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The Senior GO TO Guide is a directory of local services, facilities, and public resources available in Connecticut for aging adults

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SAVE FOR USE THROUGHOUT 2019
Benefits of Owning a Pet
A DIRECTORY OF HELPFUL INFORMATION FOR SENIORS AND THEIR FAMILIES
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®
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angela.deleon@peoples.com
People’s United Bank is committed to working in collaboration with
community partners to protect senior citizens from identity theft and
financial scams through educational programs, events and training.
Visit peoples.com/fraudwatch to
learn about our partnership with
Helping senior citizens stay
informed and protected.
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3
The Senior GO TO Guide Resource Directory is published annually by the Merrill Anderson Co., Inc.,
1166 Barnum Ave., Stratford, CT 06614. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information
in the Guide is correct, but the publisher or its employees cannot be held responsible for any errors
or omissions or damages or losses caused directly or indirectly by the information.
© 2019 Merrill Anderson Co., Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this work may be copied or
transmitted in any manner without written permission of the Publisher.
LOCAL BUSINESSES AND SERVICES
Find the products and services that you need.
32 Professionals, Businesses and Services
34 Caregivers and Residential Facilities
39 Legal, Insurance, Real Estate, Mortgages/Reverse Mortgages,
and Financial Professionals
41 Cemeteries and Funeral Homes
ARTICLES
6 COVER STORY: Benefits of Owning a Pet
10 Addressing Hearing Loss Brings Many Benefits
12 MAAP—Navigating the Journey Your Pet Will Take If You Cannot Care for It
15 What is a Geriatric Assessment?
16 Understanding the Myths and Realities of a Reverse Mortgage
18 Celebrities in the County
24 A New Kind of Long-Term Care Insurance
25 A Tax Break for the Elderly—With Strings
25 Money and Satisfaction
26 Estate Plan Essentials
30 Senior Home Care and Residential Living Options
31 Thank You Veterans! and information on VA Hospital Services
32 A Surprise Problem Upon Turning 100
Area Hospitals and Their Services for Seniors
27 Stamford Health
28 Greenwich Hospital
29 Norwalk Hospital
Table of Contents
43 Darien
45 Greenwich
48 New Canaan
51 Norwalk
53 Stamford
56 Weston
Live well, live long!
With retirements lasting longer, it’s
important to plan your future and live
a healthy lifestyle so that your senior
years will be truly golden.
Please take advantage of the many
great resources that are included
in this edition of the Senior GO TO
Guide. Most importantly, the Guide
includes information on local com-
panies, agencies, facilities and profes-
sionals who are qualified, experienced
and stand ready to assist you. Please
call on them whenever a need arises
and mention that you saw them in the
Senior GO TO Guide.
For the latest news and information
on local events please visit our web-
site at seniorgotoguide.com.
Cheers!
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Publisher
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free subscription, please e-mail us at
info@seniorgotoguide.com
or call us at 1-888-818-1232.
4
58 Westport
60 Wilton
63 Connecticut Health and Service Organizations
63 National Health and Service Organizations
65 Index
For information on local events visit seniorgotoguide.com.
For advertising info: Contact us toll free at 1-888-818-1232
or info@seniorgotoguide.com
GOVERNMENT AGENCIES AND RESOURCES
Your community offers a wide range of services especially for seniors.
42 Southwestern Connecticut Agency on Aging
5
We at The Senior Depot understand that getting older can be hard. Our store
offers a variety of quality medical productsand services designed to help you face
the transitions and complications that come with aging. Stop in and let our
knowledgeable and helpful staff show you what we truly believe:
GETTING OLDER DOESN'T HAVE TO BE SO HARD.
