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The Senior GO TO Guide is a directory of helpful public and private services in Connecticut for aging adults

Bridgeport
Easton
Fairfield
Monroe
Shelton
Stratford
Trumbull
Upper Fairfield County Edition
Guide to city and town services
N
SAVE FOR USE THROUGHOUT 2019
For the latest news and local activities, go to:
www.seniorgotoguide.com
ADULT DAY CARE
ASSISTED LIVING
HOME CARE
HOSPITAL SERVICES
NURSING FACILITIES
SENIOR HOUSING
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
Guide to Local
SERVICES
AND FACILITIES
A DIRECTORY OF HELPFUL INFORMATION FOR SENIORS AND THEIR FAMILIES
Senior go to Guide
®
Benefits of Owning a Pet
FAMOUS FROM
FAIRFIELD
COUNTY
FREE
Retirement
Tryout
Pickleball—
Fun for ALL!
©2019 People’s United Bank, N.A. | Member FDIC
For information contact
Angela DeLeon
(203) 338-4225
angela.deleon@peoples.com
Peoples United Bank is committed to working in collaboration with
community partners to protect senior citizens from identity theft and
financial scams through educational programs, events and training.
Visit peoples.com/fraudwatch to
learn about our partnership with
Helping senior citizens stay
informed and protected.
2019 Senior Guide Ad (8.44x10.875).indd 1 1/24/19 8:52 AM
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3
H
ow do you plan for asset
protection, considering the
eventuality of long-term
nursing home care? I refer to this as
TITLE XIX/MEDICAID PLANNING.
For most people, a stay in a nursing
home is initially covered by Medicare
after an individual has had at least
a three-day hospital stay and has
been referred to a nursing home
for “skilled nursing care.” Medicare
should then pay for the first 100 days
of that stay, but often terminates
Medicare coverage much sooner.
After that, it is up to the individual to
pay out of pocket. At the point when
the individual is “spent down” and is
below certain income and asset limits,
Medicaid will pay for the stay.
In Connecticut, Medicaid allows
an applicant a maximum of $1,600
in assets and $2,135.32 in gross
monthly income to be approved for
eligibility. N.B.: A married couple,
however, can preserve additional
assets and income, i.e., half the joint
assets up to a max half of $126,420
for the “community spouse” to retain
and $2,894/mo. in gross income for
a couple (#s as of 7/1/18). Excess
assets would have to be spent down.
By this point in life, most people have
a home and have worked hard all
their lives to pay for that home, and
they would like to preserve it for their
children/family. As far as Medicaid is
concerned, that home is a countable
asset unless the applicant’s spouse
or dependent still lives there, or the
applicant has the intent to return to
live in the home, during which time
the home would be considered an
exempt asset. It would be natural to
assume that you could, at that point,
sign over the deed to the house to
someone else. However, Medicaid
has a five-year “look back period”
and penalizes the applicant for the
improper transfer of assets. As a
result, Medicaid deems the applicant
ineligible for the duration of the
transfer penalty period. If your
home is still in your own name, you
may be forced to sell your home and
spend down the proceeds on nursing
home care before you are approved
for Medicaid. N.B.: There are some
exempt transfers that do not result
in a penalty, i.e., transfer to a spouse
or to an adult, live-in child who
provided care to keep you out of a
nursing home for two years prior to
your application for benefits. Medical
records and reports will be necessary
to support this exempt transfer.
One way to prevent this scenario is
to plan far ahead and transfer your
home to your children NOW and
retain a life use to the property.
There are pros and cons of this
avenue, and it works fine as long
as the transfer is completed five
years prior to your application for
benefits. By “retaining a life use,”
you are protected as your children
cannot sell or mortgage the property
or kick you out. Further, you, as
the life tenant, would be eligible
to apply for a reverse mortgage if
needed. The children would receive
a step-up in basis to the date-of-
death value of the home and thus
avoid any capital gain when they go
and sell the property. The retained
life use, however, is considered an
asset for Title XIX purposes, which
life-use value is based on your life
expectancy and the net value of the
home at the time of application
for benefits.
Proper estate planning entails TITLE
XIX/ MEDICAID PLANNING for
long-term nursing home care, taking
into consideration Medicaid’s five-
year “look back period.” Be sure
to consult with an experienced
Elder Law attorney to discuss your
TITLE XIX/MEDICAID PLANNING
options.
Attorney James M. Hughes
1432 Post Road, Fairfield, CT 06824
203-256-1977
hughes_james@sbcglobal.net
www.fairfieldctelderlaw.com
Law Office of James M. Hughes
Please call on us whenever we can be of service.
Elder Law, Title 19/MEDICAID Planning and Spend-down
Wills, Power of Attorney & Health Care Instructions Veteran’s Benefits
Trusts Estates and Probate Real Estate
Attorney Hughes provides clients with high-quality legal
services personalized for their unique needs.
Please call us at 203-256-1977 to set up a convenient appointment.
Law Office of James M. Hughes
1432 Post Road, Fairfield, CT 06824
203-256-1977 E-mail: Hughes_james@sbcglobal.net www.fairfieldctelderlaw.com
by Attorney
James M. Hughes
TITLE XIX/MEDICAID PLANNING
4
5
We at The Senior Depot understand that getting older can be hard. Our store
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LOCAL BUSINESSES AND SERVICES
Find the products and services that you need.
37 Professionals, Businesses and Services
40 Caregivers, Residential Facilities and Rehabilitation Facilities
44 Legal, Insurance, Real Estate, Mortgages/Reverse Mortgages
and Financial Professionals
46 Cemeteries and Funeral Homes
ARTICLES
4 Title XIX/Medicaid Planning
8 Keep Smiling!
11 Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery Can Improve Your Vision
12 What is a Geriatric Assessment?
14 MAAP—Navigating the Journey Your Pet Will Take If You Cannot Care for It
17 Preplanning Your Funeral Makes Sense
18 Benefits of Owning a Pet
20 A Retirement “Tryout”
22 Understanding the Myths and Realities of a Reverse Mortgage
24 Celebrities in the County
28 Holographic Wills
29 Avoid Retirement Surprises
30 A New Kind of Long-Term Care Insurance
31 A Tax Break for the Elderly—With Strings
31 Money and Satisfaction
32 Pickleball—Fun for All!
33 Estate Planning Essentials
36 Senior Home Care and Residential Living Options
43 A Surprise Problem Upon Turning 100
67 Thank You Veterans! and information on VA Hospital Services
Table of Contents
For advertising info: Contact us toll free at 1-888-818-1232
or info@seniorgotoguide.com
The Senior GO TO Guide Resource Directory is published annually by the Merrill Anderson Co., Inc.,
1166 Barnum Ave., Stratford, CT 06614. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in
the Guide is correct, but the publisher or its employees cannot be held responsible for any errors or
omissions or damages or losses caused directly or indirectly by the information.
© 2019 Merrill Anderson Co., Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this work may be copied or transmitted
in any manner without written permission of the Publisher.
GOVERNMENT AGENCIES AND RESOURCES
Your community offers a wide range of services especially for seniors.
34 Area Hospitals and Their Services for Seniors
47 Southwestern Connecticut Agency on Aging
48 Bridgeport
50 Easton
52 Fairfield
55 Monroe
57 Shelton
58 Stratford
60 Trumbull
63 Connecticut Health and Service Organizations
63 National Health and Service Organizations
65 Index
6
Live well, live long!
With retirements lasting longer, it’s
important to plan your future and live
a healthy lifestyle so that your senior
years will be truly golden.
Please take advantage of the many
great resources that are included
in this edition of the Senior GO TO
Guide. Most importantly, the Guide
includes information on local com-
panies, agencies, facilities and profes-
sionals who are qualified, experienced
and stand ready to assist you. Please
call on them whenever a need arises
and mention that you saw them in the
Senior GO TO Guide.
For the latest news and information
on local events please visit our web-
site at seniorgotoguide.com.
Cheers!
Thomas Gerrity
Publisher
tgerrity@seniorgotoguide.com
To start or to make changes to your
free subscription, please e-mail us at
info@seniorgotoguide.com
or call us at 1-888-818-1232.
For information on local events visit seniorgotoguide.com.
7
203.742.1035 | LIGHTHOUSEDENTALCARE.COM
Providing exceptional smiles for the entire
family since 1954!
VOTED ONE OF CONNECTICUTS TOP DOCTORS OF THE YEAR IN
CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE FOR 9 YEARS.
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Started in 1954 by Dr. Mark Samuels’ father, Lighthouse Dental Care is a state-of-the-art dental
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CT Lighthouse Senior Guide Flyer 284812025.indd 1 10/31/2018 3:55:18 PM
7
For information on local events visit seniorgotoguide.com.
WITH THE RIGHT DENTAL CARE, YOU’LL LOOK AND FEEL BETTER.
by Peter J.O’Connell, Editorial and Research Associate
KEEP SMILING!
W
hether you’re 9 or 99
years old, dental care
is important. If you’re
65 or older, it’s especially important
to keep a careful eye on your oral
health as poor oral health can have a
negative effect on your overall health
and well-being, Gum disease has been
potentially linked to a whole host of
issues, including stroke, high blood
pressure, and even heart disease.
So as a senior, what should you do to
protect your oral health and keep your
gums and teeth healthy and happy?
Brush gently and brush often
When some people retire, their daily
routines change, and they tend to
overlook their health and wellness as
a whole. In reality, you should do the
opposite, especially when it comes to
your dental health. As you get older,
your teeth and gums inevitably have
more “wear and tear” on them than
when you were younger.
This means that you need to be
even more diligent with your oral
health, and take the necessary steps
to keep your teeth and gums clean.
Most dentists recommend that you
brush your teeth twice a day for
approximately two minutes with
fluoride toothpaste. It’s important
to brush gently and thoroughly, but
don’t overbrush. Brushing too hard
(or using a toothpaste that is too
abrasive) can actually wear down
your teeth enamel.
Floss every day
Flossing is such a simple habit,
yet many people don’t do it. Most
estimates put adults who floss daily at
between 30%-50%. Flossing removes
small food particles, debris, and
bacteria from between your teeth, and
can be done in less than a minute. If
you’re a senior, and you’ve never made
flossing part of your daily oral hygiene
routine, get started now!
If you wear removable dentures,
keep them clean
Many seniors are opting to replace
their removable dentures with a fixed
denture or dental implants. However,
if you currently wear a removable
denture, it’s important to clean it
daily, because any bacteria or debris
on your denture will likely come into
contact with your gums, which could
increase your chances of getting
gum disease.
Avoid dry mouth, stay hydrated
The older we get, the more prone
we are to dry mouth, a condition in
which saliva production decreases.
Dry mouth can lead to a host of
Continued on page 10
8
9
WITH THE RIGHT DENTAL CARE, YOU’LL LOOK AND FEEL BETTER.
by Peter J.O’Connell, Editorial and Research Associate
KEEP SMILING!
W
hether you’re 9 or 99
years old, dental care
is important. If you’re
65 or older, it’s especially important
to keep a careful eye on your oral
health as poor oral health can have a
negative effect on your overall health
and well-being, Gum disease has been
potentially linked to a whole host of
issues, including stroke, high blood
pressure, and even heart disease.
So as a senior, what should you do to
protect your oral health and keep your
gums and teeth healthy and happy?
Brush gently and brush often
When some people retire, their daily
routines change, and they tend to
overlook their health and wellness as
a whole. In reality, you should do the
opposite, especially when it comes to
your dental health. As you get older,
your teeth and gums inevitably have
more “wear and tear” on them than
when you were younger.
This means that you need to be
even more diligent with your oral
health, and take the necessary steps
to keep your teeth and gums clean.
Most dentists recommend that you
brush your teeth twice a day for
approximately two minutes with
fluoride toothpaste. It’s important
to brush gently and thoroughly, but
don’t overbrush. Brushing too hard
(or using a toothpaste that is too
abrasive) can actually wear down
your teeth enamel.
Floss every day
Flossing is such a simple habit,
yet many people don’t do it. Most
estimates put adults who floss daily at
between 30%-50%. Flossing removes
small food particles, debris, and
bacteria from between your teeth, and
can be done in less than a minute. If
you’re a senior, and you’ve never made
flossing part of your daily oral hygiene
routine, get started now!
If you wear removable dentures,
keep them clean
Many seniors are opting to replace
their removable dentures with a fixed
denture or dental implants. However,
if you currently wear a removable
denture, it’s important to clean it
daily, because any bacteria or debris
on your denture will likely come into
contact with your gums, which could
increase your chances of getting
gum disease.
Avoid dry mouth, stay hydrated
The older we get, the more prone
we are to dry mouth, a condition in
which saliva production decreases.
Dry mouth can lead to a host of
Complete Family, Cosmetic and Reconstructive Dental Services
2499 Main Street
Stratford, CT 06615
(203) 378-5588
MogelofDG@yahoo.com
Experienced, excellent dental care provided by a dedicated staff
of professionals in a comfortable, state-of-the-art office.
Dr. Andrew Mogelof
DDS, FAGD, CDC, CFE
Dr. Scott Mogelof
DMD
Dr. James Pucci
DMD
Dr. Andrew Mogelof - Voted a Top Dentist by his peers 10 years in a row by Connecticut Magazine.
Dr. Scott Mogelof - Voted a Top Dentist by his peers 4 years in a row by Greenwich Magazine.
Through the use of dental implants, we can make your dentures feel like your natural
teeth. You will eliminate all of the hassles related to dentures, eat any foods that you want and
improve your sense of taste. Dental implants are an affordable way to regain the feeling of
having your own teeth again.
LET US HELP YOU SMILE
TM
Want to make your dentures feel like your real teeth?
We provide care to our mature patients through careful, thorough diagnosis; individually
designed treatment plans; and definitive care. We help our patients to reach the highest
level of dental health possible and to maintain that result over their lifetime.
Schedule A Visit Today!
Call to schedule a convenient appointment.
We welcome new patients!
General Dentistry, Cosmetic and
Reconstructive Services, including:
Implants
Porcelain veneers
Crowns and bridges
Full and partial dentures
Sedation
TMJ Treatment
www.drmogelof.com
9
10
dental and overall health problems.
Because saliva cleans the mouth and
remineralizes teeth, lack of sufficient
saliva encourages cavity development
and acid erosion.
• Avoid mouthwashes with alcohol,
as alcohol and toothpaste with
sodium lauryl sulfate both promote
dryness
• Avoid caffeine, tobacco, and
alcoholic beverages
• Use sugar-free gum or lozenges to
stimulate saliva production
• Drink 8 to 10 glasses of pure water
each day
• Keep a humidifier on in your
bedroom while you sleep
• If your mouth is sore, avoid spicy
or salty foods
Limit your soft drink intake
It’s no secret that alcohol and
tobacco products are bad for your
teeth and gums, but so are soft
drinks. We’re not saying that you
shouldn’t ever drink a soft drink
again, but you should be aware that
some of them are highly acidic, and
that acid can wear down your enamel
over time.
See a dentist regularly
If you haven’t been to the dentist
in a while, now is the perfect time
to go ahead and schedule your next
appointment. If you’re considering
using a new dentist, please check
out the excellent dentists listed
here in the Senior GO TO Guide. All
are highly rated and have a special
interest in treating seniors.
N
Can You Upgrade Your Dentures?
Many people believe that if they don’t like their dentures,
there is no alternative available. This, however, is no longer
accurate. Many people who wear dentures are good
candidates for dental implants. Implants are tiny pieces
of titanium that are implanted into the jawbone to keep
dentures in place and restore a natural-tooth feel.
Implant supported dentures offer many benefits over
traditional dentures. Including:
Greater stability, ensuring that your dentures do not slip and
slide around.
Restore a more natural biting and chewing capacity.
Restore your ability to fully taste what you eat.
Decrease irritation of gum tissue.
Improve speech and confidence
Preserve your jawbone, preventing further deterioration. This
is not only healthy for your mouth, but also it can improve
your facial structure.
Figuring out if you want to switch from traditional to implant-
supported dentures is entirely personal and best decided
after speaking with a dentist who specializes in prosthetic
dental procedures.
Continued from page 8
by James R. Pinke, M.D.
L
aser assisted cataract
surgery (LACS) is the newest
evolutionary improvement
in cataract surgery. This surgery
offers patients increased precision
and eliminates the need for blades
to make incisions into the eye. I
have always been at the forefront of
cataract surgery improvements. As
such I added LACS to my practice
about three-and-one-half years
ago, initially at the Wilton Surgery
Center, because there was no laser
more locally. It’s been almost two
years since I brought laser assisted
cataract surgery to the upper
Fairfield, lower New Haven County
area, specifically at the Milford-based
Connecticut Eye Surgery Center.
While laser does not replace all
aspects of cataract surgery, it can
reduce astigmatism using precise
laser light and softens the cataract to
facilitate easier removal of the cataract
material. As the Medical Director of
the Connecticut Eye Surgery Center
in Milford, I recommend this new
addition to cataract surgery care to
all of my patients.
Laser in conjunction with major
improvements in intraocular lens
technology in the past few years,
allows me to improve distance vision,
reading vision, and astigmatism in
the vast majority of patients. Most
patients who opt for advanced
technology lens implants can look
forward to not only excellent
distance vision, but also markedly
improved uncorrected intermediate
and close vision after cataract
surgery. In this new era of modern,
gentle laser assisted surgery with
multifocal lens implants, many
patients no longer require glasses for
any of their visual needs.
In my practice at The Pinke Eye
Center, we take the time to review
in detail all of the modern options
available to our patients regarding
cataract care. We consider patient
education to be extremely important.
To that end we not only educate, but
we also listen intently to allow us to
fit the available technology to our
individual patients’ needs. Patients
are often surprised at the number of
tests and sophisticated instruments
we use to guide us toward the best
treatment. We also offer second
opinions and are often surprised at
how few patients have been made
aware of the modern alternatives,
specifically laser assisted surgery and
multifocal implants.
N
Gentle, Bladeless Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery
Premium Multifocal & Astigmatic Lens Implants
Glaucoma/Diabetes/Macular Degeneration
Eyelid Plastic Surgery
Comprehensive Eye Care
Eyeglasses/Contact Lenses
Most Insurance Plans Accepted
JAMES R. PINKE, M.D.
Board Certified
Physician/Surgeon
(203) 924-8800
9 Cots Street, Shelton, CT
pinkeeyecenter.com
New Patients Welcome!
Get the highest quality eye care with courtesy, concern and compassion.
Medical Director: CT Eye Surgery Center-Milford • Attending Surgeon: Griffin Hospital / Wilton Surgery Center
Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery
Can Improve Your Vision
11
12
F
or older patients with multiple health problems, a comprehensive
geriatric assessment is a good way to get a better understanding of
your overall health and is a logical starting point for putting together
the best care program for you.
The benefits can be immediate and long-term, as was the case when my
mother had a geriatric assessment done a few months shy of her 87th
birthday. She was suffering from dementia, Parkinson’s, and depression, and
we were at wit’s end in trying to figure out how best to care for her.
As her primary caregiver, I accompanied her to the Geriatric Center. As staff
members met with my mother to evaluate her physical and mental health, I
met with other staff members so that they could get a fuller understanding
of how my mother was functioning day to day.
When we left about three hours later, we had a much better understanding
of my mother’s ailments and a comprehensive plan for her care, including
new prescriptions for treating the depression and dementia. In a matter
of days, my mother’s depression was gone, and over the next couple of
months, we noticed that her dementia had somewhat stabilized. And our
frustration level was much lower because we had confidence that she was
getting the right care.
Here is some information on what’s involved and what to expect
from a geriatric assessment.
What is a Geriatric Assessment?
What should I bring to a
geriatric assessment?
• All medicine containers
• Medical records
• Details of past illnesses, surgeries,
allergies, etc.
• Current insurance information
What should you expect during
a geriatric assessment?
A geriatric assessment may last
two hours or more. During the
assessment, geriatricians will
work closely with a team of
healthcare professionals−including
clinical nurse specialists, social
workers, physical therapists,
and pharmacists−to complete a
comprehensive evaluation.
The team will evaluate and assess
the patient’s physical health, mental
health, functional status, social
support system, and economic
status, as well as the accessibility
and safety of the person’s
living environment. During the
assessment, the person’s levels
of social and emotional support
and physical functioning will be
evaluated. The nurse also will
screen the patient for depression
and memory impairment and gather
information about social supports
and living conditions.
What is the cost of a geriatric
evaluation and management
assessment?
Medicare Part B covers costs of the
physician consultation and most
private insurance plans. Medicare
Part B also covers costs of diagnostic
tests. Specialists may bill separately,
but referrals for additional services
will be reviewed with you before
they are ordered.
N
What exactly is a geriatric
assessment?
A geriatric assessment is a
consultative resource for patients,
their family members and caregivers,
and their primary care physicians.
The assessment provides a
comprehensive assessment of an
older adult’s health issues in the
context of social and family needs,
and it provides a comprehensive plan
for managing the person’s conditions
and care.
A geriatric assessment also provides
education and patient-specific
information about health problems,
as well as information and access to
community and private supports for
patients and caregivers.
When is a geriatric assessment
appropriate?
A geriatric management assessment
is advised if you are concerned
about your loved one’s ability to live
independently or if the person is
experiencing any combination of the
following symptoms:
• Multiple health problems
• Confusion or memory loss
• Behavioral changes, including
sadness, depression, or anxiety
• Difficulty performing daily
activities
• Balance and walking problems
• Weakness, caused by
deconditioning of the muscles or
other health problems
• Nutritional concerns, including
unexplained weight loss
• Problems related to the use of
multiple medications, including
dizziness or falls
• Uncertainty about the person’s
ability to live independently.
by Thomas Gerrity, Publisher
A Day Program where they’re
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When you need Home Care,
choose the team you already trust.
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Waveny brings the expertise, quality and local
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into your home. L
earn how Waveny can come to
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A nonprofit continuum of care
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Waveny’s Adult Day Program
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With ever-changing choices of
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Free door-to-door transportation
is provided throughout most of
lower Fairfield County. Learn how
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203.594.5302 or visiting waveny.org.
Daytime Caregiver Relief
with Free Transportation
13
F
or older patients with multiple health problems, a comprehensive
geriatric assessment is a good way to get a better understanding of
your overall health and is a logical starting point for putting together
the best care program for you.
The benefits can be immediate and long-term, as was the case when my
mother had a geriatric assessment done a few months shy of her 87th
birthday. She was suffering from dementia, Parkinson’s, and depression, and
we were at wit’s end in trying to figure out how best to care for her.
As her primary caregiver, I accompanied her to the Geriatric Center. As staff
members met with my mother to evaluate her physical and mental health, I
met with other staff members so that they could get a fuller understanding
of how my mother was functioning day to day.
When we left about three hours later, we had a much better understanding
of my mother’s ailments and a comprehensive plan for her care, including
new prescriptions for treating the depression and dementia. In a matter
of days, my mother’s depression was gone, and over the next couple of
months, we noticed that her dementia had somewhat stabilized. And our
frustration level was much lower because we had confidence that she was
getting the right care.
Here is some information on what’s involved and what to expect
from a geriatric assessment.
What is a Geriatric Assessment?
What should I bring to a
geriatric assessment?
• All medicine containers
• Medical records
• Details of past illnesses, surgeries,
allergies, etc.
• Current insurance information
What should you expect during
a geriatric assessment?
A geriatric assessment may last
two hours or more. During the
assessment, geriatricians will
work closely with a team of
healthcare professionals−including
clinical nurse specialists, social
workers, physical therapists,
and pharmacists−to complete a
comprehensive evaluation.
The team will evaluate and assess
the patient’s physical health, mental
health, functional status, social
support system, and economic
status, as well as the accessibility
and safety of the person’s
living environment. During the
assessment, the person’s levels
of social and emotional support
and physical functioning will be
evaluated. The nurse also will
screen the patient for depression
and memory impairment and gather
information about social supports
and living conditions.
What is the cost of a geriatric
evaluation and management
assessment?
Medicare Part B covers costs of the
physician consultation and most
private insurance plans. Medicare
Part B also covers costs of diagnostic
tests. Specialists may bill separately,
but referrals for additional services
will be reviewed with you before
they are ordered.
N
What exactly is a geriatric
assessment?
A geriatric assessment is a
consultative resource for patients,
their family members and caregivers,
and their primary care physicians.
The assessment provides a
comprehensive assessment of an
older adult’s health issues in the
context of social and family needs,
and it provides a comprehensive plan
for managing the person’s conditions
and care.
A geriatric assessment also provides
education and patient-specific
information about health problems,
as well as information and access to
community and private supports for
patients and caregivers.
When is a geriatric assessment
appropriate?
A geriatric management assessment
is advised if you are concerned
about your loved one’s ability to live
independently or if the person is
experiencing any combination of the
following symptoms:
• Multiple health problems
• Confusion or memory loss
• Behavioral changes, including
sadness, depression, or anxiety
• Difficulty performing daily
activities
• Balance and walking problems
• Weakness, caused by
deconditioning of the muscles or
other health problems
• Nutritional concerns, including
unexplained weight loss
• Problems related to the use of
multiple medications, including
dizziness or falls
• Uncertainty about the person’s
ability to live independently.
by Thomas Gerrity, Publisher
Conflict Coaching and Mediation
of Issues Over Animals
Hamilton Law and Mediation is a premier New York law firm focused on the resolution of conflicts over
animals using Mediation and Collaborative Process.
Conflicts between people over animals will always be with us. How we respond and resolve those con-
flicts is changing. At Hamilton Law and Mediation, our focus is on the needs of our clients involved in
a conflict about an animal BEFORE they resort to litigation.
We work with pet owners who want to solve a conflict over a pet in a way that serves them and their
pet. We also work with pet service providers who
need a skill set to manage their expectations and
their clients’ expectations in a way that addresses
conflict early or, if missed, empowers them to
solve conflicts for the benefit of all.
Give us a call! We’re here and happy to help!
Please contact us if you are having a conflict
involving a beloved animal or have questions
about our services.
Debra Vey Voda-Hamilton
info@hamiltonlawandmediation.com
(914) 273-1085
Visit our Web site at
hamiltonlawandmediation.com
Workshops and Seminars
MAPPING the Journey Your Pets Take When You Can’t Take Care of Them Yourself
Continuity of Care Workshop
For Professionals and Service Providers
4 Critical Steps To Keep Your Practice Profitable and Your Life Enjoyable
Evaluate and Examine current best practices in business and client relationships.
6 Tips to Address Disagreements and Make Every Client a Raving Fan
Evaluate and Examine current best practices in a veterinary business and in
client relationships
3 Peaceful Ways to End Destructive Conversations About Animals
One-day Conflict Conversation Workshop
16-Hour Pet Professional Practice Program for Vets and all Animal Service Providers
3 Critical Mistakes Breeders/Handlers and Owners Make That Nullify Their Contracts
Contact Debra directly at (914) 273-1085 to schedule a get-acquainted call prior
to scheduling your workshop or seminar.
W
hen you share your
life with an animal
companion, planning
for your loved one’s short-term and
long-term care is imperative. They
are counting on you to ensure their
care no matter what. The older your
pet is, the more they need a plan
for future care. Most people believe
setting up directives in their will
for the future care of their pet is
enough. But, what happens to your
pet if the will is inoperative because
you are not dead, or there is a delay
in accessing your directives, or funds
are in probate for six months to a
year? What if the need to care for
your pet is due to disaster, disability,
disease, delay, or divorce? In these
scenarios are you prepared? Have
you answered key questions? By
following four steps, you will gain
peace of mind for the future care of
your beloved companion.
These tips will create a future pet
care plan that your pets can live
with. Start with drawing a MAAP.
Make a plan outlining the care
that you would like to have your
pets receive.
Address each of your pets and
their unique needs.
Appoint at least three
caregivers; only one can be a
family member.
Publish your plans and keep
them readily available.
Make a plan outlining the kind of
care that you would like your pet to
receive. This directive assumes that
you are permanently or temporarily
incapable of personally providing
the care your pet needs to receive.
Your pet caregiver will be grateful
that you provided this unique and
individualized information.
Address your pet’s individual
uniqueness. List their identifying
characteristics, including color,
sex, age, and microchip number if
applicable. This information will
be invaluable to those left to care
for your beloved companions. This
outline should talk about their eating
habits and personality traits. By
creating this document, you enable the
person caring for your pet to know its
common behavior. This would allow
another to step into your shoes.
Appoint three pet caregivers to
take over the current needs of your
pet if life circumstances occur that
limit your ability to care for them.
Appointing three caregivers in
succession helps hedge your bet. Only
one family member can be appointed
as a caregiver. This is very important.
If you cannot care for your pets,
chances are that you are in need of
assistance with your own care. Your
family will be providing it. Enabling
them to have someone else look after
your pets will be a welcome relief.
Check in often to confirm with the
people you have appointed to care for
your pets that they still can. People
may agree to care for your dog or cat
when circumstances permit such care.
MAAP—
Navigating the Journey
Your Pet Will Take If You
Cannot Care for It
By Debra A. Vey Voda-Hamilton, Esq., Mediator
Hamilton Law and Mediation, PLLC
14
Continued on page 16
Conflict Coaching and Mediation
of Issues Over Animals
Hamilton Law and Mediation is a premier New York law firm focused on the resolution of conflicts over
animals using Mediation and Collaborative Process.
Conflicts between people over animals will always be with us. How we respond and resolve those con-
flicts is changing. At Hamilton Law and Mediation, our focus is on the needs of our clients involved in
a conflict about an animal BEFORE they resort to litigation.
We work with pet owners who want to solve a conflict over a pet in a way that serves them and their
pet. We also work with pet service providers who
need a skill set to manage their expectations and
their clients’ expectations in a way that addresses
conflict early or, if missed, empowers them to
solve conflicts for the benefit of all.
Give us a call! We’re here and happy to help!
Please contact us if you are having a conflict
involving a beloved animal or have questions
about our services.
Debra Vey Voda-Hamilton
info@hamiltonlawandmediation.com
(914) 273-1085
Visit our Web site at
hamiltonlawandmediation.com
Workshops and Seminars
MAPPING the Journey Your Pets Take When You Can’t Take Care of Them Yourself
Continuity of Care Workshop
For Professionals and Service Providers
4 Critical Steps To Keep Your Practice Profitable and Your Life Enjoyable
Evaluate and Examine current best practices in business and client relationships.
6 Tips to Address Disagreements and Make Every Client a Raving Fan
Evaluate and Examine current best practices in a veterinary business and in
client relationships
3 Peaceful Ways to End Destructive Conversations About Animals
One-day Conflict Conversation Workshop
16-Hour Pet Professional Practice Program for Vets and all Animal Service Providers
3 Critical Mistakes Breeders/Handlers and Owners Make That Nullify Their Contracts
Contact Debra directly at (914) 273-1085 to schedule a get-acquainted call prior
to scheduling your workshop or seminar.
