurrent with Algebra II, or Pre-Calculus or Calculus
concurrent with Statistics. The Mathematics Department chair will advise students if they meet the requirements for
doubling up. Students are also strongly encouraged to take four years of science, four years of a foreign language
and the AP Capstone courses.
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Student Placement
St. Brendan High School offers a balanced curriculum that focuses on essential subject matter and fundamental
principles with clear objectives. Our academic vision fosters students’ curiosity and wonder through observation and
encourages higher order thinking using knowledge and reason. We offer students courses that will challenge them
as well as awaken their passions in an effort to help them find their path in life.
In order to ensure the proper academic preparation, student placement in course levels is extremely important.
Administrators, department chairpersons, teachers, and counselors collaborate to place students in the courses that
will help meet their educational and career needs.
Freshmen are placed in the appropriate course of studies as a result of their scores on the HSPT Entrance Exam,
placement tests, grades earned in elementary/middle school, middle school standardized tests. Transfer students’
placement is based on grades and standardized test scores from their previous school, as well as a placement test
whenever possible.
Sophomores, juniors, and seniors are advised by their academy directors, counselors and teachers to take courses
that will meet graduation requirements, provide college and career readiness, and fulfill scholarship criteria. Current
subject grades, GPA, standardized tests and teacher recommendations determine placement in courses. Placement
in a particular level of a course in a given year does not limit a student's ability to change course level the following
year, provided the prerequisites are met. Course placement is based on the grade at the time of course selection. If
a student meets the prerequisite grade at the end of the year, the student can be placed in the higher course if
space permits.
General Scheduling Information
Course selection should be taken seriously; therefore, the student should discuss alternatives with parents, academy
directors, teachers and the guidance counselor. When building the master schedule, every effort is made to program
class sections so that students will be enrolled in the electives they request as first choice. Students may not always
be enrolled in the courses that they request because of one or more of the following reasons:
a. students do not satisfy course prerequisites
b. the course section(s) is(are) filled to capacity
c. scheduling conflicts (two courses selected are only offered in the same time slot)
d. there are too few requests for the class and the class is not offered
Choices of alternative course should be given the same consideration as that given for first choices. Changes to
the schedule may be made on a space available basis.
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Evaluation Tools and Protocols
At St. Brendan High School, we strive to provide students with every opportunity to succeed in the classroom. In
order to meet the needs of multiple learning styles, students are evaluated using traditional assessments such as
multiple choice and essay exams and a variety of non-traditional assessments including oral evaluations, research
projects, hands-on laboratory experiments, and presentations on multiple topics. A Midterm and Final Exam will be
given in every class, each of which will account for 10 percent of the overall grade for the course. In an effort to help
our students be more college and career ready, standardized testing is given to all freshmen, sophomores, and
juniors as follows:
Freshmen: PSAT
*
and Aspire
*
(ACT practice test)
Sophomores: PSAT and Aspire
Juniors: PSAT and ACT
*Although national statistics are not gathered at the freshman level, early exposure to such standardized tests is
critical from the onset of high school.
St. Brendan High School Graduation Requirements
1. Minimum of 28 credits
2. Cumulative unweighted grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale
3. 100 community service hours as part of a service learning project. At least 25 service learning hours of
community service at each grade level.
4. No outstanding financial debts
5. Students must earn credits in the specific areas set forth below
6. One full faith-based retreat during junior or senior year
English 4 credits
Mathematics (Algebra I & higher) 4 credits
Personal Fitness and Health 1 credit
Science 3 credits
Art 0.5 credit
Social Sciences 3 credits
Theology 4 credits
Computer Science 0.5 credit
Foreign Language (same language) 2 credits
Elective courses 6 credits
St. Brendan High School will withhold diplomas and final transcripts if all requirements for graduation are not met,
including the requirement for community service. Students who do not meet the 2.0 GPA requirement will not be
allowed to participate in graduation ceremonies. Students enrolled in semester classes must pass each semester
independently of the other or will be required to remediate the course.
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Minimum Admissions Policies for the State Universities of Florida
The State of Florida Board of Regents has established minimum state-level admissions policies for first-time college
students and for students transferring without having AA degrees from Florida public community colleges. The
policies include a list of required high school academic courses considered to be the best preparation for entry to
college. These requirements are minimum state standards when applying to any of the state universities.
Since each state university may have more stringent admissions standards, students should exceed the
following minimum requirements to enhance the probability of admission.
1. Graduation from an accredited secondary school or successful completion of the GED;
2. Completion of 16 academic units in a college preparatory curriculum;
English 4 units (3 units must include substantial writing components)
Math 4 units (Algebra I or higher)
Natural Sciences 3 units (2 units must include a laboratory component)
Social Sciences 3 units
Foreign Language 2 units (same language) most prefer 4 units
Academic Electives 2 units (SUS approved courses may be used as additional academic credits)
3. Submission of official SAT or ACT scores
College Credit Programs
Students have the opportunity to earn college credit while concurrently enrolled in high school courses. Credit is
granted either through a Dual Enrollment program (DE), and/or through the Advanced Placement Program (AP).
There are some significant differences between the two programs.
Dual Enrollment Program
The Dual Enrollment Program allows students to earn college credits in specific courses granted by St. Thomas
University. Students can earn 3 or 4 college credits per semester per approved course. Credit is recognized within
Florida by most colleges and universities, but may or may not be accepted outside of Florida. Each college or
university has established policies regarding the acceptance of dual enrollment credits. Dual Enrollment for a course
is dependent on the qualifications of the instructor and the regulations set forth by St. Thomas University. Dual
enrollment course availability may change without prior notice. A student must receive a final grade of “C” or better
to transfer credits. Students are
limited to a maximum of 29 credits at time of graduation.
Dual enrollment courses
are open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors with a cumulative unweighted GPA of 3.0 or above who register in
any of the following courses:
Anatomy & Physiology Honors
AP Calculus AB
Calculus I Honors
English IV Honors
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Physics Honors
Pre-Calculus Honors
Advanced Pre-Calculus
Statistics Honors
Theology III
United States History Honors
Web Design
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Advanced Placement
The College Board designs the curriculum for Advanced Placement (AP) courses. Students enrolled in an AP course
must sit for the AP exam in May and a fee will be collected for the administration of the exam. Results are nationally
recognized, and an exam score of 3 or above is required for most colleges to grant credit. The AP Scholar Awards
are academic distinctions granted by the College Board to students that have scored exceptionally well on various
AP exams. St. Brendan High School offers AP courses in the following areas:
Art History
Biology
Calculus AB
Calculus BC
Capstone: Seminar
Capstone: Research
Chemistry
Chinese Language and Culture
Computer Science A
Computer Science Principles
Drawing
English Language & Composition
English Literature & Composition
Environmental Science
European History
French Language and Culture
Human Geography
Italian Language and Culture
Microeconomics
Physics 1
Physics 2
Physics C
Psychology
Spanish Language and Culture
Spanish Literature and Culture
Statistics
United States Government & Politics
United States History
World History: Modern
St. Brendan High School offers the AP Capstone program sponsored by the College Board. Students who complete
the Seminar and Research courses, earn a 3 or higher on the AP Exams, and earn a 3 or higher on four additional
AP Exams, will receive the AP Capstone Diploma that will be designated on their transcript. The AP Capstone
Diploma is highly regarded as a top distinction awarded by College Board, which is extremely beneficial for college
admittance and future academic goals. It is highly recommended for students to take the Capstone courses during
their sophomore and junior year. For more information regarding the AP Capstone program, please visit
https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-capstone.
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The following section of the Curriculum Guide contains course requirements and descriptions,
listed by department. Final course offerings depend upon the number of students enrolled in
each course, once the master schedule is finalized.
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Art Department
Courses listed alphabetically and categorized as Performing Arts or Visual Arts.
All courses below meet graduation requirements for Art.
Performing Arts Courses
Acting I Course No: 1011
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisites: None
Notes: Students may be required to attend and/or participate in extra rehearsals and performances outside of the
school day to support, extend, and assess learning in the classroom.
Course Description: Through improvisation, scripted scenes, performance projects, and/or practical application,
students learn to identify what makes performances believable and explore the tools used to create, articulate, and
execute them. Upon completion of this course, students have a strong foundation for future scene work, script
analysis, and play production. Public performances may serve as a culmination of specific instructional goals.
Acting II Course No: 1012
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisites: Acting I and instructor approval; audition may be required.
Notes: Students may be required to attend and/or participate in extra rehearsals and performances outside of the
school day to support, extend, and assess learning in the classroom.
Course Description: Students examine the various dimensions of characters through analysis, discussion, and
classroom performance, working with scripts from a variety of time periods and cultures. They learn to break down
a scene from a character’s point of view, and also learn to sustain a character and build the relationship between
actor and audience. Public performances may serve as a culmination of specific instructional goals.
Acting III Course No: 1013
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisites: Acting II and instructor approval; audition may be required.
Notes: Students may be required to attend and/or participate in extra rehearsals and performances outside of the
school day to support, extend, and assess learning in the classroom.
Course Description: Students focus on development of significant acting skills and knowledge of the actor’s
literature, compiling a working actor’s portfolio for exhibition and/or the interview process. They research potential
job opportunities in the film, television, game animation, and theatre industries, as well as scholarships and
opportunities available at the university level. Public performances may serve as a culmination of specific
instructional goals.
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Ballet I Course No: 1014
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Students learn basic classical dance techniques and terminology associated with the traditional
class structure of ballet. Public performances may serve as a culmination of specific instructional goals. Students
may be required to attend and/or participate in rehearsals and performances outside the school day to support,
extend, and assess learning in the classroom. Students in this class may need to obtain appropriate footwear and/or
dance attire from an outside source.
Band I Course No: 1016
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Notes: Instrument fee may be applicable
Course Description: This year-long, entry-level class, designed for students having little or no previous band
experience with woodwind, brass, and/or percussion instruments, promotes the enjoyment and appreciation of
music through performance of high-quality, beginning wind and percussion literature from different times and
places. Rehearsals focus on the development of critical listening/aural skills; rudimentary instrumental technique
and skills, music literacy, and ensemble skills; and aesthetic musical awareness culminating in periodic public
performances.
Band I I Course No: 1017
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: Band I or instructor approval
Notes: Instrument fee may be applicable
Course Description: This year-long, beginning-level class, designed for students with at least one year of woodwind,
brass, and/ or percussion ensemble experience, promotes the enjoyment and appreciation of music through
performance of high-quality wind and percussion literature. Rehearsals focus on the development of critical listening
skills, instrumental and ensemble technique and skills, expanded music literacy, and aesthetic awareness culminating
in periodic public performances.
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Band III Course No: 1018
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Band II
Notes: This course requires students to participate in extra rehearsals and performances beyond the school day.
Instrument fee may be applicable.
Course Description: This year-long class, designed for students ready to build on skills and knowledge previously
acquired in Band II, promotes the enjoyment and appreciation of music through performance of high-quality,
intermediate-level wind and percussion literature. Rehearsals focus on development of critical listening/aural skills,
individual musicianship, instrumental technique, refinement of ensemble skills, and engagement culminating in
periodic public performances.
Band IV Course No: 1019
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Band III
Notes: This course requires students to participate in extra rehearsals and performances beyond the school day.
Instrument fee may be applicable.
Course Description: This year-long, intermediate-level course, designed for students who demonstrate proficiency
in woodwind, brass and/or percussion techniques, music literacy, critical listening/aural skills, and ensemble
performance skills, promotes greater engagement with and appreciation for music through performance and other
experiences with a broad spectrum of music, as well as creativity through composition and/or arrangement. Study
includes cultivation of well-developed instrumental ensemble techniques and skills, music literacy and theory, and
deeper aesthetic engagement with a wide variety of high-quality repertoire.