Fully Electric Hospital Beds
(available in long & low beds)
Low Air-Loss Mattress Systems
Negative Pressure Wound Systems
Reclining Therapy Chairs
O2 Concentrators
Wheelchairs, Walkers & Rollators
Bath Safety Chairs & Benches
Commodes
Bariatric Equipment
Hoyer Lifts (manual & electric)
OUR PRODUCTS
CORNERSTONE MEDICALSERVICES
OUR COMPANY
Cornerstone Medical is
committed to providing
top-quality medical
equipment and first-rate
service to help support the
needs, comfort and dignity
of every patient. We service
all Nursing Homes, Hospices
and Rehab Centers in the
greater Connecticut area.
We are always there when you need us! If you need
something not listed, we will get it for you -just ask!
5
58 Westport
60 Wilton
63 Connecticut Health and Service Organizations
63 National Health and Service Organizations
65 Index
For information on local events visit seniorgotoguide.com.
I
t’s been said that the dog is
man’s best friend. But it also
could be said that animals of
many kinds can be the best friends
of both men and women—and
good medicine, too! As Pet Partners
puts it: “. . . an emerging body of
research is recognizing the impact
the human-animal bond can have on
individual and community health.”
And healthcare journalist Nicole
Brierty points out: “. . . owning a pet
could in fact improve your mental
and physical state, especially in the
elderly.” Additionally, a number of
studies have indicated that, as one
of them concludes: “Recognizing
and nurturing the connection
between animals and humans
has potential implications
for individual stability and
health, improved economic
outputs and healthcare
cost savings”—including a
decrease in doctor visits and
the amount of time spent
staying home sick.
Benefits of
Owning a Pet
by Peter J. O’Connell, Editorial and Research Associate
Your heart, your pet
Among the many good reasons for
“putting a pet in your heart”—
interacting with one (a gentle,
friendly one, of course) over time—
are the effects that an animal can
have on cardiovascular health.
Research has shown that, as scientist
R.W. Byrne points out: “Just 15
minutes bonding with an animal
sets off a chemical chain reaction
in the brain, lowering the levels of
the fight-or-flight hormone, cortisol,
and increasing production of the
feel-good hormone serotonin. The
result: heart
rate, blood
pressure
and
stress
levels immediately drop. Over the
long term, pet and human interaction
can lower cholesterol levels, fight
depression and may even help protect
against heart disease and stroke.”
One study found that an automatic
relaxation response triggered simply
by the presence of a dog in a room
with an individual actually lowered
the person’s blood pressure better than
taking a popular type of blood pressure
medication.
And heart-healthy effects are not
limited to interactions with dogs. Noted
veterinarian Dr. Marty Becker says:
“If you have a cat, you’re 30 percent
less likely to have a heart attack, and
you’re 40 percent less likely to have a
cardiovascular incident like a stroke.”
In fact, studies have shown positive
health effects from interactions with:
birds, cats, crickets, dogs, fish, guinea
pigs, hamsters, horses, rabbits, turtles,
and more! Conditions, in addition to
the cardio ones, showing such effects
include: ADHD, allergies, Alzheimer’s
and related conditions, anxiety,
autism, chronic pain, colon cancer,
fibromyalgia, depression, diabetes,
immunodeficiency,
lymphoma,
migraines,
problematic eating habits, PTSD,
recovery from joint replacement
surgery, stress, and more! For
example, the American Diabetes
Association has pointed out that
one-third of pets living with
diabetics change behavior when their
owner’s blood glucose level becomes
unstable; this change in the pet’s
behavior can function as a warning
to the owner.
One of the leading benefits of pet
ownership, particularly of dogs, is
the incentive for physical activity
that it provides. A new study,
described by Dr. Karen Becker on
healthypets.mercola.com, discovered
that older adults who owned dogs
walked almost 22 minutes per
day more than a dog-less group,
enough exercise “to meet the
U.S. and international exercise
recommendations for substantial
health benefits.” Feeding, grooming,
visiting veterinarians, playing with,
and otherwise interacting with
animals provide additional activity
for pet owners, even those who do
not have dogs to walk.