15
W
hen you share your
life with an animal
companion, planning
for your loved one’s short-term and
long-term care is imperative. They
are counting on you to ensure their
care no matter what. The older your
pet is, the more they need a plan
for future care. Most people believe
setting up directives in their will
for the future care of their pet is
enough. But, what happens to your
pet if the will is inoperative because
you are not dead, or there is a delay
in accessing your directives, or funds
are in probate for six months to a
year? What if the need to care for
your pet is due to disaster, disability,
disease, delay, or divorce? In these
scenarios are you prepared? Have
you answered key questions? By
following four steps, you will gain
peace of mind for the future care of
your beloved companion.
These tips will create a future pet
care plan that your pets can live
with. Start with drawing a MAAP.
Make a plan outlining the care
that you would like to have your
pets receive.
Address each of your pets and
their unique needs.
Appoint at least three
caregivers; only one can be a
family member.
Publish your plans and keep
them readily available.
Make a plan outlining the kind of
care that you would like your pet to
receive. This directive assumes that
you are permanently or temporarily
incapable of personally providing
the care your pet needs to receive.
Your pet caregiver will be grateful
that you provided this unique and
individualized information.
Address your pet’s individual
uniqueness. List their identifying
characteristics, including color,
sex, age, and microchip number if
applicable. This information will
be invaluable to those left to care
for your beloved companions. This
outline should talk about their eating
habits and personality traits. By
creating this document, you enable the
person caring for your pet to know its
common behavior. This would allow
another to step into your shoes.
Appoint three pet caregivers to
take over the current needs of your
pet if life circumstances occur that
limit your ability to care for them.
Appointing three caregivers in
succession helps hedge your bet. Only
one family member can be appointed
as a caregiver. This is very important.
If you cannot care for your pets,
chances are that you are in need of
assistance with your own care. Your
family will be providing it. Enabling
them to have someone else look after
your pets will be a welcome relief.
Check in often to confirm with the
people you have appointed to care for
your pets that they still can. People
may agree to care for your dog or cat
when circumstances permit such care.
MAAP—
Navigating the Journey
Your Pet Will Take If You
Cannot Care for It
However, things change, and when
called upon to take your pet, they
may not be able to follow through.
You need to know that before
it occurs.
Publish the plans that you make.
Publishing your plan, your pet
information, and the names of the
three people whom you appointed
to care for your pet helps those who
have assumed the responsibility
of caring for your pets know the
who, what, and where of your pet
care plan. Make sure that everyone
in your life knows where this pet
directive is, so they can easily access
this important information upon
your death, disability, disaster,
disease, delay, or divorce.
Did you know that sometimes it
could take up to six months and
often 12 months, to probate a Will?
What happens to your pet in the
meantime? Your Will does not
protect your animals until it is read.
Yet your pet needs those around you
to know immediately how you want
them cared for, who is available to
help provide that care, and how
they will get reimbursed for their
generosity. You may consider
setting aside funds to pay for this
care. Setting money aside in a pet
trust or annuity can be a lifesaver
for your pet when it comes
to their future care. Ask your
financial advisor or estate planner
questions as to how to provide
funding to a pet trust or from
an annuity.
This MAAP for your pet’s future
care should be created before
something happens to you. It is
not just about end of life dispersal
of your pet. If you trip, fall, and
injure yourself, who will take care
of you and your companion while
you heal? You are still alive, yet
you cannot care for your pet, and
it needs care immediately. Having
a MAAP to follow, taking these
lifesaving steps now, will ensure
that your pet is well cared for in
the event you cannot provide that
care yourself.
Be sure to visit our website for more
information about creating a MAAP
for your pets and to register for our
next online pet care planning webinar.
(It’s free to join us, and you’ll get some
additional gifts to help you protect
your pet even more!)
N
© HLM. All Rights Reserved.
Debra’s dad with his beloved Juni
Debra A. Vey Voda-Hamilton, Esq., Mediator
Hamilton Law and Mediation
www.hamiltonlawandmediation.com
By Debra A. Vey Voda-Hamilton, Esq., Mediator
Hamilton Law and Mediation, PLLC
16
W
hen you share your
life with an animal
companion, planning
for your loved one’s short-term and
long-term care is imperative. They
are counting on you to ensure their
care no matter what. The older your
pet is, the more they need a plan
for future care. Most people believe
setting up directives in their will
for the future care of their pet is
enough. But, what happens to your
pet if the will is inoperative because
you are not dead, or there is a delay
in accessing your directives, or funds
are in probate for six months to a
year? What if the need to care for
your pet is due to disaster, disability,
disease, delay, or divorce? In these
scenarios are you prepared? Have
you answered key questions? By
following four steps, you will gain
peace of mind for the future care of
your beloved companion.
These tips will create a future pet
care plan that your pets can live
with. Start with drawing a MAAP.
Make a plan outlining the care
that you would like to have your
pets receive.
Address each of your pets and
their unique needs.
Appoint at least three
caregivers; only one can be a
family member.
Publish your plans and keep
them readily available.
Make a plan outlining the kind of
care that you would like your pet to
receive. This directive assumes that
you are permanently or temporarily
incapable of personally providing
the care your pet needs to receive.
Your pet caregiver will be grateful
that you provided this unique and
individualized information.
Address your pet’s individual
uniqueness. List their identifying
characteristics, including color,
sex, age, and microchip number if
applicable. This information will
be invaluable to those left to care
for your beloved companions. This
outline should talk about their eating
habits and personality traits. By
creating this document, you enable the
person caring for your pet to know its
common behavior. This would allow
another to step into your shoes.
Appoint three pet caregivers to
take over the current needs of your
pet if life circumstances occur that
limit your ability to care for them.
Appointing three caregivers in
succession helps hedge your bet. Only
one family member can be appointed
as a caregiver. This is very important.
If you cannot care for your pets,
chances are that you are in need of
assistance with your own care. Your
family will be providing it. Enabling
them to have someone else look after
your pets will be a welcome relief.
Check in often to confirm with the
people you have appointed to care for
your pets that they still can. People
may agree to care for your dog or cat
when circumstances permit such care.
MAAP—
Navigating the Journey
Your Pet Will Take If You
Cannot Care for It
However, things change, and when
called upon to take your pet, they
may not be able to follow through.
You need to know that before
it occurs.
Publish the plans that you make.
Publishing your plan, your pet
information, and the names of the
three people whom you appointed
to care for your pet helps those who
have assumed the responsibility
of caring for your pets know the
who, what, and where of your pet
care plan. Make sure that everyone
in your life knows where this pet
directive is, so they can easily access
this important information upon
your death, disability, disaster,
disease, delay, or divorce.
Did you know that sometimes it
could take up to six months and
often 12 months, to probate a Will?
What happens to your pet in the
meantime? Your Will does not
protect your animals until it is read.
Yet your pet needs those around you
to know immediately how you want
them cared for, who is available to
help provide that care, and how
they will get reimbursed for their
generosity. You may consider
setting aside funds to pay for this
care. Setting money aside in a pet
trust or annuity can be a lifesaver
for your pet when it comes
to their future care. Ask your
financial advisor or estate planner
questions as to how to provide
funding to a pet trust or from
an annuity.
This MAAP for your pet’s future
care should be created before
something happens to you. It is
not just about end of life dispersal
of your pet. If you trip, fall, and
injure yourself, who will take care
of you and your companion while
you heal? You are still alive, yet
you cannot care for your pet, and
it needs care immediately. Having
a MAAP to follow, taking these
lifesaving steps now, will ensure
that your pet is well cared for in
the event you cannot provide that
care yourself.
Be sure to visit our website for more
information about creating a MAAP
for your pets and to register for our
next online pet care planning webinar.
(It’s free to join us, and you’ll get some
additional gifts to help you protect
your pet even more!)
N
© HLM. All Rights Reserved.
Debra’s dad with his beloved Juni
Debra A. Vey Voda-Hamilton, Esq., Mediator
Hamilton Law and Mediation
www.hamiltonlawandmediation.com
By Debra A. Vey Voda-Hamilton, Esq., Mediator
Hamilton Law and Mediation, PLLC
Preplanning Your Funeral Makes Sense
by Moriah Doyle Monsif
Gregory F. Doyle
FUNERAL HOME &
CREMATION SERVICE
Handicap
Accessible
Family Owned
& Operated
Since 1950
“Our Family
Takes Care
of Your
Family With
Compassion
& Dignity
Member of National
& Connecticut
Funeral Directors
Association
www.gregoryfdoylefuneralhome.com
Directors:
Dorothy Doyle,
Moriah Doyle Monsif,
Conan J. Doyle, Dody Doyle,
Andrea K. Rochniak
Andrea K. Rochniak,
Gregory F. Doyle (1918-2005),
Colleen Doyle Britt (1950-2010)
203-874-5641
291 Bridgeport Avenue, Milford
US Route 1, Rte I-95 Exit 34, Right .2 Miles
Devon Center
We O er:
The Traditional Funeral
Personal Service 24 Hours
Minimal Cost Cremations&Burials
Shipping Ser vice
Pre-Arrangements & Counseling
Information Regarding Title XIX
At Home Arrangements
Irrevocable & Revocable Trusts
Transferring of Funeral Trusts
Moriah Doyle Monsif
Newly renovated— including handicapped mens and women’s restrooms
N
obody likes to think about
the unfortunate reality that
life eventually ends. However, a
little forethought can make a big
difference when it comes to funeral
arrangements. By preplanning your
funeral services, your loved ones
can be saved any additional stress,
while they are already grieving your
passing, thus giving you peace of
mind now and ensuring that all your
wishes will be respected.
Here are some reasons why funeral
preplanning is so important:
Make things easier
for your loved ones
The best thing that you can do for
your loved ones after your passing is
to let them grieve in peace without
worrying about time-sensitive
funeral arrangements. When you
preplan your funeral, you save your
family from a rushed, emotional
process.
Save money by prepaying
Although prepaying for funeral
arrangements is not required, it’s
a sensible financial decision. The
costs for a funeral can occur at any
time, causing stress and financial
uncertainty. And the price for a
funeral increases regularly. When
you plan ahead and pay for your
funeral, you lock in current pricing,
avoiding future increases.
Ensure that your wishes
are followed
Does your family know where you
wish to be buried, or where you want
your services held? Every aspect
of your funeral, from location to
choosing cremation or burial, can be
decided during funeral preplanning.
And your loved ones will be
confident that they are following
your wishes.
Preplanning a funeral doesn’t have
to be hard. Please give us a call and
we will give you full information on
all of your options, so you can make
an informed decision as to which
arrangements will best suit your
needs and desires.
N
17
I
t’s been said that the dog is
man’s best friend. But it also
could be said that animals of
many kinds can be the best friends
of both men and women—and
good medicine, too! As Pet Partners
puts it: “. . . an emerging body of
research is recognizing the impact
the human-animal bond can have on
individual and community health.”
And healthcare journalist Nicole
Brierty points out: “. . . owning a pet
could in fact improve your mental
and physical state, especially in the
elderly.” Additionally, a number of
studies have indicated that, as one
of them concludes: “Recognizing
and nurturing the connection
between animals and humans
has potential implications
for individual stability and
health, improved economic
outputs and healthcare
cost savings”—including a
decrease in doctor visits and
the amount of time spent
staying home sick.
Benefits of
Owning a Pet
by Peter J. O’Connell, Editorial and Research Associate
Your heart, your pet
Among the many good reasons for
“putting a pet in your heart”—
interacting with one (a gentle,
friendly one, of course) over time—
are the effects that an animal can
have on cardiovascular health.
Research has shown that, as scientist
R.W. Byrne points out: “Just 15
minutes bonding with an animal
sets off a chemical chain reaction
in the brain, lowering the levels of
the fight-or-flight hormone, cortisol,
and increasing production of the
feel-good hormone serotonin. The
result: heart
rate, blood
pressure
and
stress
levels immediately drop. Over the
long term, pet and human interaction
can lower cholesterol levels, fight
depression and may even help protect
against heart disease and stroke.”
One study found that an automatic
relaxation response triggered simply
by the presence of a dog in a room
with an individual actually lowered
the person’s blood pressure better than
taking a popular type of blood pressure
medication.
And heart-healthy effects are not
limited to interactions with dogs. Noted
veterinarian Dr. Marty Becker says:
“If you have a cat, you’re 30 percent
less likely to have a heart attack, and
you’re 40 percent less likely to have a
cardiovascular incident like a stroke.”
In fact, studies have shown positive
health effects from interactions with:
birds, cats, crickets, dogs, fish, guinea
pigs, hamsters, horses, rabbits, turtles,
and more! Conditions, in addition to
the cardio ones, showing such effects
include: ADHD, allergies, Alzheimer’s
and related conditions, anxiety,
autism, chronic pain, colon cancer,
fibromyalgia, depression, diabetes,
immunodeficiency,
lymphoma,
migraines,
problematic eating habits, PTSD,
recovery from joint replacement
surgery, stress, and more! For
example, the American Diabetes
Association has pointed out that
one-third of pets living with
diabetics change behavior when their
owner’s blood glucose level becomes
unstable; this change in the pet’s
behavior can function as a warning
to the owner.
One of the leading benefits of pet
ownership, particularly of dogs, is
the incentive for physical activity
that it provides. A new study,
described by Dr. Karen Becker on
healthypets.mercola.com, discovered
that older adults who owned dogs
walked almost 22 minutes per
day more than a dog-less group,
enough exercise “to meet the
U.S. and international exercise
recommendations for substantial
health benefits.” Feeding, grooming,
visiting veterinarians, playing with,
and otherwise interacting with
animals provide additional activity
for pet owners, even those who do
not have dogs to walk.
More support, less stress
Stress is harmful to both physical
and mental/emotional health. Given
the deleterious effects of stress, it’s
important to note that, as an article
from the National Center for Health
Research puts it: “Findings suggest
that the social support a pet provides
can make a person feel more relaxed
and decrease stress . . . . The social
support provided by a pet might also
encourage more social interactions
with people, reducing feelings of
isolation or loneliness.” With 75% of
seniors living alone, this is obviously
an important function offered by pet
ownership. An example here would
be the fact that a person’s walking
with a dog has been found to
increase contact and communication
with other people, especially with
strangers. In this connection, it
might be mentioned that over the
years men and women of all ages
have found that being out and
about with a pet can act as a “date
magnet.” As WebMD puts it: “Forget
Internet matchmaking—a dog is a
natural conversation starter”!
Many seniors struggle against
depression. A pet can be a great
ally in that struggle. As an article
in SeniorHomes.com reports: “. . .
caring for an animal requires a sense
of responsibility and routine that
may be lacking as older adults shed
long-held work and social roles.
Caring for a pet can provide purpose
and establish a routine . . . .” In fact,
research published in the Journal
of Personality and Social Psychology
shows that pet owners have stronger
self-esteem, are more extroverted,
and less fearful than people who
don’t own pets.
Among the mental and emotional
benefits that pets offer are energy
and enthusiasm, laughter and love.
One psychotherapist notes that
“Dogs and other pets live very
much in the here and now. They
don’t worry about tomorrow. And
tomorrow can be very scary for an
older person. By having an animal
with a sense of now, it tends to
rub off on people.” And another
psychologist says, “Having a pet
helps the senior focus on something
other than physical problems and
negative preoccupations about
aging.” Veterinarian Marty Becker
puts it well: “People who have
pets are less harried; there’s more
laughter in their life. When you
come home, it’s like . . . . You’re a
star.” And: “You might lose your job,
your house, your 401(k)—but you’ll
never lose the unconditional love of
your pet.”
N
18
I
t’s been said that the dog is
man’s best friend. But it also
could be said that animals of
many kinds can be the best friends
of both men and women—and
good medicine, too! As Pet Partners
puts it: “. . . an emerging body of
research is recognizing the impact
the human-animal bond can have on
individual and community health.”
And healthcare journalist Nicole
Brierty points out: “. . . owning a pet
could in fact improve your mental
and physical state, especially in the
elderly.” Additionally, a number of
studies have indicated that, as one
of them concludes: “Recognizing
and nurturing the connection
between animals and humans
has potential implications
for individual stability and
health, improved economic
outputs and healthcare
cost savings”—including a
decrease in doctor visits and
the amount of time spent
staying home sick.
Benefits of
Owning a Pet
by Peter J. O’Connell, Editorial and Research Associate
Your heart, your pet
Among the many good reasons for
“putting a pet in your heart”—
interacting with one (a gentle,
friendly one, of course) over time—
are the effects that an animal can
have on cardiovascular health.
Research has shown that, as scientist
R.W. Byrne points out: “Just 15
minutes bonding with an animal
sets off a chemical chain reaction
in the brain, lowering the levels of
the fight-or-flight hormone, cortisol,
and increasing production of the
feel-good hormone serotonin. The
result: heart
rate, blood
pressure
and
stress
levels immediately drop. Over the
long term, pet and human interaction
can lower cholesterol levels, fight
depression and may even help protect
against heart disease and stroke.”
One study found that an automatic
relaxation response triggered simply
by the presence of a dog in a room
with an individual actually lowered
the person’s blood pressure better than
taking a popular type of blood pressure
medication.
And heart-healthy effects are not
limited to interactions with dogs. Noted
veterinarian Dr. Marty Becker says:
“If you have a cat, you’re 30 percent
less likely to have a heart attack, and
you’re 40 percent less likely to have a
cardiovascular incident like a stroke.”
In fact, studies have shown positive
health effects from interactions with:
birds, cats, crickets, dogs, fish, guinea
pigs, hamsters, horses, rabbits, turtles,
and more! Conditions, in addition to
the cardio ones, showing such effects
include: ADHD, allergies, Alzheimer’s
and related conditions, anxiety,
autism, chronic pain, colon cancer,
fibromyalgia, depression, diabetes,
immunodeficiency,
lymphoma,
migraines,
problematic eating habits, PTSD,
recovery from joint replacement
surgery, stress, and more! For
example, the American Diabetes
Association has pointed out that
one-third of pets living with
diabetics change behavior when their
owner’s blood glucose level becomes
unstable; this change in the pet’s
behavior can function as a warning
to the owner.
One of the leading benefits of pet
ownership, particularly of dogs, is
the incentive for physical activity
that it provides. A new study,
described by Dr. Karen Becker on
healthypets.mercola.com, discovered
that older adults who owned dogs
walked almost 22 minutes per
day more than a dog-less group,
enough exercise “to meet the
U.S. and international exercise
recommendations for substantial
health benefits.” Feeding, grooming,
visiting veterinarians, playing with,
and otherwise interacting with
animals provide additional activity
for pet owners, even those who do
not have dogs to walk.
More support, less stress
Stress is harmful to both physical
and mental/emotional health. Given
the deleterious effects of stress, it’s
important to note that, as an article
from the National Center for Health
Research puts it: “Findings suggest
that the social support a pet provides
can make a person feel more relaxed
and decrease stress . . . . The social
support provided by a pet might also
encourage more social interactions
with people, reducing feelings of
isolation or loneliness.” With 75% of
seniors living alone, this is obviously
an important function offered by pet
ownership. An example here would
be the fact that a person’s walking
with a dog has been found to
increase contact and communication
with other people, especially with
strangers. In this connection, it
might be mentioned that over the
years men and women of all ages
have found that being out and
about with a pet can act as a “date
magnet.” As WebMD puts it: “Forget
Internet matchmaking—a dog is a
natural conversation starter”!
Many seniors struggle against
depression. A pet can be a great
ally in that struggle. As an article
in SeniorHomes.com reports: “. . .
caring for an animal requires a sense
of responsibility and routine that
may be lacking as older adults shed
long-held work and social roles.
Caring for a pet can provide purpose
and establish a routine . . . .” In fact,
research published in the Journal
of Personality and Social Psychology
shows that pet owners have stronger
self-esteem, are more extroverted,
and less fearful than people who
don’t own pets.
Among the mental and emotional
benefits that pets offer are energy
and enthusiasm, laughter and love.
One psychotherapist notes that
“Dogs and other pets live very
much in the here and now. They
don’t worry about tomorrow. And
tomorrow can be very scary for an
older person. By having an animal
with a sense of now, it tends to
rub off on people.” And another
psychologist says, “Having a pet
helps the senior focus on something
other than physical problems and
negative preoccupations about
aging.” Veterinarian Marty Becker
puts it well: “People who have
pets are less harried; there’s more
laughter in their life. When you
come home, it’s like . . . . You’re a
star.” And: “You might lose your job,
your house, your 401(k)—but you’ll
never lose the unconditional love of
your pet.”
N
19
20
A Retirement “Tryout”
by Thomas Gerrity, Publisher
R
etirement is sometimes defined
in terms of what one is leaving
behind—a career, difficult clients,
job stress, the daily commute, the
grind. But for retirement to be
fully satisfying, according to many
experts, one needs to retire to
something, not just from something.
Defining that “to” and giving
it a tryout is what we mean by
“pretesting” your retirement. Here
are some examples.
Donate your time and expertise.
An attorney acquaintance of ours
spent most of his career as in-house
counsel for a major oil company. As
he approached his retirement years,
he arranged to be allowed to do pro
bono legal work for immigrants. He
found the experience so rewarding
that after he started drawing his oil
company pension, he founded a
law firm specializing in such pro
bono work.
The “soft launch” of a retirement
consultancy. Another acquaintance
thought his years of experience
in the banking business might be
valuable in creating a marketing
consultancy for financial services
firms. Before he retired, this person
tried out some of his ideas with
the advertising agency that his
bank used. Both sides found the
experience valuable, and a basis
was created for the individual’s
new marketing firm. He was able
to have a clear financial path to
follow once his regular full-time
employment ended.
Try a month’s vacation. It would be a
shame to retire to a quiet, secluded
life-style, only to find it boring after
a few months. Many retirees report
that they miss the camaraderie of
their working lives after they retire.
Before deciding upon retirement
relocation, it can be helpful to spend
an extended period of time in the
possible new location, to see what
day-to-day life would be like there.
As you conduct these tryouts, you
should monitor your finances,
noting any adjustments that may be
required. You may find that your
spending needs change or vary from
your expectations, and that may
influence your choice of a retirement
start date.
Testing the water early can head off
unpleasant surprises after one enters
retirement. By then, many decisions
have become irreversible.
N
M
anaging a loved one’s healthcare can be taxing and all-consuming, which is why it’s so
important for caregivers to take time for themselves. Waveny’s caregiver relief solutions can
provide seniors and families with the help they need to make the most of everything, together.
Daily:
Take advantage of our vibrant Adult Day Program with free local transportation for daytime
peace of mind.
Overnight: Plan a getaway knowing overnight respite guests with Alzheimer’s and dementia can
stay with us for as short as a week at The Village, our award-winning memory care community.
At Home: Our trusted care can even come to you – whether skilled nurses and therapists,
a live-in aide, or just a helping hand – through Waveny’s home-based services. You can choose
any combination of our services and programs to meet your unique needs and preferences.
Conveniently located in New Canaan, Waveny’s continuum of care flows fluidly within a single
nonprofit organization, without any expensive buy-in fees or long-term commitments. So if
downsizing into a caring and compassionate independent living or memory care community is
something you’re considering, now is the perfect time to sample senior living with a 3-month
trial at The Inn or The Village.
Discover more by dropping by, calling
203.594.5302 or just visiting waveny.org.
T
he
G
ift
of
C
aregiver
R
elief
.
CALL TODAY!
203-618-4232 or visit nathanielwitherell.org
THE CARE YOU NEED,
CLOSE TO HOME
We’ll help you get back
to the life you love.
SHORT-TERM REHABILITATION
Short-term Rehabilitation
Services
Rehabilitation facilities provide therapy for
individuals recovering from surgery, illness or an
accident. Generally, those needing short-term,
in-patient rehabilitation may remain involved in
their program at a facility for as little as a couple
of days to as long as several weeks or more.
Short-term rehabilitation programs help patients
to achieve their maximum functional capacity and
get back to their homes and community in the
shortest time possible.
Physical therapy is a health care specialty
involved with evaluating, diagnosing and treating
disorders of the musculoskeletal system. The goal
of physical therapy is to restore maximal functional
independence to patients.
Occupational therapy is assessment and
treatment whose goal is to recover and maintain
the daily living and work skills of people with
a physical, mental, or cognitive disorder.
Occupational therapists also focus on identifying
and eliminating environmental barriers to
independence and participation in daily activities.
Speech-language pathologists work to prevent,
assess, diagnose, and treat speech, language,
social communication, cognitive-communication,
and swallowing disorders in children and adults.
Introducing Our NEW
Intensive Stroke Rehabilitation Program
DIRECTED BY
Neurologist: Daryl Story, Physiatrist: Claudio Petrillo
and Pulmonologist: Donald McNichol
A CARING
Place Between
Hospital & Home
76 West Rocks Rd., Norwalk, CT
203.847.5893 • ndhrehab.org
NOTRE DAME
Health and Rehabilitation Center
FORMERLY NOTRE DAME CONVALESCENT HOME
21
22
T
here are many
misconceptions with financial
programs, and the Reverse
Mortgage is no exception. Many
people think that Reverse Mortgage
Loans are extremely complicated, but
the following discussion of myths
and tips will help guide you to make
a decision that is right for you and
your family’s needs as you navigate
through the process. At Atlantic
Home Loans, we make the process as
easy as possible.
Myth 1: The borrower is restricted on
how to use the loan proceeds.
Once any existing mortgage or
lien has been paid off, the net loan
proceeds from your Reverse Mortgage
(also called an HECM loan—Home
Equity Conversion Mortgage) can be
used for any reason. Many borrowers
use it to supplement their retirement
income, delay receiving Social
Security benefits, pay off debt, pay
for medical expenses, remodel their
home, or assist their adult children.
Myth 2: The home must be free of
any existing mortgages.
A large percentage of borrowers use
the reverse mortgage loan to pay off
an existing mortgage and eliminate
other monthly payments.
Myth 3: Once loan proceeds are
received, you pay taxes on them.
Reverse Mortgage loan proceeds
are tax free as they are not
considered income. However, it
is recommended that you consult
your financial advisor and any
government agencies for any
effect on your individual taxes or
government benefits.
Myth 4: The lender owns the home.
You will retain the title and
ownership during the life of the
loan, and you are free to sell your
home or pay down the loan at
any time. The loan is not due
as long as you continue to meet
loan obligations such as living in
this home, maintaining the home
according to the Federal Housing
Administration (FHA) requirements,
and keeping up to date the real
estate taxes and homeowner’s
insurance.
Myth 5: Only those with no
other assets typically need
reverse mortgages.
N
Quite the contrary. Many affluent
borrowers 62 and older with
million-dollar homes and healthy
retirement assets are using reverse
mortgage loans as part of their estate
planning. Many clients are working
with their financial professionals and
estate attorneys to use the reverse
mortgage as a part of enhancing the
quality and enjoyment of their life
and the lives of those they love.
Call me, Cindy Perham, Reverse
Mortgage Specialist at Atlantic
Home Loans, to see how a Reverse
Mortgage can change your life.
Cindy Perham
Reverse Mortgage Specialist
Atlantic Home Loans
222 Post Road, Suite 2621
Fairfield, CT 06824
(203) 521-0445 mobile
(203) 454-1000, X 2104 office
(203) 413-4423. fax
cperham@atlantichomeloans.com
NMLS #110424
Understanding the Myths and Realities of a Reverse Mortgage
by Cindy Perham,
Reverse Mortgage
Specialist,
Atlantic Home Loans
NEW INCREASED FHA LIMITS for Reverse Mortgages in 2019
Lower your cost of living during retirement
Increase your purchasing power
Eliminate monthly mortgage payments*
Rightsize to a smaller, lower
-
maintenance home
Buy a home closer to family and friends Enjoy carefree living in a senior housing community
*The borrower will be responsible for paying property charges, including
homeowner
'
s insurance, taxes, and maintenance of home for the term of the loan.
Please contact me today for mortgage questions, live rate quotes,
or a
R
everse
M
ortgage Proposal!
Atlan
LICENSED MORTGAGE BANKERS
Cindy Perham
Reverse Mortgage Specialist
Atlantic Home Loans
222 Post Road, Suite 2621
Fairfield, CT 06824
(203) 521-0445 mobile
(203) 454-1000, X 2104 office
(203) 413-4423. fax
cperham@atlantichomeloans.com
NMLS #11042
T
here are many
misconceptions with financial
programs, and the Reverse
Mortgage is no exception. Many
people think that Reverse Mortgage
Loans are extremely complicated, but
the following discussion of myths
and tips will help guide you to make
a decision that is right for you and
your family’s needs as you navigate
through the process. At Atlantic
Home Loans, we make the process as
easy as possible.
Myth 1: The borrower is restricted on
how to use the loan proceeds.
Once any existing mortgage or
lien has been paid off, the net loan
proceeds from your Reverse Mortgage
(also called an HECM loan—Home
Equity Conversion Mortgage) can be
used for any reason. Many borrowers
use it to supplement their retirement
income, delay receiving Social
Security benefits, pay off debt, pay
for medical expenses, remodel their
home, or assist their adult children.
Myth 2: The home must be free of
any existing mortgages.
A large percentage of borrowers use
the reverse mortgage loan to pay off
an existing mortgage and eliminate
other monthly payments.
Myth 3: Once loan proceeds are
received, you pay taxes on them.
Reverse Mortgage loan proceeds
are tax free as they are not
considered income. However, it
is recommended that you consult
your financial advisor and any
government agencies for any
effect on your individual taxes or
government benefits.
Myth 4: The lender owns the home.
You will retain the title and
ownership during the life of the
loan, and you are free to sell your
home or pay down the loan at
any time. The loan is not due
as long as you continue to meet
loan obligations such as living in
this home, maintaining the home
according to the Federal Housing
Administration (FHA) requirements,
and keeping up to date the real
estate taxes and homeowner’s
insurance.
Myth 5: Only those with no
other assets typically need
reverse mortgages.
N
Quite the contrary. Many affluent
borrowers 62 and older with
million-dollar homes and healthy
retirement assets are using reverse
mortgage loans as part of their estate
planning. Many clients are working
with their financial professionals and
estate attorneys to use the reverse
mortgage as a part of enhancing the
quality and enjoyment of their life
and the lives of those they love.
Call me, Cindy Perham, Reverse
Mortgage Specialist at Atlantic
Home Loans, to see how a Reverse
Mortgage can change your life.