Broadcasting I Course No: 1020
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit 1 semester
Prerequisite: Sophomore or Junior standing
Course Description: The objective of this course is to offer instruction in the writing, reporting, anchoring, conducting
interviews, post-production editing, and videotaping of news, features, editorials, and critical reviews. Content
includes the history of broadcast journalism, criteria for recognizing sound journalistic practices, and basics of video
production.
Broadcasting II Course No: 1021
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Broadcasting I and approval from course instructor
Course Description: The objective of this course is to offer further instruction in the writing, reporting, anchoring,
conducting interviews, post production editing, and videotaping of news, features, editorials, and critical reviews.
Content includes more advanced topics in the history of broadcast journalism, criteria for recognizing sound
journalistic practices, and video production.
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Broadcasting III Course No: 1022
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Broadcasting II and approval from course instructor
Course Description: This course covers competencies in special effects lighting, use of equipment, digital audio and
video recording and editing operations, television production and programming, and online research.
Dance Technique I Course No: 1024
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisites: None
Notes: This course generally requires students to participate in extra rehearsals and performances beyond the
school day.
Course Description: Dance I is designed to give the beginner / intermediate level student an overview of dance. The
fundamentals of dance technique, phrasing, choreography, and performance will be emphasized within a historical
and cultural context.
Dance Technique II Course No: 1025
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisites: Dance Technique I and instructor approval
Notes: This course generally requires students to participate in extra rehearsals and performances beyond the
school day.
Course Description: The course is a continuation of Dance I, with further emphasis on technique, style, phrasing, and
performance. Students continue studying varied dance styles with emphasis on improvisation and choreography.
Dance Technique III Honors Course No: 1026
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisites: Dance Technique II and instructor approval
Notes: This course generally requires students to participate in extra rehearsals and performances beyond the
school day.
Course Description: The course is the last in the sequence with further emphasis on technique, style, phrasing, and
performance. Students will continue studying varied dance styles and further develop improvisation and
choreography skills.
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Debate I Honors Course No: 1027
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisites: 3.3 weighted GPA
Note: This course generally requires students to participate in activities beyond the school day. Competition is a
course requirement; each competition will have separate fees. Students will be required to attend at least four
throughout the year.
Course Description: This course introduces the various types of speeches as well as the keys for effective speech
preparation and confident, competent communicators as they learn to research language and vocabulary effectively.
Students learn useful delivery strategies as well as how to perfect their listening, observation, and analysis skills.
Music of the World Course No: 1028
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to develop a general knowledge of music through listening, and
understanding all styles and genres of music. Students will learn how today’s music (such as pop/rock, big-band,
jazz, hip-hop, rap, etc.) has been influenced by the traditional style.
Music Theory I Course No: 1029
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Students learn how music is constructed and developed, and acquire a basic understanding of
the structural, technical, and historical elements of music, including electronic music. Student theorists develop basic
ear-training, keyboard, and functional singing skills, and engage in the creative process through individual and
collaborative projects. Public performances may serve as a resource for specific instructional goals. Students may
be required to attend one or more performances outside the school day to support, extend, and assess learning in
the classroom.
Public Speaking Course No: 1030
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: This course provides the student with practical speaking experience in a variety of situations
that include answering questions in class, interviews, and formal argumentation. Effective and ineffective
communication techniques are explored and verbal/nonverbal skills are analyzed. The ultimate goal is to enhance a
necessary survival skill by improving speech effectiveness and building self-confidence.
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Vocal Ensemble I Course No: 1032
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Audition or instructor approval
Notes: This course generally requires students to participate in extra rehearsals and performances beyond the
school day.
Course Description: Students with little or no experience in vocal ensemble will develop basic musicianship and
ensemble performance skills through the study of basic, high-quality music in diverse styles. Student musicians
focus on building foundational music techniques, music literacy, listening skills, and aesthetic awareness. Public
performances may serve as a culmination of specific instructional goals.
Vocal Ensemble II Course No: 1033
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Vocal Ensemble I and instructor approval
Notes: This course generally requires students to participate in extra rehearsals and performances beyond the
school day.
Course Description: This course is designed to extend experience in basic vocal production techniques and part
singing. The focus is to extend basic musicianship skills and to develop vocal tone production, music literacy, and
music listening skills.
Vocal Ensemble III Course No: 1034
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Vocal Ensemble II and instructor approval
Notes: This course generally requires students to participate in extra rehearsals and performances beyond the
school day
Course Description: This course is designed to provide instruction in the development of musicianship and vocal
technical skills through the study of varied choral literature. The focus is to understand and interpret notation, simple
musical form, varied style periods, aesthetic values, and to establish appropriate tone production and performance
technique. Students strengthen vocal ensemble performance skills, music literacy, and analytical skills through the
study of high-quality music in diverse styles. Student musicians learn to self-assess and collaborate as they rehearse,
perform, and study relevant history and cultures. Public performances may serve as the culmination of specific
instructional goals.
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Visual Arts Courses
Art 2D Course No: 1040
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunities to develop a basic
understanding of the artistic expression of ideas through two-dimensional media. Students experiment with the
media and techniques used to create a variety of two-dimensional (2-D) artworks through the development of skills
in drawing, painting, printmaking, collage, and/or design. Students practice, sketch, and manipulate the structural
elements of art to improve mark making and/or the organizational principles of design in a composition from
observation, research, and/or imagination. Through the critique process, students evaluate and respond to their
own work and that of their peers. This course incorporates hands-on activities and consumption of art materials.
Art 3D Course No: 1041
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to give students a basic understanding of three-dimensional art
methods, media, techniques, and craftsmanship. Students explore how space, mass, balance, and form combine to
create aesthetic forms or utilitarian products and structures. Instruction may include, but is not limited to sculpture,
ceramics, or building arts. Media may include, but are not limited to, clay, wood, plaster, and paper maché. Student
artists consider the relationship of scale, volume, visual weight, and gravity to create freestanding structures. They
explore sharp and diminishing detail, size, position, overlapping, visual pattern, texture, implied line, space, and
plasticity, reflecting craftsmanship and quality in the surface and structural qualities of the completed art forms.
Art History Course No: 1042
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Notes:
Course Description: Students take an inquiry-based approach to exploring, researching, and analyzing works of art
across time and cultures. In developing art-specific vocabulary, students explore how the structural elements of art
and organizational principles of design have been used to solve artistic challenges and create meaning. Students
learn to identify the functions, forms, media, styles of art, cultural ideas, and themes related to time periods and
geographical places. Career options related to art history and criticism are also explored. This course incorporates
hands-on activities and consumption of art materials.
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Art History Honors Course No: 1043
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Cumulative weighted average of 3.3 or higher
Course Description: Students explore the role of art in history and culture through observation and analysis of
significant works of art and architecture from Prehistory through the 16th century. Student historians investigate
the societal context of works, considering traditional forms and conventions of representation, symbolism, and the
purposes for which the art was created. The course includes an introduction to the methodologies of art history and
criticism, study of the media and techniques used by artists from various cultures and time periods, and use of
appropriate terminology in verbal and written analyses of artworks drawn from around the world. Student historians
critique and compare works across time and cultures to develop an understanding of, and respect for, the visual
arts as a chronicle of history, cultural heritage, and the human experience. This course may incorporate hands-on
activities and consumption of art materials.
AP Art History Course No: 1044
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 3.5 weighted GPA
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: Students will examine major forms of artistic expression from the past and present and from a
variety of cultures. Students learn to look at works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and to articulate
what they see or experience. This course is designed to provide college-level instruction in art history and prepare
students for the AP exam in early May.
Ceramics/Pottery I Course No: 1045
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing
Course Description: This course gives the students a basic understanding of ceramic processes. The student will
learn the composition and treatment of clay and the qualities different forms and styles. The student will use hand-
building techniques with clay bodies, and tools necessary in creating various pieces.
Digital Art Imaging I Course No: 1046
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: Students explore the fundamental concepts, terminology, techniques, and applications of digital
imaging to create original work. Students produce digital still images through the use of Photoshop. Through the
critique process, students evaluate and respond to their own work and that of their peers to measure artistic
growth. This course incorporates hands-on activities, the use of technology, and consumption of art materials.
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Digital Art Imaging II Course No: 1047
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisites: Digital Art Imaging I or instructor approval
Course Description: Students explore and develop concepts, terminology, techniques, and applications to design,
create, print, and display original two-dimensional graphic and fine works of art. As they become more adept at
using the tools and techniques available to them, students design digital still images through the use of
Illustrator. Through the critique process, students evaluate and respond to their own designs and images and those
of their peers to measure artistic growth with increasing sophistication. This course incorporates hands-on activities,
the use of technology, and consumption of art materials.
AP Drawing Course No: 1048
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Completion of Portfolio Honors or instructor approval
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: The AP Drawing portfolios are designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical
experience of art. AP Drawing is not based on a written exam; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at
the end of the school year. The AP Drawing Program sets a national standard for performance in the visual arts that
contributes to the significant role the arts play in academic environments. AP Drawing is an introductory college-
level drawing course. Students refine and apply skills and ideas they develop throughout the course to produce
drawings.
Portfolio Honors Course No: 1049
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Completion of Art /2D and instructor approval
Note: There is a $50 materials fee for this course.
Course Description: This course allows the student to further develop creative skills. Emphasis is placed on
technique, composition and design. A variety of media will be explored. Projects will allow students to prepare
portfolio for college admission.
Film I Course No: 1050
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: Senior standing
Course Description: Students explore the fundamental concepts, terminology, techniques, and applications of digital
imaging to create original work. The instructional focus will be on film. Students produce digital animated images
through the single or combined use of computers, digital cameras, digital video cameras, scanners, photo editing
software, drawing and painting software, graphic tablets, printers, new media, and emerging technologies. Through
the critique process, students evaluate and respond to their own work and that of their peers to measure artistic
growth. This course incorporates hands-on activities, the use of technology, and consumption of art materials.
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Photography Course No: 1051
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: Senior standing
Course Description: Students explore the foundations of art making using beginning photography techniques. This
course may include, color and/or black and white photography via digital media and/or traditional photography.
Students become familiar with the basic mechanics of a camera, including lens and shutter operation, compositional
foundations, printing an image for display, and evaluating a successful print. Student may use a variety of media
and materials, such as 35mm black and white film, single lens reflex camera, digital camera, darkroom, computer
application, filters, various papers, digital output, photogram, cyanotypes, Sabatier effect, and pinhole photography.
Craftsmanship and quality are reflected in the surface of the prints and the care of the materials. Photographers use
an art criticism process to evaluate, explain, and measure artistic growth in personal/group works and incorporates
hands-on activities and consumption of art materials.
Visual Technology I Course No: 1052
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Students introduced to the fundamental concepts, terminology, techniques, and applications
of digital imaging to create original work. Students produce animated digital images through the use of Maya
Animation Software and AutoCAD Design Software, as well as new media, and emerging technologies. Through the
critique process, students evaluate and respond to their own work and that of their peers to measure artistic growth.
This course incorporates hands-on activities, the use of technology, and consumption of art materials.
Visual Technology II Course No: 1053
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Course introduces students to fundamental concepts, terminology, techniques, and applications
of digital imaging to create original work. Students produce animated digital images through the use of Maya
Animation Software and AutoCAD Design Software, as well as new media, and emerging technologies. Through the
critique process, students evaluate and respond to their own work and that of their peers to measure artistic growth.
This course incorporates hands-on activities, the use of technology, and consumption of art materials.
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Business /Computer Science Department
Courses listed alphabetically and categorized as Business or Computer Science/Technology.
Business Courses
Accounting I Honors Course No: 1111
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Weighted average of 3.5 or higher
Course Description: This course teaches basic concepts and procedures of accounting theory. Students receive a
detailed overview of accounting from the viewpoint of the sole proprietorship, the partnership, and the corporation.