More support, less stress
Stress is harmful to both physical
and mental/emotional health. Given
the deleterious effects of stress, it’s
important to note that, as an article
from the National Center for Health
Research puts it: “Findings suggest
that the social support a pet provides
can make a person feel more relaxed
and decrease stress . . . . The social
support provided by a pet might also
encourage more social interactions
with people, reducing feelings of
isolation or loneliness.” With 75% of
seniors living alone, this is obviously
an important function offered by pet
ownership. An example here would
be the fact that a person’s walking
with a dog has been found to
increase contact and communication
with other people, especially with
strangers. In this connection, it
might be mentioned that over the
years men and women of all ages
have found that being out and
about with a pet can act as a “date
magnet.” As WebMD puts it: “Forget
Internet matchmaking—a dog is a
natural conversation starter”!
Many seniors struggle against
depression. A pet can be a great
ally in that struggle. As an article
in SeniorHomes.com reports: “. . .
caring for an animal requires a sense
of responsibility and routine that
may be lacking as older adults shed
long-held work and social roles.
Caring for a pet can provide purpose
and establish a routine . . . .” In fact,
research published in the Journal
of Personality and Social Psychology
shows that pet owners have stronger
self-esteem, are more extroverted,
and less fearful than people who
don’t own pets.
Among the mental and emotional
benefits that pets offer are energy
and enthusiasm, laughter and love.
One psychotherapist notes that
“Dogs and other pets live very
much in the here and now. They
don’t worry about tomorrow. And
tomorrow can be very scary for an
older person. By having an animal
with a sense of now, it tends to
rub off on people.” And another
psychologist says, “Having a pet
helps the senior focus on something
other than physical problems and
negative preoccupations about
aging.” Veterinarian Marty Becker
puts it well: “People who have
pets are less harried; there’s more
laughter in their life. When you
come home, it’s like . . . . You’re a
star.” And: “You might lose your job,
your house, your 401(k)—but you’ll
never lose the unconditional love of
your pet.”
N
Continued on
page 8
6
7
A Day Program where they’re
always in good company.
When you need Home Care,
choose the team you already trust.
Waveny Home Healthcare
makes rehabilitation
at home a realistic choice with our skilled team of
visiting nurses, physical, occupational and speech
therapists, and medical social workers.
Waveny at Home
offers a range of caregiving
services provided by compassionate home health
aides, certified nursing assistants, companions,
live-in caregivers, and homemakers.
Waveny brings the expertise, quality and local
resources of a community-based healthcare system
into your home. L
earn how Waveny can come to
you by calling
203.594.5249 or just visiting
www.waveny.org.
A nonprofit continuum of care
that’s planning ahead for you.
Waveny’s Adult Day Program
in New Canaan offers meaningful
camaraderie and care in a secure
setting for daytime caregiver relief.
With ever-changing choices of
recreational activities, hands-on
personal care, managed medication,
shower services, access to on-site
therapies, and even overnight respite
care, we serve the varied needs of
seniors and their families.
Free door-to-door transportation
is provided throughout most of
lower Fairfield County. Learn how
to enjoy a free trial day by calling
203.594.5302 or visiting waveny.org.
Daytime Caregiver Relief
with Free Transportation
7
I
t’s been said that the dog is
man’s best friend. But it also
could be said that animals of
many kinds can be the best friends
of both men and women—and
good medicine, too! As Pet Partners
puts it: “. . . an emerging body of
research is recognizing the impact
the human-animal bond can have on
individual and community health.”
And healthcare journalist Nicole
Brierty points out: “. . . owning a pet
could in fact improve your mental
and physical state, especially in the
elderly.” Additionally, a number of
studies have indicated that, as one
of them concludes: “Recognizing
and nurturing the connection
between animals and humans
has potential implications
for individual stability and
health, improved economic
outputs and healthcare
cost savings”—including a
decrease in doctor visits and
the amount of time spent
staying home sick.