Cindy Perham
Reverse Mortgage Specialist
Atlantic Home Loans
222 Post Road, Suite 2621
Fairfield, CT 06824
(203) 521-0445 mobile
(203) 454-1000, X 2104 office
(203) 413-4423. fax
cperham@atlantichomeloans.com
NMLS #110424
Understanding the Myths and Realities of a Reverse Mortgage
by Cindy Perham,
Reverse Mortgage
Specialist,
Atlantic Home Loans
NEW INCREASED FHA LIMITS for Reverse Mortgages in 2019
Lower your cost of living during retirement
Increase your purchasing power
Eliminate monthly mortgage payments*
Rightsize to a smaller, lower
-
maintenance home
Buy a home closer to family and friends Enjoy carefree living in a senior housing community
*The borrower will be responsible for paying property charges, including
homeowner
'
s insurance, taxes, and maintenance of home for the term of the loan.
Please contact me today for mortgage questions, live rate quotes,
or a
R
everse
M
ortgage Proposal!
Atlan
LICENSED MORTGAGE BANKERS
Cindy Perham
Reverse Mortgage Specialist
Atlantic Home Loans
222 Post Road, Suite 2621
Fairfield, CT 06824
(203) 521-0445 mobile
(203) 454-1000, X 2104 office
(203) 413-4423. fax
cperham@atlantichomeloans.com
NMLS #11042
23
24
C
heers (1982-1993) was one
of the most popular shows
in the history of television.
And one of the show’s most popular
characters was mail carrier Cliff.
John Ratzenberger played Cliff and
received Emmy nominations for his
performance. John didn’t just play
Cliff; he invented the role, which
didn’t exist until John, auditioning
for another role, suggested that
there be a “bar know-it-all” and got
the job by improvising hilariously.
John was born in 1947 in Bridgeport
and raised in Hungarian and Polish
neighborhoods there. He worked
blue-collar jobs until moving to
Britain in the 1970s and beginning
a career in the performing arts,
particularly improvisation. He has
worked in show business, wearing
various “hats” ever since, including
acting in over 40 films. Cheers
was followed by various voice
performances in animated Pixar
features. For the past 20 years or
so, John has been active in many
ways in raising awareness about the
Fairfield County is noted for the number of famous people
born or raised in the area or who chose to make it their
home for significant periods. These celebrities are a very
diverse group. Let’s take a look at a few of them.
by Peter J.O’Connell, Editorial and Research Associate
Celebrities IN THE COUNTY
BRIDGEPORT: JOHN RATZENBERGER
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
EASTON: DEBRAH FARENTINO
D
ebrah Farentino was
born in California in
1959 but now lives on—
and loves—a farm in Easton. She
became a model and then began
an acting career in 1982, when she
was cast in the TV series Capital.
She has since appeared in over 50
movies and TV shows, including
NYPD Blue, The Outer Limits,
JAG, CSI: Miami, Hawaii Five o,
Wildfire, and Eureka. Perhaps her
most noted role was as Devon
Adair in the NBC series Earth
2, the first female commander
depicted in a science-fiction work.
Debrah also has produced specials
importance of skilled trades and
engineering disciplines. He also
supports faith-based projects and has
never lost touch with his beloved
Bridgeport roots, though he currently
lives in California with his second
wife. In 2012 he seriously considered
moving back to Connecticut to run
for the U.S. Senate as a Republican.
for CBS, including the acclaimed
Saving America’s Heroes, and
has appeared on CBS News as a
special correspondent, covering
the Guardian Angels’ anti-crime
patrols and Air Force rescue units
in Afghanistan. Additionally, this
talented and resourceful woman
is a trained precision driver, who
can perform auto stunts but says,
“My hobby is science—actually
biology.” Debrah Farentino was
chosen by People Magazine as one
of “The 50 Most Beautiful People
in the World” at a time when she
was pregnant with Sophie, the
second of her two daughters.
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
McCormick Sturm in 1949, Strum,
Ruger & Company, became
world prominent and the largest
manufacturer of firearms in the
U.S. Historian and biographer R.L.
Wilson writes: “Ruger was a true
firearms genius who mastered the
disciplines of inventing, designing,
engineering, manufacturing and
marketing better than anyone since
Samuel Colt. No one in the 20th
century so clearly dominated the
field, or was so skilled at articulating
the unique appeal of quality firearms
for legitimate uses.” Interestingly,
in the 1980s Bill Ruger became
controversial for advocating a form
of gun control—prohibition of high-
capacity magazines—that has gone
into effect, in some states, including
Connecticut, only in recent years.
In addition to his business activities,
William B. Ruger was a notable
collector of art, antiques, and classic
cars and a supporter of numerous
charities.
FAIRFIELD: WILLIAM B. RUGER
B
ill Ruger (1916-2002)
was considered a
genius in his field.
His field was firearms, and he lived
in Fairfield, where he located his
company’s headquarters. Born
in Brooklyn, N.Y., Bill acquired
a passion for firearms when his
father gave him the gift of a rifle at
age 12. But Bill had a passion not
simply for possession of firearms
but also for designing them. While
a college student, making drawings
on a relative’s dining room table
and turning an empty room into
a machine shop, he designed a
machine gun that the U.S. Army
liked so much that Bill decided on
a career as a full-time gun designer.
For more than a half-century
thereafter, Bill Ruger helped invent
and patent scores of firearms for
hunting, target shooting, collecting,
self-defense, law enforcement, and
national defense. The company
that he founded with Alexander
SHELTON: ISAAC HULL
M
ost of the thousands of
motorists who every
day cross Commodore
Isaac Hull Memorial Bridge
connecting Shelton and Derby
probably are not familiar with the
life of the man for whom the bridge
is named. They should be, for he
was a great patriot and national
hero, with a long and storied
military career. As one account
puts it, he made an “immeasurable
contribution to . . . national self-
Photo Source: Pinterest
esteem and the navy’s tradition for
. . . two centuries.” Naming the
bridge between Shelton and Derby
after Isaac Hull is appropriate, for
Isaac was most likely born, in 1773,
in what is now Shelton but was
then still part of the town of Derby.
Isaac always loved his home area
but began going to sea with his
mariner father at the age of 14. By
the age of 19, he was commanding
merchant vessels himself. In 1798
he was commissioned a lieutenant
Photo Source:Wikipedia
25
C
heers (1982-1993) was one
of the most popular shows
in the history of television.
And one of the show’s most popular
characters was mail carrier Cliff.
John Ratzenberger played Cliff and
received Emmy nominations for his
performance. John didn’t just play
Cliff; he invented the role, which
didn’t exist until John, auditioning
for another role, suggested that
there be a “bar know-it-all” and got
the job by improvising hilariously.
John was born in 1947 in Bridgeport
and raised in Hungarian and Polish
neighborhoods there. He worked
blue-collar jobs until moving to
Britain in the 1970s and beginning
a career in the performing arts,
particularly improvisation. He has
worked in show business, wearing
various “hats” ever since, including
acting in over 40 films. Cheers
was followed by various voice
performances in animated Pixar
features. For the past 20 years or
so, John has been active in many
ways in raising awareness about the
Fairfield County is noted for the number of famous people
born or raised in the area or who chose to make it their
home for significant periods. These celebrities are a very
diverse group. Let’s take a look at a few of them.
by Peter J.O’Connell, Editorial and Research Associate
Celebrities IN THE COUNTY
BRIDGEPORT: JOHN RATZENBERGER
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
EASTON: DEBRAH FARENTINO
D
ebrah Farentino was
born in California in
1959 but now lives on—
and loves—a farm in Easton. She
became a model and then began
an acting career in 1982, when she
was cast in the TV series Capital.
She has since appeared in over 50
movies and TV shows, including
NYPD Blue, The Outer Limits,
JAG, CSI: Miami, Hawaii Five o,
Wildfire, and Eureka. Perhaps her
most noted role was as Devon
Adair in the NBC series Earth
2, the first female commander
depicted in a science-fiction work.
Debrah also has produced specials
importance of skilled trades and
engineering disciplines. He also
supports faith-based projects and has
never lost touch with his beloved
Bridgeport roots, though he currently
lives in California with his second
wife. In 2012 he seriously considered
moving back to Connecticut to run
for the U.S. Senate as a Republican.
for CBS, including the acclaimed
Saving America’s Heroes, and
has appeared on CBS News as a
special correspondent, covering
the Guardian Angels’ anti-crime
patrols and Air Force rescue units
in Afghanistan. Additionally, this
talented and resourceful woman
is a trained precision driver, who
can perform auto stunts but says,
“My hobby is science—actually
biology.” Debrah Farentino was
chosen by People Magazine as one
of “The 50 Most Beautiful People
in the World” at a time when she
was pregnant with Sophie, the
second of her two daughters.
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
McCormick Sturm in 1949, Strum,
Ruger & Company, became
world prominent and the largest
manufacturer of firearms in the
U.S. Historian and biographer R.L.
Wilson writes: “Ruger was a true
firearms genius who mastered the
disciplines of inventing, designing,
engineering, manufacturing and
marketing better than anyone since
Samuel Colt. No one in the 20th
century so clearly dominated the
field, or was so skilled at articulating
the unique appeal of quality firearms
for legitimate uses.” Interestingly,
in the 1980s Bill Ruger became
controversial for advocating a form
of gun control—prohibition of high-
capacity magazines—that has gone
into effect, in some states, including
Connecticut, only in recent years.
In addition to his business activities,
William B. Ruger was a notable
collector of art, antiques, and classic
cars and a supporter of numerous
charities.
FAIRFIELD: WILLIAM B. RUGER
B
ill Ruger (1916-2002)
was considered a
genius in his field.
His field was firearms, and he lived
in Fairfield, where he located his
company’s headquarters. Born
in Brooklyn, N.Y., Bill acquired
a passion for firearms when his
father gave him the gift of a rifle at
age 12. But Bill had a passion not
simply for possession of firearms
but also for designing them. While
a college student, making drawings
on a relative’s dining room table
and turning an empty room into
a machine shop, he designed a
machine gun that the U.S. Army
liked so much that Bill decided on
a career as a full-time gun designer.
For more than a half-century
thereafter, Bill Ruger helped invent
and patent scores of firearms for
hunting, target shooting, collecting,
self-defense, law enforcement, and
national defense. The company
that he founded with Alexander
SHELTON: ISAAC HULL
M
ost of the thousands of
motorists who every
day cross Commodore
Isaac Hull Memorial Bridge
connecting Shelton and Derby
probably are not familiar with the
life of the man for whom the bridge
is named. They should be, for he
was a great patriot and national
hero, with a long and storied
military career. As one account
puts it, he made an “immeasurable
contribution to . . . national self-
Photo Source: Pinterest
esteem and the navy’s tradition for
. . . two centuries.” Naming the
bridge between Shelton and Derby
after Isaac Hull is appropriate, for
Isaac was most likely born, in 1773,
in what is now Shelton but was
then still part of the town of Derby.
Isaac always loved his home area
but began going to sea with his
mariner father at the age of 14. By
the age of 19, he was commanding
merchant vessels himself. In 1798
he was commissioned a lieutenant
Photo Source:Wikipedia
Continued on page 26
26
from Connecticut were soon put
to the test when the War of 1812
began. In July of that year, the
Constitution made a daring escape
from five pursuing British ships.
The escape took 64 hours with
the enemy vessels in sight at all
times. Captain Hull at times even
used longboats, which his sailors
rowed, to tow the Constitution.
A month later the Constitution
encountered HMS Guerriere,
and a fierce, classic battle at sea
ensued. It was from this battle
that the Constitution acquired the
memorable name “Old Ironsides,”
for cannonballs bounced off some
in the newly formed United States
Navy and distinguished himself
during the troubles with France
at that time known as the Quasi-
War and in the conflicts with the
Barbary States of North Africa in the
first years of the 19th century. By
1806 Isaac had become a captain.
In 1810 he assumed command of
the heavy frigate USS Constitution.
There were disciplinary problems
in the service at that time. But
according to one historian, Isaac
Hull was perhaps the “most popular
captain in the service” and the
“greatest all-round seaman in the
navy.” The skills of the captain
of the hard planks from which
the ship was constructed. The
battle ended with a great morale-
boosting victory for the Americans.
The Secretary of the Navy wrote
Captain Hull: “In this action we
know not most to applaud, your
gallantry or your skill. You and
your crew are entitled to and will
receive the applause and gratitude
of your grateful country.” And
they did. After the war Isaac Hull
continued to serve his country
as Commandant of various Navy
Yards and Commodore of the
Mediterranean Squadron. He died
in 1843.
H
arvey Hubbell II, born
in 1857 to a family with
Trumbull roots, is an
outstanding example of a classic
American type. He was a “tinkerer,”
who, always looking to make things
more convenient and efficient,
steadily moved from invention to
invention, enterprise to enterprise,
until he eventually became—like his
contemporaries Edison, Ford, and
Westinghouse—one of the country’s
major industrialists, contributing
both to new product design and
manufacturing innovation. Harvey’s
first work experience was with
manufacturers of marine engines
and printing machinery, but he
resigned as manager at one of these
firms in 1888 and opened his own
manufacturing facility in Bridgeport.
There and at successively larger
facilities that he soon established,
he began to design and patent such
items as a paper roll holder, tapping
machines, blanking and framing
dies, and machinery for making
TRUMBULL: HARVEY HUBBELL II
screws and small parts. Harvey soon
turned his attention to new ways
to utilize and control electricity.
It is said that his interest in these
new ways was spurred by a walk
through New York City in which
he observed the problems that a
janitor in an arcade was having
in dealing with some electrical
games. In 1896 Harvey patented the
now-familiar on/off pull chain for
electrical devices. Seemingly simple,
it was actually a major innovation.
Another such major electrical
innovation came in 1904: separable
plugs in different configurations on
a single flush-mounted receptacle.
More new products soon followed:
cartridge fuses and the fuse block,
lamp solders, key sockets, etc.,
etc. Eventually, Harvey patented at
least 45 inventions. His company
offered 63 electrical products in
1901 and a thousand in 1917. In
1905 the company took the name
that it holds today, Harvey Hubbell,
Incorporated. By the time that
Harvey Hubbell II died in 1927, he
and his corporation had become
key to the spread of electrical
power throughout the U.S. The
corporation, run by Harvey’s son
for many years, is now a massive
and diverse one, headquartered in
Shelton and operating worldwide.
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
in many of the “anthology series” of
the early years of TV. She made her
Broadway debut in 1957. Around that
time she fell in love with Stratford,
while playing leading roles at the
American Shakespeare Festival
Theatre there. Roles in a number of
movies and TV series kept coming
along over the years. But none had
as great an impact as her memorable
performances as the patrician
newspaper publisher, Mrs. Pynchon,
in the long-running TV series Lou
Grant in the 1970s and ’80s and as
the murderous “Mafia mom,” Livia, in
The Sopranos series in the late 1990s.
Nancy and Paul lived their last years
in a house in the Lordship section of
Stratford. Nancy Marchand died in
2000, a day before her 72nd birthday,
and a few months after her beloved
husband’s death.
D
istinguished character
actress Nancy Marchand
ruled her roles with great
talent. And her roles often were those
of women who “ruled”—savvy and
imperious authority figures such
as newspaper publishers, queens,
grande dames, even a madam and
a mob matriarch. Her distinctive
physical presence, which she once
described as a “strange combination
of being very imposing and down-
to-earth,” helped her have success
playing such characters. And that
success came to her both on and
off Broadway, in regional theater,
and in films and television. For her
achievements she was inducted into
the American Theatre Hall of Fame
and received numerous awards and
award nominations. Her journey to
fame began in Buffalo, New York,
where she was born in 1928. After
graduating from Carnegie Institute in
1949, she met and married actor Paul
Sparer, while both were performing
in productions of Shakespeare and
Shaw in Boston. The couple had
three children and remained married
until Paul’s death in 1999. After
marrying, Nancy and Paul moved
to New York, and Nancy appeared
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
MONROE: ED AND LORRAINE WARREN
“W
ho ya gonna call?” If
bothered by ghosts,
demons, poltergeists,
or other such paranormal pests, the
answer for many people for many
years was not the comical eponymous
“Ghostbusters” of the 1980s hit
movie referenced in that line from
its catchy theme song. It was Ed and
Lorraine Warren, once described
as “essentially ordinary people who
happen to do highly extraordinary
work.” That extraordinary work
was as paranormal investigators and
author/lecturers associated with
some of the most notorious cases of
alleged hauntings and possessions,
including: the Annabelle Higgins
case about a possessed doll; the
“Amityville Horror” case; the
Snedeker case about demons infesting
a Connecticut home. Reports by
the Warrens about their cases have
inspired dozens of films, TV shows,
and books. There have been 17 films
in the “Amityville Horror” series
alone. The Warrens carried out
much of their work in conjunction
with the New England Society for
Psychic Research (NESPR), which
Ed and Lorraine founded in 1952. It
is the oldest “ghost hunting” group
in New England. Ed and Lorraine’s
own story is a love story, not a
horror story. They met in 1943 in a
Bridgeport movie theatre, where Ed
was an usher. Lorraine was a student
at Lauralton Hall in Milford. They
married two years later, while Ed was
in the Navy. Ed always said that he
was raised in a haunted house until
the age of 12. But he and Lorraine did
not begin their career as investigators
of the “dark side” until the 1950s,
when Ed, an artist, began selling
drawings of houses believed to be
haunted. The Warrens always said that
they used science in their work, and
that criticism of their claims is based
on an inadequate understanding of
the truths of religion. Ed passed away
in 2006 at the age of 79, and Lorraine
(born in 1927) has now retired from
active investigations but presides over
the Occult Museum in the Warrens’
longtime home in Monroe. Son-in-law
Tony Spera carries on Ed and Lorraine
Warren’s work.
N
Photo Source: Pinterest
STRATFORD: NANCY MARCHAND
Continued from page 25
27
from Connecticut were soon put
to the test when the War of 1812
began. In July of that year, the
Constitution made a daring escape
from five pursuing British ships.
The escape took 64 hours with
the enemy vessels in sight at all
times. Captain Hull at times even
used longboats, which his sailors
rowed, to tow the Constitution.
A month later the Constitution
encountered HMS Guerriere,
and a fierce, classic battle at sea
ensued. It was from this battle
that the Constitution acquired the
memorable name “Old Ironsides,”
for cannonballs bounced off some
in the newly formed United States
Navy and distinguished himself
during the troubles with France
at that time known as the Quasi-
War and in the conflicts with the
Barbary States of North Africa in the
first years of the 19th century. By
1806 Isaac had become a captain.
In 1810 he assumed command of
the heavy frigate USS Constitution.
There were disciplinary problems
in the service at that time. But
according to one historian, Isaac
Hull was perhaps the “most popular
captain in the service” and the
“greatest all-round seaman in the
navy.” The skills of the captain
of the hard planks from which
the ship was constructed. The
battle ended with a great morale-
boosting victory for the Americans.
The Secretary of the Navy wrote
Captain Hull: “In this action we
know not most to applaud, your
gallantry or your skill. You and
your crew are entitled to and will
receive the applause and gratitude
of your grateful country.” And
they did. After the war Isaac Hull
continued to serve his country
as Commandant of various Navy
Yards and Commodore of the
Mediterranean Squadron. He died
in 1843.
H
arvey Hubbell II, born
in 1857 to a family with
Trumbull roots, is an
outstanding example of a classic
American type. He was a “tinkerer,”
who, always looking to make things
more convenient and efficient,
steadily moved from invention to
invention, enterprise to enterprise,
until he eventually became—like his
contemporaries Edison, Ford, and
Westinghouse—one of the country’s
major industrialists, contributing
both to new product design and
manufacturing innovation. Harvey’s
first work experience was with
manufacturers of marine engines
and printing machinery, but he
resigned as manager at one of these
firms in 1888 and opened his own
manufacturing facility in Bridgeport.
There and at successively larger
facilities that he soon established,
he began to design and patent such
items as a paper roll holder, tapping
machines, blanking and framing
dies, and machinery for making
TRUMBULL: HARVEY HUBBELL II
screws and small parts. Harvey soon
turned his attention to new ways
to utilize and control electricity.
It is said that his interest in these
new ways was spurred by a walk
through New York City in which
he observed the problems that a
janitor in an arcade was having
in dealing with some electrical
games. In 1896 Harvey patented the
now-familiar on/off pull chain for
electrical devices. Seemingly simple,
it was actually a major innovation.
Another such major electrical
innovation came in 1904: separable
plugs in different configurations on
a single flush-mounted receptacle.
More new products soon followed:
cartridge fuses and the fuse block,
lamp solders, key sockets, etc.,
etc. Eventually, Harvey patented at
least 45 inventions. His company
offered 63 electrical products in
1901 and a thousand in 1917. In
1905 the company took the name
that it holds today, Harvey Hubbell,
Incorporated. By the time that
Harvey Hubbell II died in 1927, he
and his corporation had become
key to the spread of electrical
power throughout the U.S. The
corporation, run by Harvey’s son
for many years, is now a massive
and diverse one, headquartered in
Shelton and operating worldwide.
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
in many of the “anthology series” of
the early years of TV. She made her
Broadway debut in 1957. Around that
time she fell in love with Stratford,
while playing leading roles at the
American Shakespeare Festival
Theatre there. Roles in a number of
movies and TV series kept coming
along over the years. But none had
as great an impact as her memorable
performances as the patrician
newspaper publisher, Mrs. Pynchon,
in the long-running TV series Lou
Grant in the 1970s and ’80s and as
the murderous “Mafia mom,” Livia, in
The Sopranos series in the late 1990s.
Nancy and Paul lived their last years
in a house in the Lordship section of
Stratford. Nancy Marchand died in
2000, a day before her 72nd birthday,
and a few months after her beloved
husband’s death.
D
istinguished character
actress Nancy Marchand
ruled her roles with great
talent. And her roles often were those
of women who “ruled”—savvy and
imperious authority figures such
as newspaper publishers, queens,
grande dames, even a madam and
a mob matriarch. Her distinctive
physical presence, which she once
described as a “strange combination
of being very imposing and down-
to-earth,” helped her have success
playing such characters. And that
success came to her both on and
off Broadway, in regional theater,
and in films and television. For her
achievements she was inducted into
the American Theatre Hall of Fame
and received numerous awards and
award nominations. Her journey to
fame began in Buffalo, New York,
where she was born in 1928. After
graduating from Carnegie Institute in
1949, she met and married actor Paul
Sparer, while both were performing
in productions of Shakespeare and
Shaw in Boston. The couple had
three children and remained married
until Paul’s death in 1999. After
marrying, Nancy and Paul moved
to New York, and Nancy appeared
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
MONROE: ED AND LORRAINE WARREN
“W
ho ya gonna call?” If
bothered by ghosts,
demons, poltergeists,
or other such paranormal pests, the
answer for many people for many
years was not the comical eponymous
“Ghostbusters” of the 1980s hit
movie referenced in that line from
its catchy theme song. It was Ed and
Lorraine Warren, once described
as “essentially ordinary people who
happen to do highly extraordinary
work.” That extraordinary work
was as paranormal investigators and
author/lecturers associated with
some of the most notorious cases of
alleged hauntings and possessions,
including: the Annabelle Higgins
case about a possessed doll; the
“Amityville Horror” case; the
Snedeker case about demons infesting
a Connecticut home. Reports by
the Warrens about their cases have
inspired dozens of films, TV shows,
and books. There have been 17 films
in the “Amityville Horror” series
alone. The Warrens carried out
much of their work in conjunction
with the New England Society for
Psychic Research (NESPR), which
Ed and Lorraine founded in 1952. It
is the oldest “ghost hunting” group
in New England. Ed and Lorraine’s
own story is a love story, not a
horror story. They met in 1943 in a
Bridgeport movie theatre, where Ed
was an usher. Lorraine was a student
at Lauralton Hall in Milford. They
married two years later, while Ed was
in the Navy. Ed always said that he
was raised in a haunted house until
the age of 12. But he and Lorraine did
not begin their career as investigators
of the “dark side” until the 1950s,
when Ed, an artist, began selling
drawings of houses believed to be
haunted. The Warrens always said that
they used science in their work, and
that criticism of their claims is based
on an inadequate understanding of
the truths of religion. Ed passed away
in 2006 at the age of 79, and Lorraine
(born in 1927) has now retired from
active investigations but presides over
the Occult Museum in the Warrens’
longtime home in Monroe. Son-in-law
Tony Spera carries on Ed and Lorraine
Warren’s work.
N
Photo Source: Pinterest
STRATFORD: NANCY MARCHAND
and one in ten to age
95. You may calculate your
own life expectancy with
the calculator found at
https://www.ssa.gov/planners/
lifeexpectancy.html.
How much will
you need?
Developing a realistic retirement
budget is an important exercise,
one that requires an examination of
values as much as resources. Some
people enjoy living rather modestly
during retirement. But one retiree we
know says, “Life is too short to drink
cheap wine.” The retirement budget
needs to be understood from three
perspectives.
Essential versus discretionary
spending. Which expenditures could
be curtailed, even eliminated, in the
event of financial reversals? Food
is essential; restaurant dining is not.
Is there room in the budget
for savings?
Structural versus peripheral expenses.
Some costs are binding, not subject
to modification, and failure to meet
them means a structural change in
retirement. If you own real property,
you must pay the taxes. If you have
a mortgage, you must make the
payments. If you own a car, you
have to pay for routine maintenance.
Trips, vacations, and gifts, in
contrast, are peripheral expenses.
Fixed versus inflation-prone costs.
Inflation has been very mild in
recent years, but this may not
be a permanent condition. Most
retirement expenses are vulnerable
to inflation, while retirement income
generally is fixed. The response to
inflation may include cutting back
on optional purchases or substituting
less expensive items for those that
become unaffordable.
Understand also that long, modern
retirements typically include three
phases:
active retirement, filled with travel
and pursuit of deferred dreams;
passive retirement, typically
beginning in the mid-70s, when
activities are gradually reduced; and
final retirement, a period often
marked by failing health and a need
for long-term care.
A different retirement budget applies
to each of these three periods.
N
T
he latest news on
retirement preparedness
is not encouraging. An
estimated 40% of households
headed by people aged 55 through
70 are unlikely to have sufficient
resources to maintain their standard
of living, according to a Wall Street
Journal analysis. The median 401(k)
account balance for this group is just
$135,000, which might be enough
for a $600 per month joint life
annuity for a couple aged 65 and 62.
More troubling, the debt for this
cohort is on the rise. New York
Federal Reserve data indicate that
those aged 60 through 69 had about
$2 trillion in total debt, an 11%
increase since 2004. Car loan debt
was up 25%, and student loan debt
increased by a factor of 6!
More and more people will have to
work longer to achieve the level of
financial independence necessary for
retirement security.
How long should you plan for?
At the same time, life expectancies
are improving, and that raises
the financial stakes still further.
According to the Social Security
Administration, men who turned
65 in 2018 will, on average, live to
age 84.3, and women to age 86.7.
Many retirements will last for 25
or 30 years. About one in four of
those now 65 will live to age 90,
Avoid Retirement
Surprises
by James B. Gust, Senior Editor, Merrill Anderson Company
Holographic Wills
by Thomas Gerrity, Publisher
B
ecause a will is a vitally
important document, one
that controls the disposition
of property interests and may have
significant tax consequences as
well, the requirements for the valid
execution are formal. The specifics
vary from state to state, but in general
two witnesses and the signature of the
testator are required, as well as the
date of execution.
In many states an exception to these
formalities is provided for an entirely
handwritten will, known in legal
circles as a holographic will. Again,
the rules vary from state to state, but
a signature and a clear expression of
testamentary intentions are normally
essential. Traditionally, the entire
document must be in the testator’s
handwriting, but witnesses are
not required.
A will that is created by filling in the
blanks on a preprinted form is in a
gray area. Arguably, the testator’s
handwriting has been used for the
most important parts of the will, but
probate courts are more comfortable
if such do-it-yourself efforts are
witnessed.
A will on a phone?
A recent case from Michigan put a
new light on these issues.
Duane Horton, age 21, was a trust
beneficiary and in the care of a
conservator. In his journal Duane
wrote: “I am truly sorry about this.
. . . My final note, my farewell is on
my phone. The app should be open.
If not look on evernote, ‘Last Note.’ ”
Duane then killed himself.
The “Last Note” was an electronic
file containing apologies, religious
thoughts, messages to specific
individuals, typos, and the following
paragraph:
“Have my uncle go through my stuff,
pick out the stuff that belonged to
my dad and/or grandma, and take
it. If there is something he doesn’t
want, feel free to keep it and do with
it what you will. My guns (aside
from the shotgun that belonged to
my dad) are your’s to do with what
you will. Make sure my car goes
to Jody if at all possible. If at all
possible, make sure that my trust
fund goes to my half sister Shella,
and only her. Not my mother. All of
my other stuff is you’re do whatever
you want with. I do ask that
anything you well, you give 10% of
the money to the church, 50% to my
sister Shella, and the remaining 40% is
your’s to do whatever you want with.”
The note had Duane’s full name typed
at the end. The conservator offered
the journal entry and the note as
Duane’s last will and testament, even
though it did not meet the statutory
requirements for either a formal will
or a holographic will. Duane’s mother
opposed the acceptance of these
documents. If they were rejected, the
mother would inherit the entire estate
under the laws of intestacy, as Duane
had no other heirs.
The probate court found that under
Michigan law, there was clear and
convincing evidence that Duane
intended the electronic document
to communicate his testamentary
intentions. It was accepted as his will,
so the mother lost out. The Michigan
Court of Appeals recently affirmed
that decision.
Consequences
Estate planners have expressed concern
about what this decision may mean
for the executors of future estates.
Will the executor now have a duty to
go through a decedent’s papers and
electronic files in search of documents
that might constitute a will? What if
an individual who already has a will
creates a handwritten “amendment,”
altering the dispositive provisions?
What if such a handwritten note
were the result of undue influence
or a delusion?
Uncertainty about testamentary
intentions is what sometimes causes
probate to become prolonged. The best
way to be confident that one’s estate
plans will be implemented without
undue delay is to obtain the services
of an experienced estate planning
attorney for the drafting and execution
of one’s last will and testament.
N
28
and one in ten to age
95. You may calculate your
own life expectancy with
the calculator found at
https://www.ssa.gov/planners/
lifeexpectancy.html.
How much will
you need?
Developing a realistic retirement
budget is an important exercise,
one that requires an examination of
values as much as resources. Some
people enjoy living rather modestly
during retirement. But one retiree we
know says, “Life is too short to drink
cheap wine.” The retirement budget
needs to be understood from three
perspectives.
Essential versus discretionary
spending. Which expenditures could
be curtailed, even eliminated, in the
event of financial reversals? Food
is essential; restaurant dining is not.
Is there room in the budget
for savings?
Structural versus peripheral expenses.
Some costs are binding, not subject
to modification, and failure to meet
them means a structural change in
retirement. If you own real property,
you must pay the taxes. If you have
a mortgage, you must make the
payments. If you own a car, you
have to pay for routine maintenance.