Both service and merchandising businesses are studied. Topics covered are the accounting cycle, ledgers, payroll,
taxes, plant assets, depreciation, and inventory methods. Students are taught to perform manual and computerized
accounting functions.
Accounting II Honors Course No: 1112
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Accounting I Honors and instructor approval
Course Description: This course continues the study of accounting principles and offers a QuickBooks certification
course. The content includes workplace voucher systems, cash receipts, petty cash, payroll records, tax forms,
inventory, and internal control systems.
Business Law Course No: 1113
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: Business Law is designed to familiarize the student with those laws that affect his/her daily life.
The course includes such topics as a basic introduction to the law and the system of government in the United
States, the difference between crimes and torts, laws for minors, families, and consumers, contracts, buying and
selling, using credit, insurance, and employment.
Business Management Course No: 1114
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: Minimum weighted average of 3.3 or higher
Course Description: This course is designed to prepare students for the global business environment by exploring
themes of economics, leadership, marketing, principles of management, human resource relations, and business
ethics case studies. Students will use a software-based business simulation.
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Entrepreneurship Course No: 1115
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Half credit 1 semester
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in Business Management or 80 or higher in Marketing
Course Description: This course provides instruction in the basic principles of entrepreneurship including the role of
the entrepreneur, entrepreneurship as a career, ethics in business, and the principles of marketing, financing, and
managing a business. There is no occupational completion point after the completion of this course.
Personal Finance Course No: 1116
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: This course is designed to provide basic personal finance skills that are relevant to our lives,
laying a solid foundation for financial independence and future financial decisions. Students will learn how to
manage money effectively by learning to budget, use credit, understand earning power, and how to save and invest.
International Business Systems Course No: 1117
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: This course is designed to prepare students to live and work in a global economy. Students
develop an understanding of business principles, management styles, economics, and customs which affect business
systems in the international environment.
Marketing Course No: 1118
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: This course introduces students to the theory and application of the marketing mix. Students
will become familiar with identifying and segmenting markets, the functions of marketing, sales, communication
skills, channels of distribution, pricing strategies and practices, marketing research, and promotion and advertising.
Student activities include computerized marketing simulations.
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Computer Science/Technology Courses
AP Computer Science A Course No: 1131
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Previous programming course with a grade of 80 or higher, and a weighted average of 3.8 or higher,
or instructor approval.
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: The Advanced Placement Program offers a course and exam in introductory computer science.
The course emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and
algorithm development, and is meant to be the equivalent of a first-semester college-level course in computer
science. It also includes the study of data structures, design, and abstraction.
AP Computer Science Principles Course No: 1132
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Weighted cumulative average of 3.5 or higher
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: Advanced Placement’s newest computer science course introduces students to the foundational
concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology impact the world.
With a unique focus on creative problem solving and real-world applications, AP Computer Science Principles
prepares students for college and career.
Apple App Development with Swift Course No: 1133
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full Credit 1 year
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in Algebra I (College Prep)
Course Description: In this one year course of Apple app development, students learn how to program object-
oriented applications using Swift. Students receive practical experience with tools, techniques, and concepts needed
to build a basic iOS application. At the end of the course, students will have the opportunity to be Swift Certified
Level 1 through Certiport.
Computer Programming I (Java) Course No: 1134
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in current math course or teacher recommendation
Notes: May be available for dual enrollment
Course Description: This course, used for scientific, mathematical, and system programming, is designed to teach
the student how to program a computer using the Java language. It is intended for the student who has strong
analytical skills.
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Game and Simulation Programming Course No: 1135
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 1 and cumulative weighted average of 2.8 or higher
Course Description: This course is focused on students acquiring the appropriate programming skill for rendering a
game or simulation product, including program control, conditional branching, memory management, score-
keeping, timed event strategies and methodologies, and implementation issues.
Introduction to Coding Course No: 1136
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit 1 semester
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in Algebra I (College Prep)
Course Description: Introduction to Coding is an entry-level course designed for students to learn computer-
programming concepts with a focus on the creation of software applications employing procedural programming
techniques in Python.
Principles of Computer Science Course No: 1137
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: This course is required for sophomores.
Course Description: Designed to appeal to a diverse audience, this course examines some of the fundamental ideas
of the science of computing. Lectures and hands-on assignments cover a wide variety of topics such as the Internet,
software applications, computer programming, limits of computing, and graphics. Microsoft Office will be used in
this course; this includes Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access. Typing.com and Construct 3 are online components
where students will learn through online delivery of content and instruction with some element of student control
over time, place, path, or pace.
Robotics I Course No: 1138
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in Algebra I phase 1 or Champagnat; 75 or higher in Algebra II (College Prep)
Course Description: This course provides students with a foundation in content and skills associated with robotics
and automation, including artificial intelligence, electronics, and principles of engineering.
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Robotics II Course No: 1139
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Robotics I and teacher recommendation
Course Description: This course is the second robotics course where students will continue to learn content and
skills essential to the design and operation of robotics. These include artificial intelligence, sensors, electronic
devices, engineering technologies, motion physics, electrical motors, programming, simulation and modeling, and
critical thinking skills. Furthermore, the robots created in this course will be entered in robotics competitions.
Web Design Course No: 1140
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: None
Notes: May be available for dual enrollment credit.
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to have students successfully access information on the Internet
and to introduce them to creating and maintaining a web page. The topics covered will include, but not be limited
to, the World Wide Web, FTP, electronic mail, search engines, HTML and CSS.
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English Department
Courses listed by grade level.
English I Course No: 1211
Course Level: Fundamental
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Course Description: This course is designed to help the student develop the skills required for the effective use of
Standard English including grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization. It reviews previously studied
composition skills and carries the student further into the study of more advanced skills which lead to better writing.
Literature is studied using selections in poetry, short stories, drama, and non-fiction from a literature text and outside
novels. Students will write various types of essays, DBQ essays and research papers. Vocabulary is studied
throughout the year using a formal text along with additional material incorporated into the course. Instruction is
also provided in preparation for the PSAT, SAT and ACT.
English I Course No: 1212
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Course Description: This course is designed to help the student master the skills required for the effective use of
Standard English including grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization. It reviews previously studied
composition skills and carries the student further into the study of more advanced skills which lead to better writing.
Literature is studied using selections in poetry, short stories, drama, and non-fiction from a literature text and outside
novels. Students will write various types of essays, DBQ essays and research papers. Vocabulary is studied
throughout the year using a formal text along with additional material incorporated into the course. Instruction is
also provided in preparation for the PSAT, SAT and ACT.
English I Honors Course No: 1213
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Course Description: This course is a more intensive version of English I, designed to encourage reading, grammar,
composition, and vocabulary skills. The areas are intertwined throughout the year as an ongoing process. Students
are required to illustrate their understanding by means of paragraph development, outlining, theme papers,
research papers, and personal journals. Students are required to read novels independently and write creative and
analytical reports. Instruction is also provided in preparation for the PSAT, SAT and ACT.
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Pre-AP English 1 Course No: 1214
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Alpha program
Course Description: Pre-AP English 1 focuses on the reading, writing, and language skills that have immediate
relevance for students and that will be essential for their future coursework. Texts take center stage in the Pre-AP
English 1 classroom, inspiring and preparing all students for close, critical reading and analytical writing. The course
trains the reader to observe the small details in a text to arrive at a deeper understanding of the whole. It also trains
the writer to focus on crafting complex sentences, building this foundational skill en route to more sophisticated,
longer-form analyses.
English II Course No: 1221
Course Level: Fundamental
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English I (Fundamental) or less than 70 in English I (College Prep)
Course Description: English II covers the literature of Great Britain from 450 to the present according to the following
periods: Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Neo-classical, Romantic, Victorian, and Modern. Students will read
Shakespearean plays, novels, and a selection of poetry and essays. A particular emphasis is given to literature as the
expression of the time in which the works appeared. Attention is also given to the socio-economic backgrounds
and growth of English thought and language. Students will write various types of essays as well as a literary research
paper. Instruction is also provided in preparation for the PSAT, SAT and ACT.
English II Course No: 1222
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in English I (Fundamental), 70 or higher in English I (College Prep) or less than 80 in English
I Honors
Course Description: English II covers the literature of Great Britain from 450 to the present according to the following
periods: Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Neo-classical, Romantic, Victorian, and Modern. Students will read
Shakespearean plays, novels, and a selection of poetry and essays. A particular emphasis is given to literature as the
expression of the time in which the works appeared. Attention is also given to the socio-economic backgrounds
and growth of English thought and language. Students will write various types of essays, with a focus on critical
analysis, as well as a literary research paper. Instruction is also provided in preparation for the PSAT, SAT and ACT.
English II Honors Course No: 1223
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 83 or higher in English IHonors or a 95 in English I department chairperson approval.
Course Description: This class, like English II, focuses on the British literary tradition. It is composed of students who
are considered an accelerated group. The students are encouraged to develop an understanding of both critical and
creative thinking skills and use that knowledge in their writing. Students write various types of essays, with a focus
on critical analysis, as well as a literary research paper. The course work begins with Anglo-Saxon times and extends
into twentieth-century Great Britain. Instruction is also provided in preparation for the PSAT, SAT and ACT.
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Pre-AP English 2 Course No: 1224
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Alpha program
Course Description: Pre-AP English 2 builds on the foundation of English 1, with an emphasis on the recursive moves
that matter in preparing students for the challenges of college-level reading, writing, and discussion. While English
1 introduces the fundamental routines of close observation, critical analysis, and appreciation of author’s craft,
English 2 requires students to apply those same practices to a new host of nonfiction and literary texts. As readers,
students develop a vigilant awareness of how the poet, playwright, novelist, and writer of nonfiction alike can
masterfully manipulate language to serve their unique purposes. As writers, students compose more nuanced
analytical essays without losing sight of the importance of well-crafted sentences and a sense of cohesion.
English III Course No: 1231
Course Level: Fundamental
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English II (Fundamental) or less than 70 in English II (College Prep)
Course Description: English III seeks to provide the student with an overall view of American literature from the
earliest writers to contemporary writers. Integrated into this study are those underlying facets of studying literature:
reading, vocabulary, and writing skills. A research paper will be written the second semester. A class novel will be
read each semester. Instruction is also provided in preparation for the PSAT, SAT, and ACT.
English III Course No: 1232
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in English II (Fundamental), 70 or higher in English II (College Prep) or less than 83 in
English II Honors
Course Description: English III seeks to provide the student with an overall view of American literature from the
earliest writers to contemporary writers. Integrated into this study are those underlying facets of studying literature:
reading, vocabulary, and writing skills. A research paper will be written the second semester. A class novel will be
read each semester. Instruction is also provided in preparation for the PSAT, SAT, and ACT.
English III Honors Course No: 1233
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: 83 in English IIHonors or a 95 in English II and department chairperson approval
Course Description: The content of this course focuses on American literature at a challenging level. The focus is
on critical and creative thinking. Aside from required texts, these students will read two novels independently, write
critical analysis, book reviews, and a literary research paper. Instruction is also provided in preparation for the PSAT,
SAT, and ACT.
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AP English Language & Composition Course No: 1234
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Alpha Program or 90 or higher in English II-Honors, successful completion of mock AP Exam and
department chairperson approval.
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: This course is a college-level course examining prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts.
The course focuses on helping students become skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Students
begin with a discussion of the elements that an author uses to rhetorically manipulate an audience and work to
analyze the author’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects. Students will intelligently analyze and use
rhetoric and rhetorical techniques to be able to comprehend and comment on any text they read. Students will
analyze language as a persuasive tool and the relationship between writer, context, audience, and argument.