Benefits of
Owning a Pet
by Peter J. O’Connell, Editorial and Research Associate
Your heart, your pet
Among the many good reasons for
“putting a pet in your heart”—
interacting with one (a gentle,
friendly one, of course) over time—
are the effects that an animal can
have on cardiovascular health.
Research has shown that, as scientist
R.W. Byrne points out: “Just 15
minutes bonding with an animal
sets off a chemical chain reaction
in the brain, lowering the levels of
the fight-or-flight hormone, cortisol,
and increasing production of the
feel-good hormone serotonin. The
result: heart
rate, blood
pressure
and
stress
levels immediately drop. Over the
long term, pet and human interaction
can lower cholesterol levels, fight
depression and may even help protect
against heart disease and stroke.”
One study found that an automatic
relaxation response triggered simply
by the presence of a dog in a room
with an individual actually lowered
the person’s blood pressure better than
taking a popular type of blood pressure
medication.
And heart-healthy effects are not
limited to interactions with dogs. Noted
veterinarian Dr. Marty Becker says:
“If you have a cat, you’re 30 percent
less likely to have a heart attack, and
you’re 40 percent less likely to have a
cardiovascular incident like a stroke.”
In fact, studies have shown positive
health effects from interactions with:
birds, cats, crickets, dogs, fish, guinea
pigs, hamsters, horses, rabbits, turtles,
and more! Conditions, in addition to
the cardio ones, showing such effects
include: ADHD, allergies, Alzheimer’s
and related conditions, anxiety,
autism, chronic pain, colon cancer,
fibromyalgia, depression, diabetes,
immunodeficiency,
lymphoma,
migraines,
problematic eating habits, PTSD,
recovery from joint replacement
surgery, stress, and more! For
example, the American Diabetes
Association has pointed out that
one-third of pets living with
diabetics change behavior when their
owner’s blood glucose level becomes
unstable; this change in the pet’s
behavior can function as a warning
to the owner.
One of the leading benefits of pet
ownership, particularly of dogs, is
the incentive for physical activity
that it provides. A new study,
described by Dr. Karen Becker on
healthypets.mercola.com, discovered
that older adults who owned dogs
walked almost 22 minutes per
day more than a dog-less group,
enough exercise “to meet the
U.S. and international exercise
recommendations for substantial
health benefits.” Feeding, grooming,
visiting veterinarians, playing with,
and otherwise interacting with
animals provide additional activity
for pet owners, even those who do
not have dogs to walk.
More support, less stress
Stress is harmful to both physical
and mental/emotional health. Given
the deleterious effects of stress, it’s
important to note that, as an article
from the National Center for Health
Research puts it: “Findings suggest
that the social support a pet provides
can make a person feel more relaxed
and decrease stress . . . . The social
support provided by a pet might also
encourage more social interactions
with people, reducing feelings of
isolation or loneliness.” With 75% of
seniors living alone, this is obviously
an important function offered by pet
ownership. An example here would
be the fact that a person’s walking
with a dog has been found to
increase contact and communication
with other people, especially with
strangers. In this connection, it
might be mentioned that over the
years men and women of all ages
have found that being out and
about with a pet can act as a “date
magnet.” As WebMD puts it: “Forget
Internet matchmaking—a dog is a
natural conversation starter”!
Many seniors struggle against
depression. A pet can be a great
ally in that struggle. As an article
in SeniorHomes.com reports: “. . .
caring for an animal requires a sense
of responsibility and routine that
may be lacking as older adults shed
long-held work and social roles.
Caring for a pet can provide purpose
and establish a routine . . . .” In fact,
research published in the Journal
of Personality and Social Psychology
shows that pet owners have stronger
self-esteem, are more extroverted,
and less fearful than people who
don’t own pets.
Among the mental and emotional
benefits that pets offer are energy
and enthusiasm, laughter and love.