Trips, vacations, and gifts, in
contrast, are peripheral expenses.
Fixed versus inflation-prone costs.
Inflation has been very mild in
recent years, but this may not
be a permanent condition. Most
retirement expenses are vulnerable
to inflation, while retirement income
generally is fixed. The response to
inflation may include cutting back
on optional purchases or substituting
less expensive items for those that
become unaffordable.
Understand also that long, modern
retirements typically include three
phases:
active retirement, filled with travel
and pursuit of deferred dreams;
passive retirement, typically
beginning in the mid-70s, when
activities are gradually reduced; and
final retirement, a period often
marked by failing health and a need
for long-term care.
A different retirement budget applies
to each of these three periods.
N
T
he latest news on
retirement preparedness
is not encouraging. An
estimated 40% of households
headed by people aged 55 through
70 are unlikely to have sufficient
resources to maintain their standard
of living, according to a Wall Street
Journal analysis. The median 401(k)
account balance for this group is just
$135,000, which might be enough
for a $600 per month joint life
annuity for a couple aged 65 and 62.
More troubling, the debt for this
cohort is on the rise. New York
Federal Reserve data indicate that
those aged 60 through 69 had about
$2 trillion in total debt, an 11%
increase since 2004. Car loan debt
was up 25%, and student loan debt
increased by a factor of 6!
More and more people will have to
work longer to achieve the level of
financial independence necessary for
retirement security.
How long should you plan for?
At the same time, life expectancies
are improving, and that raises
the financial stakes still further.
According to the Social Security
Administration, men who turned
65 in 2018 will, on average, live to
age 84.3, and women to age 86.7.
Many retirements will last for 25
or 30 years. About one in four of
those now 65 will live to age 90,
Avoid Retirement
Surprises
by James B. Gust, Senior Editor, Merrill Anderson Company
29
M
ore than 400,000 long-
term-care insurance
policies were sold in
1992, according to figures published
by The Wall Street Journal. These are
the policies that help seniors cover
the costs of nursing home stays
at the end of life. At least 400,000
additional policies were purchased
each year in the subsequent ten
years, peaking at about 750,000
in 2002.
Then sales collapsed, and never
again reached the 400,000 level. Last
year, reportedly only 66,000 such
policies were sold. The need for
long-term-care insurance has never
been greater. What happened to
the market?
A New Kind of Long-Term-Care Insurance
by Thomas Gerrity, Publisher
Actuarial errors
A series of actuarial errors were
made when long-term-care insurance
was first introduced. The most
important of these was the “lapse
rate,” the number of policies that
will be terminated without ever
paying a benefit. This occurs
either because the insured stops
paying premiums or the insured
dies without making a claim. The
actuaries chose a fairly conservative
lapse rate of 5%. At that rate, if
1,000 policies were sold in year one,
only 400 would be in force 20 years
later. As it turned out, the buyers of
long-term-care insurance thought
of their purchase as an investment,
not as insurance, and so the lapse
experience was closer to 1%, which
implies that 800 of every 1,000
policies still will be in force after 20
years. That led to far higher payouts
than projected.
Two more errors compounded the
damage. The first is that medical
advances have lengthened life
expectancies, which, in turn,
increases the likelihood of making
a claim on a long-term-care
insurance policy. The second is that
the actuaries generally assumed a
7% rate of return on the invested
premiums on these policies. That
assumption was fine in the 1990s,
but interest rates have been at
historic lows since 2008.
Hybrid insurance
The new approach in this area
combines life insurance with long-
term-care insurance. An estimated
260,000 such policies were sold last
year. There is wide variation among
such policies, but they may offer:
a death benefit;
guaranteed level premiums;
a return of premium feature should
the buyer have a change of heart;
fully paid-up insurance after
10 years.
When the product offers more,
it will cost more. In an example
published recently in The Wall Street
Journal, coverage for a couple in
their mid-50s came to over $32,000
per year for 10 years, a total of
$320,000. That compares to some
$8,500 per year for a traditional
long-term policy, in which the
premiums must continue to be
paid. After 30 years, the traditional
policy will require $255,000 in total
premiums, assuming no premium
increases, so the disparity is not as
large as it may at first appear.
What’s more, the minimum death
benefit of the hybrid policy was
$180,000 per spouse, which will be
larger than the total premiums paid.
Still, the hybrid policy requires most
of the premium payment early. For
this couple, the policy will be paid
up when they are in their mid-60s,
and they may well not make a claim
for another 20 years. Such coverage
will be most attractive for individuals
with high current income, sufficient
to comfortably cover the premiums,
who wish to protect a large estate
from being eroded by private nursing
home costs. Maximum coverage in
the illustration was $1,371,891
per spouse.
Look to the future
If you already have a long-term-care
policy, you probably want to hang
on to it. For the most part, those
who have purchased these policies
have profited from them.
Planning is necessary. Despite
the price increases, long-term-
care insurance will prove to be an
important part of that plan for many
affluent families.
N
SHORT TAKES
A Tax Break for the Elderly—With Strings
by James B. Gust, Senior Editor, Merrill Anderson Company
Many cities and towns offer some tax
relief for their elderly citizens. There
may be some generosity behind the
offer, or it may be part of an attempt
to compete with lower-tax states for
retiree citizens. That competition may
heat up now that the state and local
tax deduction is limited to $10,000.
The tax relief takes different forms
around the country:
tax credits that phase out at
higher income levels;
homestead exemptions to lower
property taxes;
freezes on assessed valuations; or
property taxes deferred until
death, payable when the home
is sold.
Deferred property taxes may
include interest charges, as in a
recent Massachusetts case.
Frances Arntz filed for property
tax deferral on her home in 1989,
when she was 76 years old. Her
son suspects that she mistook
“deferral” for “forgiveness,” and did
not understand that the tax would
eventually have to be paid, because
she had the financial resources to pay
the tax. Frances never told anyone
what she had done.
Frances moved out of the home in
2008, so the deferrals ended. Her
son began to rent the home, and he
took charge of paying the property
tax every year. The tax bills included a
notation at the bottom: “Prior tax bills
outstanding.” Unfortunately the son
overlooked that warning.
When Frances died in 2018, her
children expected to inherit the house
free and clear, as the mortgage had
been paid long ago. Instead, they
received a property tax bill from the
town for $170,000. Some $50,000
was for the deferred taxes, the rest
was interest that had been charged
at 8%. About $70,000 of the interest
was incurred after 2008, from the
time Frances moved out until
she died.
The heirs are understandably upset
that the town didn’t warn them about
the tax time bomb. But the town did
follow the letter of the law, and in
fact had that notice on the bottom of
every tax bill. The notice just didn’t
spell out how big the bomb was, or
the interest that was running.
Financial discussions between
elderly parents and their adult children
can be difficult, even emotional. But
they are very important to have.
Money and Satisfaction
Lotteries have become enormously
popular in the United States. There is
a widespread perception that many
lottery winners burn through their
newfound wealth rather quickly, and
don’t end up better off in the long run.
Swedish researchers have examined
this question more rigorously, in a
manner akin to a randomized test of a
drug’s efficacy. They surveyed winners
of major prizes in the Swedish lottery
as well as minor winners and lottery
players who did not win, a total of
3,362 players. The surveys were taken
from five to 22 years after the event.
The findings are interesting.
Lottery winners were significantly
more satisfied with their lives, and that
extra satisfaction lasted for decades.
Those who won hundreds of
thousands were measurably more
satisfied than those who won tens
of thousands.
The winners did not rapidly spend
their winnings, and did not quit their
jobs. They did tend to retire earlier.
Oddly, the researchers found
that winning the lottery did not affect
happiness. It is thought that questions
about happiness go to mood or
feelings, while questions on life
satisfaction trigger more broadly
based introspection.
Winning the lottery had no
discernable effect on physical or
mental health of the winners or
their children.
So, although money can’t buy
happiness, it can—at least in Sweden—
buy satisfaction.
30
M
ore than 400,000 long-
term-care insurance
policies were sold in
1992, according to figures published
by The Wall Street Journal. These are
the policies that help seniors cover
the costs of nursing home stays
at the end of life. At least 400,000
additional policies were purchased
each year in the subsequent ten
years, peaking at about 750,000
in 2002.
Then sales collapsed, and never
again reached the 400,000 level. Last
year, reportedly only 66,000 such
policies were sold. The need for
long-term-care insurance has never
been greater. What happened to
the market?
A New Kind of Long-Term-Care Insurance
by Thomas Gerrity, Publisher
Actuarial errors
A series of actuarial errors were
made when long-term-care insurance
was first introduced. The most
important of these was the “lapse
rate,” the number of policies that
will be terminated without ever
paying a benefit. This occurs
either because the insured stops
paying premiums or the insured
dies without making a claim. The
actuaries chose a fairly conservative
lapse rate of 5%. At that rate, if
1,000 policies were sold in year one,
only 400 would be in force 20 years
later. As it turned out, the buyers of
long-term-care insurance thought
of their purchase as an investment,
not as insurance, and so the lapse
experience was closer to 1%, which
implies that 800 of every 1,000
policies still will be in force after 20
years. That led to far higher payouts
than projected.
Two more errors compounded the
damage. The first is that medical
advances have lengthened life
expectancies, which, in turn,
increases the likelihood of making
a claim on a long-term-care
insurance policy. The second is that
the actuaries generally assumed a
7% rate of return on the invested
premiums on these policies. That
assumption was fine in the 1990s,
but interest rates have been at
historic lows since 2008.
Hybrid insurance
The new approach in this area
combines life insurance with long-
term-care insurance. An estimated
260,000 such policies were sold last
year. There is wide variation among
such policies, but they may offer:
a death benefit;
guaranteed level premiums;
a return of premium feature should
the buyer have a change of heart;
fully paid-up insurance after
10 years.
When the product offers more,
it will cost more. In an example
published recently in The Wall Street
Journal, coverage for a couple in
their mid-50s came to over $32,000
per year for 10 years, a total of
$320,000. That compares to some
$8,500 per year for a traditional
long-term policy, in which the
premiums must continue to be
paid. After 30 years, the traditional
policy will require $255,000 in total
premiums, assuming no premium
increases, so the disparity is not as
large as it may at first appear.
What’s more, the minimum death
benefit of the hybrid policy was
$180,000 per spouse, which will be
larger than the total premiums paid.
Still, the hybrid policy requires most
of the premium payment early. For
this couple, the policy will be paid
up when they are in their mid-60s,
and they may well not make a claim
for another 20 years. Such coverage
will be most attractive for individuals
with high current income, sufficient
to comfortably cover the premiums,
who wish to protect a large estate
from being eroded by private nursing
home costs. Maximum coverage in
the illustration was $1,371,891
per spouse.
Look to the future
If you already have a long-term-care
policy, you probably want to hang
on to it. For the most part, those
who have purchased these policies
have profited from them.
Planning is necessary. Despite
the price increases, long-term-
care insurance will prove to be an
important part of that plan for many
affluent families.
N
SHORT TAKES
A Tax Break for the Elderly—With Strings
by James B. Gust, Senior Editor, Merrill Anderson Company
Many cities and towns offer some tax
relief for their elderly citizens. There
may be some generosity behind the
offer, or it may be part of an attempt
to compete with lower-tax states for
retiree citizens. That competition may
heat up now that the state and local
tax deduction is limited to $10,000.
The tax relief takes different forms
around the country:
tax credits that phase out at
higher income levels;
homestead exemptions to lower
property taxes;
freezes on assessed valuations; or
property taxes deferred until
death, payable when the home
is sold.
Deferred property taxes may
include interest charges, as in a
recent Massachusetts case.
Frances Arntz filed for property
tax deferral on her home in 1989,
when she was 76 years old. Her
son suspects that she mistook
“deferral” for “forgiveness,” and did
not understand that the tax would
eventually have to be paid, because
she had the financial resources to pay
the tax. Frances never told anyone
what she had done.
Frances moved out of the home in
2008, so the deferrals ended. Her
son began to rent the home, and he
took charge of paying the property
tax every year. The tax bills included a
notation at the bottom: “Prior tax bills
outstanding.” Unfortunately the son
overlooked that warning.
When Frances died in 2018, her
children expected to inherit the house
free and clear, as the mortgage had
been paid long ago. Instead, they
received a property tax bill from the
town for $170,000. Some $50,000
was for the deferred taxes, the rest
was interest that had been charged
at 8%. About $70,000 of the interest
was incurred after 2008, from the
time Frances moved out until
she died.
The heirs are understandably upset
that the town didn’t warn them about
the tax time bomb. But the town did
follow the letter of the law, and in
fact had that notice on the bottom of
every tax bill. The notice just didn’t
spell out how big the bomb was, or
the interest that was running.
Financial discussions between
elderly parents and their adult children
can be difficult, even emotional. But
they are very important to have.
Money and Satisfaction
Lotteries have become enormously
popular in the United States. There is
a widespread perception that many
lottery winners burn through their
newfound wealth rather quickly, and
don’t end up better off in the long run.
Swedish researchers have examined
this question more rigorously, in a
manner akin to a randomized test of a
drug’s efficacy. They surveyed winners
of major prizes in the Swedish lottery
as well as minor winners and lottery
players who did not win, a total of
3,362 players. The surveys were taken
from five to 22 years after the event.
The findings are interesting.
Lottery winners were significantly
more satisfied with their lives, and that
extra satisfaction lasted for decades.
Those who won hundreds of
thousands were measurably more
satisfied than those who won tens
of thousands.
The winners did not rapidly spend
their winnings, and did not quit their
jobs. They did tend to retire earlier.
Oddly, the researchers found
that winning the lottery did not affect
happiness. It is thought that questions
about happiness go to mood or
feelings, while questions on life
satisfaction trigger more broadly
based introspection.
Winning the lottery had no
discernable effect on physical or
mental health of the winners or
their children.
So, although money can’t buy
happiness, it can—at least in Sweden—
buy satisfaction.
31
Estate Plan Essentials
A
surprising number of people have not
yet attended to their estate planning.
Perhaps this is because estate planning
has become so much more complicated in recent
years, even though the burden of taxes at death has
been in decline. Estate planning now usually covers
medical and financial decisions before the end of
life, as well as after death.
HERE ARE THE DOCUMENTS THAT WILL BE
DRAFTED FOR MANY ESTATE PLANS TODAY.
Document What it does
FINANCIAL:
Will
Identifies beneficiaries. May establish one or
more trusts for ongoing asset management.
Nominates the person or organization to be
responsible for estate settlement.
Power of attorney
Delegates authority to an agent to make
financial decisions. The agent’s authority ends
when the principal is incapacitated.
Durable power of attorney
Delegates financial decision power to an
agent, even if the principal is incapacitated. In
some cases, the power “springs” into being
upon incapacity or other identified event.
Revocable living trust
Transfers assets and full financial manage
-
ment authority to a trustee. The trust may
continue into incapacity, even beyond the
death of the trustor.
MEDICAL:
Power of attorney for
health care (sometimes
called a health care proxy)
Identifies an individual to make medical
decisions when one is unconscious or
incapacitated.
Living will
Provides guidelines for medical decisions
when an individual becomes terminally ill,
such as whether feeding tubes or ventilators
should be used to prolong life.
Do not resuscitate order
(DNR)
Specifically requests that cardiopulmonary
resuscitation not be used if one’s heart or
breathing stops.
Source: Merrill Anderson Company
32
I
ts name is amusing, and its
current growth in popularity is
phenomenal. It’s pickleball.
It’s fun for all, and it’s very good
for seniors.
Pickleball is a sport created in 1965
in the state of Washington by some
golfing buddies returned from the
links who wanted to provide an
enjoyable activity for their loved ones.
So they improvised, putting together
elements of badminton, tennis, and
ping-pong.
Playing it
As pickleball is played now, two or
four players use solid paddles made
of wood or composite material to hit
a perforated plastic ball, similar to a
wiffle ball, over a net on a court with
dimensions and layout rather like that
of a doubles badminton court, under
rules somewhat akin to tennis, with a
number of modifications.
The overall pickleball court (20 x
44 ft.) is striped, but with no alleys,
and a net separates the two areas of
the court. Each area has an outer
court, divided into two service zones
by stripes, and an inner court, not
divided, extending out seven feet
from the net on each side. This inner
court, called “the kitchen,” is a non-
volley zone. (To volley is to hit the
ball before it touches the ground and
bounces.) The ball must be served by
an underhand stroke from below navel
level in an upward arc.
Victory goes to the first side to score
11 points and lead by at least two
points. If the sides are tied at 10
points each, the first side to get ahead
by two points wins the game. Only the
serving side may score a point. That
side receives a point when the other
side commits a “fault.”
Faults include:
hitting the ball beyond the net
PICKLEBALL: FUN FOR ALL, GREAT FOR SENIORS!
by Peter J. O’Connell, Editorial and Research Associate
hitting the ball out of bounds
not hitting the serve into the
opposing diagonal service zone
touching any part of the non-
volley zone on the serve
volleying from the non-
volley zone
volleying the ball before at
least one bounce has occurred
on each side
Benefiting from it
The USA Pickleball Association
(USAPA) describes the sport as one
of the fastest-growing in the country
and dubs it “highly contagious.”
This positive and metaphorical use
of “contagious” is intended to bring
to mind the many health benefits of
pickleball, particularly for seniors.
The www.sportsimports.com/blog
points out: “If you are looking for
some great exercise for your mind and
body, pickleball can’t be beat. Playing
pickleball allows you to work on your
balance, agility, reflexes, and hand-eye
coordination without putting excessive
strains on your body. Pickleball is a
wonderful alternative for older players
who . . . have physical limitations
such as hip, shoulder, knee or other
joint problems.”
The Medical University of South
Carolina Web site, www.muschealth.
org/health-aging, indicates some of the
reasons for these benefits:
“The small court keeps the ball in
play, but you are not over exerted
during any one point.”
“The smaller court also means less
running and less wear and tear . . . .”
The paddle is “a low intensity
instrument with minimal stress on the
tendons and muscles of the arms.”
Underhand serving “makes the
game easier to play and less taxing on
the arms.”
“Racket/paddle sports boost the
cardiovascular system . . . .”
“The endorphins and other bioamines
that are released are useful in elevating
self-esteem and controlling depression
. . . .”
Pickleball is a very enjoyable and
sociable sport, those who play it say.
And it can be quickly learned and played
at a reasonable level by almost anyone.
It is also inexpensive to play. Paddles
average $75-$100 and balls about
$2.00. As for clothing, you can wear
pretty much anything comfortable and
appropriate for your climate. So go
join the fun, along with the more than
2.5 million current participants!
Finding it
The USA Pickleball Association keeps
track of the more than 15,000 indoor
and outdoor pickleball courts in the
country today—whether at commercial
locations or in parks or schools or at
senior facilities and retirement venues.
And approximately 90 new locations are
being added every month.
You can obtain the latest information
about courts in your area from a USAPA
Web site, www.plus2play.org. Use the
provided Search box to search by city,
state, ZIP code, or location name—or
geographically by clicking the Map link.
For general information, you can reach
USAPA by e-mail at geninfo@usapa.org
and by U.S. mail at:
USAPA
P.O. Box
7354
Surprise, AZ 85374
N
Estate Plan Essentials
A
surprising number of people have not
yet attended to their estate planning.
Perhaps this is because estate planning
has become so much more complicated in recent
years, even though the burden of taxes at death has
been in decline. Estate planning now usually covers
medical and financial decisions before the end of
life, as well as after death.
HERE ARE THE DOCUMENTS THAT WILL BE
DRAFTED FOR MANY ESTATE PLANS TODAY.
Document What it does
FINANCIAL:
Will
Identifies beneficiaries. May establish one or
more trusts for ongoing asset management.
Nominates the person or organization to be
responsible for estate settlement.
Power of attorney
Delegates authority to an agent to make
financial decisions. The agent’s authority ends
when the principal is incapacitated.
Durable power of attorney
Delegates financial decision power to an
agent, even if the principal is incapacitated. In
some cases, the power “springs” into being
upon incapacity or other identified event.
Revocable living trust
Transfers assets and full financial manage
-
ment authority to a trustee. The trust may
continue into incapacity, even beyond the
death of the trustor.
MEDICAL:
Power of attorney for
health care (sometimes
called a health care proxy)
Identifies an individual to make medical
decisions when one is unconscious or
incapacitated.
Living will
Provides guidelines for medical decisions
when an individual becomes terminally ill,
such as whether feeding tubes or ventilators
should be used to prolong life.
Do not resuscitate order
(DNR)
Specifically requests that cardiopulmonary
resuscitation not be used if one’s heart or
breathing stops.
Source: Merrill Anderson Company
33
AREA
HOSPITALS
and their
services for
seniors
St. Vincent’s Outreach Program
St. Vincent’s Outreach Program seeks to help
residents of Bridgeport who have difficulty
accessing primary care because of physical
isolation, disability/frailty, psychological reasons
or lack of financial resources. Such residents
include low-income, disabled, homeless, frail
elderly and homebound persons. Outreach
care, including geriatric assessments and other
geriatric services, is provided on a 24-hour
basis by an interdisciplinary team of physi-
cians, nurses and social workers. Qualifying
patients may receive home medical visits and
transportation for medical services.
Outreach services are provided
at two locations:
St. Vincent’s Geriatric Clinic in St. Vincent’s
Family Health Center
762 Lindley St. • Bridgeport, CT 06606
Adult Medicine Center of St. Vincent’s
Neighborhood Health Center
Lower level of Thomas Merton Center
43 Madison Ave. • Bridgeport, CT 06604
For more information on Outreach services,
call 203-576-5710.
BRIDGEPORT HOSPITAL
Bridgeport Hospital is a private, not-for-profit, full-service hospital and teaching institution. It is part
of the Yale New Haven Health System and primarily serves patients from Fairfield and New Haven
Counties. The hospital has: 383 licensed beds; more than 2,600 employees; nearly 600 active
attending physicians, representing more than 60 medical specialties. This busy institution annu-
ally has more than 19,000 admissions and more than 207,000 outpatient visits to the hospital
(including more than 76,000 emergency department visits and more than 36,000 clinic visits).
Founded in 1878 by a group of community leaders, Bridgeport Hospital was Fairfield County’s first
hospital, and P.T. Barnum was the hospital’s first president. The hospital’s vision, its current leaders
state, remains essentially what it was at the time of its founding: “To provide advanced medical
care and health promotion with excellence and compassion.
Main location: 267 Grant St. • Bridgeport, CT 06610 • 203-384-3000
www.bridgeporthospital.org
Physician/Services Referral (English and Spanish, 24/7): 1-888-357-2396
Bridgeport Hospital is affiliated with a number of satellite facilities, both in the city and the suburbs.
Here are some:
Fairfield
Fairfield Urgent Care Center
309 Stillson Rd. • 203-331-1924
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.
Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m. 5 p.m.
Shelton
Ahlbin Center for Rehabilitation Medicine
Suite 184
4 Corporate Drive • 203-925-4201
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 7:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.
Huntington Walk-in Medical Center
887 Bridgeport Ave. • 203-225-6020
Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.
Southport
Ahlbin Center for Rehabilitation Medicine
Suite 3
2600 Post Road • 203-259-7117
Hours: Mon. & Fri., 7:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.;
Tues. & Thurs., 6:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m.; Wed.
7:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Stratford
Ahlbin Center for Rehabilitation Medicine
3585 Main St. • 203-445-2621
Mon., 7:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.; Tues. & Thurs.,
7:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Trumbull
Ahlbin Center for Rehabilitation Medicine
2750 Reservoir Avenue • 203-445-2621
Mon. & Tues. & Thurs., 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.;
Wed. & Fri., 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Geriatric Home Visit Program
For housebound older adults, Bridgeport
Hospital’s Home Visit Group of geriatricians
and nurse practitioners can bring the care that
they require right into their homes. The Group
becomes the primary care physician for these
patients.
REACH Programs (Geriatric Outpatient
Psychiatric Services)
If psychiatric conditions and/or substance
abuse complicate the common concerns of
aging, Bridgeport Hospital’s REACH Programs
can help by providing intensive outpatient
treatment. One program provides structured
daily treatment at the hospital every weekday,
9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Another program sees
patients three to four times per week, 9:30
a.m.-1:30 p.m. In either program, patients
are placed in an Older Adult Track and
receive group and family therapy. For more
information, call the REACH Programs at
203-384-3377.
Geriatric Inpatient Psychiatric Program
If an assessment reveals that an older adult
needs hospital care because of a psychiatric
condition, this program provides close,
constant supervision.
GEMS: Geriatric Emergency Medical Services
Bridgeport Hospital is the only hospital in
Connecticut that offers an emergency medi-
cine service dedicated specifically to the
needs of those 65 or older. In GEMS a
nurse practitioner, working with Emergency
Department physicians, greets patients,
explains what testing may be done, helps
put patients and their families at ease, helps
develop a proper plan of care and, upon
release, ensures that patients return to a safe
environment. For more information about
GEMS, call 203-384-GEMS (4367).
Outreach Programs
Bridgeport Hospital prides itself on offering
many services and resources to the com-
munity for health, wellness and education. A
number of these are support services targeted
for seniors. They include lectures, classes, sup-
port groups, publications, and various evalu-
ations and screenings. For more information,
call 1-888-357-2396.
Of special note:
AARP Senior Driver Safety Program
This program is a one-day course offered once
a month at the hospital.
Continued top of next page
Center for Geriatrics
Older adults need a special kind of care and
understanding to address the range of physi-
cal, mental, medical, social and other issues
that they often have to confront. To meet
these needs, Bridgeport Hospital maintains
the Center for Geriatrics. From the Center,
Geriatric Specialty Services Teams of experts—
geriatricians, psychiatrists, nurse practitioners,
social workers and other staff—work together,
in close collaboration with primary care physi-
cians, to provide individualized programs of
care and support for patients and their fami-
lies. The Center’s wide range of services is
aimed at meeting the wide range of needs
of seniors and their loved ones.
Bridgeport Hospital Center for Geriatrics
95 Armory Rd. • Stratford, CT 06614
203-384-3388 • Fax: 203-384-4034
Specialized geriatric services at Bridgeport
Hospital include:
Geriatric Assessment Program
In an assessment of an older adult having
difficulties, experts: conduct exams, tests,
screenings; review drugs and supplements
being taken; gather information to understand
personal and family medical history. The
assessment is the first step toward finding the
best solutions to the problems of the senior.
ST. VINCENT’S MEDICAL CENTER
In 1905 an order of Catholic nuns, the Daughters of Charity, opened a
75-bed hospital, with a mission to serve the sick, poor, homeless, dis-
abled and frail elderly in the Greater Bridgeport area. Steady expansion
over the years has created the St. Vincent’s Medical Center of today—a
473-bed community teaching and referral hospital, employing more than
2,000 people and offering a full range of inpatient and outpatient ser-
vices, provided by an active medical staff of more than 700 physicians,
representing more than 50 specialties. St. Vincent’s has many affiliates
and is a member of Ascension Health, the largest Catholic, nonprofit,
healthcare system in the country. Leaders of St. Vincent’s say that it
strives every day to fulfill its Vision Statement--”St. Vincent’s: Setting the
Standard for Care You Can Trust.”
Main location: 2800 Main St. • Bridgeport, CT 06606 • 203-576-6000
For appointments, call the Care Line: 877-255-7847 • www.stvincents.org
St. Vincent’s Web site offers the FIND A DOCTOR tool, which allows those seeking to discuss
their health concerns or those of a loved one with a medical expert to search for the expert by
specialty, practice, location or keyword.
Among St. Vincent’s many endeavors to meet the health needs of the community are Urgent
Care Walk-In Centers at four locations:
Bridgeport 4600 Main St. • 203-371-4445
Fairfield 1055 Post Rd. • 203-259-3440
Milford 199 Cherry St. • 203-696-3502
Monroe 401 Monroe Tnpk. • 203-268-2501
Shelton 2 Trap Falls Rd. • 203-929-1109
Stratford 3272 Main St. • 203-386-0366
Hours for all locations: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Audiology (Hearing) Services at the Ahlbin
Rehabilitation Center
The Ahlbin Center provides comprehensive
hearing services and also evaluation and treat-
ment for vestibular disorders (dizziness).
226 Mill Hill Ave. • Bridgeport, CT 06610 •
203-336-7301
Blood Pressure Screenings
The Emergency Care Institute of Bridgeport
Hospital provides free blood pressure screen-
ings at various dates and times at senior
centers in Fairfield, Shelton and Stratford. For
more information, call 1-888-357-2396.
Lifeline
Lifeline is a 24-hour personal emergency
response program in which trained staff
members are available at the touch of a
button to call emergency personnel and
family members for both medical and non-
medical situations. For more information,
call 1-800-242-1306, ext. 4937.
St. Vincent’s Senior Services
St. Vincent’s seeks to build “regional centers
of excellence” in “key service areas.” One of
these areas involves promoting the health
of aging adults through geriatric specialists
at the Medical Center’s main location and a
dedicated Senior Services facility at 2 Trap
Falls Rd. in Shelton, adjacent to the Urgent
Care Walk-In Center. For more information,
call 1-855-331-1113.
Senior Services works to understand the
complex needs of older adults and be a
resource to help them and their families
attain and maintain health and indepen-
dence. The aim is to create a comprehensive
and coordinated network of care, comple-
menting that of primary care physicians, and
providing assistance with medications/pre-
scriptions, consultations about treatment and
care, and evaluations of the effectiveness of
various care options for the senior involved.
Club 50/Boomers
St. Vincent’s sponsors Club 50/Boomers as
an organization for people age 50 and older
who are interested in maintaing their health
through educational programs and social
events, including lectures, health screen-
ings, wellness programs and excursions.
Membership is free, and anyone over 50
can join. Membership offers discounts on the
programs and excursions and also on parking,
meals at St. Vincent’s, various publications and
prescription drugs at most pharmacies. For
more information, call 203-576-5111.
34
AREA
HOSPITALS
and their
services for
seniors
St. Vincent’s Outreach Program
St. Vincent’s Outreach Program seeks to help
residents of Bridgeport who have difficulty
accessing primary care because of physical
isolation, disability/frailty, psychological reasons
or lack of financial resources. Such residents
include low-income, disabled, homeless, frail
elderly and homebound persons. Outreach
care, including geriatric assessments and other
geriatric services, is provided on a 24-hour
basis by an interdisciplinary team of physi-
cians, nurses and social workers. Qualifying
patients may receive home medical visits and
transportation for medical services.
Outreach services are provided
at two locations:
St. Vincent’s Geriatric Clinic in St. Vincent’s
Family Health Center
762 Lindley St. • Bridgeport, CT 06606
Adult Medicine Center of St. Vincent’s
Neighborhood Health Center
Lower level of Thomas Merton Center
43 Madison Ave. • Bridgeport, CT 06604
For more information on Outreach services,
call 203-576-5710.