English IV Course No: 1242
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English III
Course Description: English IV encompasses literature from around the globe. World Literature covers classical and
contemporary texts. A particular emphasis is given to literature as the expression of the time in which the works
appeared. Class discussion is an essential part of the course, and active participation is required of all students.
Students will write various types of essays, with a focus on critical analysis, as well as a literary research paper.
English IV Honors Course No: 1243
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: 83 in English IIIHonors or a 93 in English III and department chairperson approval
Notes: This course may be available for dual enrollment credit.
Course Description: English IV Honors encompasses literature from around the globe. English IV Honors is
composed of students who are considered an accelerated group. The students are encouraged to develop an
understanding of both critical and creative thinking skills and apply that knowledge in their writing. World Literature
covers classical and contemporary texts. A particular emphasis is given to literature as the expression of the time in
which the works appeared. Class discussion is an essential part of the course, and active participation is required of
all students. Students will write various types of essays, with a focus on critical analysis, as well as a literary research
paper.
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AP English Literature & Composition Course No: 1244
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Alpha Program or 88 or higher in AP English Language or a 95 or higher in English III-Honors, successful
completion of a writing assessment and a cumulative weighted average of 4.0 or higher and department chair
approval.
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: In this course students are involved in the critical reading of literary works. Through such study,
they sharpen their awareness of language and their understanding of the writer's craft. They develop critical
standards for the independent appreciation of any literary work, and they increase their sensitivity to literature as
shared experience. To achieve these goals, students study the individual work, its language, characters, action, and
themes. They consider its structure, meaning and value, and its relationship to contemporary experience as well as
to the times in which it was written. The students will read, analyze and write reports for these novels in addition to
the required work. The first semester is an introduction to paragraph and expository writing. The desired goals are
the honest and effective use of language and the organization of ideas in a clear, coherent, and persuasive way. The
emphasis in the second semester is placed upon critical thinking, evaluating and writing based on works of
recognized literary merit. The study of British Literature, as well as preparation for the Advanced Placement English
exam, will take place throughout the course.
The following courses are electives. They do not satisfy any graduation requirements in English.
Creative Writing Course No: 1250
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit 1 Semester
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop and use fundamental writing and
language skills for creative expression in a variety of literary forms. Emphasis will be on development of a personal
writing style. The content should include, but not be limited to, the following: analysis of literary models, impact of
audience, purpose, and writing mode, writing process strategies, personal writing style, various creative writing
experiences, peer review techniques, publication of final products.
Journalism I Yearbook Course No: 1252
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in current English class and recommendation of yearbook advisor. In order to be
considered for this course, students must complete an application that will include a writing sample.
Notes: This course generally requires students to participate in work and meetings beyond the school day.
Course Description: Journalism I is an introductory course to print media, specifically the study of journalism and
the production of the school yearbook. Students learn how to produce a yearbook and journalistic-style writing.
(Students transferring from other schools who were enrolled in a journalism course must prove mastery of certain
skills before being able to enroll in this course. The alternative for those who transfer, but are not proficient, is to
become a member of the yearbook staff with approval of the advisor.)
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Journalism II Yearbook Course No: 1253
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in current English class and recommendation of yearbook advisor. In order to be
considered for this course, students must complete an application that will include a writing sample.
Notes: This course generally requires students to participate in work and meetings beyond the school day.
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to enable students to extend fundamental skills in the production
of journalism, the production of the school yearbook and to develop further knowledge of journalism history, ethics
use, and management techniques related to the production of journalistic media. (Students transferring from other
schools who were enrolled in a journalism course must prove mastery of certain skills before being able to enroll in
this course. The alternative for those who transfer, but are not proficient, is to become a member of the yearbook
staff with approval of the advisor.)
Journalism III Yearbook Course No: 1254
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisites: 85 or higher in current English class and recommendation of yearbook advisor. In order to be
considered for this course, students must complete an application that will include a writing sample.
Notes: This course generally requires students to participate in work and meetings beyond the school day
Course Description: Throughout this course, students will develop skills in the production of journalism across print,
multimedia, web-based, and broadcasting platforms. Students will demonstrate advanced skills in layout design,
organization/management skills, and use of technology for the successful production of journalistic media; use
writing strategies to craft various forms of journalistic writing, including news writing, feature writing, sports writing,
and editorial writing expressing ideas with maturity and complexity appropriate to writer, audience, purpose, and
context; and demonstrate awareness of the changing careers within the multiple formats of 21st century journalism.
AP Capstone Courses
AP Capstone Seminar Course No: 1260
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in Honors English course; students must be enrolled in the Alpha program and/or in an
academy, and 4.0 weighted GPA; sophomore class standing
Notes: Student must take the AP Exam in May. There is a fee for the AP Exam.
Course Description: AP Seminar engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of
academic and real-world topics and themes by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework,
students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, foundational, literary, and philosophical texts;
listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and
performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in
written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team.
Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and
precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.
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AP Capstone Research Course No: 1261
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in AP Seminar, 4.0 weighted GPA, and teacher recommendation. Notes: There is a fee for
the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: The second course in the AP Capstone experience allows students to design, plan, and conduct
a yearlong research-based investigation on a topic of individual interest. Through this inquiry and investigation,
students demonstrate the ability to apply scholarly understanding to real-world problems and issues. Students
further their skills acquired in the AP Seminar Course by understanding research methodology; employing ethical
research practices; and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information to build, present, and defend an
argument.
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Mathematics Department
Students may double up in the following courses: Geometry concurrent with Algebra II or Pre-calculus; or Calculus (any level)
concurrent with Statistics. The Mathematics Department chair will advise students if they meet the requirements for doubling
up.
This approach will assist student to become more college and career ready. Courses listed by level and sequence.
Algebra I Course No: 1311
Course Level: Fundamental
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Course Description: This course is offered to students who require a slower-paced math course, while at the same
time providing students with the necessary skills to successfully complete the objectives of Algebra I. Students
enrolled in this course earn the one credit of high school Algebra I required for college admission.
Algebra I Course No: 1312
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Course Description: This course aims to acquaint students with the basic how and why of algebraic structures. Topics
include: the structure of mathematical systems, properties of real numbers, set notation, equations, inequalities,
absolute value, relations and functions, rational expressions, radical expressions, polynomials (operations and
factoring), graphing, and the translation of word situations into numerical relations.
Algebra I Honors Course No: 1313
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Notes: All students are required to have a Texas Instruments 84 graphing calculator.
Course Description: This rigorous course delivers a full-year honors curriculum and prepares students for Honors
Geometry and Honors Algebra II. Beginning with a brief review of pre-algebra concepts, students move quickly
through familiar content. Real-life applications help students to understand the importance of algebra in our world.
Topics include the real number system, solving equations and inequalities, polynomials and exponents, factoring
and applications, rational expressions, graphing linear equations, solving linear systems, roots and radicals, quadratic
equations, probability, statistics and modeling.
Geometry Course No: 1321
Course Level: Fundamental
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I (Fundamental)
Course Description: This course introduces the fundamentals of Euclidean Geometry. The fundamental purpose of
the course in Geometry is to formalize and extend students' geometric experiences. Students explore more complex
geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal
mathematical arguments.
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Geometry Course No: 1322
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 95 or higher in Algebra I (Fundamental); 70 or higher in Algebra I (College Prep); successful
completion of Algebra II Honors, or departmental placement for ninth graders.
Course Description: This course is offered to students who have successfully completed Algebra 1. Topics covered
include points, lines and planes, initial postulates and theorems and their respective proofs, angle relationships,
parallel and perpendicular lines, congruent triangles, similar polygons, areas, circles, construction, loci, and
coordinate geometry.
Geometry Honors Course No: 1323
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 95 or higher in Algebra I (College Prep), 80 or higher in Algebra I Honors, 95 or higher in Algebra II
(College Prep), or 80 or higher in Algebra II Honors
Course Description: This course is offered as the second course in the Honors Program and is intended as a rigorous
preparation for the sequential courses in junior and senior years. The course emphasizes critical thinking and
brainstorming in predicting, observing and explaining. Objectives are aligned with the State of Florida Standards
and consist of an in-depth study of plane and coordinate geometry, providing an accelerated study of Euclidean
Geometry, including formal proofs. The objective is to give the student an in-depth study of Geometry with emphasis
on the methods of proofs and the formal language of mathematics. Topics include but not limited to the following:
logic and reasoning, lines, planes, angles, triangles, similarity, congruence, polygons and circles, area and volume.
Algebra II Course No: 1331
Course Level: Fundamental
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I (Fundamental) and Geometry (Fundamental)
Course Description: This course is a continuation of the study of Algebra I and includes equations with three
variables, determinants, sequences, and series, complex numbers, analytic geometry, exponents, logarithms,
probability, statistics and modeling.
Algebra II Course No: 1332
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 95 or higher in Geometry (Fundamental), or 70 or higher in Geometry (College Prep); 70 or higher in
Algebra I (College Prep) or completion of Geometry Honors. Students that are doubling up must have an 80 or
higher in the previous class.
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to continue the study of the structure of Algebra and to provide
a foundation for applying these skills to other mathematical fields, including trigonometry. Topics include real
numbers, equations and inequalities in one variable, polynomials, systems of linear equations and inequalities,
relations and functions, exponents and radicals, quadratic equations and inequalities: in one variable, ration,
proportion, variation, verbal problems, graphing, probability, statistics and modeling. Students will also be
introduced to the study of trigonometry, which will be continued in the next course in the sequence.
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Algebra II Honors Course No: 1333
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in Geometry Honors, 95 or higher in Geometry (College Prep), 80 or higher in Algebra I
Honors, or departmental placement for ninth graders, and department chairperson approval
Notes: All students are required to have a Texas Instruments 84 graphing calculator.
Course Description: This course represents a comprehensive and intensive study of the topics of Algebra II. Topics
covered will include: review of Alg. I topics, a study of functions, equations and their graphs, linear systems of
equations, matrices, quadratic equations and their graphs, polynomials and their functions; radical, rational,
exponential, logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, conic sections, probability, statistics and modeling.
Pre-Calculus Course No: 1340
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in Algebra II (College Prep) or 70 to 79 in Geometry Honors, or 80 or higher in Analysis of
Functions, 70-79 in Algebra II Honors
Notes: All students are required to have a Texas Instruments 84 graphing calculator.
Course Description: The course is designed to provide the student with the study of functions and other algebraic
skills needed for the study of calculus. The course represents an intensive study of analytic geometry, elementary
functions and introductory calculus. Topics include concepts of algebra, equations, inequalities, functions and their
graphs, polynomial and rational functions, trigonometry, probability, statistics, modeling and logic.
Pre-Calculus Honors Course No: 1341
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in Algebra II Honors or 95 or higher in Algebra II (College Prep)
Notes: All students are required to have a Texas Instruments 84 graphing calculator; may be available for dual
enrollment credit
Course Description: This course provides the student with the study of functions and other algebraic skills needed
for the study of Calculus. The course represents an intensive study of analytic geometry, elementary functions and
introductory calculus. Topics include concepts of algebra, equations, inequalities, functions and their graphs,
polynomial and rational functions, trigonometry, probability, statistics and modeling.
Advanced Pre-Calculus Course No: 1342
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Algebra II Honors, 90 or higher Geometry Honors
Notes: This course is available for dual enrollment credit. All students are required to have a Texas Instruments 84
graphing calculator.
Course Description: This demanding course prepares students pursuing AP Calculus. It covers those topics common
to most traditional pre-calculus courses (linear and quadratic functions, exponential and logarithmic functions,
trigonometric functions, polar coordinates and vectors) but also incorporates topics including probability, logic,
statistics, and an introduction to limits and derivatives. Applications to real world events and graphing calculators
are also woven into the course extensively. Technology and graphing calculators are used in this course to reinforce
the concepts covered. An emphasis is placed on solving problems algebraically, graphically, and numerically.