One psychotherapist notes that
“Dogs and other pets live very
much in the here and now. They
don’t worry about tomorrow. And
tomorrow can be very scary for an
older person. By having an animal
with a sense of now, it tends to
rub off on people.” And another
psychologist says, “Having a pet
helps the senior focus on something
other than physical problems and
negative preoccupations about
aging.” Veterinarian Marty Becker
puts it well: “People who have
pets are less harried; there’s more
laughter in their life. When you
come home, it’s like . . . . You’re a
star.” And: “You might lose your job,
your house, your 401(k)—but you’ll
never lose the unconditional love of
your pet.”
N
8
Continued from page 6
CALL TODAY! 203-618-4232 or visit nathanielwitherell.org
We’ll help you get back
to the life you love.
THE CARE YOU NEED, CLOSE TO HOME
SHORT-TERM REHABILITATION
9
Dr. Bauman: It is a function of my
own drive for excellence, the pursuit
of perfection. I began my studies with
an effort to master the principles of
electronics and sound propagation. With
that mastery, I can make modifications
to hearing aids so as to optimize what
patients need. My clinical experience
and 30 years at the Hearing, Balance
and Speech Center have taught me how
variable those needs are. My ultimate
goal is not just to make people hear
better but to live better. My real reward
is hearing from a patient that I have
done that.
SGTG: Has treating patients “like a
family,” as you said, been a way of
learning about the variability of needs
involved in helping people “live better”?
Dr. Bauman: Yes. Actually, the “ear
system” is a kind of “family” itself,
involving hearing, balance, and speech.
In people’s families there are different
needs by age because of changes in
the brain and ambulatory changes.
Moreover, people of the same age
and degree of hearing loss may have
different, deep-seated preferences as to
what they most want to hear—young
grandchildren, say, or opera. Their aids
need to be adjusted differently. I have
to understand not just a person’s degree
of hearing loss, but, in a sense, the total
picture of the preferences from his or
her brain and soul.
SGTG: What do you think is the best
way of encouraging someone with
hearing difficulty to actually visit a
professional specializing in hearing?
LIFE IN BALANCE
Addressing Hearing Loss Brings Many Benefits
by Peter J. O’Connell, Editorial and Research Associate
W
ith the technology
available today, hearing
aids can enhance the
quality of life significantly for most
people with hearing impairment.
First and foremost, you will hear a lot
better. It will become a lot easier to
hear what other people say. You will
become reacquainted with sounds
that you may not have heard clearly
for a long time, such as birds singing,
doorbells ringing, the wind howling,
water running. Because of the
importance of hearing-related issues,
and the problem of the reluctance of
many to seek appropriate counseling
and treatment, the Senior GO
TO Guide reached out to a noted
Connecticut audiologist, Dr. Natan
Bauman, to get the benefit of
his insights.
SGTG: Dr. Bauman, how would you
describe the essence of what you do?
Dr. Bauman:
We are a practice with
a passion. We do not just dispense
hearing aids; we provide better hearing
through technology, education, and
counseling. We truly understand that
hearing is priceless and the effect that
it has on our overall health and social
interaction. We treat our patients like
a family and find a solution for each
patient based on his or her specific
needs. We want our patients to be able
to enjoy the subtleties of sound that
enrich our lives.
SGTG: Could you comment more
on the “passion” that drives
your practice?
HAVE YOU HEARD?
That more than 30 million people in the U.S. over age 50 have impaired hearing—including two-thirds of those
older than 70 years and four-fifths of those older than 85—yet less than 15% of the hearing impaired use a hearing
aid device.
That the average person seeing a medical professional about difficulty in hearing has been having trouble for seven
or more years before seeing the professional.