BRIDGEPORT HOSPITAL
Bridgeport Hospital is a private, not-for-profit, full-service hospital and teaching institution. It is part
of the Yale New Haven Health System and primarily serves patients from Fairfield and New Haven
Counties. The hospital has: 383 licensed beds; more than 2,600 employees; nearly 600 active
attending physicians, representing more than 60 medical specialties. This busy institution annu-
ally has more than 19,000 admissions and more than 207,000 outpatient visits to the hospital
(including more than 76,000 emergency department visits and more than 36,000 clinic visits).
Founded in 1878 by a group of community leaders, Bridgeport Hospital was Fairfield County’s first
hospital, and P.T. Barnum was the hospital’s first president. The hospital’s vision, its current leaders
state, remains essentially what it was at the time of its founding: “To provide advanced medical
care and health promotion with excellence and compassion.
Main location: 267 Grant St. • Bridgeport, CT 06610 • 203-384-3000
www.bridgeporthospital.org
Physician/Services Referral (English and Spanish, 24/7): 1-888-357-2396
Bridgeport Hospital is affiliated with a number of satellite facilities, both in the city and the suburbs.
Here are some:
Fairfield
Fairfield Urgent Care Center
309 Stillson Rd. • 203-331-1924
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.
Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m. 5 p.m.
Shelton
Ahlbin Center for Rehabilitation Medicine
Suite 184
4 Corporate Drive • 203-925-4201
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 7:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.
Huntington Walk-in Medical Center
887 Bridgeport Ave. • 203-225-6020
Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.
Southport
Ahlbin Center for Rehabilitation Medicine
Suite 3
2600 Post Road • 203-259-7117
Hours: Mon. & Fri., 7:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.;
Tues. & Thurs., 6:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m.; Wed.
7:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Stratford
Ahlbin Center for Rehabilitation Medicine
3585 Main St. • 203-445-2621
Mon., 7:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.; Tues. & Thurs.,
7:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Trumbull
Ahlbin Center for Rehabilitation Medicine
2750 Reservoir Avenue • 203-445-2621
Mon. & Tues. & Thurs., 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.;
Wed. & Fri., 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Geriatric Home Visit Program
For housebound older adults, Bridgeport
Hospital’s Home Visit Group of geriatricians
and nurse practitioners can bring the care that
they require right into their homes. The Group
becomes the primary care physician for these
patients.
REACH Programs (Geriatric Outpatient
Psychiatric Services)
If psychiatric conditions and/or substance
abuse complicate the common concerns of
aging, Bridgeport Hospital’s REACH Programs
can help by providing intensive outpatient
treatment. One program provides structured
daily treatment at the hospital every weekday,
9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Another program sees
patients three to four times per week, 9:30
a.m.-1:30 p.m. In either program, patients
are placed in an Older Adult Track and
receive group and family therapy. For more
information, call the REACH Programs at
203-384-3377.
Geriatric Inpatient Psychiatric Program
If an assessment reveals that an older adult
needs hospital care because of a psychiatric
condition, this program provides close,
constant supervision.
GEMS: Geriatric Emergency Medical Services
Bridgeport Hospital is the only hospital in
Connecticut that offers an emergency medi-
cine service dedicated specifically to the
needs of those 65 or older. In GEMS a
nurse practitioner, working with Emergency
Department physicians, greets patients,
explains what testing may be done, helps
put patients and their families at ease, helps
develop a proper plan of care and, upon
release, ensures that patients return to a safe
environment. For more information about
GEMS, call 203-384-GEMS (4367).
Outreach Programs
Bridgeport Hospital prides itself on offering
many services and resources to the com-
munity for health, wellness and education. A
number of these are support services targeted
for seniors. They include lectures, classes, sup-
port groups, publications, and various evalu-
ations and screenings. For more information,
call 1-888-357-2396.
Of special note:
AARP Senior Driver Safety Program
This program is a one-day course offered once
a month at the hospital.
Continued top of next page
Center for Geriatrics
Older adults need a special kind of care and
understanding to address the range of physi-
cal, mental, medical, social and other issues
that they often have to confront. To meet
these needs, Bridgeport Hospital maintains
the Center for Geriatrics. From the Center,
Geriatric Specialty Services Teams of experts—
geriatricians, psychiatrists, nurse practitioners,
social workers and other staff—work together,
in close collaboration with primary care physi-
cians, to provide individualized programs of
care and support for patients and their fami-
lies. The Center’s wide range of services is
aimed at meeting the wide range of needs
of seniors and their loved ones.
Bridgeport Hospital Center for Geriatrics
95 Armory Rd. • Stratford, CT 06614
203-384-3388 • Fax: 203-384-4034
Specialized geriatric services at Bridgeport
Hospital include:
Geriatric Assessment Program
In an assessment of an older adult having
difficulties, experts: conduct exams, tests,
screenings; review drugs and supplements
being taken; gather information to understand
personal and family medical history. The
assessment is the first step toward finding the
best solutions to the problems of the senior.
ST. VINCENT’S MEDICAL CENTER
In 1905 an order of Catholic nuns, the Daughters of Charity, opened a
75-bed hospital, with a mission to serve the sick, poor, homeless, dis-
abled and frail elderly in the Greater Bridgeport area. Steady expansion
over the years has created the St. Vincent’s Medical Center of today—a
473-bed community teaching and referral hospital, employing more than
2,000 people and offering a full range of inpatient and outpatient ser-
vices, provided by an active medical staff of more than 700 physicians,
representing more than 50 specialties. St. Vincent’s has many affiliates
and is a member of Ascension Health, the largest Catholic, nonprofit,
healthcare system in the country. Leaders of St. Vincent’s say that it
strives every day to fulfill its Vision Statement--”St. Vincent’s: Setting the
Standard for Care You Can Trust.”
Main location: 2800 Main St. • Bridgeport, CT 06606 • 203-576-6000
For appointments, call the Care Line: 877-255-7847 • www.stvincents.org
St. Vincent’s Web site offers the FIND A DOCTOR tool, which allows those seeking to discuss
their health concerns or those of a loved one with a medical expert to search for the expert by
specialty, practice, location or keyword.
Among St. Vincent’s many endeavors to meet the health needs of the community are Urgent
Care Walk-In Centers at four locations:
Bridgeport 4600 Main St. • 203-371-4445
Fairfield 1055 Post Rd. • 203-259-3440
Milford 199 Cherry St. • 203-696-3502
Monroe 401 Monroe Tnpk. • 203-268-2501
Shelton 2 Trap Falls Rd. • 203-929-1109
Stratford 3272 Main St. • 203-386-0366
Hours for all locations: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Audiology (Hearing) Services at the Ahlbin
Rehabilitation Center
The Ahlbin Center provides comprehensive
hearing services and also evaluation and treat-
ment for vestibular disorders (dizziness).
226 Mill Hill Ave. • Bridgeport, CT 06610 •
203-336-7301
Blood Pressure Screenings
The Emergency Care Institute of Bridgeport
Hospital provides free blood pressure screen-
ings at various dates and times at senior
centers in Fairfield, Shelton and Stratford. For
more information, call 1-888-357-2396.
Lifeline
Lifeline is a 24-hour personal emergency
response program in which trained staff
members are available at the touch of a
button to call emergency personnel and
family members for both medical and non-
medical situations. For more information,
call 1-800-242-1306, ext. 4937.
St. Vincent’s Senior Services
St. Vincent’s seeks to build “regional centers
of excellence” in “key service areas.” One of
these areas involves promoting the health
of aging adults through geriatric specialists
at the Medical Center’s main location and a
dedicated Senior Services facility at 2 Trap
Falls Rd. in Shelton, adjacent to the Urgent
Care Walk-In Center. For more information,
call 1-855-331-1113.
Senior Services works to understand the
complex needs of older adults and be a
resource to help them and their families
attain and maintain health and indepen-
dence. The aim is to create a comprehensive
and coordinated network of care, comple-
menting that of primary care physicians, and
providing assistance with medications/pre-
scriptions, consultations about treatment and
care, and evaluations of the effectiveness of
various care options for the senior involved.
Club 50/Boomers
St. Vincent’s sponsors Club 50/Boomers as
an organization for people age 50 and older
who are interested in maintaing their health
through educational programs and social
events, including lectures, health screen-
ings, wellness programs and excursions.
Membership is free, and anyone over 50
can join. Membership offers discounts on the
programs and excursions and also on parking,
meals at St. Vincent’s, various publications and
prescription drugs at most pharmacies. For
more information, call 203-576-5111.
35
For VA Connecticut Healthcare
System, see inside back cover.
Choice What is it? Considerations
Homemaker services
or companion services
Assistance with household tasks
(cleaning, preparing meals, shopping, can
accompany to doctor’s visits, etc.).
Keeps individual in familiar setting. Companionship. Medication
reminders. Can be isolating. No social or recreational opportunities.
Personal care assistant
(PCA) services
Personnel hired to help with activities of
daily living so that an older adult or
disabled person may continue to
live independently.
Keeps individual in familiar setting. Individual care and attention.
Can be isolating. No social or recreational opportunities. Insurance
reimbursements generally not available.
Home health care
Nursing and related care that is provided
in the home. Licensed by the state.
Keeps individual in familiar setting. Individualized care and
attention. Can be isolating. No social or recreational opportunities.
Strict limits on insurance reimbursements.
Adult day care
Day programs where transportation to and
from the program is often available. Meals
may be served.
Nursing supervision, rehabilitation services and other assistance
may be available. May not work well if the program is the only
source of care. Works best if informal caregivers are available.
Limited financial support is available.
Independent
senior housing
Homes, condos or apartments for people
who can maintain an independent
lifestyle.
Often have built-in opportunities for socializing. In some cases there
may be rental assistance from the federal government. Generally,
household help provided. No home health care provided.
Congregate housing
and retirement
communities
Retirement housing that may offer meals,
transportation, recreational activities and
other services.
Noninstitutional. When supplemented with services, the residence
can meet the needs of a frail person who may maintain indepen-
dence at a lower cost than in a nursing home. These facilities may
not be appropriate for individuals with significant care needs.
Continuing care
retirement
communities
Residential living that often includes con-
tracts guaranteeing lifetime medical care.
Communities often offer premium residential settings and ameni-
ties. Security of knowing that there is guaranteed care. There are
entry and monthly fees, and the communities may not be eligible to
take Medicaid residents.
Assisted living
Personal care services that are provided in
a congregate-housing setting that meets
state requirements.
Facility is primarily a residence and is noninstitutional. No state fund-
ing available at this time. Facility may not be appropriate for indi-
viduals with significant care needs.
Home for the aged
A facility where seniors requiring some
daily assistance share meals and enjoy
social and recreational services. State
licensed.
Ongoing supervision is available. Less institutional than a nursing
facility. A full array of health services may not be available within the
home. Group living involves some loss of privacy and autonomy.
Intermediate care
nursing unit
A separate type of nursing home level for
individuals with fewer medical and nursing
needs than skilled nursing. State licensed.
Nursing care and social and recreational programming available.
Medicaid may be a source of payment for eligible individuals. An
institutional setting.
Skilled nursing unit
A nursing home in which residents may
live either for short periods of time for
rehabilitation or for extended periods.
State licensed.
Nursing supervision and social and recreational programming
available for long-term stays. Medicaid may be a source of
payment for eligible individuals. An institutional setting.
Continuing Care
at Home Programs
A membership program that offers
healthy, independent seniors the ability
to stay at home with personal care
management and a lifetime of care in the
home, or in a facility as needed.
Members live in their own homes as long as possible, moving to
assisted living or skilled nursing settings only when required. There
is a membership fee and monthly fees. Programs are licensed in
specific geographical areas. There are a limited number of programs
nationally as this is a new concept in life care.
Senior home care and residential living options
36
37
Professionals, Businesses and Services
DENTISTS
Certified by The American Board of Ophthalmology.
Specializing in cataract surgery.
Also caring for patients with glaucoma, diabetes and
macular degeneration.
Comprehensive eye care,
including contact lens fitting.
Most insurance plans accepted.
Call today • 203.880.5350 • kurileceyecare.com
NEW
PATIENTS
WELCOME!
Jeffrey M. Kurilec, M.D.
Conveniently located near the intersection of Routes 25 and 111 on the Trumbull-Monroe town line.
Kurilec Eye Care, LLC
115 Technology Drive, Suite C201
Trumbull, CT 06611
Southwest Community Health Center
46 Albion St., Bridgeport, CT 06605 ...........203-330-6000
968 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport, CT 06605 .......203-330-6000
762 Lindley St., Bridgeport, CT 06606 .........203-330-6000
Dental, Internal Medicine and Women’s Health.
See ad, page 40.
Eye Care and Eye Wear
Eye Group of Connecticut, LLC
Jeffrey Kaplan, MD • Jeffrey Sandler, MD
4699 Main Street, Suite 106, Bridgeport .....(203) 374-8182
www.eyegroupct.com
Our Physicians are Board Certified in the practice of
Ophthalmology and Ophthalmic Surgery. Comprehensive eye
care for adults and children performed in a warm and caring
environment. Specializing in: Cataract Surgery utilizing revo-
lutionary lens technology, Glaucoma, Diabetic eye care, Eye
Allergies, Contact lens challenges and Drooping eyelids/brows.
See ad, page 3.
Dentists
Lighthouse Dental Care
Mark Samuels, D.M.D.
Joy Cocchiola, D.M.D.
Eben Light, D.M.D.
88 Ryders Lane, Stratford, CT 06614 ........(203) 742-1035
LighthouseDentalCare.com
Affordable dental care for the entire family.
Voted one of Connecticut’s “Top Doctors of the Year” in
Connecticut Magazine for 8 years. See ad, page 7.
Mogelof Dental Group
Andrew Mogelof, D.D.S.
Scott Mogelof, D.M.D.
James Pucci, D.M.D.
2499 Main St., Stratford, CT 06615 .........(203) 378-5588
We provide care to patients of all ages through careful,
thorough diagnosis, individually designed treatment plans; and
definitive care. We help our patients reach the highest level of
dental health possible and to maintain that result over their
lifetime. See ad, page 9.
38
EYE CARE AND EYE WEAR
1/2 mile from Trumbull/Bridgeport line
4270 Main Street, Bridgeport • 203-372-4569
(Corner Frenchtown Road. Next to Traveland)
Eye Exams
Eyeglasses
Contact Lenses and Fittings
Repairs: All done on
premises. We will
recut your lenses to
fit new frames.
Free Home, Hospital & Nursing Home Visits.
We Take HUSKY for eye exams and eyeglasses.
CUSTOMERS CAN ALWAYS USE THEIR OWN FRAMES.
40%
Discount for
AARP & AAA
Kurilec Eye Care, LLC
Jeffrey M. Kurilec, M.D.
115 Technology Drive • Suite C201 • Trumbull, CT 06611
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (203) 880-5350
kurileceyecare.com
• Conveniently located near the intersection of Routes 25 and
111 on the Trumbull-Monroe town line. • Certified by The
American Board of Ophthalmology. • Specializing in cataract
surgery. • Also caring for patients with glaucoma, diabetes and
macular degeneration. • Comprehensive eye care, including
contact lens fitting. • Most insurance plans accepted.
See ad, page 37.
Gentle, Bladeless Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery
Premium Multifocal & Astigmatic Lens Implants
Glaucoma/Diabetes/Macular Degeneration
Eyelid Plastic Surgery
Comprehensive Eye Care
Eyeglasses/Contact Lenses
Most Insurance Plans Accepted
JAMES R. PINKE, M.D.
Board Certified
Physician/Surgeon
(203) 924-8800
9 Cots Street, Shelton, CT
pinkeeyecenter.com
New Patients Welcome!
Get the highest quality eye care with courtesy, concern and compassion.
Medical Director: CT Eye Surgery Center-Milford • Attending Surgeon: Griffin Hospital / Wilton Surgery Center
Family Vision Center
775 Main St., Stratford, CT 06615 ...........(203) 377-2020
107 Boston Ave., Bridgeport, CT 06610 ......(203) 333-2020
10% Senior Discount Every Day! Call for an appointment
today or bring in your prescription. Medicare accepted, along
with many other vision plans. See ad, page 39.
Furze & Ackley Inc. O-Opticians
4270 Main St., Bridgeport, CT 06606 ........(203) 372-4569
FREE EYE EXAMS! 35% Discount for AAA & AARP Members.
Free Home, Hospital & Nursing Home Visits. We Take HUSKY
for eye exams and eyeglasses. See ad, this page.
James Pinke, M.D.
Shelton Medical Center
9 Cots St., Shelton, CT 06484 ..............(203) 924-8800
We are dedicated to being your Center for eye health.
See ad, this page, and page 11.
What the Great Poets had to say about Aging and the Last of Life
A lively presentation at your facility for a modest fee by a professional writer/editor/researcher and former college instructor.
To sponsor this presentation, contact: Peter J. O’Connell
800 Quinnipiac Avenue • New Haven, CT 06513 • (203) 469-5192 • pjpoconnell@gmail.com
39
10%
Senior Discount
Every Day
5% more off
with this ad!
775 Main Street • Stratford
203-377-2020
107 Boston Avenue • Bridgeport
203-333-2020
Visit us on the Web at
familyvisioncenters.net
Monday, Tuesday, Friday
9 am - 6 pm
Thursday 9:30 am - 7:30 pm
Saturday 9:00 am - 2 pm
Eye exam includes glaucoma & cataract testing
Digital imaging technology
Complete pair of Bifocal eyeglasses starting at $120
Certified Dry Eye Treatment Center
Post Cataract Surgery Co-Management Services
Call for an appointment today or bring in your prescription.
Medicare accepted, along with many other vision plans.
HAIR STYLISTS
All Styles
*
Perms
*
Cuts
*
Coloring
For an appointment,
call Debra.
The Perfect Solution
for Shut-ins &
Elderly People
—and Anyone Else Who
Wants to Look Great!
HAIR SERVICES
AT HOME
Call Today! (203) 929-2109 or (203) 913-2192 (cell)
Mention this ad and get
$5 OFF wash, cut and blow dry.
25 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE
Discount applies to new customers only.
Hair Stylists
Hair on Wheels
Hair Services at Home
Call for an appointment ....................(203) 929-2109
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (203) 913-2192
All Styles • Perms • Cuts • Coloring. See ad, this page.
Internal Medicine
Southwest Community Health Center
46 Albion St., Bridgeport, CT 06605 ...........203-330-6000
968 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport, CT 06605 .......203-330-6000
762 Lindley St., Bridgeport, CT 06606 .........203-330-6000
Dental, Internal Medicine and Women’s Health.
See ad, page 40.
Please patronize our advertisers to thank
them for making this directory possible.
Medical Equipment and Supplies
The Senior Depot Store
770 Connecticut Ave, Norwalk, CT 06854 ....(203) 956-0962
195 Federal Rd, Brookfield, CT 06804 .......(203) 775-1095
www.cornerstonest.net
Senior Depot offers a large variety of top-quality medical
supplies and aids for daily living. Our knowledgeable staff
is committed to meeting your needs while supporting you
through the natural transitions and complications of aging.
Stop in today and let us show you what we truly believe:
Getting older doesn’t have to be so hard! See ad, page 5.
Women’s Health Services
Southwest Community Health Center
46 Albion St., Bridgeport, CT 06605 ...........203-330-6000
968 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport, CT 06605 .......203-330-6000
762 Lindley St., Bridgeport, CT 06606 .........203-330-6000
Dental, Internal Medicine and Women’s Health.
See ad, this page.
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES
40
Adult Day Programs
SUNSET SHORES ADULT DAY HEALTH CENTER
720 Barnum Ave. Cutoff, Stratford, CT .......(203) 380-1228
We provide quality daytime care while you work or are in need
of respite! See ad, this page.
Assisted Living/Independent Living
The Inn • Part of Waveny LifeCare Network
73 Oenoke Ridge, New Canaan, CT 06840 ...(203) 594-5450
www.waveny.org. Nestled in a scenic neighborhood that is
walking distance from New Canaan’s lovely town center, The
Inn is a cozy, not-for-profit rental community for independent
living that welcomes seniors from everywhere.
With three delicious meals served daily, a caring and attentive
professional staff, and just 40 private apartments, residents at
The Inn enjoy the benefits of living in a thriving, yet intimate
retirement community. Wonderful amenities are all included in
Caregivers, Residential Facilities
and Rehabilitation Facilities
We provide…
Health Monitoring by Registered Nurses
Therapeutic Recreation—Stimulating Activities and Outings
Continental Breakfast, Catered Lunch and Snacks Provided
Coordination of Transportation
Specialized Alzheimers Care
Assistance With Personal Care Needs
Home Assessments
Resource Information For Funding Assistance
Caregiver Support and Referral Service
Featuring the “GQ Club for Men”
¡Programas en Español!
Additional Benefits
Assistance for families caring for an elderly or disabled relative
Relief during the day for families with care responsibilities
Adult Day Health Centers
Remesa Harborview/Next Step
Fiscal Intermediary Services
We provide quality daytime care while you work or are in need of respite!
“Your Home Away from Home”
720 Barnum Avenue Cutoff (RT 1) • Stratford, CT 06614 • (203) 380-1228 • www.cteldercare.com
Se Habla
Espanol
~
Open
Saturdays!
41
ELDER CARE
a modest rental fee. Inn residents also have priority access to
Waveny LifeCare Network’s continuum of healthcare services,
programs and facilities, including Waveny Care Center and
Waveny Home Healthcare. See ad, page 13.
Elder Care
Waveny LifeCare Network
3 Farm Road, New Canaan, CT 06840 .......(203) 594-5331
www.waveny.org. For 40 years, person-centered care has been
at the heart of Waveny’s mission. Like a river, our comprehen-
sive continuum of programs, services and residential options
flows fluidly to benefit those we serve. We welcome older
adults from all areas. Contact us today to arrange a tour of our
award-winning New Canaan campus! See ad, page 13.
Home Care/Home Health Care
Comfort Keepers
Greenwich, CT ...........................(203) 629-5029
email: CKofLFC@comfortkeepers.com
Shelton, CT ..............................(203) 924-4949
email: shelton@comfortkeepers.com
Comfort Keepers enables both seniors and those suffering
from non-age-related conditions with services needed to help
them remain safe and independent in the comfort of their own
homes. We offer an extensive range of non-medical care ser-
vices, tailored to the unique needs of each individual, including
companionship, rehab recovery, chronic care and end-of-life
support. Service is available hourly, 24/7, and live-in. Comfort
Keepers is part of a nationwide network of over 750 quality
providers, all dedicated to help people live happy, independent
and dignified lives. See ad, page 42
Griswold Home Care
Stratford • 1122 Broadbridge Ave., Stratford, CT 06615
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (203) 380-2700
Bethel/Danbury • 43 Grassy Plain St., Bethel, CT 06801
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (203) 744-9200
Norwalk • 193 East Ave., Norwalk CT 06855
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (203) 852-9707
www.GriswoldHomeCare.com
Personal care, homemaking and companionship in Fairfield
County for 26 years. All caregivers receive a rigorous interview
and background check. A free in-home assessment is con-
ducted on all cases. Low-cost, high-quality care ensured through
quality audits. Covered by worker’s compensation, general
liability and bonding insurance. Call for info on Parkinson and
Alzheimer’s respite grants. Hourly and live-in. See ad, this page.
Stratford 203.380.2700
Norwalk 203.852.9707 | Danbury 203.744.9200
GriswoldHomeCare.com
If you have a loved one who needs in-home, non-medical
assistance, we can help. A compassionate caregiver can provide a
wide array of support — everything from assisting with personal
care, preparing meals, and doing light housekeeping to being
there when you can't be so people can stay home and remain
independent. Hourly and live-in options are available.
© 2017 Griswold International, LLC
We give people the
help they need to live
in the place they love.
42
NURSING HOMES
Home Choice Senior Care, Inc.
Westport, CT .............................(203) 227-5040
Customized Homecare Services for people of all ages! Live-in
or daily services available. Proudly serving Fairfield County with:
Nurse’s Aides, Companions and Home Health Aides.
See ad, this page.
Nursing Homes
Notre Dame Health and Rehabilitation Center
76 West Rocks Road, Norwalk, CT 06851 ......203-847-5893
www.ndhrehab.org
Our goal is to optimize the quality of life. We are a caring
place between Hospital and Home with our New Intensive
Stroke Rehabilitation Program. Our welcoming and home-like
60-bed residence, including 6 private rooms, is located on five
landscaped acres in Norwalk, CT, and is operated under the
loving sponsorship of The Sisters of Saint Thomas of Villanova.
See ad, this page.
Rehabilitation Facilities
The Nathaniel Witherell
70 Parsonage Road, Greenwich, CT 06830
George Cossifos ..........................(203) 618-4232
I Want to Stay in My Own Home!
We Help People Remain Safe & Independent
Affordable Non-Medical In-Home Care
Companionship Meal Preparation
Personal Care Incidental Transportation
Grocery Shopping & Errands Light Housekeeping
Laundry & Linen Washing Grooming & Dressing Guidance
Family Respite Care 24-Hour & Live-In Care Available
Our staff is caring and compassionate
Carefully screened, bonded and insured
CT DCP Reg. #HCA 108 & 141
www.comfortkeepers.com
Most offices independently owned and operated.
Lower Fairfield County
203-629-5029
Upper Fairfield &
Lower N. Haven Counties
203-924-4949
For Service or Referrals, Call:
203-227-5040
www.homechoicect.com
The Right Choice ~ Right at Home
Home Choice Senior Care
Home Choice Senior Care of Westport
Proudly serving Fairfield County with
Nurse’s Aides, Companions, Home Health Aides
Customized Homecare Services
For people of all ages!
Live-In or Daily Services Available
Introducing Our NEW Intensive Stroke Rehabilitation Program
DIRECTED BY
Neurologist: Daryl Story, Physiatrist: Claudio Petrillo and Pulmonologist: Donald McNichol
A CARING
Place Between
Hospital & Home
76 West Rocks Rd., Norwalk, CT • 203.847.5893 • ndhrehab.org
NOTRE DAME
Health and Rehabilitation Center
FORMERLY NOTRE DAME CONVALESCENT HOME
43
REHABILITATION FACILITIES
www.nathanielwitherell.org
Short-term rehab at The Nathaniel Witherell is designed to fit
your life and style. There are 46 private rooms with WiFi access
and live/work space. State-of-the-art therapy is available seven
days a week, and you’ll enjoy excellent patient-centered care.
The Witherell offers the following comprehensive short-term
rehab programs: Orthopedic, Cardiac, Pulmonary, Neurological,
and General Medical. Outpatient therapies are also available.
See ad, page 21.
Rehabilitation Services at Waveny Care Center
3 Farm Road, New Canaan, CT 06840 .......(203) 594-5340
www.waveny.org. Waveny Care Center’s outpatient
Rehabilitation Services are available to people from all areas
who are recovering at home from an injury, illness or other
type of medical condition that requires rehabilitative therapy.
We also offer short-term rehabilitation services on an
inpatient basis.
We provide state-of-the-art physical, occupational and speech
therapies as well as therapeutic massage. To complement
these services, we also offer nutritional counseling and health
promotion programs.
Our highly experienced rehabilitation therapy staff will effec-
tively treat and support you in reaching your highest potential,
while strictly adhering to your doctor’s orders. Patients benefit
immediately from our staff’s enthusiasm and clinical expertise,
as well as from the facility’s state-of-the-art equipment and
individualized care. See ad, page 13.
A SURPRISING PROBLEM UPON TURNING 100
Last century, when life insurance com-
panies calculated premiums needed to
fund a whole life policy, they expected
that no one would live beyond age 100.
Accordingly, most whole life insurance
issued then includes a termination date.
When the insured reaches age 100, the
policy has matured.
As life expectancy grew, the insurance
industry updated their actuarial tables to
provide coverage to age 121. However,
this change took place in 2001. Policies
issued before 2001 may still include ter
-
mination provisions.
This phenomenon was explored and
explained by financial planner Barry
Flagg in his recent article, “What Happens
to My Life Insurance at Age 100, and
What Can I Do About it?” (Leimberg
Information Services, November 6, 2018).
When the policy terminates
Termination of a life insurance policy is
not likely to be welcomed by the insured.
At that moment the insurance company
pays out the accumulated cash value of
the policy, and the insurance ends before
the death of the insured.
If the coverage were designed as an
“endowment” policy, the cash value
would be equal to the face value of
the insurance. If the insured amount
were $500,000, for example, the entire
$500,000 would be paid to the policy
owner upon reaching age 100. However,
unlike insurance death benefits, which
are free from income tax, this payment
would be subject to state and local
income taxes in the year of receipt.
Endowed policies are the exception, not
the rule, according to Mr. Flagg. Given
the increases in the cost of insurance in
recent years, coupled with declines in
policy earnings, the cash value in most
policies will be less than the face value
of the insurance, and could be as low as
$1.00. The insured then loses the death
benefit after receiving the cash value.
Still worse are those policies that allowed
for borrowing from cash values to pay
additional premiums. When the policy
terminates, the loan is forgiven—but a
loan forgiveness is taxable income! The
phantom income could be taxed at a
moment when the insured has no money
to pay the tax.
Alternatives
There may be a way out for some poli-
cyholders who bought whole life insur-
ance before 2001 and who might live to
100. Some insurance companies offer
a Maturity Extension Rider to continue
the policy. The terms of such extensions
need to be thoroughly understood,
however. In some cases the value of the
extension is defined as the cash value of
the policy at age 100—if the cash value
is low, so is the value of the continued
insurance. Still, at least an income tax has
been avoided.
The next best option to consider, accord-
ing to Mr. Flagg, is to exchange the
limited policy for a new one that defines
maturity beyond age 100. This approach
works best with younger insureds (in
their 70s) who are still insurable. As one
approaches age 90, the chance of obtain
-
ing a new life insurance contract dimin-
ishes rapidly.
As a last resort, Mr. Flagg suggests that
the policy may be exchanged tax free
for a deferred annuity. Income taxes are
not avoided, but at least they may be
deferred until death. The gain from the
policy would then be taxed as income in
respect of a decedent.
If you are the owner of a whole life insur
-
ance policy issued before 2001, you’ll
want to meet with your financial advisors
soon to read the fine print and explore
your alternatives.
44
ATTORNEYS
Providing
Professional Personal
Service
Amy E. Todisco*
amy@btlawfirm.com
One Eliot Place Fairfield, CT 06824-5154
Phone: (203) 254-1118 Fax: (203) 254-2453 www.btlawfirm.com
*President, Connecticut Chapter National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, Inc. 2009-2010; Connecticut Bar Association Elder Law Committee, Executive Committee member.