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Analysis of Functions Course No: 1352
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 75 or higher in Algebra II (College Prep) or successful completion of Algebra II Honors.
Course Description: This course is intended for the student who has completed a fundamental sequence of required
mathematics courses. It introduces higher-level topics and an intense review for successful study of the mathematics
required in college. New topics include: Fundamental Theorem of Algebra; Remainder Theorem; Binomial Theorem;
Rational Expressions; graphs of linear, quadratic, absolute value, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic,
trigonometric and piece-wise functions; inverse functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric
functions; matrix operations; permutations; combinations; arithmetic sequences; and geometric sequences.
Math for College Readiness Course No: 1351
Course Level: Fundamental
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II (phase 1)
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to strengthen the skill level of high school seniors who have
completed Algebra I, II, and Geometry and who wish to pursue credit generating mathematics courses at the college
level. Specific topics covered include Functions and Relations, Polynomials, Rational Expressions and Equations,
Radical Expressions and Equations, Quadratic equations, Logarithmic and Exponential Functions, Matrices, Simple
and Compound Interest, Descriptive Statistics, Vocabulary and Strategies for College Readiness.
Calculus I Course No: 1360
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in Pre-Calculus or 70 or higher in Pre-Calculus-Honors
Notes: All students are required to have a Texas Instruments 84 graphing calculator.
Course Description: This course is intended for students who have a thorough working knowledge of Algebra I,
Algebra II, Geometry and Trigonometry. The course begins with a review of Pre-Calculus and then includes an
intensive study of the general theory and techniques of calculus. Topics include algebraic, trigonometric,
exponential and logarithmic functions; limits; derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic
functions; techniques of integration.
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Calculus I Honors Course No: 1361
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Pre-Calculus, 80 or higher in Pre-Calculus Honors, 75 or higher in Advanced Pre-
Calculus, and department chairperson approval.
Notes: This course may be available for dual enrollment. All students are required to have a Texas Instruments 84
graphing calculator.
Course Description: This course is intended for students who have a thorough working knowledge of Algebra I,
Algebra II, Geometry and Trigonometry. The course involves an extensive study of the general theory and
techniques of Calculus. Topics include algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; limits,
derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; techniques of integration;
approximation to the definite integral using rectangles; application of the definite integral to find areas between
curves and volumes of solids of revolution. This course is available for dual enrollment.
AP Calculus AB Course No: 1362
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Pre-Calculus Honors, 80 or higher in Advanced Pre-Calculus, and department
chairperson approval
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May. This course may be available for dual
enrollment. All students are required to have a Texas Instruments 84 graphing calculator.
Course Description: The curriculum for this course, provided by the College Board, is driven by the need to prepare
the students for the AP Calculus exam in May. This course is intended for students who have a thorough working
knowledge of Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry and Trigonometry. The course involves an extensive study of the
general theory and techniques of Calculus. Topics include algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic
functions; limits, derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; techniques of
integration; approximation to the definite integral using rectangles; application of the definite integral to find areas
between curves and volumes of solids of revolution.
Calculus II Honors Course No: 1363
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in Calculus I, or successful completion of Calculus I Honors, or AP Calculus
Notes: This course may be available for dual enrollment in the spring. All students are required to have a Texas
Instruments 84 graphing calculator.
Course Description: This is the second of three courses in the basic calculus sequence. Topics include different
techniques of integration and improper integrals. Polynomial approximations of sequences and infinite series are
included. Parametric equations and the use of plane curves and polar graphs are part of this course. Concepts of
vectors within planes, lines and surfaces in space are also discussed.
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AP Calculus BC Course No: 1364
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in AP Calculus AB, 90 or higher in Calculus I Honors, and department chairperson approval
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May. This course is available for dual
enrollment. All students are required to have a Texas Instruments 84 graphing calculator.
Course Description: This course is equivalent to a typical second semester college Calculus course. Topics covered
will be a review of Calculus AB (limits, derivatives and their applications, and integrals and their applications), further
integration techniques, infinite series, conics, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and vectors. The course
emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed
graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, with the connections among these representations highlighted.
The curriculum for this course, provided by the College Board, is driven by the need to prepare the students for the
AP Calculus BC exam in May.
Statistics Honors Course No: 1371
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in Pre-Calculus or 75 or higher in Pre-Calculus Honors, 90 or higher in Analysis of
Functions, 93 or higher in Algebra II (College Prep), 80 or higher in Algebra II Honors, or successful completion of
Calculus
Notes: This course is available for dual enrollment in the fall. All students are required to have a Texas Instruments
84 graphing calculator.
Course Description: The course involves an extensive study of probability, elementary statistics, and hypothesis
testing. Specific topics include binomial distribution; combinations and permutations; descriptive, inferential;
correlation and regression; measures of central tendency; normal distribution, randomness; and sampling theory.
AP Statistics Course No: 1372
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Pre-Calculus or 85 or higher in Pre-Calculus Honors or 85 and higher in Calculus, or 80
or higher in Calculus Honors and AP Calculus, and department chairperson approval.
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May. All students are required to have a
Texas Instruments 84 graphing calculator
Course Description: The course is an intensive study of probability, elementary statistics, and hypothesis testing.
Specific topics include binomial distribution; combinations and permutations; descriptive, inferential; correlation
and regression; measures of central tendency; normal distribution, randomness; and sampling theory.
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Physical Education Department
Courses listed alphabetically by course title.
HOPE - Health Opportunities through Physical Education Course No: 1410
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisites: None
Notes: Necessary to fulfill Physical Education requirement for graduation.
Course Description: This course combines health and physical education and enables students to experience first-
hand the many benefits of regular physical activity, proper nutrition, and healthy decision making. Fitness training
principles are applied to workouts to enhance and improve health-related and skill-related areas of fitness.
Additional course topics challenge students to become educated consumers, manage stress, choose nutritious
foods, make healthy lifestyle choices, be effective members of a team, and influence others in the community in a
positive way.
Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries Course No: 1411
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of HOPE; It is strongly recommended that students complete Anatomy &
Physiology/Anatomy & Physiology Honors and First Aid and Safety prior to this course.
Notes: Enrollment preference is given to Medical Sciences Academy students
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop knowledge of the anatomy and
physiology related to athletic injuries and skill related to the nature, prevention, care and rehabilitation of athletic
injuries. Students will study safety practices, rules, terminology, history of the sports/activities, correct techniques
in performing skills, consumer issues, benefits of participation, fitness activities and fitness assessments. Students
will also learn about injury prevention, rehabilitation, career opportunities and conditioning methods.
Sports Officiating Course No: 1412
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half Credit 1 semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of HOPE
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to enable students to acquire knowledge of sport rules and
regulations, to develop skills in officiating selected sports, improve skills in specified team sports, and maintain or
improve health-related fitness. The content will include: safety practices, rules, terminology, etiquette, history of the
sports, sportsmanship, correct techniques in performing skills, correct signals for officiating, umpiring and officiating
games, consumer issues, benefits of participation, fitness activities, and assessment of skills and fitness assessments.
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Team Sports I Course No: 1413
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to develop the physical skills necessary to be competent in many
forms of movement, knowledge of team sports concepts such as offensive and defensive strategies and tactics, and
appropriate social behaviors within a team or group setting. The integration of fitness concepts throughout the
content is critical to the success of this course.
Team Sports II Course No: 1414
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Team Sports I and/or participation in a varsity sport
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to develop the physical skills necessary to be competent in many
forms of movement, knowledge of team sports concepts such as offensive and defensive strategies and tactics, and
appropriate social behaviors within a team or group setting. The integration of fitness concepts throughout the
content is critical to the success of this course.
Weight Training I Course No: 1415
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisites: None
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to further develop the physical skills necessary to be competent
in many forms of movement as it relates to weight training. The integration of fitness concepts throughout the
content is critical to the success of this course.
Weight Training II Course No: 1416
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Weight Training I
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to further develop the physical skills necessary to be competent
in many forms of movement as it relates to weight training. The integration of fitness concepts throughout the
content is critical to the success of this course.
Weight Training III Course No: 1417
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit 1 semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Weight Training I and II or department chairperson approval
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to further develop the physical skills necessary to be competent
in many forms of movement as it relates to weight training. The integration of fitness concepts throughout the
content is critical to the success of this course.
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Science Department
Courses listed alphabetically by grade level and sequence.
Biology I Course No: 1512
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Course Description: This course is designed to give the student a thorough knowledge of the development of
biological principles starting with simple levels of biological organizations and progressing to more complex levels.
This course is designed also to give the student the information and tools necessary for applying the scientific
method in scientific investigation. Laboratories are used to reinforce scientific investigation. Microscope use and
simple animal dissections are introduced.
Biology I Honors Course No: 1513
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Course Description: This course is designed to give the student a thorough knowledge of the development of
biological principles starting with simple levels of biological organizations and progressing to more complex levels.
This course is designed also to give the student the information and tools necessary for applying the scientific
method in scientific investigation. Laboratories are used to reinforce scientific investigation. Microscope use and
simple animal dissections are introduced.
Pre-AP Biology Course No: 1514
Alias: 2000335
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Alpha program
Course Description: Pre-AP Biology sparks student motivation and critical thinking about our living world as they
engage in real-world data analysis and problem solving. The Pre-AP Biology course emphasizes the integration of
content with science practices powerful reasoning tools that support students in analyzing the natural world
around them. Having this ability is one of the hallmarks of scientific literacy and is critical for numerous college and
career endeavors in science and the social sciences.
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Physical Science Course No: 1521
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I (Fundamental) or Geometry (Fundamental)
Course Description: This is an introductory course that permits the student to form a basic understanding of physics
and chemistry. Topics include: matter and energy, property changes and composition of matter, acids, bases and
salts, chemistry of water, causes of motion, heat energy, wave motion and energy. This course is also geared to
applying basic concepts to modern applications, for example, environmental education, energy education,
consumer education, and occupational education.
Chemistry I Course No: 1522
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 75 or higher in Algebra I (College Prep) or 75 or higher in Geometry (College Prep) or successful
completion of Physical Science.
Course Description: This course introduces the student to topics in inorganic chemistry ranging from the properties
of matter to solution chemistry. Lecture theory will be reinforced with practical laboratory experiments. Algebra
topics will be reviewed as needed.
Chemistry I Honors Course No: 1523
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 93 or higher in Algebra I (College Prep) or 80 or higher in Algebra I Honors, or 93 or higher in Geometry
(College Prep) or 80 or higher in Geometry Honors, or successful completion of Algebra II/Algebra II Honors
Course Description: This course introduces the student to various topics in inorganic chemistry ranging from the
properties of matter to solution chemistry and electrochemistry. Quantitative problem solving will be emphasized.
Lecture theory will be reinforced with practical laboratory experiments.
Pre-AP Chemistry Course No: 1524
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Alpha program
Notes:
Course Description: Pre-AP Chemistry focuses on students developing a deep conceptual understanding of matter
and energy at the molecular level by asking student to explain their macroscopic observations using particulate-
level reasoning. Pre-AP Chemistry emphasizes the integration of content with science practices powerful reasoning
tools that support students in analyzing the natural world around them. Having this ability is one of the hallmarks
of scientific literacy and is critical for numerous college and career endeavors in science and the social sciences.
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Physics I Course No: 1530
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: completion of Chemistry I or Chemistry Honors and concurrently enrolled in Algebra II (College Prep)
or higher
Course Description: This course represents a general overview of the topics of physics. It is the study of matter and
the laws that govern it. Topics include force and motion, work and energy, electricity and magnetism, and waves.
Laboratory experiments will reinforce concepts covered in class.