Dr. Bauman: My profession needs
to do a better job of making people
understand the importance of hearing
to overall physical, mental, emotional,
social health and the consequences
of neglecting hearing problems. For
example, hearing problems impact
the cardiovascular system, dementia,
diabetes. With impaired hearing, you live
more poorly, may find relating to other
people a chore and stressful rather than a
pleasure, may even isolate yourself from
social relationships. Sound makes a huge
difference in our lives, for the brain turns
sound into emotion. Actually of the five
senses, you could say that hearing is the
most important for survival. We have ears
to hear from all directions, and, unlike
our eyes, our ears are open 24/7. Their
receptors are closer to the limbic system.
The great Helen Keller was blind and
deaf but said that if she could achieve just
one, sight or hearing, she would choose
hearing. So if your hearing is impaired,
go to an audiologist—have a professional
listen to what you have to say.
Dr. Bauman holds a Master’s in electronics
and electro-acoustics from Wroclaw
Polytechnic Institute in Poland and Master’s
and Doctor’s degrees in audiology from
Columbia University. For ten years Dr.
Bauman directed a clinic at Yale-New
Haven Hospital, with a faculty appointment
in the Yale School of Medicine. In 1988 he
opened the Hearing, Balance and Speech
Center and in 1999 the New England
Tinnitus and Hyperacusis Clinic. HBSC
now has six locations spread throughout
Fairfield and New Haven Counties. Dr.
Bauman is the developer of hearing aids that
have been called “revolutionary.”
N
10
Dr. Bauman: It is a function of my
own drive for excellence, the pursuit
of perfection. I began my studies with
an effort to master the principles of
electronics and sound propagation. With
that mastery, I can make modifications
to hearing aids so as to optimize what
patients need. My clinical experience
and 30 years at the Hearing, Balance
and Speech Center have taught me how
variable those needs are. My ultimate
goal is not just to make people hear
better but to live better. My real reward
is hearing from a patient that I have
done that.
SGTG: Has treating patients “like a
family,” as you said, been a way of
learning about the variability of needs
involved in helping people “live better”?
Dr. Bauman: Yes. Actually, the “ear
system” is a kind of “family” itself,
involving hearing, balance, and speech.
In people’s families there are different
needs by age because of changes in
the brain and ambulatory changes.
Moreover, people of the same age
and degree of hearing loss may have
different, deep-seated preferences as to
what they most want to hear—young
grandchildren, say, or opera. Their aids
need to be adjusted differently. I have
to understand not just a person’s degree
of hearing loss, but, in a sense, the total
picture of the preferences from his or
her brain and soul.
SGTG: What do you think is the best
way of encouraging someone with
hearing difficulty to actually visit a
professional specializing in hearing?
LIFE IN BALANCE
Addressing Hearing Loss Brings Many Benefits
by Peter J. O’Connell, Editorial and Research Associate
W
ith the technology
available today, hearing
aids can enhance the
quality of life significantly for most
people with hearing impairment.
First and foremost, you will hear a lot
better. It will become a lot easier to
hear what other people say. You will
become reacquainted with sounds
that you may not have heard clearly
for a long time, such as birds singing,
doorbells ringing, the wind howling,
water running. Because of the
importance of hearing-related issues,
and the problem of the reluctance of
many to seek appropriate counseling
and treatment, the Senior GO
TO Guide reached out to a noted
Connecticut audiologist, Dr. Natan
Bauman, to get the benefit of
his insights.
SGTG: Dr. Bauman, how would you
describe the essence of what you do?
Dr. Bauman:
We are a practice with
a passion. We do not just dispense
hearing aids; we provide better hearing
through technology, education, and
counseling. We truly understand that
hearing is priceless and the effect that
it has on our overall health and social
interaction. We treat our patients like
a family and find a solution for each
patient based on his or her specific
needs. We want our patients to be able
to enjoy the subtleties of sound that
enrich our lives.
SGTG: Could you comment more
on the “passion” that drives
your practice?
HAVE YOU HEARD?
That more than 30 million people in the U.S. over age 50 have impaired hearing—including two-thirds of those
older than 70 years and four-fifths of those older than 85—yet less than 15% of the hearing impaired use a hearing
aid device.