Medicaid (“Title 19”) Eligibility,
Planning and Protection of Asset
Strategies; Medicaid Applications
and Appeals
Involuntary Conservatorships
Powers of Attorney and
Advance Directives
Estate Planning
Probate
Wills,Trusts & Estates
Special Needs Trusts
and Planning
&
Braunstein
Todisco, P.C.
Attorneys at Law
Committed To Protecting the Dignity, Financial
and Legal Rights of Seniors
Law Offices of Kurt M. Ahlberg
2885 Main Street, Stratford, CT 06614 .......(203) 377-1311
www.ahlberglawfirm.com
Attorneys Kurt M. Ahlberg and Carl A. Glad know that the deci-
sions you make today will have a lasting impact for you and
your families. That is why Attorneys Ahlberg and Glad will lever-
age their experience, industry know-how, and, most
importantly, their understanding and connection to family and
the community to help you achieve your goals.
Don’t hesitate: Call us today. See ad, page 45.
Banks
People’s United Bank
Call. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-800-772-1090
With over 400 branches, including our 7-day Stop & Shop
locations. For all your banking and wealth management needs.
www.peoples.com. See ad, inside front cover.
Attorneys
Braunstein & Todisco, P.C.
One Eliot Place, Fairfield, CT 06824 .........(203) 254-1118
Committed to Protecting the Dignity, Financial and Legal Rights
of Seniors. See ad, this page.
Eliovson & Tenore/Elderlaw & Family Counseling
Associates, LLC
117 Tunxis Hill Rd., Fairfield, CT ............(203) 259-7195
Specializing in Elder Law and Estate Planning. See ad, page 45.
Law Office of James M. Hughes
1432 Post Road, Fairfield, CT 06824 ........(203) 256-1977
E-mail: Hughes_james@sbcglobal.net
• Elder Law and Title 19/MEDICAID Planning and Spend-down
• Wills, Power of Attorney & Health Care Instructions
• Veteran’s Benefits • Trusts • Estates and Probate • Real Estate
See ad, page 4.
Legal, Insurance, Real Estate, Mortgages/
Reverse Mortgages, and Financial Professionals
45
MORTGAGES/REVERSE MORTGAGES
Eliovson & Tenore
. . . because experience matters
Probate & Conservatorship
Estate Planning
Asset Protection
Medicaid/Title XIX Eligibility
Wills & Trusts
Special Needs Trusts
Elder Law|Estate Planning|Probate
Real Estate|Medicaid|Business Law
STATIONHOUSE SQUARE
2505 Main Street, Building 1, Suite 221,
Stratford, CT 06615
T: 203-386-1282 F: 203-386-1795
www.kevinkellylaw.com
Please patronize our advertisers to thank
them for making this directory possible.
Mortgages/Reverse Mortgages
Atlantic Home Loans
Cindy Perham, Mortgage Banker NMLS#110424
222 Post Road, Suite 2621, Fairfield, CT 06824
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Office: (203) 454-1000 x 2104
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cell: (203) 521-0445
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fax: (203) 413-4423
cperham@atlantichomeloans.com • www.atlantichomeloans.com
At Atlantic Home Loans, we pledge to provide you with profes-
sional service that is honest, efficient, and courteous. We offer
a wide variety of mortgage options to fit your needs. See ad,
page 23.
The Law Offices of Kurt M.Ahlberg
Wills and Probate
Estate Planning
Elder Law
Real Estate
Small Business
Social Security Disability
Civil and Injury Litigation
Kurt M.Ahlberg
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Carl A. Glad
ATTORNEY AT LAW
2885 Main Street | Stratford, CT 06614
attyKurtMAhlberg@gmail.com
cglad.kmalaw@gmail.com
203.377.1311 | FAX 203.296.4936
2016KMA3.5x5SeniorGo2 11/15/16 11:32 AM Page 1
The Law Offices of Kurt M. Ahlberg
Wills and Probate
Estate Planning
Elder Law
Real Estate
Small Business
Social Security Disability
Civil and Injury Litigation
CTSeniorHelpCenter.com Fast, easy, and always FREE!
46
Cemeteries and Funeral Homes
Funeral Homes
Gregory F. Doyle Funeral Home
291 Bridgeport Ave., Milford, CT 06460. . . . (203) 874-5641
www.gregoryfdoylefuneralhome.com
We offer a variety of funeral services, from traditional funerals to
competitively priced cremations.
Personal Service 24 Hours • Pre-Arrangements & Counseling
• Title 19 • Irrevocable & Revocable Trusts • At Home
Arrangements available. See ad, this page, page 17.
HELPING YOU
HONOR
THE ONE YOU LOVE
Our calling is to provide your family with a highly
personalized funeral experience that will be a source of
comfort both now and in the future.
SHAUGHNESSEY BANKS
Funerals Cremation Preplanning
SHAUGHNESSEY BANKS
Funerals Cremation Preplanning
50 Reef Road, Fairfield Center
(203) 255-1031
www.shaughnesseybanks.com
“Helping You Honor
the One You Love”
50 Reef Road, Fairfield Center
(203) 255-1031
www.shaughnesseybanks.com
“Helping
You Honor
the One
You Love”
50 Reef Road • Fairfield Center • 203-255-1031
www.shaughnesseybanks.com
At Shaughnessey Banks Funeral Home, the end of your loved
one’s journey is met with compassion and care.
FUNERAL HOMES
Shaughnessey Banks Funeral Home
50 Reef Rd., Fairfield, CT 06824 ............(203) 255-1031
www.shaughnesseybanks.com
HELPING YOU HONOR THE ONE YOU LOVE.
See ad, this page.
Please patronize our advertisers to thank
them for making this directory possible.
Gregory F. Doyle
FUNERAL HOME &
CREMATION SERVICE
Handicap
Accessible
Family Owned
& Operated
Since 1950
“Our Family
Takes Care
of Your
Family With
Compassion
& Dignity
Member of National
& Connecticut
Funeral Directors
Association
www.gregoryfdoylefuneralhome.com
Directors:
Dorothy Doyle,
Moriah Doyle Monsif,
Conan J. Doyle, Dody Doyle,
Andrea K. Rochniak
Andrea K. Rochniak,
Gregory F. Doyle (1918-2005),
Colleen Doyle Britt (1950-2010)
203-874-5641
291 Bridgeport Avenue, Milford
US Route 1, Rte I-95 Exit 34, Right .2 Miles
Devon Center
We O er:
The Traditional Funeral
Personal Service 24 Hours
Minimal Cost Cremations&Burials
Shipping Ser vice
Pre-Arrangements & Counseling
Information Regarding Title XIX
At Home Arrangements
Irrevocable & Revocable Trusts
Transferring of Funeral Trusts
Moriah Doyle Monsif
Newly renovated— including handicapped mens and women’s restrooms
Southwestern Connecticut
Agency on Aging
The Southwestern Connecticut Agency on Aging (SWCAA)
is a private, not-for-profit corporation established in 1974
and designated as one of a number of Area Agencies on
Aging functioning under the Older Americans Act of 1965.
(There are five such Agencies in Connecticut.) SWCAA
utilizes federal and state funds to benefit the elderly in
the 14-town region of southwestern Connecticut. These
funds help support such services as nutrition, health care,
in-home care, adult day care, respite care, legal assistance,
transportation, senior centers, and outreach and social
support. SWCAA researches and evaluates elderly issues,
offers community education related to the needs of the
elderly, and serves as an advocate for older individuals. It
is a resource for information on and referrals to services
for older adults, including health insurance, housing and
in-home care. The Agency administers the CHOICES
Program, Statewide Respite Program and the National
Caregiver Support Program for the region. SWCAA is also
an “Access Agency,” under contract with the Department
of Social Services of the State of Connecticut, to provide
care management to clients who receive home and
community-based services through the Connecticut
Home Care Program for Elders.
Southwestern CT Agency on Aging, Inc.
1000 Lafayette Blvd. • Bridgeport, CT 06604
Telephone Number (203) 333-9288
Toll-Free Number 1-800-994-9422
Fax Number (203) 332-2619
47
48
Mayor • Joseph Ganim
Margaret Morton Government Center
999 Broad Street • Bridgeport, CT 06604
203-576-7201 • Fax: 203-576-3913
E-mail: mayor@bridgeportct.gov
MAYOR’S COMMISSION ON SENIOR CITIZENS
Members appointed by Mayor for two-year terms
to study conditions and needs of elderly and
recommend solutions to their problems.
Members:
Chairperson • Frances Newby
Vice Chairperson • Robert J. Burdo
Bettie Cook
BRIDGEPORT DEPARTMENT ON AGING
307 Golden Hill St. • Bridgeport, CT 06604
203-576-7993 • Fax: 203-576-7521
Hours: 7 a.m.-3 p.m.
E-mail: marie.heller@Bridgeportct.gov.
Public Facilities Director • John Ricci • 203-576-7130
E-mail: john.ricci@bridgeportct.gov
Superintendent of Recreation • Luann Conine
203-576-8080 • E-mail: luann.conine@bridgeportct.gov
Project Director • Marie Heller • 203-576-7989
E-mail: marie.heller@Bridgeportct.gov
• Recreation and exercise programs: Variety of programs
at all three senior centers, including bingo, ceramics class-
es, Wii practice daily, line dancing, arts, Red Hat Society
club, chair exercise, trips, Grandparents Club.
• Senior Transportation Program: Free transportation for
members only to Eisenhower Senior Center. Convenient
pickup points throughout the city.
BRIDGEPORT SENIOR CENTERS
Dwight D. Eisenhower Senior Center
307 Golden Hill St. 06604 • 203-576-7993
Hours: 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Executive Director • Marie Heller 203-7993
E-mail: marie.heller@bridgeportct.gov
Membership to Eisenhower Center is free to all
Bridgeport residents. Free transportation is provided to
and from the Center. Center offers the following activi-
ties on a weekly basis: Ceramic classes; Computer class;
Tai-Chi; Zumba and Chair Exercise; Karaoke; Bingo
and Pokeno; Cards; Billiards; Wii; Dominos; Knitting;
Manicures and Pedicures; and Hair Cutting. A daily nutri-
tional lunch is provided by CW Resources, Inc.
A quarterly Newsletter that lists all activities and trips
is provided at the front desk of the Eisenhower Center.
A certified counselor is at the Center twice a month to
provide assistance or answer any questions. Center also
provides assistance for the Renter’s Rebate Program.
Black Rock Senior Center
2676 Fairfield Ave. • Bridgeport, CT 06605
203-576-7258 • Hours: 9:00 a.m.-4 p.m.
Executive Director • Bonnie Roach
E-mail: bonnie.roach@bridgeportct.gov
Exercise equipment available. • Bingo: Wed., 12:30 p.m.-
3:00 p.m. • Line dancing: Mon., 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
• Movie: Mon. 12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m. • crafts/knit classes
• Daily lunch provided at noon.
East Side Senior Center
1057 East Main St. • Bridgeport, CT 06608
203-395-8366 • Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
Executive Director • Rosemary Wong
Email: rosemary.wong@bridgeportct.gov
Free membership for Bridgeport residents 55+. A nutritious
Spanish lunch is provided by CW Resources as a private/
federally funded program for those 60+. Members must
make reservations in advance by visiting the Center.
Members’ Activities: Dominos, Bingo Mania, Jumbo Word/
Number Search, Meditative Adult Coloring, Checkers, Wii
Virtual Games, Dancercise, Members’ Birthday Bashes,
Excursion Bus Trips, Music/Singing Therapy, Therapeutic
Work in Garden, Creative Painting, Handcraft Arts, Board
Games.
Information/referrals by Certified Benefit Counselors
regarding such programs as Federal/State Entitlements,
Connecticut Energy Assistance Program (seasonal), State
Tax Relief Renters’ Rebate Program.
North End Bethany Senior Center
20 Thorme St. • Bridgeport, CT 06606 • 203-576-7730
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Executive Director • Carrie Taylor
carrie.taylor@bridgeportct.gov
Bingo: 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m. • Chat Session: 10:30 a.m.-
12:30 p.m. • Plus: Billiards, craft classes, exercise class, line
dancing, movies, pinochle, pokeno, Wii practice.
Hall Senior Center
52 George E. Pipkin’s Way • Bridgeport, CT 06608
203-345-2000 • Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Program Director • Jessica Ortiz • 203-345-2028
E-mail: info@hnhonline.org
Hall Senior Center is not operated by the City of
Bridgeport. It is one of the Hall Neighborhood House proj-
ects. The Center addresses the health, social, emotional,
City of Bridgeport
BRIDGEPORT
49
BRIDGEPORT
and recreational needs of community seniors through a
variety of programs. Bridgeport residents at least 60 years
of age or older are eligible to take part in the Center’s
activities. The Center has a 25-passenger bus that trans-
ports seniors to and from the Center and on its many
field trips.
Activities: arts and crafts; assistive referrals; field trips;
intergenerational art education; health screenings and
preventative health education; recreational and social
events; special events; workshops
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
For pickup of seniors under the Senior Transportation
Program of the Department of Social Services,
call 203-576-8247, 203-576-7993.
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
The City, both by itself and in conjunction with the State
of Connecticut, offers several tax relief programs for
the elderly and certain other groups. The programs are
administered by the Tax Assessor’s Office.
Acting Tax Assessor • Daniel J. Kenny, CCMA, SPA
City Hall, Room 105, 45 Lyon Ter.
Bridgeport, CT 06604 • 203-576-7241 • Fax: 203-332-5521
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
For information specifically about the tax relief
programs, call 203-576-8062.
BRIDGEPORT PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM
www.bportlibrary.org
Burroughs-Saden Library (Main Library)
Burroughs Building • 925 Broad St. 06604
203-576-7400
Black Rock Branch
2705 Fairfield Ave. 06605 • 203-576-7025
Newfield Branch (reopening in Spring)
775 Central Ave, 06607 • 203-576-7828
North Branch
3455 Madison Ave. 06606 • 203-576-7003
East Side Branch
174 E. Main St. 06608 • 203-576-7634
PROBATE COURT
Judge • Paul Ganim
City Hall Annex, 999 Broad St. • Bridgeport, CT 06604
203-576-3945 • Fax: 203-576-7898
Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
BRIDGEPORT POLICE DEPARTMENT
Armando J. Perez, Chief
Headquarters: 300 Congress St. • Bridgeport, CT 06604
E-mail: bptctpd@bridgeportct.gov
Non-emergency complaints: 203-576-7671
Non-emergencies information: 203-581-5100
Records/Property Division: 203-581-5270
Criminal Background Checks: 203-581-5270
Victim Assistance: 203-336-5522
Animal Control:
Jennifer Wallace • Chief Animal Control Officer
236 Evergreen Street • 203-576-7727 • Fax: 203-576-8119
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
BRIDGEPORT FIRE DEPARTMENT
Richard E. Thode, Chief
Headquarters: 30 Congress St. • Bridgeport, CT 06604
E-mail: bridgeport.fire@bridgeportct.gov
Non-emergencies: 203-337-2070 • Fax: 203-575-8274
Free smoke detectors: 203-335-8835
E-mail: bridgeport.fireemail@bridgeportct.gov
Fire Stations
Headquarters: 30 Congress St. • 203-576-7666
Engine 3 & 4: 233 Wood Ave. • 203-576-7660
Engine/Ladder 6: 1035 Central Ave. • 203-576-7681
Engine 7/Ladder 11: 245 Ocean Ter. • 203-576-7830
Engine/Ladder 10: 950 Boston Ave. • 203-576-7673
Engine 12: 265 Beechmont Ave. • 203-576-7675
Engine 15: 104 Evers St. • 203-576-7677
Engine 16: 3115 Madison Ave. • 203-576-7678
BRIDGEPORT’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
60-64 6,068
65-74 7,574
75-84 4,652
85+ 2,262
Total 60+ 20,556
Total population of
Bridgeport: 144,229
Percentage 60 years of age
or over: 14.2%
Land area: 17.5 sq. mi.
50
EASTON
First Selectman • Adam W. Dunsby
E-mail: adunsby@eastonct.gov
Easton Town Hall
225 Center Rd. • Easton, CT 06612
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 61 • Easton, CT 06612
203-268-6291 • Fax: 203-268-4928 • www.eastonct.gov
Town Hall Hours: 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Check www.eastonct.gov for specific department hours.
COMMISSION FOR THE AGING
Develops policies and exercises oversight regarding needs
of senior citizens.
Linda Dollard Ann Hughs Phyllis Machledt
Karen Martin Melinda O’Brien Lisa Tasi
MUNICIPAL AGENT/SENIOR SERVICES
Responsible for referrals and assistance with federal,
state and local programs, including, but not limited to,
Insurance, Food Stamps, Social Security, Medicare and
Fuel Assistance for Easton residents over the age of 60.
Eileen Zimmerman, LCSW
650 Morehouse Rd., Easton, CT 06612
203-268-1137 • Hours: 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
SOCIAL SERVICES DIRECTOR
Administers various programs to assist disabled and
low-income Easton residents under the age of 60.
Eileen Zimmerman, LCSW • 203-268-1137
Outreach worker: Pam Healy • 203-261-0289
SENIOR CENTER
Center is “intellectual, educational, cultural and social cen-
ter for adults of all ages, but especially for retirees, seniors
and physically challenged adults . . . . purpose is to enrich
the town . . . and to provide assistance to [those] in need.”
650 Morehouse Rd. • Easton, CT 06612 • 203-268-1145
www.eastonseniors.com • Fax: 203-268-9586
E-mail: esseniorsc@optonline.net
Hours: 7:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Director • Val J. Buckley 203-268-1145
Assistant Director • Kay Oestreicher
Programs and services include:
• Availability of: audiobooks, cable TV, computers, CDs,
DVDs, fax machine, Internet cafe, investment data, large-
print books, Optelec reader, periodicals, photocopier,
therapy equipment, video library.
Opportunities for: arts and crafts, quilting, knitting,
weaving, card and board games, bridge lessons, bowling,
ceramics, culinary classes, driver’s ed for elderly, film
showings, trips, musical programs, excercise programs.
Presentations on: law, finance, art, religion, more.
Scheduled presence of: hair stylist, handyman, massage
therapist, notary public/justice of the peace, seamstress.
• Trips: day and vacation trips.
• Dial-a-Ride: van transportation 7 days a week.
SUPPORTIVE SERVICES FOR FAMILIES AND
CAREGIVERS/TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
Contact Municipal Agent/Senior Services, Social Services
Director and Senior Center for information
on these services.
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
On matters relating to assessments and elderly, Office of
the Assessor prepares homeowners’ forms to be sent to
state for approval.
Town Hall • 203-268-6291 • Fax: 203-268-4928
Assessor • Rachel Maciulewski
Tax Relief for the Elderly Committee assists with local tax
relief issues. See Web site www.eastonct.gov for current
information regarding program options.
PUBLIC LIBRARY
691 Morehouse Rd. • Easton, CT 06612
203-261-0134 • Fax: 203-261-0708
www.eastonlibrary.org
Hours: Mon., Tues. & Wed., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Thurs., 10
a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri., 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Director • Lynn Zaffino
E-mail: lzaffino@eastonlibrary.org
PROBATE COURT
Easton is part of Probate Court for District 46.
Trumbull Town Hall • 5866 Main St. • Trumbull, CT 06611
203-452-5068
Judge • T.R. Rowe
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
POLICE DEPARTMENT
Chief • Timothy Shaw
700 Morehouse Rd. • Easton, CT 06612
Non-emergencies: 203-268-4111 • Fax: 203-268-6703
www.eastonctpolice.com
Town of Easton
51
EASTON
60-64 471
65-74 622
75-84 357
85+ 171
Total 60+ 1,620
Total population of Easton:
7,490
Percentage 60 years of age
or over: 21.3%
Land area: 28.6 sq. mi.
Safe Seniors Contact Program available free to any
resident homebound, medically disabled or over 60.
Each day call is placed to individual’s home via computer.
If no response, second call is placed. If still no response,
officer is dispatched to residence and relative or key
holder contacted.
FIRE DEPARTMENT
1 Center Rd. • Easton, CT 06612
Non-emergencies: 203-268-2833
www.eastonct.gov/fire-department
Chief • Steve Waugh
VOLUNTEER EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE
(EMS)
EMS has several full-time staffers, dozens of volunteers
and two ambulances functioning in cooperation with
first-responders in Police Department.
448 Sport Hill Rd. • Easton, CT 06612
Non-emergencies: 203-452-9595 • Fax: 203-452-7660
Interim Chief of Service • Jonathan Arnold
E-mail: chief@eastonems.com
HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF EASTON, INC.
Located in a special section of the Easton Library.
691 Morehouse Rd. • Easton, CT 06612 • 203-261-2090
E-mail: hseastonct@gmail.com
Hours: By appointment • Please write for information.
President • Chester Burley
Executive Director/Curator • Bruce Nelson
OPEN SPACES
A combination of public and private action has provided
Easton residents with the benefits of considerable
open space.
Town of Easton Open Spaces
The following Town-owned areas are open, where
appropriate, for cross-country skiing, dog walking, fishing,
hiking, riding and snowshoeing.
• Mill River Open Space (6.8 acres) Provides fishing
accesses along the Mill River off South Park Ave.
• Paine Open Space (130 acres) Located off Maple Rd.
• Steep Hill Open Space (1.1 acres) Located near the
south end of North Park Ave.
Aspetuck Land Trust
Private, nonprofit Connecticut corporation dedicated to the
preservation of open space in perpetuity in Easton, Fairfield,
Weston and Westport. Has preserved over 1,800 acres of
open space in these towns. Nature preserves open to the
public make up over 600 of the 1,800 acres. Trust has acres
open in Easton for cross-country skiing, fishing, hiking, riding
and snowshoeing.
• Abbey Lane Fishing Pond. Abbey Rd.
Also accessible via Poindexter Preserve.
• Crow Hill Nature Preserve (162 acres)
Located at the end of Wyldewood Rd.
• Island Pond/Pond View Preserve (10 acres)
Located within the town-owned Paine Open Space.
• Jump Hill Preserve. Located at the north end of Trout
Brook Valley
• Poindexter Nature Preserve (38 acres)
Located off Judd Rd. between Maple Rd. and Knapp St.
• Randal Farm Preserve (34 acres) 700 Sport Hill Rd.
• William Warner Angler’s Preserve (5 acres)
Provides three fishing accesses along the Mill River off
South Park Ave.
OTHER IMPORTANT CONTACTS
Animal Control Officer • Kelly Fitch • 203-268-9172
Conservation Dept. • Phillip Doremus • Wetlands
Enforcement Officer
Easton Community Center • 364 Sport Hill Rd.
203-459-9700
Planning and Zoning • 203-268-6291
Public Works Director • Edward Nagy • 203-268-0714
Registrar of Voters • (203) 268-6291
David Smith (D) • Vincent Caprio (R)
Tax Collector • Krista Kot • 203-268-6291, ext. 140
Town Clerk • Christine Halloran, CCTC
203-268-6291, ext. 133
EASTON’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
52
FAIRFIELD
First Selectman • Michael C. Tetreau
Office of the First Selectman
John J. Sullivan Independence Hall, 2nd Fl
725 Old Post Rd. • Fairfield, CT 06824
203-256-3030 • Fax: 203-256-3008
E-mail: FirstSelectmanFFld@fairfieldct.org
Constituent Concerns
Kathleen Griffin • 203-256-3031
E-mail: kgriffin@fairfieldct.org
Deputy Chief of Staff
Jennifer Carpenter • 203-256-3095
E-mail: jcarpenter@fairfieldct.org
www.fairfieldct.org/firstselectman
Old Town Hall
611 Old Post Rd. • Fairfield, CT 06824
Town Hall Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Town Switchboard: 203-256-3000
Fax for Other Than the First Selectman: 203-256-3080
Town Website: www.fairfieldct.org
HUMAN AND SOCIAL SERVICES
Advised by Human Services Commission, the Depart-ment
of Human and Social Services arranges for the provision
of programs and services to adults of all ages, including
senior citizens and people with disabilities.
Director •Julie DeMarco
E-mail: jdemarco@fairfieldct.org
100 Mona Terrace • Fairfield, CT 06824 • 203-256-3166
• Services (by appointment): information, referral,
assessment and counseling regarding: Medicare/Medigap;
HMOs; certain legal matters; long-term care; fuel assis-
tance; tax assistance; volunteer opportunities; family prob-
lems; Title 19 and other entitlements; housing assistance;
home care and visits; nursing homes/assisted living;
support groups; more. For information about an appoint-
ment with a social worker regarding careplanning or
entitlements, call 203-256-3166.
BIGELOW CENTER FOR SENIOR ACTIVITIES
The Bigelow Center is the main resource location for
activities and services for older adults and their families
and caregivers.
100 Mona Terrace • Fairfield, CT 06824
203-256-3166 • Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
www.fairfieldct.org/bigelowcenter
Director • Melissa DiVito
E-mail: mdivito@fairfieldct.org
Program Coordinator • Margaret Andrews
E-mail: mandrews@fairfieldct.org
Activities: defensive driving courses; fitness and exercise
programs; dancing; arts and crafts; bingo and card games;
senior groups (music/singing, TV/video, investment, walk-
ing, others); movies; Learning in Retirement programs;
computer classes and Continuing Education classes.
• Health screenings (by schedule): blood pressure
and others.
• Hot Lunch: reservations required two days in advance;
$5.00. Hours: Mon.-Fri., 12:15 p.m.
• Monthly newsletter: describes Center activities and lunch
menus. Available at the Center, Town Hall, libraries and
other locations in the community.
SUPPORTIVE SERVICES FOR FAMILIES
AND CAREGIVERS
The Town provides support groups for families and caregiv-
ers of older adults. For information,call the Department of
Human and Social Services at 203-256-3166.
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
Buses are available for transportation for seniors. Please
call the Senior Center dispatcher at 203-256-3168, Mon.
through Fri. between the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
for service.
Bus service is limited to:
• Medical appointments
• Grocery shopping on scheduled days according to
location and limited to 1½ hours
• Coming to the Senior Center
• Special approved outings
There are no exceptions to this schedule of trips. Fee for
riding the bus varies with destination and type of trip.
A ten-punch bus ticket may be purchased at the
dispatcher’s office for $5.00.
• Bus service to the Senior Center or shopping is one punch
for round trip.
• Bus service to the doctor in:
• Fairfield is two punches each way (or $2.00 round trip);
• Bridgeport is four punches each way (or $4.00 round trip)
For reservation information or further details, please call the
Senior Center dispatcher: 203-256-3168.
Town of Fairfield
53
FAIRFIELD
EUNICE POSTOL RECREATION CENTER
75 Mill Plain Rd. • Fairfield, CT 06824
203-256-3191 • Fax: 203-256-3145
Hours: Mon.-Fri. hours to 5:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.;
Sat.-Sun. hours to 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
www.fairfieldrecreation.com
In addition to facilities for classes, games and events, the
Recreation Center maintains a fully equipped and staffed
fitness center for aerobics, strength training and other
exercises. A yearly membership in the Recreation Center
is $110 for persons 62 and older. Three-month member-
ships are available for $55. Call the Center for more infor-
mation. Persons who meet Social Services Department
eligibility requirements may obtain yearly memberships
for $55. Call 203-256-3170 for details.
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
The Town, in conjunction with the State of Connecticut,
offers several tax relief programs for disabled persons and
qualified residents age 65 and over. The programs are
administered by the Assessor’s Office. Application period
Feb. 1- May 15.
Tax Assessor • Ross D. Murray
E-mail: assesorsoffice@fairfieldct.org
611 Old Post Rd. • Fairfield, CT 06824 • 203-256-3110
Hours: 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
www.fairfieldct.org/taxassessor
HOUSING PROGRAMS
The Town, through its Office of Community & Economic
Development (OCED), maintains a list of providers of
housing for the elderly and disabled in Fairfield. As these
facilities are operated by different entities, those inter-
ested should contact each one individually to determine
current availability, eligibility requirements, and applica-
tion procedures. To see this list, go to www.fairfieldct.
org/content/10726/13067/13304.aspx and click on the
appropriate link.
For information on Rental Assistance or the Housing
Choice Vouchers Program under the federal Section 8
program, contact Carol Martin, 203-366-0578.
The Handyman Program is administered by OCED with
federal funding to assist low-income homeowners with
minor maintenance and repairs. For information, contact
203-256-3120. • www.fairfieldct.org/commdevelopment
FAIRFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM
www.fairfieldct.org/library
Fairfield Public Library (Main Library)
1080 Old Post Rd. • Fairfield, CT 06824
203-256-3155
Fairfield Woods Branch Library
1147 Fairfield Wood Rd. • Fairfield, CT 06825
203-255-7307
Pequot Library
720 Pequot Ave. • Southport, CT 06890
203-259-0346
www.pequotlibrary.org
PROBATE COURT
Judge • Kate Maxham
725 Old Post Rd. • Fairfield, CT 06824 • 203-256-3041
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
For noncritical situations, call the following numbers
(in various departments):
Unusual activities/possible
public safety problems 203-254-4800
Health issues 203-256-3020
Road, tree problems, etc. 203-256-3177
Storm or disaster infoline 203-254-4899
Homeland Security concerns
or suspicions 1-866-457-8477
FAIRFIELD POLICE DEPARTMENT
100 Reef Rd. • Fairfield, CT 06824
Non-emergencies: 203-254-4800
Chief • Christopher Lyddy
E-mail: clyddy@fairfieldct.org
Website: www.fpdct.com
The “Are You OK?” electronic reassurance program allows
elderly, handicapped or homebound persons to register
with the Police Department to receive a phone call at
their residences at a predetermined time each day. If
there is no answer after two attempts, the Emergency
Communications Center (open 24 hours a day) is noti-
fied, and a police officer is dispatched to the residence
to check on the well-being and safety of the subscriber.
There is no charge for the service, and applications to
register are available at the Police Department or the
front office of the Fairfield Senior Center. The Police
Department also maintains a program under which any-
54
one wishing to register a person who has Alzheimer’s
may do so by coming to Department headquarters, com-
pleting a registration form and providing two photos of
the individual. Registration also can be done through the
national Alzheimer’s Association.
FAIRFIELD FIRE DEPARTMENT
140 Reef Rd. • Fairfield, CT 06824
Non-emergencies: 203-254-4700 • Fax: 203-254-4724
Chief • Denis McCarthy
E-mail: dmccarthy@fairfieldct.org
Website: www.fairfieldct.org/fire
Every fall the Fire Department will go to the homes of
residents 65 or older to change the batteries of all their
smoke detectors. The Department maintains a database
of all senior citizens whose batteries were changed the
previous year and sends a letter to these seniors inform-
ing them when it is again time for the Department to
be changing batteries. To be included in the database,
contact the Department. The Department also operates
blood-pressure screenings and other programs
for seniors.