Physics I Honors Course No: 1531
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Chemistry I, 80 or higher in Chemistry I Honors and concurrently enrolled in Pre-calculus
or higher
Notes: This course may be available for dual enrollment credit.
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide a rigorous introductory study of the theories and laws
governing the interaction of matter, energy and the forces of nature. Throughout this course, the scientific method
will be used to solve problems, employ the metric measurements, and demonstrate safe and effective use of
laboratory instruments. Students will study Newton's laws of motion and gravitation, the First and Second Law of
Thermodynamics, simple harmonic and projectile motion, and calculate friction and torque and uniform circular
motion problems. Students will learn the laws that govern gases, liquids and solids as well as electric and magnetic
forces and the nature of sound and light. Laboratory experiments will reinforce concepts covered in class.
AP Physics 1 Course No: 1532
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 87 or higher in Chemistry Honors and 87 or higher in Algebra II Honors, concurrently enrolled in Pre-
calculus honors or higher and/or successful completion of Physics I-Honors
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: The AP Physics 1 course focuses on the first semester of an algebra-based, introductory college-
level physics sequence and provide students with enduring understanding to support future advanced course work
in the sciences. Students will cultivate their understanding of physics and science practices as they explore
kinematics, dynamics, circular motion, simple harmonic motion, linear momentum, work, rotational motion,
electrostatics, DC circuits (resistors only), and mechanical waves and sound.
Anatomy & Physiology Course No: 1540
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology I
Notes: Enrollment preference is given to Medical Sciences Academy students.
Course Description: This course provides a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the components
of the human body to include study of preserved specimens, microscopic study, physiologic experiments, computer
simulations, and introduces case studies. This course is enhanced with laboratory experiences.
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Anatomy & Physiology Honors Course No: 1541
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 80 or higher in Biology I Honors or 93 or higher in Biology I
Notes: May be available for dual enrollment; enrollment preference is given to Medical Sciences Academy students.
Course Description: This course provides a comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body
and introduces student to common human disease processes. The course is enhanced by a wide selection of media
to include study of preserved specimens, microscopic study, physiologic experiments, computer simulations and
introduces case studies.
AP Biology Course No: 1516
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Biology I Honors and 87 or higher in Chemistry Honors, and cumulative weighted
average of 4.0
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: AP Biology is an introductory college-level biology course. Students will cultivate their
understanding of biology through inquiry-based investigations as they explore the following topics: evolution,
cellular processes, energy transformation, cell-to-cell communication, genetics, information transfer, ecology, and
microscopic and macroscopic interactions.
AP Chemistry Course No: 1525
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Chemistry Honors; 87 or higher in Algebra II, and a cumulative weighted average of 4.0
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course
usually taken during the first college year. Students will attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a
reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. Students will learn to think clearly and to express their
ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and logic. There will be an emphasis on chemical calculations and the
mathematical formulation of principles, and higher level laboratory work.
AP Environmental Science Course No: 1544
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in Biology I Honors and Chemistry Honors or 90 or higher in Biology I and Chemistry, and
cumulative weighted average of 3.7.
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: This course provides students with the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies
required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems
both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine
alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.
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AP Physics 2 Course No: 1533
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Physics 1, and cumulative weighted average of 4.0
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: The AP Physics 2 course focuses on the first semester of an algebra-based, introductory college-
level physics sequence and provide students with enduring understanding to support future advanced course work
in the sciences. Students will cultivate their understanding of physics and science practices as they explore
thermodynamics, fluid statics and dynamics, electrostatics, DC and RC circuits, magnetism and electromagnetic
induction, geometric and physical optics, quantum physics, atomic, and nuclear physics.
AP Physics C: Mechanics Course No: 1534
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Physics I and concurrently enrolled in AP Calculus AB or higher
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: The course explores topics such as kinematics; Newton's laws of motion; work, energy and
power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation.
Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout the course.
Applied Engineering Technology I Course No: 1550
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: An 80 or higher in Algebra I and/or Geometry
Notes: Enrollment preference given to STEM Academy students
Course Description: This course helps students understand the field of engineering/engineering technology and
prepares them for postsecondary engineering programs by developing a more in-depth mastery of the associated
mathematics, scientific, and technological knowledge and skills. The course also includes essential concepts of
technology and design, as well as concerns about the social and political implications of technological change.
Applied Engineering Technology II Course No: 1551
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Applied Engineering Technology I
Notes: Enrollment preference given to STEM Academy students
Course Description: This course further develops student understanding in the field of engineering/engineering
technology and prepares them for postsecondary engineering programs by further developing a more in-depth
mastery of the associated mathematics, science, and technology knowledge and skills. The course also includes
advanced concepts of technology and design, and further consider the social and political implications of
technological change.
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Biology II Honors Course No: 1515
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology I Honors or 87 or higher in Biology I
Course Description: This course gives an overview of the functions of living things, placing an emphasis on their
organizations (both anatomical and cellular metabolism and behavior). Topics include: genetics and biotechnology,
reproduction, regulation of the internal environment, responsiveness, coordination, and evolution. Microscopic
techniques and skills will be developed.
Environmental Science Course No: 1543
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology I and Chemistry
Course Description: This course will integrate various concepts of life, earth and physical sciences as they relate to
the environment. All current environmental topics (including water quality, pollution, resources, land management,
recycling, conservation, population dynamics, and economic implications), will be discussed at length with special
emphasis on the local environment and ecology.
First Aid and Safety Course No: 1552
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 Semester
Prerequisite: cumulative weighted average of 3.3
Notes: Enrollment preference given to Medical Sciences Academy students
Course Description: This course provides a basic overview of the causes and preventions of unintentional injuries,
appropriate emergency responses to those injuries and crisis response planning. Safety education should include
cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the use of an automatic external defibrillator (AED), first aid for obstructed
airway, and injury prevention.
Forensic Science 1 Course No: 1553
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisites: 75 or higher in Biology I and Chemistry I
Notes: Enrollment preference giving to STEM and Medical Sciences Academy students
Course Description: Forensic Science is a highly interdisciplinary subject that incorporates Biology, Chemistry,
Physics, Entomology, Earth Science, Anatomy and Physiology as well as other aspects of Science. This course is
designed to integrate the core scientific disciplines (as outlined in the Florida Standard Course of Study for grades
9-12) by exposing students to both the fundamentals of forensic theory and hands-on application of the skills and
knowledge required of a forensic crime scene investigator. Project-based learning through laboratory investigation
and discussions/class lecture will serve as the main method of content delivery.
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Forensic Science 2 Course No: 1554
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Forensic Science 1
Notes: Enrollment preference giving to STEM and Medical Sciences Academy students
Course Description: Forensic Science II is a highly interdisciplinary course that incorporates Biology, Chemistry,
Physics, Entomology, Earth Science, Anatomy and Physiology, and Anthropology. This course is designed to
integrate the core scientific disciplines (as outlined in the Florida Standard Course of Study for grades 9-12) and
expand upon the knowledge and skills learned in Forensic Science I by exposing students to advanced exploration
of forensic theories and methodologies including survey, evidence collection and processing, excavation and
recovery and a mock fetal pig autopsy. Project-based learning through laboratory investigation, field practicums,
and discussions/class lecture will serve as the main method of content delivery.
Health Explorations Honors Course No: 1555
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: cumulative weighted 3.5 average or academy director recommendation
Notes: Enrollment preference given to Medical Sciences Academy students. It is strongly recommended that
students complete Anatomy & Physiology prior to this course.
Course Description: The purpose of this course is for students to apply health-related research practices. Experiences
include discourses in major health problems in society, modern health practices, current scientific findings related
to human diseases and disorders, collection, analysis and evaluation of health information, health advocacy trends,
and health career investigations.
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Social Sciences Department
Courses listed by grade level and sequence.
World History Course No: 1611
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Course Description: This course traces the development of Western Civilization's economic, social, and political
institutions. Beginning with prehistoric man, the course examines the roots of civilization, the achievements of the
classical world, and the reasons for the disintegration of the Roman Empire. The course also describes the gradual
rebuilding of the Middle Ages, the material and intellectual changes resulting from the Renaissance and the Age of
Enlightenment. Causes and consequences of the democratic revolutions are explored; the forces of industrialization,
nationalism and imperialism are evaluated. The rise of fascism, World War II, and the post war era are analyzed with
emphasis on future implications.
World History Honors Course No: 1612
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Course Description: This course incorporates the basic goals of World History while examining in greater depth the
cultural and political evolution of the eras studied. Original source readings are used to supplement the student's
background. Emphasis is placed on the development of critical thinking skills through class discussions and research
assignments.
AP World History: Modern Course No: 1613
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Alpha Program
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the
evolution of global processes and contacts in different types of human societies from 1200 A.D. to the present. This
understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills.
The course highlights the nature of changes in global frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as
comparisons among major societies. It emphasizes relevant factual knowledge, leading interpretive issues, and skills
in analyzing types of historical evidence. Periodization, explicitly discussed, forms an organizing principle to address
change and continuity throughout the course. Specific themes provide further organization to the course, along
with consistent attention to contacts among societies that form the core of world history as a field of study. The AP
World History course offers motivated students the opportunity to immerse themselves in the processes that, over
time, have resulted in increasing interactions. This course offers balanced global coverage, with Africa, the Americas,
Asia, Europe, and Oceania all represented.
51
United States History Course No: 1621
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: The purpose of this survey course is to provoke students to analyze the factors and events that
have helped shape our country. Students are provided the necessary information obtained from different historical
perspectives through the textbook, lectures, and primary sources found in the readers. Critical analysis and cultural
relativism will be used in understanding how past decisions have influenced contemporary American society.
United States History Honors Course No: 1622
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 95 or higher in English II, or 85 or higher in English II Honors, and concurrently enrolled in English III
Honors or higher
Notes: May be available for dual enrollment credit.
Course Description: The aim of this survey course is to provoke students to analyze the factors and events that have
helped shape our country. Students are provided the necessary information obtained from different historical
perspectives through the textbook, lectures, and primary sources found in the readers. Critical analysis and cultural
relativism will be used in understanding how past decisions have influenced contemporary American society.
AP United States History Course No: 1623
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Alpha Program or concurrently enrolled in AP English Language
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: This course provides students with the opportunity to acquire a comprehensive understanding
of the chronological development of the American people by examining the political, economic, social, religious,
military, scientific, and cultural events that shaped our nation. Emphasis will be placed on the development of
analytical skills in students so that they can critically evaluate the various issues and events in the development of
the United States. This is done by focusing on persistent themes and change in history and by applying historical
reasoning to seek solutions to contemporary problems. Content will be determined by topics presented by the AP
examination in May.
United States Government Course No: 1631
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: Successful completion of US History
Course Description: This semester course will provide the student with a basic understanding of how our
government is organized, how it works, and the responsibilities of those in government. Upon completion of the
course, students should not only be more informed about the nature and workings of the United States government,
but also more skilled in thinking systematically and critically, and more concerned and willing to participate in the
civic affairs of their government.
52
United States Government Honors Course No: 1632
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: 93 or higher in US History or 83 or Higher in US History Honors, or AP US History and a cumulative
weighted average of 3.67 or higher
Course Description: This semester course will provide students with a thorough understanding of our nation's
system of government. It will instill in students the qualities of good citizenship that will enable them to put their
knowledge into action and an appreciation for the contemporary issues that face our nation. Upon completion of
the course, students will be more skilled in thinking systematically and critically, and more concerned and willing to
participate in the civic affairs of their government.
AP United States Government & Politics Course No: 1633
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Half credit 1 semester
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in AP U.S. History, or 90 or higher in US History Honors, and a cumulative weighted average
of 4.0 or higher
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: The course provides a thorough understanding of our nation’s system of government. Students
will acquire a critical perspective of our political system, while learning general concepts used to interpret American
politics and analyze specific case studies. Students will also become familiar with the various institutions, groups,
beliefs, and ideas that constitute the American political perspective.