That the average person seeing a medical professional about difficulty in hearing has been having trouble for seven
or more years before seeing the professional.
Dr. Bauman: My profession needs
to do a better job of making people
understand the importance of hearing
to overall physical, mental, emotional,
social health and the consequences
of neglecting hearing problems. For
example, hearing problems impact
the cardiovascular system, dementia,
diabetes. With impaired hearing, you live
more poorly, may find relating to other
people a chore and stressful rather than a
pleasure, may even isolate yourself from
social relationships. Sound makes a huge
difference in our lives, for the brain turns
sound into emotion. Actually of the five
senses, you could say that hearing is the
most important for survival. We have ears
to hear from all directions, and, unlike
our eyes, our ears are open 24/7. Their
receptors are closer to the limbic system.
The great Helen Keller was blind and
deaf but said that if she could achieve just
one, sight or hearing, she would choose
hearing. So if your hearing is impaired,
go to an audiologist—have a professional
listen to what you have to say.
Dr. Bauman holds a Master’s in electronics
and electro-acoustics from Wroclaw
Polytechnic Institute in Poland and Master’s
and Doctor’s degrees in audiology from
Columbia University. For ten years Dr.
Bauman directed a clinic at Yale-New
Haven Hospital, with a faculty appointment
in the Yale School of Medicine. In 1988 he
opened the Hearing, Balance and Speech
Center and in 1999 the New England
Tinnitus and Hyperacusis Clinic. HBSC
now has six locations spread throughout
Fairfield and New Haven Counties. Dr.
Bauman is the developer of hearing aids that
have been called “revolutionary.”
N
11
A Sound Approach to Better Hearing
A Practice with a Passion
6 Convenient Locations:
Branford, Bristol, Hamden, Norwalk, Wallingford & Waterbury
Each ofce is under the direction of
Dr. Natan Bauman, Ed.D., M.S., Eng., FAAA
• Treatment of Hearing Loss
• Balance Problems, Buzzing or Ringing (Tinnitus)
• Sound Sensitivity
• Dizziness
• Hearing Aid Repair and Replacement
• Most Technically Advanced Hearing Devices
Hearing Well is a Family Affair
We are a practice with a passion - “We do not just sell hearing aids, we sell better hearing, which
leads to a better life,” says Dr. Bauman, who has devoted his career to his passion, audiology. At
HBSC, we offer state-of-the-art testing, diagnostics and hearing devices for those who may have a
hearing problem. Our practice is like a family, and we treat our patients as a member of the family. We
truly care about and listen to our patients. We pride ourselves in knowing that we can change people’s
lives, giving them the opportunity to engage with their friends and loved ones.
Our center is well known for its ability to develop innovative methods for helping those who
are hard of hearing, or suffer from tinnitus or other sound sensitivity disorders!
Central Oce 203.287.9915 | info@hearingbalance.com | hearingbalance.com
*The purpose of this hearing assessment and/or demonstration is for hearing wellness to determine if the patient(s) may benet from using hearing aids. Products demonstrated may differ from products sold.
Test conclusion may not be a medical diagnosis. The use of any hearing aid may not fully restore normal hearing and does not prevent future hearing loss. Testing is to evaluate your hearing wellness, which
may include selling and tting hearing aids. Hearing instruments may not meet the needs of all hearing-impaired individuals. One offer per customer. Offer not available to any consumer using an insurance
benet, a Managed Care, or Federal reimbursement (including third-party administered reimbursements). Offer cannot be combined with any of our promotional offers, coupons or discounts.
Other terms may apply. See ofce for details.
COMPLIMENTARY
Hearing Assessment*
& Demonstration* of
the NEW Oticon Opn™


203.866.6671
HAVE TROUBLE HEARING? WE CAN HELP!