FILE OF LIFE AND FREE BLOOD PRESSURE
SCREENINGS
The Fairfield Fire Department recommends keeping
updated medical information readily available in the
event of an emergency for fire, police, and ambulance
personnel. The File of Life is a refrigerator magnet with an
attached red plastic pocket labeled “FILE OF LIFE”. In the
plastic pocket is a tri-fold card on which you can record
your vital emergency information. Fill in the information
on the card. Remember, the information will help first
responders to better assist you in an emergency. Please
stop by a local fire station to pick up your kit and have
your blood pressure taken.
“ICE”-IN CASE OF EMERGENCY
Who should be contacted if you are in an accident, fall
downstairs, or have a medical condition that prevents
you from speaking? Firefighters are trained to look at your
phone for an emergency contact called “ICE.” Save your
primary emergency contacts phone numbers under this
name, and they will be able to notify the contacts if you
are injured and can’t call them yourself.
60-64 3,005
65-74 4,012
75-84 3,030
85+ 1,878
Total 60+ 11,925
Total population of the
Town of Fairfield: 59,404
Percentage 60 years of age
or over: 20.2%
Land area: 30.6 sq. mi.
FAIRFIELD
OTHER IMPORTANT CONTACTS
Animal Control • 203-254-4857
Animal Control Officer • Paul Miller
Fairfield Animal Shelter, 211 Richard White Way
E-mail: pmiller@fairfieldct.org
Health Department • 203-256-3020
Sullivan Independence Hall, first floor
Director • Sands Cleary
E-mail: scleary@fairfieldct.org
Dept. of Public Works • 203-256-3010
Sullivan Independence Hall, First Floor
Director • Joe Michelangelo
E-mail: jmichelangelo@fairfieldct.org
Parks & Recreation Department • 203-256-3191
75 Mill Plain Road
Director • Anthony Calabrese
acalabrese@fairfieldct.org
Registrars of Voters • 203-256-3115
Old Town Hall
Steve Elworthy (R) selworthy@fairfieldct.org
Matthew Waggner (D) mwaggner@fairfieldct.org
Tax Collector • 203-256-3100
Old Town Hall
Tax Collector • David Kluczwski
E-mail: taxoffice@fairfieldct.org
Town Clerk • 203-256-3090
Old Town Hall
Town Clerk • Betsy P. Browne, CMC, MCTC
bbrowne@fairfieldct.org
Planning and Zoning • 203-256-3050
Planning Director • Jim Wendt
Sullivan Independence Hall • jwendt@fairfieldct.org
FAIRFIELD’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
55
MONROE
• Special programs. Clothing assistance available to resi-
dents in event of fire or other disaster; donated holiday
gifts distributed to residents based on need; Emergency
Evacuation List available to residents needing assistance
during an evacuation; information made available about
File of Life, Yellow Dot Program, K-9 LAPS (Locating
Alzheimer’s Patients Safely). For information about any
programs mentioned here, call: 203-452-2813
or 203-452-2815.
MONROE SENIOR CENTER
235 Cutlers Farm Rd., Monroe, CT 06468
Director • Amy Lachioma • 203-452-2815, ext. 3
Fax: 203-452-2965 • E-mail: alachioma@monroect.org
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Wed. evenings and
Sat. morning hours dependent on programs.
Elderly Services Coordinator • Kim Cassia
• 203-452-2815, ext. 4
Center offers:
• Social, recreational, educational, programs and
activities to anyone age 55 or older. Membership
required. Annual fee (July-June) is $15.00 for Monroe
residents, $20.00 for nonresidents. Some programs may
require an additional fee.
• Outreach. Available to residents age 60 and over
permanently or temporarily confined to their homes or
who are isolated, frail or low-income. Elderly Services
Coordinator provides assistance regarding government
entitlement programs and educates residents and their
families about resources and services. For information,
call Kim Cassia at 203-452-2815, ext. 4.
SUPPORTIVE SERVICES
FOR FAMILIES AND CAREGIVERS
For information about such services, call Elderly
Services Coordinator Kim Cassia at Senior Center,
203-452-2815.
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
Medical and non-medical transportation within Monroe
and to Bridgeport, Stratford, Trumbull available to
residents 60+ or disabled on weekdays. Reservations
required at least 48 hours in advance. Appointments
must be: for Monroe, between 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; for
Bridgeport, Stratford, Trumbull, between 9:45 a.m.-2:00
p.m. All appointments must conclude by 3:30 p.m. Rides
within Monroe are $2.00 one-way or round-trip and
$4.00 one-way or round-trip to Trumbull, Stratford and
Bridgeport. For information and to make reservations,
call Transportation Coordinator Betsy Kraushaar
at 203-452-2815, ext 2.
First Selectman • Kenneth Kellogg
Monroe Town Hall
7 Fan Hill Rd. • Monroe, CT 06468
203-452-2800, ext. 1001 • Fax: 203-452-5475
E-mail: kkellogg@monroect.org • www.monroect.org
Monroe Town Hall
7 Fan Hill Rd. 06468 • 203-452-2800
Hours: Mon.-Thurs., 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.;
Fri., 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
MONROE COMMISSION ON AGING
Commission suggests development of programs and
policies for advancing well-being of older adults of
Monroe and provision of services to senior citizens by
Department of Social and Senior Services.
Chairman: Helma Chartier Leslie Gosselin
Vivian Capoccitti Sean Shanely
Jaime Geisel Beverly Zwierlein
Town Council Liaison • Jason Maur
COMMUNITY & SOCIAL SERVICES
7 Fan Hill Rd. 06468 • 203-452-2813
Director • Amy Lachioma
Social Services Coordinator • Mary Ann Kalm
Department offers:
• Referral and assistance with federal, state and local
programs, including, but not limited to: Husky, Charter
Oak Insurance, Food Stamps, Social Security (including
SS Disability and Survivor’s benefits), Medicare, Medicaid,
Tax Relief, and Rent Relief. Eligible residents helped
to understand the process and information and to
complete required paperwork and documentation.
• Heating assistance programs (for those with low
or moderate incomes), including: Connecticut Energy
Assistance Program, Operation Fuel, Project Warmth and
Utility programs.
• Monroe Counseling Service. Short-term counseling
sessions available to Monroe residents from Dierdre
Ekholdt, LCSW. • 203-452-2800, ext. 1178.
E-mail: dekholdt@monroect.org
• Food Pantry at 980 Monroe Tpke. Provides nutritious
food to eligible residents. Week’s worth of food distribut-
ed once a month by appointment. Food can be delivered
to those ill or without transportation.
Food Pantry Coordinator • Kathleen Turner
203-452-2817 • E-mail: foodpantry@monroect.org
Town of Monroe
56
60-64 1,143
65-74 1,401
75-84 879
85+ 319
Total 60+ 3,742
Total population of the
Town of Monroe: 19,479
Percentage 60 years of age
or over: 19.3%
Land area: 26.4 sq. mi.
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
The Assessor’s Office is responsible for the
administration of tax relief programs.
7 Fan Hill Rd., Rm. 202 06468
203-452-2803 • Fax: 203-452-2253
Assessor • Justin Feldman
For information about property ownership, tax exemp-
tions and tax relief, contact the Assessor’s Assistant.
E-mail: Rcaiola@MonroeCT.org
Assistant • Ruthan Caiola • 203-452-2800, ext. 1003
EDITH WHEELER PUBLIC LIBRARY
733 Monroe Tpke. 06468
203-452-2850 • Fax: 203-261-3359
E-mail: reference@ewml.org
PROBATE COURT
Judge • T.R. Rowe
5866 Main St. • Trumbull, CT 06611 • 203-452-5068
Monroe is under the jurisdiction of the same Probate
Court as Trumbull and Easton.
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
MONROE POLICE DEPARTMENT
Chief • John L. Salvatore,
7 Fan Hill Rd. 06468
Non-emergencies: 203-261-3622
TRIAD is the Community Awareness Program for Seniors.
It is an alliance of the Police Department, the Senior
Center and the community to coordinate activities for
the safety and well-being of older adults. The “Are You
OK?” Program is an extension of TRIAD. It is an auto-
matic telephone-dialing system that calls senior citizens
to check on their welfare.
MONROE FIRE DEPARTMENTS
Headquarters: Monroe CompanyChief • Josh Krize
Station 1 • 18 Shelton Rd. (Rte. 110)
Station 2 • 54 Jockey Hollow Rd.
Non-emergencies: 203-452-2827
Stepney CompanyChief • Mike Klemish
Station 1 • 88 Main St.
Station 2 • 801 Main St.
Non-emergencies: 203-268-5389
Stevenson CompanyChief • John Howe
Station 1 • 1580 Monroe Tpk.
MONROE
Station 2 • 1260 Monroe Tpk.
Non-emergencies: 203-261-8120
MONROE VOLUNTEER EMERGENCY
MEDICAL SERVICES (MVEMS)
John Brenna, EMS
54 Jockey Hollow Rd. 06468
Non-emergencies: 203-452-2826
Has three ambulances available for emergency medical
services 24/7. Conducts yearly town-wide CPR training
sessions and also offers instruction for those seeking to
become certified as Emergency Medical Technicians or
Medical Response Technicians.
OTHER IMPORTANT CONTACTS
Animal Control/Shelter • 203-452-3760
Shelter address: 447 Purdy Hill Road
E-mail: erisko@monroectpolice.com
Health Dept. • 203-452-2818
Director • Nancy Brault, MPH, RS
E-mail: nbrault@monroect.org
Public Works • 203-452-2814
Director • Chris Nowacki • E-mail:cnowacki@monroect.org
Parks and Recreation Dept. • 203.452.2806
E-mail: parksandrec@monroect.org
Acting Director • Missy Orosz
E-mail: morosz@monroect.org
Registrar of Voters • 203-452-2820
Jamieson A. Campbell (D) • E-mail: jcampbell@monroect.org
Jan O. Larsen, Deputy (D) • E-mail: jlarsen@monroect.org
Margaret J. Villani (R)E-mail: mvillani@monroect.org
Debra Dutches, Deputy (R) ddutches@monroect.org
Tax Collector • Manny Cambra CCMC • 203-452-2804
E-mail: mcambra@monroect.org
Town Clerk • Vida V. Stone • 203-452-2811
E-mail: vstone@monroect.org
Planning and Zoning Dept. • 203-452-2812
Town Planner • Rick Schultz
E-mail: rschultz@monroect.org
MONROE’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
57
SHELTON
SHELTON PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM
Plumb Memorial Library
65 Wooster St.
Library System Director • Joan Stokes
203-924-1580 • E-mail: jstokes@biblio.org
Hours: Mon.-Thurs., 9:00 a.m.-8:30 p.m.; Fri.-Sat.,
10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
Huntington Branch Library
41 Church St. (inside Community Center)
203-926-0111 • Hours: Mon., 12:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.;
Tues.-Thurs., 10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m.; Friday 10:00 a.m.-
5:00 p.m. Sat., 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
PROBATE COURT
Judge • Fred J. Anthony
40 White St. • P.O. Box 127
203-924-8462
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
SHELTON POLICE DEPARTMENT
Chief • Shawn Sequeira
203-924-4440
Headquarters: 85 Wheeler St.
Non-emergencies: 203-924-1544
SHELTON FIRE DEPARTMENT
54 Hill Street, Suite 101
Chief • Francis T. Jones III
203-924-1555 x 1337
F.jones@cityofshelton.org
Shelton’s Fire Department provides fire protection; rescue
services and conducts fire prevention and safety programs
to the community. The department consists of four fire
companies operating from four stations located throughout
the city by dedicated volunteer firefighters serving from the
following fire companies.
Echo Hose Hook & Ladder Co. 1
379 Coram Ave.
Non-emergencies: 203-924-4241
Huntington Fire Company 3
44 Church St.
Non-emergencies: 203-929-1414
Pine Rock Park Fire Company 4
722 Long Hill Rd.
Non-emergencies: 203-929-1239
White Hills Fire Company 5
2 School St.
Non-emergencies: 203-929-1749
Mayor • Mark A. Lauretti
City Hall
54 Hill Street • Shelton, CT 06484
203-924-1555, ext. 1504 • Fax: 203-924-0185
E-mail: shelton01@cityofshelton.org
Shelton City Hall
54 Hill St. • 203-924-1555 • www.cityofshelton.org
SENIOR CITIZENS COMMITTEE
Shelton’s Senior Citizens Committee addresses issues
connected with aging and consists of nine members,
appointed for two-year terms by the mayor. Regular
meetings are held at the Shelton Senior Center at 4 p.m.
on the second Tuesday of each month.
Senior Committee Members:
Chairman: Walter Oko Margaret Keane
Jacqueline Bruno William Smarz
Judson Crawford Roberta Sutkowski
Cheryl Dziubina Marilyn Terlaga
Barbara Hayslip
SHELTON SENIOR CENTER
81 Wheeler St. • 203-924-9324
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Director • Doreen Laucella
Email: d.laucella@cityofshelton.org
Provides a lunch program, health screenings, financial
and insurance presentations, and educational, social
and recreational programs (computer classes, field trips,
more) for persons age 55 or older. Membership general-
ly required for programs and activities ($4.00 for Shelton
residents; $10 for out-of-town residents).
Information line: 203-924-2355
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
The Assessor’s Office in City Hall administers various state
and local programs of tax relief for homeowners and vet-
erans. Eligibility for the homeowners’ program requires:
residency in Shelton; age of 65 years or older or total dis-
ability status; income within State of Connecticut
qualifying levels. Some additional blind, disabled,
“freeze,” homeowners’ and veterans’ programs are
available, too. Also, renters’ rebate applications will
be accepted at Shelton Senior Center, 81 Wheeler St.,
Shelton, CT 06484. Rent receipts, utility receipts and
meeting income requirements are needed for participa-
tion in the renters’ rebate program.
Assessor • Bill Gaffney • 203-924-1555, ext. 1500
E-mail: w.gaffney@cityofshelton.org
City of Shelton
58
SHELTON’S EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
(EMS)
Chief • Michael Chaffee
E-mail: mchaffee@sheltonems.com
Ambulance transport and emergency first responder
service provided 24/7 by Echo Hose Ambulance Corps.
Paramedic care provided through Valley EMS, the regional
paramedic provider serving the Lower Naugatuck Valley.
Echo Hose Ambulance Corps also provides public educa-
tion and outreach on emergency medicine and public
health matters.
Echo Hose Ambulance Corps
100 Meadow St. • PO Box 213 06484
Non-emergencies: 203-924-9211 • Fax: 203-924-6603
OTHER IMPORTANT CONTACTS
Animal Control • 203-924-2501
11 Brewster Lane
Supervisor • Leon Sylvester
E-mail: l.sylvester@cityofshelton.org
City Clerk • Margaret R. Domorod
203-924-1555, ext. 1503
E-mail: m.domorod@cityofshelton.org
Naugatuck Valley Health District 203-881-3255
98 Bank Street, Seymour, CT 06483
Jeff Dussetschleger, DDS, MPH, Director of Health
Web site: www.nvhd.org
Parks and Recreation Department • 203-925-8422
41 Church St.
Director • Ron Herrick
E-mail: r.herrick@cityofshelton.org
Public Works • 203-924-9277
Registrar of Voters • 203-924-2533, Option 1
Peter Pavone (R), Ext. 306 • Robert Lally (D), Ext. 305
Tax Collector • Lisa A. Theroux, CCMC
203-924-1555, ext. 1501
E-mail: l.theroux@cityofshelton.org
SHELTON’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
STRATFORD
Town of Stratford
60-64 2,648
65-74 3,487
75-84 2,210
85+ 1,206
Total 9,551
Total population of the City
of Shelton: 39,559
Percentage 60 years of age
or over: 24.2%
Land area: 31.4 sq. mi.
Mayor • Laura Hoydick,
Stratford Town Hall, Room 202
2725 Main Street • Stratford, CT 06615
203-385-4001 • Fax: 203-385-4108
E-mail: mayor@townofstratford.com
www.townofstratford.com
Constituent Services and Outreach • Marc Dillon
STRATFORD SENIOR SERVICES DEPARTMENT
1000 West Broad St. 06615
203-385-4050 • Fax: 203-385-4057
E-mail: baldwincenter@townofstratford.com
Office hours: Mon.-Fri., 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Acting Director Senior Services Lauren Donovan
Supervisor Lauren Donovan
Senior Clerk Maureen Barstow
Social Services Coordinator/
Municipal Agent for Elderly Shirley Dominguez
C.A.R.E.S. Coordinator Erin McLeod
C.A.R.E.S. Activity Coordinator Mio Vazquez-Ramos
Outreach Coordinator Mary Balog
Handicapped Info and Referrals Susan M. Pawluk
203-385-4020
Transportation Scheduler Janice Niper
203-385-4051
Stratford Senior Services provides information and person-
al assistance to all Stratford residents over 60 years old
with: Medicaid, Medicare, Snap, Social Security, Renters
Rebate, Health Insurance Issues, Home Care Services,
Energy Assistance, Farmers Market.
• Outreach Program
Provides visits to homebound elderly, information about
housing concerns and referrals for other services. Provides
programs off-site at housing sites.
BALDWIN CENTER
The Town runs a fully operational daily activity center for
Stratford residents 55 and over. The Center offers a wide
range of activities and events for both men and women.
The Center also serves lunch Mon.-Fri.
The Center is open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
1000 West Broad St. 06615 • 203-385-4050
E-mail: baldwincenter@townofstratford.com
59
STRATFORD
SUPPORTIVE SERVICES FOR FAMILIES
AND CAREGIVERS
For information about these services, call
Senior Services Department, 203-385-4050.
Programs, located at Baldwin Center, include:
• C.A.R.E.S.—Community-At-Risk-Elderly-Services
Social Model Adult Day Program—currently offered five
days a week
• Family Caregiver Counselor
Director of Senior Services provides information on
services offered in conjunction with the National Family
Caregivers Association to those caring for adults 60 years
of age and older, including: individual counseling that can
assist caregivers in making decisions; caregivers’ training
and education; respite care that can provide a caregiver
with a much-needed break. Hours: Tues.-Thurs., 8:30
a.m.-4 p.m. • 203-385-4055
E-mail: ldonovan@townofstratford.com
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
The Town has a transportation service for residents over
60 years old and for handicapped residents over 21 years
old. All medical-related rides are free of charge, and non-
medical rides are $1.00 each way. Transportation is avail-
able: Mon.-Fri., 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Call 385-4051,
Mon.-Fri., 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m., for reservations.
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
The Town, both by itself and in conjunction with the State
of Connecticut, offers several tax relief, energy assistance
and rental rebate programs for senior citizens. You may
be eligible if you: are aged 65 or older, totally disabled
or blind, a veteran or the spouse of a veteran; meet cer-
tain income guidelines; or own a handicapped-equipped
vehicle. The programs are administered by the Town
Assessor’s office.
Assessor • Melinda Fonda
E-mail: mfonda@townofstraford.com
Stratford Town Hall • 203-385-4025
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
STRATFORD LIBRARY
2203 Main Street • Stratford, CT 06615
Hours: Mon.-Thurs., 10:00 a.m-8:00 p.m.; Fri.,
Sat., 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.; Sun., 1-5 p.m., Oct.-May.
Circulation desk: 203-385-4160; Reference desk:
203-385-4164; Administration: 203-385-4166
E-mail: ask@stratford.lib.ct.us
The Library is accessible to people with a variety
of physical disabilities. It is wheelchair-accessible at
the Main Street entrance and all public areas are
wheelchair-accessible except for the restrooms on the
first floor. (The public restroom on the Lower Level is
accessible.) Individuals with disabilities may contact the
Library to discuss special needs, and the Library offers
materials and programs for patrons with visual or
auditory disabilities.
Library Director • Sheri Szmanski
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
STRATFORD POLICE DEPARTMENT
Chief • Joseph McNeil
900 Longbrook Ave. • Stratford, CT 06614
Non-emergencies: 203-385-4100 • Fax: 203-385-4019
E-mail: jmcneil@townofstratford.com
STRATFORD FIRE DEPARTMENT
Chief • Robert McGrath
rmcgrath@townofstraford.com
Headquarters/Company 1
2704 Main St. • Stratford, CT 06615
Non-emergencies: 203-385-4070 • Fax: 203-381-2081
E-mail: rmcgrath@townofstratford.com
Fire Company 2 • 1415 Huntington Rd.
Non-emergencies: 203-385-4074
Fire Company 3 • 20 Prospect Dr.
Non-emergencies: 203-385-4076
Fire Company 4 • 200 Oronoque Ln.
Non-emergencies: 203-385-4079
STRATFORD EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
(EMS)
Director • Michael Loiz
Headquarters 2712 Main St. • Stratford, CT 06614
Oronoque Substation • 200 Oronoque Lane
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
Non-emergencies: 203-385-4060 • Fax: 203-385-4156
E-mail: emsadmin@stratfordems.org
Web site: www.stratfordems.org
PROBATE COURT
Judge • Max Rosenberg
Birdseye Municipal Complex
468 Birdseye St., Stratford, CT 06615 • 203-385-4023
60
TRUMBULL
First Selectman • Vicki A. Tesoro
203-452-5005 • Fax: 203-452-5038
E-mail: firstselectman@trumbull-ct.gov
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Chief Administrative Officers
Cynthia Katske • E-mail: ckatske@trumbull-ct.gov
Katheleen McGannon
E-mail: kmcgannon@trumbull-ct.gov
Trumbull Town Hall
5866 Main St. • Trumbull, CT 06611
203-452.5000 • www.trumbull-ct.gov
TRUMBULL SENIOR CENTER
Director • Michele Jakab
E-mail: mjakab@trumbull-ct.gov
The Center at Priscilla Place
23 Priscilla Place 06611 • 203-452-5199
E-mail: seniorcenter@trumbull-ct.org
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Trumbull Senior Center offers a variety of innovative
programs and activities for older adults geared toward
staying healthy. These include: art classes; computer
classes; crafts; exercise classes; games; health screenings;
lectures; parties; trips. The Town of Trumbull and CW
Resources collaborate to provide a nutritious daily lunch
at the Senior Center for a suggested donation. Monthly
newsletters are available on the Town of Trumbull Web
site, which is: www.trumbull-ct.gov.
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
The Center provides transportation to Trumbull residents,
age 60 and over and to disabled adults. Rides are avail-
able Monday-Friday from 9:00 a.m. -2:30 p.m. for travel-
ing to and from the senior center, medical appointments,
and shopping. All buses are equipped with a wheelchair
lift. Service animals and assistive devices welcome.
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES
Director • Michele Jakab • 203-452-5144
The Department of Social Services strives to promote the
social well-being, self-sufficiency, and quality of life of the
residents of Trumbull by providing needs-based services
and support, such as: benefits screenings; counseling and
advocacy; information and assistance; financial assistance
and other resources. The Department is open for office
visits and also offers home visits. A food pantry is located
at the Trumbull Senior Center.
Town of Trumbull
60-64 3,100
65-74 4,176
75-84 3,172
85+ 1,626
Total 60+ 12,074
Total population of the
Town of Stratford: 51,384
Percentage 60 years of age
or over: 23.4%
Land area: 18.7 sq. mi.
OTHER IMPORTANT CONTACTS
Stratford Animal Control
225 Beacon Point Rd. 203-385-4068
Dept. E-mail: acos@townofstratford.com
Animal Control Officer • Rachel Solveira
E-mail: rsolveira@townofstratford.com
Health Dept. • 203-385-4090
Director • Andrea L. Boissevain, MPH, 468 Birdseye St.
E-mail: healthdepartment@townofstratford.com
Planning and Zoning • 203-385-4017
Planning & Zoning Administrator • Jay Habansky, AIC
E-mail: jhabansky@townofstratford.com
Administrative Clerk • Eva (Tiny) Jowers
E-mail: ejowers@townofstratford.com
Zoning Enforcement Officer • John Rusatsky,
E-mail: jrusatsky@townofstratford.com
Public Works Dept. • 203-385-4080
550 Patterson Avenue
E-mail: publicworks@townofstratford.com
Stratford Recreation Department • 203-385-4052
468 Birdseye Street
E-mail: recreation@townofstratford.com
Registrars of Voters • 203-385-4048, 203-385-4049
Lou Decilio (R) • Rick Marcone (D)
E-mail: Registrars@townofstratford.com
Tax Collector • 203-385-4030
E-mail: TaxCollector@townofstratford.com
Town Clerk • Susan M. Pawluk • 203-385-4020
E-mail: spawluk@townofstratford.com
STRATFORD’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
61
TRUMBULL
NURSING DEPARTMENT
Nursing Director • Lynn Steinbrick
E-mail: lsteinbrick@trumbull-ct.gov
The Center at Priscilla Place
23 Priscilla Place 06611 • Trumbull, CT 06611
203-452-5090 • Fax: 203-452-3853
A Geriatric Wellness Nurse, Teresa Cryan, MSN, RN, is
available at the Senior Center on Monday through Friday
to: provide health screenings, conduct educational pro-
gram on health-related topics for Trumbull seniors; assist
in making doctor appointments; coordinate guest speak-
ers on senior wellness topics; consult on common geriat-
ric health concerns. She is also available at Stern Village
Elderly Housing site to offer these services.
MARY J. SHERLACH COUNSELING CENTER
Robin Bieber, MS • Victor Olson, MA
121 Old Mine Rd. • Trumbull, CT 06611
203-452-5134 • 203-452-5193 • www.trumbull-ct.gov
The Mary J. Sherlach Counseling Center provides a clini-
cal setting for individuals and family group therapy and
crisis intervention services for individuals and families
who are residents of Trumbull and for Town employees.
The Center offers support services provided by Licensed
Family Therapists, a Social Worker, and Drug and Alcohol
Counselor. The Center assists in all stages of family transi-
tion, including: adolescent, family and couples therapy:
positive parenting: youth leadership programs: and support
for seniors.
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
The Tax Assessor is responsible for implementing
State and Town senior citizen and veteran tax
relief programs.
Town Hall, Main Floor 06611 • 203-452-5016
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Tax Assessor • Mark DeVestern
E-mail: mdevestern@trumbull-ct.gov
TRUMBULL LIBRARY SYSTEM
Director • Stefan Lyhne
E-mail: slyhne@trumbull-ct.gov
• Main Library
33 Quality St. 06611
203-452-5197 • Fax: 203-452-5125
Hours: Mon.-Thurs., 9 a.m.- 8 p.m. Fri., Sat., 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Sun. Sept. 9- May 19, 2019 1 p.m.- 5 p.m.
www.trumbullct-library.gov
• Fairchild-Nichols Memorial Branch Library
1718 Huntington Tpke. 06611
203-452-5196 • Fax: 203-452-5178
E-mail: fairchildlibrary@trumbull-ct.gov
Hours: Mon., Wed. 10. a. m- 8 p.m.,
Tues., Thurs, 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. Closed Friday & Saturday
The Trumbull Library System offers a wide range of items
and services for senior citizens: large-print books in all
genres and a large collection of CDs and download-
able audiobooks. Most of its extensive DVD collection is
closed captioned for the hearing impaired.
Homebound Delivery Service is available for those who
are unable to come into the library buildings. Special
services include: Librarian by Appointment (individualized
reference help from a professional librarian); computer
classes and eBook download demonstrations; book dis-
cussions; online data bases and helpful resources that
can be accessed from home computer with library card;
and a wide range of other programs of interest to seniors
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
TRUMBULL POLICE DEPARTMENT
Chief • Michael Lombardo, Sr.
158 Edison Rd. 06611 • 203-261-3665 (non-emergency)
E-mail: police@trumbull-ct.gov
Report suspicious activity to the Police Department.
FIRE DEPARTMENTS/EMERGENCY
MEDICAL SERVICES
Trumbull Volunteer Fire Co. No. 1
• Station One • 860 White Plains Rd. • 203-452-0465
• Station Two • 980 Daniels Farm Rd. • 203-268-5975
E-mail: board@trumbullvfc.com • www.trumbullvfc.com
Long Hill Fire Department
• Station One • 6315 Main St. • 203-452-0779
• Station Two • 5400 Main St.
• Station Three • 4229 Madison Ave.
www.longhillfd.com
Nichols Fire Department
• Station One • 100 Shelton Rd. • 203-459-0159
Station Two • 582 Booth Hill Rd.
E-mail: webmaster@nicholsfire.com
www.nicholsfire.com
62
Alliance for Aging Research, 1700 K St. NW, Suite 740,
Washington, DC 20006, Phone: 202-293-2856,
www.agingresearch.org.
Alzheimer’s Association, 225 North Michigan Avenue, Floor 17,
Chicago, IL 60601, Phone: 1-800-335-8700 (toll free),
E-mail: info@alz.org, www.alz.org.
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 9400 West
Higging Rd. Rosemont, IL 60018, Phone: 847-823-7186,
www.aaos.org.
American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry, 6728 Old
McLean Village Drive, McLean, VA 22101, (703) 556-9222,
www.aagponline.org
American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary
Rehabilitation, 330 N. Wabash Ave., Suite 2000, Chicago, IL
60611, Phone: (312) 321-5146, E-mail: aacvpr@tmahq.com,
www.aacvpr.org.
American Cancer Society, 250 Williams St., NE, Atlanta, GA
30303, Phone: 1-800-ACS-2345 (227-2345) (toll free),
www.cancer.org.
American College of Surgeons, 633 North St. Clair St., Chicago,
IL 60611-3211, Phone: 1-800-621-4111 (toll free), E-mail: post-
master@facs.org, www.facs.org.
American Council of the Blind, 1703 N. Beauregard St., Suite
420, Alexandria, VA 2220, Phone: (800) 424-8666, www.acb.org
American Diabetes Association, 1701 North Beauregard St.,
Arlington, VA 22301, Phone: 1-800-DIABETES (342-2383)
(toll free), www.diabetes.org.
American Heart Association, 7272 Greenville Ave., Dallas,
TX 75231, Phone: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721) (toll free),
1-888-4-STROKE (478-7653) (toll free), www.heart.org.
American Lung Association, 55 W. Wacker Drive, Suite 1150
Chicago, IL 60601, Phone: 1-800-LUNG-USA (586-4872) (toll
free), E-mail: info@lung.org, www.lung.org.
American Parkinson Disease Association, 135 Parkinson Ave.,
Staten Island, NY 10305, Phone: 1-800-223-2732
(toll free), E-mail: apda@apdaparkinson.org.
American Physical Therapy Association, 1111 North Fairfax St.
Alexandria, VA 22314, Phone: 1-800-999-2782, ext. 3395 (toll
free), www.apta.org.