Economics Course No: 1641
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 Semester
Prerequisite: Successful completion of US History
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to acquire an understanding of the way in which society organizes
its limited resources to satisfy unlimited wants. Students will be introduced to the major characteristics of the mixed
market economic system in the United States and how the basic economic questions are answered. The intent is to
provide the students with an understanding of the forces of the marketplace by examining the effect of their roles
as producers, consumers, savers, investors, resource owners, voters, and taxpayers in the system.
Economics Honors Course No: 1642
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Half credit - 1 Semester
Prerequisite: 93 or higher in US History or 83 or higher in US History Honors or AP US History and cumulative
weighted average of 3.67 or higher
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to acquire a comprehensive understanding of the way in which
society organizes its limited resources to satisfy unlimited wants. The course will also deal with the distinguishing
characteristics of other types of economic systems. Particular attention will be given to the American mixed
economic system. The intent is to provide students with tools to examine and analyze the implications of market
solutions and public policy decisions related to economic problems.
53
AP Microeconomics Course No: 1643
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Half credit 1 semester
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in AP U.S. History, or 90 or higher in U.S. History Honors, and a cumulative weighted average of
4.0 or higher
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: AP Microeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles of
economics that apply to the functions of individual economic decision-makers. The course also develops students’
familiarity with the operation of product and factor markets, distributions of income, market failure, and the role of
government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and
data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts.
The following courses are electives. They do not satisfy any graduation requirements in social studies.
American Mosaic Honors Course No: 1650
Course level: Honors
Course Length: Half credit - 1 Semester
Prerequisite: Senior standing and a cumulative weighted average of 3.5 or higher
Course Description: The course examines the development of American society from 1900 to the present, with
particular emphasis on social and cultural history. Concentration will focus on a decade-by-decade study of such
topics as entertainment, food, music, art, radio, television, movies, fads, and fashion. In addition to the text,
supplementary materials will be used: books, magazines, internet sources, and videos/DVDs. Students will be
exposed to a broad range of historical information, thereby providing an in-depth understanding and appreciation
of American life in the 20
th
and 21
st
Centuries.
AP Human Geography Course No: 1651
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing; 85 or higher in honors history, or 85 or higher in Honors English, or 93 or higher
in US History, and a cumulative weighted average of 3.7
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: The purpose of AP Human Geography is to enable students to become more geo-literate. The
course focuses on the distribution, processes, and effects of human populations on the planet. Units of study include
population, migration, culture, language, religion, ethnicity, political geography, economic development, industry,
agriculture, and urban geography. Case studies are drawn from world regions, with an emphasis on understanding
the world in which we live today. Historical information serves to enrich analysis of the impacts of phenomena such
as globalization, colonialism, and human-environment relationships on places, regions, cultural landscapes, and
patterns of interaction.
54
AP European History Course No: 1652
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in honors history, or 85 or higher in Honors English, or 93 or higher in US History, and a
cumulative weighted average of 3.7
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May. Course may be available for dual
enrollment credit.
Course Description: AP European History is an introductory college-level European history course. Students cultivate
their understanding of European history through analyzing historical sources and learning to make connections and
craft historical arguments as they explore concepts like interaction of Europe and the world; economic and
commercial developments; cultural and intellectual developments; states and other institutions of power; social
organization and development; national and European identity; and technological and scientific innovation.
Constitutional Law Studies Honors Course No: 1653
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: Cumulative weighted GPA of 3.5 or higher
Notes: Enrollment preference will be given to Law and Global Business Academy students
Course Description: This course focuses on students’ rights as guaranteed in the Bill of Rights. Freedom of speech,
the press, religion, and due process of law including the right to a fair trial are highlighted. A close look at the
Watergate scandal dramatizes the importance of preserving these rights. Actual Supreme Court cases are applied
to course topics in order to give students a true appreciation of how our legal system works with respect to civil
liberties.
Criminal and Civil Law Studies Course No: 1654
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: Sophomore, junior or senior standing
Notes: Enrollment preference will be given to Law and Global Business Academy students
Course Description: Students will come to appreciate the basics of criminal law including trial procedure as well as
defenses in the court room today. Students will also be exposed to relevant topics in the areas of consumer and
family law that will have practical applications in their everyday lives as young citizens. Specific areas of study will
include contracts, warranties, credit, default practices, marriage, wills, and inheritance.
Introduction to Criminal Justice Honors Course No: 1655
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Half credit - 1 semester
Prerequisite: a cumulative weighted GPA of 3.5 or higher
Notes: Enrollment preference will be given to Law and Global Business Academy students; may be available for dual
enrollment credit
Course Description: The purpose of this course is for students to develop an appreciation of America’s legal system
as the foundation of American society. Students will examine the American legal system and the nature and
importance of specific rights granted under the United States Constitution. The nature and causes of crime will also
be presented with an examination of the various categories of crime. The course may be available for college credit.
55
Psychology I/II Course No: 1661
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing
Note: Enrollment preference will be given to Law and Global Business and Medical Sciences Academy students.
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunities to acquire an
understanding of human behavior, behavioral interaction and the progressive development of individuals. This goal
is achieved through the study of various types of interpersonal relationships. Emphasis is placed upon the
development of communication skills and methods of arriving at alternatives in solving everyday problems. This
course involves a great deal of student input and participation.
Psychology I/II Honors Course No: 1662
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and cumulative weighted average of 3.5 or higher
Notes: One semester may be available for dual enrollment. Enrollment preference will be given to Law and Global
Business and Medical Sciences Academy students.
Course Description: The objective of this course is to provide opportunities for students to expand their awareness
of areas of psychology. This goal is achieved through the study of the theories of personality development,
motivation and emotion, and other areas of psychological research. Emphasis is placed on the many parallels that
can be drawn between our biological and psychological reactions to everyday occurrences. Comparisons are made
between healthy personality development and abnormal development.
AP Psychology Course No: 1663
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing; Enrollment in English Honors or 85 or higher in English; cumulative weighted
average of 3.7 or higher
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May. Enrollment preference will be given
to Law and Global Business and Medical Sciences Academy students.
Course Description: The course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the
behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological
facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn
about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.
56
Theology Department
Courses listed by grade level.
Theology I Course No: 1711
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to give students a general knowledge and appreciation of the Sacred
Scriptures. Through their study of the Bible they will come to encounter the living Word of God, Jesus Christ. In the course
they will learn about the Bible, authored by God through inspiration, and its value to people throughout the world. They
will learn how to read the Bible and will become familiar with the major sections of the Bible and the books included in
each section. The students will pay attention to the Gospels, where they may grow to know and love Jesus Christ more
personally. Students will study the mystery of Jesus Christ, the living Word of God, the Second Person of the Blessed
Trinity. In this course students will understand that Jesus Christ is the ultimate revelation to us from God. In learning about
who He is, the students will also learn who He calls them to be.
Theology II Course No: 1712
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: None
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to help students understand all that God has done for us through his
Son, Jesus Christ. Through this course of study, students will learn that for all eternity, God has planned for us to share
eternal happiness with him, which is accomplished through the redemption Christ won for us. Students will learn that they
share in this redemption only in and through Jesus Christ. They will also be introduced to what it means to be a disciple
of Christ and what life as a disciple entails. This course will also help the students understand that in and through the
Church they encounter the living Jesus Christ. They will be introduced to the fact that the Church was founded by Christ
through the Apostles and is sustained by him through the Holy Spirit. The students will come to know that the Church is
the living Body of Christ today. This Body has both divine and human elements. In this course, students will learn not so
much about events in the life of the Church but about the sacred nature of the Church.
Theology III Course No: 1713
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: None
Notes: Course may be available for dual enrollment credit.
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to help students understand that they can encounter Christ today in a
full and real way in and through the sacraments, and especially through the Eucharist. Students will examine each of the
sacraments in detail so as to learn how they may encounter Christ throughout life. This course will also help students
understand that it is only through Christ that they can fully live out God’s plans for their lives. Students are to learn the
moral concepts and precepts that govern the lives of Christ’s disciples.
57
Theology IV Course No: 1714
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit 1 year
Prerequisite: None
Notes: Course may be available for dual enrollment credit.
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the Church’s social teaching. In this course,
students are to learn how Christ’s concern for others, especially the poor and needy, is present today in the Church’s
social teaching and mission. Student will also explore the meaning of responding to God’s call to live as a Christian
in society through their particular vocation.
58
World Languages Department
Courses listed by level within the same language.
Spanish Courses
Spanish I Course No: 1811
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Course Description: Spanish I is for students with little or no background in Spanish. This introductory course will
focus on the development of the basic concepts of the language. The student will acquire good pronunciation and
develop a listening aptitude. This will be accomplished by the oral presentation in class of the fundamentals of
sounds and grammar, by drills in pronunciation, by the use of audio-visual aids, and by workbook exercises. This
course will include both oral and written assignments of vocabulary, simple verb tenses, and basic grammatical
structures. Students will also be introduced to important aspects of Spanish culture.
Spanish II Course No: 1813
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish I or departmental placement
Course Description: Spanish II is a continuation of Spanish I. This course will build on the foundations of Spanish I
with emphasis placed upon the development of an extensive vocabulary and oral expression. Grammatical structures
learned the previous year are reviewed and new ones are learned. Strong emphasis will be placed on the spoken
language as a means of communication in class, aiming at a fair fluency by the end of the year. The students will
continue to acquire an appreciation of the culture of the Spanish-speaking world. This course will be conducted
mostly in the target language.
Spanish II Honors Course No: 1814
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Spanish I or departmental placement
Course Description: This course is a continuation of Spanish I. This course will build on the foundations of Spanish I
with emphasis placed upon the development of an extensive vocabulary and oral expression. Grammatical structures
learned the previous year are reviewed and new ones are learned. Strong emphasis will be placed on the spoken
language as a means of communication in class, aiming at a fair fluency by the end of the year. The student will also
be introduced to contemporary readings and analysis. The students will continue to acquire an appreciation of the
culture of the Spanish-speaking world. This course will be conducted mostly in the target language.
59
Spanish III Course No: 1815
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish II or departmental placement
Course Description: This is an intermediate Spanish course designed to develop in students a greater degree of
proficiency in the four basic language skills and to deepen their understanding and appreciation of Hispanic culture.
At this level of language learning the primary goal is to develop a high degree of proficiency in the four basic
language skills: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. The course will include both oral and written assessment
of grammatical structures and vocabulary. It will also provide a comprehensive review of grammatical concepts
learned in Spanish I and II. This course will be conducted entirely in the target language.
Spanish III Honors Course No: 1816
Course Level: Honors
Couse Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Spanish II or 85 or higher in Spanish II Honors
Course Description: This is an intermediate Spanish course designed to develop in students a greater degree of
proficiency in the four basic language skills and to deepen their understanding and appreciation of Hispanic culture.
At this level of language learning the primary goal is to develop a high degree of proficiency in the four basic
language skills: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. The course will include both oral and written assessment
of grammatical structures and vocabulary. It will also provide a comprehensive review of grammatical concepts
learned in Spanish I and II. The student will be introduced to literary selections of the Spanish-speaking world. All
reading selections will deal with a contemporary cultural or historical topic. This course will be conducted entirely
in the target language.
Spanish IV Honors Course No: 1817
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Spanish III or 87 or higher in Spanish III - Honors
Course Description: This is an advanced course designed to further develop the students’ reading and speaking
skills, while reinforcing their listening and writing skills. This course will prepare students for the AP Spanish
Language course by emphasizing the development of grammar concepts, verb conjugations, style, vocabulary, and
syntax in their writing and expression. Students will acquire proficiency in oral and written expression. The student
will be introduced to various aspects of Hispanic traditions, customs, and values. This course will be conducted
entirely in the target language.
60
Spanish Speakers I Course No: 1820
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Course Description: This course is designed for students who have some prior knowledge of Spanish due to family
or cultural factors. The students can understand spoken Spanish but need to refine their reading, writing, and
speaking skills. Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to recognize fundamental grammatical
structures, simple verb tenses, and comprehend reading material presented in class. A special emphasis will be given
to the expansion of vocabulary. Students are also introduced to important aspects of Spanish culture. The course
will be conducted entirely in the target language.
Spanish Speakers II Course No: 1821
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish Speakers I or departmental placement
Course Description: This course is a continuation of Spanish Speakers I and will review basic grammar for students
who already speak Spanish. A special emphasis will be given to the expansion of vocabulary and to the comparative
study of Spanish and English phonetics in order to avoid oral and written interferences. The course will focus on oral
communication free from English interference and begins to identify problems in reading and writing caused by
differences between English and Spanish. Grammatical structures including all indicative verb tenses will be studied
in great detail. The main objective of the course is to provide the student with a greater degree of proficiency in the
four basic language skills: listening, reading, writing, and speaking. This will be accomplished through the study of
vocabulary, reading comprehension, spelling, and grammar. Students will acquire general knowledge of the
Spanish-speaking countries by studying their culture, geography, and history. This course will be conducted entirely
in the target language.
Spanish-Speakers II Honors Course No: 1822
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full Credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Spanish Speakers I or departmental placement
Course Description: This course is a continuation of Spanish Speakers I and will review basic grammar for students
who already speak Spanish. A special emphasis will be given to the expansion of vocabulary and to the comparative
study of Spanish and English phonetics in order to avoid oral and written interferences. The course will focus on oral
communication free from English interference and begins to identify problems in reading and writing cause by
differences between English and Spanish. Grammatical structures including all indicative verb tenses will be studied
in great detail. The main objective of the course is to provide the student with a greater degree of proficiency in the
four basic language skills: listening, reading, writing, and speaking. This will be accomplished through the study of
vocabulary, reading comprehension, spelling, and grammar. The student will acquire general knowledge of the
Spanish-speaking countries by studying their culture, geography, and history. The student will be introduced to
contemporary readings and analysis. This course will be conducted entirely in the target language.
61
Spanish Speakers III Course No: 1823
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish Speakers II and sophomore standing or 82 or higher in Spanish Speakers
II or departmental placement
Course Description: The purpose of this course it to enable students whose heritage language is Spanish to develop,
maintain, and enhance proficiency in their heritage language by reinforcing and expanding skills in listening,
speaking, reading, and writing, as well as Spanish grammar skills acquired in Spanish Speakers 2. Students are
exposed to a variety of Spanish literary genres and authors from a variety of cultural authentic sources. The course
will give students a panoramic view of the literature and culture of Spain and Latin America. Emphasis will be placed
on the development of advanced skills such as public speaking, literary analysis, expository and creative writing.
Language Arts Standards are also included in this course to enable students to become literate in Spanish and gain
a better understanding of the nature of their own language as well as other languages to be acquired. The course
content will continue reflecting the cultural values of Spanish language and societies. This course will be conducted
entirely in the target language.
Spanish Speakers III Honors Course No: 1824
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in Spanish Speakers II Honors, 90 or higher in Spanish Speakers II or departmental placement
Course Description: The purpose of this course it to enable students whose heritage language is Spanish to develop,
maintain, and enhance proficiency in their heritage language by reinforcing and expanding skills in listening,
speaking, reading, and writing, as well as Spanish grammar skills acquired in Spanish Speakers 2. Students are
exposed to a variety of Spanish literary genres and authors from a variety of cultural authentic sources. The literary
works in this honors course will be presented in a more detailed and accelerated manner. The course will give
students a panoramic view of the literature and culture of Spain and Latin America. Emphasis will be placed on the
development of skills such as public speaking, literary analysis, expository and creative writing. Language Arts
Standards are also included in this course to enable students to become literate in Spanish and gain a better
understanding of the nature of their own language as well as other languages to be acquired. The course content
will continue reflecting the cultural values of Spanish language and societies. This course will be conducted entirely
in the target language.
Spanish Speakers IV Course No: 1825
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: successful completion of Spanish Speakers III
Course Description: The students will demonstrate proficiency in the four language skills: reading comprehension,
listening, speaking, and writing. Although grammar, syntax, and spelling are still reinforced through oral and written
drills, this course gives emphasis to the development of more advanced skills such as public speaking, literary
analysis, and expository and creative writing. This course will be conducted entirely in the target language.
62
AP Spanish Language & Culture Course No: 1826
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Spanish Speakers III or 87 or higher in Spanish III H or 90 or higher in Spanish IV Honors
or 90 or higher in Spanish Speakers IV or departmental placement
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: The AP Spanish Language and Culture course emphasizes communication (understanding and
being understood by others) by applying the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of
communication in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies,
and cultural awareness. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course strives not to overemphasize grammatical
accuracy at the expense of communication. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught
entirely in Spanish. The AP Spanish Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of culture in
both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of cultural
products (e.g. tools, books, music, laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns of social interactions within a
culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions).
AP Spanish Literature & Culture Course No: 1827
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in AP Spanish Language and Culture
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to develop oral and written fluency at an advanced level. After
successfully completing this course, the student will understand a literary lecture in Spanish, participate actively in
discussions on literary topics, and will be able to analyze in content and form the works of major Spanish and Latin
American writers from the Middle Ages to the present.
French Courses
French I Course No: 1830
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Course Description: French I introduces the student to the basic structures of the French language. Developing
good habits of pronunciation, listening, and reading and writing skills are accomplished by the oral presentation in
class of the fundamentals of sound and the fundamentals of grammar, by the use of audio-visual aids, and by
workbook exercises. Students are also introduced to important aspects of French culture.
63
French II Course No: 1831
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of French I or departmental placement
Course Description: This course reinforces the basic structures of French already studied in French I, and introduces
further structures not covered in that year. Strong emphasis is now placed on the spoken language as a means of
communication in class, aiming at a fair fluency by the end of the year. Emphasis is further placed upon the students’
reading and writing skills. Supplementary readings and audio-visual aids are used. Students will acquire an
appreciation of the culture of the French-speaking world. This course will be conducted in the target language.
French II Honors Course No: 1832
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full Credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in French I or teacher recommendation
Course Description: This course reinforces the basic structures of French already studied in French I, and introduces
further structures not covered in that year. Strong emphasis is now placed on the spoken language as a means of
communication in class, aiming at a fair fluency by the end of the year. Emphasis is further placed upon the students’
reading and writing skills. Supplementary readings and audio-visual aids are used. Students will acquire an
appreciation of the culture of the French-speaking world. This course will be conducted in the target language.
French III Honors Course No: 1833
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in French II-Honors or 90 or higher in French II or teacher recommendation
Course Description: This course consolidates and polishes the basic structures of the French language. It prepares
the students to achieve greater fluency in French as they immerse daily in the French culture through readings and
authentic audio selections. Students will develop their skills in interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes
of communication in a variety of contexts.
AP French Language & Culture Course No: 1834
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in French III-Honors or teacher recommendation
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: The AP French Language and Culture course emphasizes communication (understanding and
being understood by others) by applying the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of
communication in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication strategies,
and cultural awareness. The AP French Language and Culture course strives not to overemphasize grammatical
accuracy at the expense of communication. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the course is taught
almost exclusively in French. The AP French Language and Culture course engages students in an exploration of
culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students’ awareness and appreciation of
cultural products (e.g. tools, books, music, laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns of social interactions
within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions.)
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Italian Courses
Italian I Course No: 1840
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Course Description: Italian I introduces the student to the basic structure of the Italian language. Developing good
habits of pronunciation, listening, reading and writing skills are accomplished by the oral presentation in class of
the fundamentals of sounds and the fundamentals of grammar, by the use of audio-visual aids, and by workbook
exercises. Students are also introduced to the important aspects of Italian culture.
Italian II Honors Course No: 1842
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Italian I
Course Description: This course reinforces the basic structures of Italian already studied in Italian I. Strong emphasis
is now placed on the spoken language as a means of communication in class, aiming at a fair fluency by the end of
the year. Strong emphasis is further placed upon the students’ reading and writing skills. By the end of the course
the students will have acquired an appreciation of the culture of the Italian-speaking world.
Italian III Honors Course No: 1843
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Italian II or 85 or higher in Italian II Honors or teacher recommendation
Course Description: The purpose of this course is to enable students to enhance proficiency in Italian through a
linguistic, communicative, and cultural approach to language learning. There is continued emphasis on the
development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Experiences with Italian literature are broadened.
Cross-cultural understanding is fostered and real-life applications are emphasized throughout the course.
AP Italian Language & Culture Course No: 1844
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit- 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Italian III-Honors or teacher recommendation
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: This Advanced Placement Italian course stresses culture and communication. Students are
exposed to a wide range of authentic language and culture materials including books, newspapers, websites and
audio visual resources. This course is conducted exclusively in Italian and is designed for highly motivated students.
Throughout this course, students continue to develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in Italian
through cultural and literary readings, music, films, media and classroom activities. This syllabus is designed to
expose students to complex grammar structures and cultural materials across the three communicative modes:
interpersonal, interpretive and presentational. Each lesson focuses on student-centered and interactive activities
that include pair or group work, role plays, debates and class presentations.
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Mandarin Courses
Mandarin I Course No: 1850
Course Level: College Prep
Course Length: Full credit- 1 year
Prerequisite: Departmental placement
Course Description: This course introduces students to the target language and its culture. Students will develop
communicative skills in all 3 modes of communication and cross-cultural understanding. Emphasis will be placed
on proficient communication in the language. An introduction to reading and writing is also included as well as
culture, connections, comparisons, and communities.
Mandarin II Honors Course No: 1851
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full credit- 1 year
Prerequisite: Mandarin I
Course Description: This course reinforces the fundamental skills acquired by the students in Mandarin I. It will
develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills as well as cultural awareness. Specific content to be covered
is a continuation of listening and oral skills acquired in Mandarin I. Reading and writing receive more emphasis,
while oral communication remains the primary objective. The cultural survey of the target language-speaking people
is continued.
Mandarin III Honors Course No: 1852
Course Level: Honors
Course Length: Full Credit - 1 year
Prerequisite: Mandarin II
Course Description: This course provides mastery and expansion of skills acquired by the students in Mandarin II.
Specific content includes, but is not limited to, expansions of vocabulary and conversational skills through
discussions of selected readings. Contemporary vocabulary stresses activities that are important to the everyday life
of the target language-speaking people.
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AP Chinese Language & Culture Course No: 1853
Course Level: Advanced Placement
Course Length: Full credit- 1 year
Prerequisite: 90 or higher in Mandarin III-Honors or teacher recommendation
Notes: There is a fee for the AP Exam. Student must take the AP Exam in May.
Course Description: The AP Chinese Language and Culture course in Mandarin Chinese emphasizes communication
(understanding and being understood by others) by applying the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational
modes of communication in real-life situations. This includes vocabulary usage, language control, communication
strategies, and cultural awareness. The AP Chinese Language and Culture course strives not to overemphasize
grammatical accuracy at the expense of communication. To best facilitate the study of language and culture, the
course is taught almost exclusively in Chinese. The AP Chinese Language and Culture course engages students in
an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. The course develops students' awareness
and appreciation of cultural products, (e.g., tools, books, music, laws, conventions, institutions); practices (patterns
of social interactions within a culture); and perspectives (values, attitudes, and assumptions).
Make Your Own

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