American Podiatric Medical Association, 9312 Old Georgetown
Rd, Bethesda, MD 20814, Phone: 1-800-FOOT-CARE (366-8227)
(toll free), E-mail: askapma@apma.org, www.apma.org.
American Society on Aging, 575 Market Street, Suite 2100,
San Francisco, CA 94105, Phone: 1-800-537-9728 (toll free),
E-mail: info@asaging.org, www.asaging.org.
Connecticut Health and Service Organizations
AARP Connecticut. Suite104, Capitol Place, 21 Oak St., Hartford,
CT 06106. Tel. (866) 295-7279; Fax: (860) 249-7707;
http://states.aarp.org/category/connecticut/;
www.facebook.com/AARPCT; twitter.com/AARPCT
Alzheimer’s Association, Connecticut Chapter. Main Office:
Suite 4b, 200 Executive Blvd, Southington, CT 06489.
Tel: (860) 828-2828; http://www.alz.org/ct/
in_my_community_contact.asp
Center for Medicare Advocacy, Inc. P.O. Box 350, Willimantic,
CT 06226. Tel. (860) 456-7790; Fax: (860) 456-2614;
www.medicareadvocacy.org/; http://www.medicareadvocacy.org
Connecticut Commission on Aging. State Capitol, 210 Capitol
Ave., Hartford, CT 06106. Tel.: (860) 240-5200; coa@cga.ct.gov;
www.cga.ct.gov/coa;
Connecticut Home Care Program for Elders. Administered by
Connecticut Department of Social Services, Alternate Care Unit:
25 Sigourney St., Hartford, CT 06106. Tel.: (800) 445-5394;
www.ct.gov/dss/cwp/view.asp?a==2353&q=305170
Elderly Nutrition Program (South Central and Southwestern
Connecticut). Bridgeport area—congregate meals: CW Resources,
Inc. 215 Warren St., Bridgeport, CT 06604. Tel. (203) 332-3264.
Bridgeport area—home-delivered meals: FSW, Inc. CT.
475 Clinton Ave., Bridgeport, CT 06605. Tel. (203) 368-4291;
Fax: 203-332-7631. Derby area—TEAM Project Manna.
30 Elizabeth St., Derby, CT 06418. Tel. (203) 736-5420;
Fax: (203) 736-5425. New Haven area—LifeBridge Community
Services. Tel. (203) 752-9919; Fax: (203) 752-9691.
Stamford area—Catholic Charities of Fairfield County. Suite 10,
30 Myano Lane, Stamford, CT 06902. Tel. (203) 324-6175; Fax:
(203) 323-1108
Retired and Senior Volunteer Program. South Central
Connecticut RSVP (sponsored by Agency on Aging of South
Central Connecticut): One Long Wharf Dr., New Haven, CT
06511. Tel. (203) 752-3059. Southwestern Connecticut RSVP
(sponsored by Norwalk Economic Opportunity Now/N.E.O.N.):
95 South Main St., Norwalk, CT 06854. Tel. (203) 663-7332.
For additional information: www.ct.gov/agingservices/cwp/view.
asp?a=2513&q=313072
Senior Community Service Employment Program. Greater
Bridgeport Area: Southwestern Connecticut Agency on Aging,
1000 Lafayette Blvd., Bridgeport, CT 06604. Tel. (800) 994-9422.
Greater New Haven Area: Agency on Aging of South Central
Connecticut, One Long Wharf Dr., New Haven, CT 06511.
Tel. (203) 785-8533. Greater Stamford Area: Jewish Family
Service, 733 Summer St., 6th Floor, Stamford, CT 06901.
Tel. (203) 921-4161. For other locations in Fairfield and New
Haven Counties: Associates for Training and Development.
Tel. (800) 439-3307. For additional information:
www.ct.gov/agingservices/cwp/view.asp?a=2513&q=313068
National Health and Service Organizations
60-64 1,956
65-74 2,869
75-84 2,357
85+ 1,361
Total 60+ 7,182
Total population of the
Town of Trumbull: 36,018
Percentage 60 years of age
or over: 23.6%
Land area: 23.29 sq. mi.
Trumbull Emergency Medical Services
203-452-5146
250 Middlebrooks Avenue
Chief of EMS • Leigh Goodman
lgoodman@trumbull-ct.gov
Trumbull Emergency Medical Services cover over 4,200
emergency calls each year. The organization is adding
new pieces of equipment to its fleet and it provides free
monthly training to all of its members
PROBATE COURT
Judge • T.R. Rowe • Town Hall 06611
203-452-5068 • Fax: 203-452-5092
OTHER IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS
Animal Control • 203-452-5088
Trumbull Animal Shelter
300 Church Hill Road
Animal Control Officer • Lynn Dellabianca
E-mail: ldellabianca@trumbull-ct.gov
Arts Coordinator • Emily Areson • 203-452-5065
E-mail: eareson@trumbull-ct.gov
Health Dept. • 203-452-1030
Health Inspector • Shaquaisha Andrews
E-mail: sandrews@trumbull-ct.gov
Parks Dept. • 203-452-5060
Superintendent of Parks • Dmitri Paris
E-mail: dparis@trumbull-ct.gov
Public Works • 203-452-5045
Director • John Marsilio
E-mail: jmarsilio@trumbull-ct.gov
Recreation Dept. • 203-452-5060
E-mail: recreation@trumbull-ct.gov
Registrar of Voters • 203-452-5059/ 203-452-5058
Democratic Registrar • Mary Markham
Assistant • Sandy Mangiacapra (D)
E-mail: smangiacapra@trumbull-ct.gov
Republican Registrar • William S. Holden
Assistant • Barbara Wenz • bwenz@trumbull-ct.gov
Sewer Dept.-WPCA • 203-452-5048
Tax Collector • Donna M. Pellitteri • 203-452-5024
E-mail: dpellitteri@trumbull-ct.gov
Town Clerk • Suzanne Burr Monaco • 203-452-5035
sburrmonaco@trumbull-ct.gov
TRUMBULL’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
TRUMBULL
Alliance for Aging Research, 1700 K St. NW, Suite 740,
Washington, DC 20006, Phone: 202-293-2856,
www.agingresearch.org.
Alzheimer’s Association, 225 North Michigan Avenue, Floor 17,
Chicago, IL 60601, Phone: 1-800-335-8700 (toll free),
E-mail: info@alz.org, www.alz.org.
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 9400 West
Higging Rd. Rosemont, IL 60018, Phone: 847-823-7186,
www.aaos.org.
American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry, 6728 Old
McLean Village Drive, McLean, VA 22101, (703) 556-9222,
www.aagponline.org
American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary
Rehabilitation, 330 N. Wabash Ave., Suite 2000, Chicago, IL
60611, Phone: (312) 321-5146, E-mail: aacvpr@tmahq.com,
www.aacvpr.org.
American Cancer Society, 250 Williams St., NE, Atlanta, GA
30303, Phone: 1-800-ACS-2345 (227-2345) (toll free),
www.cancer.org.
American College of Surgeons, 633 North St. Clair St., Chicago,
IL 60611-3211, Phone: 1-800-621-4111 (toll free), E-mail: post-
master@facs.org, www.facs.org.
American Council of the Blind, 1703 N. Beauregard St., Suite
420, Alexandria, VA 2220, Phone: (800) 424-8666, www.acb.org
American Diabetes Association, 1701 North Beauregard St.,
Arlington, VA 22301, Phone: 1-800-DIABETES (342-2383)
(toll free), www.diabetes.org.
American Heart Association, 7272 Greenville Ave., Dallas,
TX 75231, Phone: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721) (toll free),
1-888-4-STROKE (478-7653) (toll free), www.heart.org.
American Lung Association, 55 W. Wacker Drive, Suite 1150
Chicago, IL 60601, Phone: 1-800-LUNG-USA (586-4872) (toll
free), E-mail: info@lung.org, www.lung.org.
American Parkinson Disease Association, 135 Parkinson Ave.,
Staten Island, NY 10305, Phone: 1-800-223-2732
(toll free), E-mail: apda@apdaparkinson.org.
American Physical Therapy Association, 1111 North Fairfax St.
Alexandria, VA 22314, Phone: 1-800-999-2782, ext. 3395 (toll
free), www.apta.org.
American Podiatric Medical Association, 9312 Old Georgetown
Rd, Bethesda, MD 20814, Phone: 1-800-FOOT-CARE (366-8227)
(toll free), E-mail: askapma@apma.org, www.apma.org.
American Society on Aging, 575 Market Street, Suite 2100,
San Francisco, CA 94105, Phone: 1-800-537-9728 (toll free),
E-mail: info@asaging.org, www.asaging.org.
Connecticut Health and Service Organizations
AARP Connecticut. Suite104, Capitol Place, 21 Oak St., Hartford,
CT 06106. Tel. (866) 295-7279; Fax: (860) 249-7707;
http://states.aarp.org/category/connecticut/;
www.facebook.com/AARPCT; twitter.com/AARPCT
Alzheimer’s Association, Connecticut Chapter. Main Office:
Suite 4b, 200 Executive Blvd, Southington, CT 06489.
Tel: (860) 828-2828; http://www.alz.org/ct/
in_my_community_contact.asp
Center for Medicare Advocacy, Inc. P.O. Box 350, Willimantic,
CT 06226. Tel. (860) 456-7790; Fax: (860) 456-2614;
www.medicareadvocacy.org/; http://www.medicareadvocacy.org
Connecticut Commission on Aging. State Capitol, 210 Capitol
Ave., Hartford, CT 06106. Tel.: (860) 240-5200; coa@cga.ct.gov;
www.cga.ct.gov/coa;
Connecticut Home Care Program for Elders. Administered by
Connecticut Department of Social Services, Alternate Care Unit:
25 Sigourney St., Hartford, CT 06106. Tel.: (800) 445-5394;
www.ct.gov/dss/cwp/view.asp?a==2353&q=305170
Elderly Nutrition Program (South Central and Southwestern
Connecticut). Bridgeport area—congregate meals: CW Resources,
Inc. 215 Warren St., Bridgeport, CT 06604. Tel. (203) 332-3264.
Bridgeport area—home-delivered meals: FSW, Inc. CT.
475 Clinton Ave., Bridgeport, CT 06605. Tel. (203) 368-4291;
Fax: 203-332-7631. Derby area—TEAM Project Manna.
30 Elizabeth St., Derby, CT 06418. Tel. (203) 736-5420;
Fax: (203) 736-5425. New Haven area—LifeBridge Community
Services. Tel. (203) 752-9919; Fax: (203) 752-9691.
Stamford area—Catholic Charities of Fairfield County. Suite 10,
30 Myano Lane, Stamford, CT 06902. Tel. (203) 324-6175; Fax:
(203) 323-1108
Retired and Senior Volunteer Program. South Central
Connecticut RSVP (sponsored by Agency on Aging of South
Central Connecticut): One Long Wharf Dr., New Haven, CT
06511. Tel. (203) 752-3059. Southwestern Connecticut RSVP
(sponsored by Norwalk Economic Opportunity Now/N.E.O.N.):
95 South Main St., Norwalk, CT 06854. Tel. (203) 663-7332.
For additional information: www.ct.gov/agingservices/cwp/view.
asp?a=2513&q=313072
Senior Community Service Employment Program. Greater
Bridgeport Area: Southwestern Connecticut Agency on Aging,
1000 Lafayette Blvd., Bridgeport, CT 06604. Tel. (800) 994-9422.
Greater New Haven Area: Agency on Aging of South Central
Connecticut, One Long Wharf Dr., New Haven, CT 06511.
Tel. (203) 785-8533. Greater Stamford Area: Jewish Family
Service, 733 Summer St., 6th Floor, Stamford, CT 06901.
Tel. (203) 921-4161. For other locations in Fairfield and New
Haven Counties: Associates for Training and Development.
Tel. (800) 439-3307. For additional information:
www.ct.gov/agingservices/cwp/view.asp?a=2513&q=313068
National Health and Service Organizations
63
HEALTH & SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS
American Stroke Association c/o American Heart
Association, 7272 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, TX 75231, Phone:
1-888-4STROKE (478-7653) (toll free), E-mail: strokeassociation@
heart.org, www.strokeassociation.org.
Arthritis Foundation National Office, 1335 West Peachtree
Street, Atlanta, GA 30309, U.S. Mail: P.O. Box 7669, Atlanta, GA
30357, Phone: (404) 872-7100, E-mail: help@arthritis.org, www.
arthritis.org.
Bright Focus Foundation, 22512 Gateway Center Dr., Clarksburg,
MD 20871, Phone: 1-800-437-2423, (437-2423) (toll free),
www.brightfocus.org.
Captioned Media Program National Association of the Deaf,
1447 East Main Street, Spartanburg, SC 29307, Phone:
1-800-237-6213 (toll free), E-mail: info@cfv.org, www.cfv.org.
Caregiver Action Network,1130 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite
500, Washington, DC 20036, Phone: (202) 454-3970, Email:
info@caregiveraction.org, www.carwegiveraction.org.
Community Transportation Association of America, 1341 G
Street, NW, 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Phone:
1-800-891-0590, Fax: 202-737-9197, www.ctaa.org.
Hearing Loss Association of America, 7910 Woodmont Avenue,
Suite 1200, Bethesda, MD 20814, Phone: 301-657-2248, E-mail:
info@hearingloss.org, www.hearingloss.org.
Lighthouse Guild, 15 West 65th St., New York, NY 10023, Phone:
1-800-829-0500 (toll free), E-mail: info@lighthouse.org, www.
lighthouseguild.org.
Medicare Rights Center, 266 W 37th St, Third Fl., New York, NY
10018, Phone: 1-800-333-4114, www.medicarerights.org
National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive,Bethesda,
MD 20892-9760, Phone: 1-800-4-CANCER, www.cancer.gov
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Clearinghouse, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892,
Phone: 1-888-644-6226, www.nccih.nih.gov
National Center on Elder Abuse, c/o University of Southern
California Keck School of Medicine, Department of Family
Medicine and Geriatrics, 1000 South Fremont Avenue, Unit 22
Bld. A-6, Alhambra, CA 91803. Phone: 1-855-500-3537,
www.ncea.aoa.gov/index.aspx
National Council on Aging, 251 18th Street South, Suite 500,
Arlington, VA 22202, Phone: 571-527-3900, www.ncoa.org
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Information Center,
PO Box 30105, Bethesda, MD 20824-0105, Phone: 301-592-
8573, E-mail: nhlbiinfo@nhlbi.nih.gov, www.nhlbi.nih.gov.
National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization,
1731 King St., Alexandria, VA 22314,
Phone: (703) 837-1500, E-mail: nhpco_info@nhpco.org,
www.nhpco.org.
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases,
5601 Fishers Lane, Bethesda, MD 20892-6612, Phone:
866-284-4107 (toll free), E-mail: niaidoc@nih.gov,
www.niaid.nih.gov.
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, 9000
Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892-2290, Phone: 301-402-4261,
E-mail: nidcrinfo@mail.nih.gov, www.nidcr.nih.gov/.
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney
Diseases, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892. Phone:
(301) 496-3583, www.niddk.nih.gov.
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke,
P.O. Box 5801, Bethesda, MD 20824, Phone: 1-800-352-9424
(toll free), www.ninds.nih.org.
National Institute on Aging, Building 31, Room 5C27,
31 Center Drive, MSC 2292, Bethesda, MD 20892-2292, Phone:
1-800-222-2225 (toll free), E-mail: niainfo@mail.nih.gov,
www.nih.gov/nia.
National Kidney Foundation, 30 East 33rd Street, New York, NY
10016, Phone: 1-800-622-9010 (toll free) www.kidney.org.
National Library Service for the Blind and Physically
Handicapped, Library of Congress, 1291 Taylor Street, NW,
Washington, DC 20542, Phone: 1-800-424-8567 (toll free),
E-mail: nls@loc.gov, www.lcweb.loc.gov/nls/.
National Osteoporosis Foundation, 1251 18th St., Arlington, VA
22202, Phone: 1-800-223-2226 (toll free), www.nof.org,
National Stroke Association, 9707 East Easter Lane, Englewood,
CO 80112-3747, Phone: 1-800-STROKES (787-6537)
(toll free), www.stroke.org.
Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, 1395 Broadway, Suite 1509,
New York, NY 10018, Phone: 1-800-457-6676 (toll free),
E-mail: info@pdf.org.
Pension Rights Center, 1350 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 206,
Washington, DC 20036, Phone: 202-296-3776,
E-mail: pnsnrights@aol.com.
Skin Cancer Foundation, 149 Madison Avenue, Suite 901, New
York, NY 10016, Phone: 1-800-SKIN-490 (754-6490) (toll free),
www.skincancer.org.
United Seniors Health Council, www.unitedseniorshealth.org.
Vision Council. 225 Reinekers Ln., Suite 700, Alexandria, VA
22314, 1-866-826-0290 (toll free) http://www.thevisioncouncil.
org.
Well Spouse Association, 63 West Main Street, Suite 14,
Freehold, NJ 07728, Phone: 1-800-838-0879 (toll free),
E-mail: info@wellspouse.org, www.wellspouse.org.
U.S. Social Security Administration
The Social Security Administration is a federal government
agency and has offices around the country. Information from
the SSA can be obtained by calling 1-800-772-1213 or by
contacting one of the Connecticut offices, which include:
Bridgeport • 3885 Main St. • 866-331-6399
Meriden • 1 West Main St. • 877-409-8429
New Haven • 150 Court St. • 866-331-5281
Stamford • 2 Landmark Sq. • 866-770-1881
Find additional and expanded information at
www.seniorgotoguide.com
HEALTH & SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS
64
65
Index
PROFESSIONALS, BUSINESSES AND SERVICES
Dentists
Lighthouse Dental Care .............................7, 37
Mogelof Dental Group ..............................9, 37
Southwest Community Health Center.................37, 40
Eye Care and Eye Wear
Eye Group of Connecticut, LLC .......................3, 37
Family Vision Center ...............................38, 39
Furze & Ackley Inc. O-Opticians .........................38
James Pinke, M.D..................................11, 38
Kurilec Eye Care, LLC ..............................37, 38
Hair Stylists
Hair on Wheels ......................................39
Internal Medicine
Southwest Community Health Center.................39, 40
Poetry Presentation
What the Great Poets Had to Say About Aging
and the Last of Life ...................................38
Medical Equipment and Supplies
The Senior Depot Store .............................5, 40
Women’s Health Services
Southwest Community Health Center....................40
CAREGIVERS, RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES
AND REHABILITATION FACILITIES
Adult Day Programs
Adult Day Programs at Waveny ......................... 13
Sunset Shores Adult Day Health Centers ................. 40
Assisted Living and Independent
Living Communities
The Inn • Part of Waveny LifeCare Network ............13, 40
Elder Care
Waveny LifeCare Network ...........................13, 41
Home Care/Home Health Care
Comfort Keepers ..................................41, 42
Griswold Home Care .................................41
Home Choice Senior Care .............................42
Hospitals
Bridgeport Hospital ...................................34
St Vincent’s Medical Center .............................35
VA Connecticut Healthcare System ..........inside back cover
Nursing Homes
Notre Dame Health and Rehabilitation Center..........21, 42
Rehabilitation Facilities and Service Providers
Notre Dame Health and Rehabilitation Center..........21, 43
Rehabilitation Services at Waveny Care Center .........13, 43
The Nathaniel Witherell ............................21, 43
Waveny Lifecare Network ..............................21
LEGAL, INSURANCE, REAL ESTATE,
MORTGAGES/REVERSE MORTGAGES AND
FINANCIAL PROFESSIONALS
Attorneys
Braunstein & Todisco, PC ..............................44
Eliovson & Tenore/
Elderlaw & Family Counseling Associates, LLC ..........44, 45
Kevin Kelly & Associates Attorneys at Law ................45
Law Office of James M. Hughes ......................4, 44
Law Offices of Kurt Ahlberg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 45
Banks
People’s United Bank ..................inside front cover, 44
Mortgages/Reverse Mortgages
Atlantic Home Loans ...........................22, 23, 45
CEMETERIES AND FUNERAL HOMES
Gregory F. Doyle Funeral Home .....................17, 46
Shaughnessey-Banks Funeral Home .....................46
American Stroke Association c/o American Heart
Association, 7272 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, TX 75231, Phone:
1-888-4STROKE (478-7653) (toll free), E-mail: strokeassociation@
heart.org, www.strokeassociation.org.
Arthritis Foundation National Office, 1335 West Peachtree
Street, Atlanta, GA 30309, U.S. Mail: P.O. Box 7669, Atlanta, GA
30357, Phone: (404) 872-7100, E-mail: help@arthritis.org, www.
arthritis.org.
Bright Focus Foundation, 22512 Gateway Center Dr., Clarksburg,
MD 20871, Phone: 1-800-437-2423, (437-2423) (toll free),
www.brightfocus.org.
Captioned Media Program National Association of the Deaf,
1447 East Main Street, Spartanburg, SC 29307, Phone:
1-800-237-6213 (toll free), E-mail: info@cfv.org, www.cfv.org.
Caregiver Action Network,1130 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite
500, Washington, DC 20036, Phone: (202) 454-3970, Email:
info@caregiveraction.org, www.carwegiveraction.org.
Community Transportation Association of America, 1341 G
Street, NW, 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Phone:
1-800-891-0590, Fax: 202-737-9197, www.ctaa.org.
Hearing Loss Association of America, 7910 Woodmont Avenue,
Suite 1200, Bethesda, MD 20814, Phone: 301-657-2248, E-mail:
info@hearingloss.org, www.hearingloss.org.
Lighthouse Guild, 15 West 65th St., New York, NY 10023, Phone:
1-800-829-0500 (toll free), E-mail: info@lighthouse.org, www.
lighthouseguild.org.
Medicare Rights Center, 266 W 37th St, Third Fl., New York, NY
10018, Phone: 1-800-333-4114, www.medicarerights.org
National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive,Bethesda,
MD 20892-9760, Phone: 1-800-4-CANCER, www.cancer.gov
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Clearinghouse, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892,
Phone: 1-888-644-6226, www.nccih.nih.gov
National Center on Elder Abuse, c/o University of Southern
California Keck School of Medicine, Department of Family
Medicine and Geriatrics, 1000 South Fremont Avenue, Unit 22
Bld. A-6, Alhambra, CA 91803. Phone: 1-855-500-3537,
www.ncea.aoa.gov/index.aspx
National Council on Aging, 251 18th Street South, Suite 500,
Arlington, VA 22202, Phone: 571-527-3900, www.ncoa.org
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Information Center,
PO Box 30105, Bethesda, MD 20824-0105, Phone: 301-592-
8573, E-mail: nhlbiinfo@nhlbi.nih.gov, www.nhlbi.nih.gov.
National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization,
1731 King St., Alexandria, VA 22314,
Phone: (703) 837-1500, E-mail: nhpco_info@nhpco.org,
www.nhpco.org.
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases,
5601 Fishers Lane, Bethesda, MD 20892-6612, Phone:
866-284-4107 (toll free), E-mail: niaidoc@nih.gov,
www.niaid.nih.gov.
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, 9000
Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892-2290, Phone: 301-402-4261,
E-mail: nidcrinfo@mail.nih.gov, www.nidcr.nih.gov/.
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney
Diseases, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892. Phone:
(301) 496-3583, www.niddk.nih.gov.
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke,
P.O. Box 5801, Bethesda, MD 20824, Phone: 1-800-352-9424
(toll free), www.ninds.nih.org.
National Institute on Aging, Building 31, Room 5C27,
31 Center Drive, MSC 2292, Bethesda, MD 20892-2292, Phone:
1-800-222-2225 (toll free), E-mail: niainfo@mail.nih.gov,
www.nih.gov/nia.
National Kidney Foundation, 30 East 33rd Street, New York, NY
10016, Phone: 1-800-622-9010 (toll free) www.kidney.org.
National Library Service for the Blind and Physically
Handicapped, Library of Congress, 1291 Taylor Street, NW,
Washington, DC 20542, Phone: 1-800-424-8567 (toll free),
E-mail: nls@loc.gov, www.lcweb.loc.gov/nls/.
National Osteoporosis Foundation, 1251 18th St., Arlington, VA
22202, Phone: 1-800-223-2226 (toll free), www.nof.org,
National Stroke Association, 9707 East Easter Lane, Englewood,
CO 80112-3747, Phone: 1-800-STROKES (787-6537)
(toll free), www.stroke.org.
Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, 1395 Broadway, Suite 1509,
New York, NY 10018, Phone: 1-800-457-6676 (toll free),
E-mail: info@pdf.org.
Pension Rights Center, 1350 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 206,
Washington, DC 20036, Phone: 202-296-3776,
E-mail: pnsnrights@aol.com.
Skin Cancer Foundation, 149 Madison Avenue, Suite 901, New
York, NY 10016, Phone: 1-800-SKIN-490 (754-6490) (toll free),
www.skincancer.org.
United Seniors Health Council, www.unitedseniorshealth.org.
Vision Council. 225 Reinekers Ln., Suite 700, Alexandria, VA
22314, 1-866-826-0290 (toll free) http://www.thevisioncouncil.
org.
Well Spouse Association, 63 West Main Street, Suite 14,
Freehold, NJ 07728, Phone: 1-800-838-0879 (toll free),
E-mail: info@wellspouse.org, www.wellspouse.org.
U.S. Social Security Administration
The Social Security Administration is a federal government
agency and has offices around the country. Information from
the SSA can be obtained by calling 1-800-772-1213 or by
contacting one of the Connecticut offices, which include:
Bridgeport • 3885 Main St. • 866-331-6399
Meriden • 1 West Main St. • 877-409-8429
New Haven • 150 Court St. • 866-331-5281
Stamford • 2 Landmark Sq. • 866-770-1881
Find additional and expanded information at
www.seniorgotoguide.com
HEALTH & SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS
66
Publisher
Thomas Gerrity
Art Director
Paula R. Soli
Graphic Designer
Jean Venditti
Advertising Sales
Jennifer VanGele
Editorial &
Research Associate
Peter J. O’Connell
Customer Service
Sarah Scalzo
Web Master
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Disribution
Dave Chirico
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This Guide is intended to assist senior citizens, older adults and their families in obtaining information about products and services of interest. However,
because of the constant changing and updating of information contained herein, it is not possible to guarantee complete accuracy of all the information or
the complete absence of errors or omissions. The publisher, therefore, does not assume liability for any inaccuracy, errors or omissions in the information, nor
assume any liability for inaccurate or misleading information or errors or omissions contained in advertisements in this Guide.
Published annually by The Merrill Anderson Co., Inc., Stratford, CT 06614. Copyright 2019 by The Merrill Anderson Co., Inc. All rights reserved.
Get detailed information on:
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Medical Equipment and Supplies
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Funeral Services
Cemeteries
Transportation Services
Robert J. Burdo, Vice Chairman, Bridgeport
Commission on Senior Citizens
Marie J. Heller, Project Director, Bridgeport
Department on Aging, Eisenhower Center
Jessica Ortiz, Program Director, Hall
Neighborhood House Senior Center,
Bridgeport
Rosemary Wong, East Side Senior Center
Community Project Coordinator,
Bridgeport
Val Buckley, Director, Easton Senior Center
Sophia Vournazos, Easton Town Hall
Ellen Zimmerman, Municipal Agent for
Elderly Persons, Town of Easton
Jennifer Carpenter, Deputy Chief of Staff,
Town of Fairfield
Julie DeMarco, Director of Human Services,
Town of Fairfield
Amy Lachioma, Director of Community &
Social Services, Monroe Senior Center
Alice McKane, Office Assistant, Town of
Monroe
Cyndee Burke, Executive Secretary, Office of
the Mayor, City of Shelton
Doreen Laucella, Director, Shelton Senior
Center
Sandra Arburr, Director, Baldwin Center,
Town of Stratford
Alicia Altobelli, Executive Assistant to First
Selectman, Town of Trumbull
Michele Jakab, Director of Human Services,
Trumbull Senior Center
JoAnne Veltri, Mary J. Sherlach
Counseling Center
Thanks also to everyone who is helping to distribute copies of the Guide.
We extend a special thanks to everyone who helped make the
Senior GO TO Guide possible, especially:
VA CONNECTICUT
HEALTHCARE SYSTEM—
WEST HAVEN CAMPUS
The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
(VA) offers a variety of health services to
meet the needs of America's veterans. In
Connecticut those services encompass an
inpatient facility and Ambulatory Care
Center in West Haven (a/k/a VA Connecticut
West Haven Campus); an Ambulatory Care
Center in Newington; and six primary care
Community Based Outpatient Clinics located
around the state. All veterans who have
met the service and duty requirements
for eligibility are encouraged to enroll in
the VA Healthcare System by completing
an Application for Health Benefits and
providing certain documents.
An Eligibility Office is located at the West
Haven Campus and can be reached at
203-937-5711, ext. 3328 or 3131.
VA Connecticut Healthcare System West
Haven Campus • 203-932-5711
950 Campbell Ave., West Haven, CT 06516
Once enrolled in the VA Healthcare System,
each veteran will receive a personalized
Veterans Health Benefits Handbook. The
purpose of the Handbook is to provide
a current and accurate description of VA
healthcare benefits and services, tailored
specifically to the individual veteran.
VA Connecticut offers information and
assistance to older veterans through its
Geriatrics and Extended Care Program.
The Program seeks to help veterans with
their needs in regard to: community living;
nursing home entry; hospice and palliative
care; spinal cord injuries; home-based
primary care; geriatric consults; home and
community-based care. The Program can be
reached at 203-932-5711, ext. 2121, Mon.-
Fri., 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
VA Connecticut also offers a wide range of
health and wellness educational programs.
Information about these can be obtained
from the Veteran Health Education
Coordinator at 203-932-5711,
ext. 5189, Mon.-Fri., 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
For further information about VA
Connecticut Healthcare System—West Haven
Campus, contact the Public Affairs Office at
203-937-3824.
Honoring all who served.
A veteran is someone who wrote a blank check, payable to the United States of America,
for an amount of up to and including his life.”
—Gene Castagnetti, Director, National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific
67
Detailed information on:
City/Town Services for Seniors
Senior Living
Independent Living
Assisted Living
Skilled Nursing and Rehab
Alzheimer’s and Memory Care
Hospice
Adult Day Care
Home Care Services
Medical and Non-medical
Medical Equipment and Supplies
Healthcare Professionals
Dentists
Eye Care
Hearing
Geriatric Care Management
Professional Services
Elder Law Attorneys
Seniors Real Estate Specialists
Medicare Advisors
Reverse Mortgage Specialists
Financial Advisors
Long-term Care Specialists
Pet Services
End of Life Services
Funeral Services
Cemeteries
Transportation Services
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