Hamden
2661 Dixwell Ave.
Norwalk
148 East Ave., Suite 3L
Wallingford
25 Fair St.
Branford
11 Harrison Ave.
Waterbury
171 Grandview Ave.,
Suite 203
Bristol
291 Queen St.
1212
W
hen you share your
life with an animal
companion, planning
for your loved one’s short-term and
long-term care is imperative. They
are counting on you to ensure their
care no matter what. The older your
pet is, the more they need a plan
for future care. Most people believe
setting up directives in their will
for the future care of their pet is
enough. But, what happens to your
pet if the will is inoperative because
you are not dead, or there is a delay
in accessing your directives, or funds
are in probate for six months to a
year? What if the need to care for
your pet is due to disaster, disability,
disease, delay, or divorce? In these
scenarios are you prepared? Have
you answered key questions? By
following four steps, you will gain
peace of mind for the future care of
your beloved companion.
These tips will create a future pet
care plan that your pets can live
with. Start with drawing a MAAP.
Make a plan outlining the care
that you would like to have your
pets receive.
Address each of your pets and
their unique needs.
Appoint at least three
caregivers; only one can be a
family member.
Publish your plans and keep
them readily available.
Make a plan outlining the kind of
care that you would like your pet to
receive. This directive assumes that
you are permanently or temporarily
incapable of personally providing
the care your pet needs to receive.
Your pet caregiver will be grateful
that you provided this unique and
individualized information.
Address your pet’s individual
uniqueness. List their identifying
characteristics, including color,
sex, age, and microchip number if
applicable. This information will
be invaluable to those left to care
for your beloved companions. This
outline should talk about their eating
habits and personality traits. By
creating this document, you enable the
person caring for your pet to know its
common behavior. This would allow
another to step into your shoes.
Appoint three pet caregivers to
take over the current needs of your
pet if life circumstances occur that
limit your ability to care for them.
Appointing three caregivers in
succession helps hedge your bet. Only
one family member can be appointed
as a caregiver. This is very important.
If you cannot care for your pets,
chances are that you are in need of
assistance with your own care. Your
family will be providing it. Enabling
them to have someone else look after
your pets will be a welcome relief.
Check in often to confirm with the
people you have appointed to care for
your pets that they still can. People
may agree to care for your dog or cat
when circumstances permit such care.
MAAP—
Navigating the Journey
Your Pet Will Take If You
Cannot Care for It
However, things change, and when
called upon to take your pet, they
may not be able to follow through.
You need to know that before
it occurs.
Publish the plans that you make.
Publishing your plan, your pet
information, and the names of the
three people whom you appointed
to care for your pet helps those who
have assumed the responsibility
of caring for your pets know the
who, what, and where of your pet
care plan. Make sure that everyone
in your life knows where this pet
directive is, so they can easily access
this important information upon
your death, disability, disaster,
disease, delay, or divorce.
Did you know that sometimes it
could take up to six months and
often 12 months, to probate a Will?
What happens to your pet in the
meantime? Your Will does not
protect your animals until it is read.
Yet your pet needs those around you
to know immediately how you want
them cared for, who is available to
help provide that care, and how
they will get reimbursed for their
generosity. You may consider
setting aside funds to pay for this
care. Setting money aside in a pet
trust or annuity can be a lifesaver
for your pet when it comes
to their future care. Ask your
financial advisor or estate planner
questions as to how to provide
funding to a pet trust or from
an annuity.
This MAAP for your pet’s future
care should be created before
something happens to you. It is
not just about end of life dispersal
of your pet. If you trip, fall, and
injure yourself, who will take care
of you and your companion while
you heal? You are still alive, yet
you cannot care for your pet, and
it needs care immediately. Having
a MAAP to follow, taking these
lifesaving steps now, will ensure
that your pet is well cared for in
the event you cannot provide that
care yourself.
Be sure to visit our website for more
information about creating a MAAP
for your pets and to register for our
next online pet care planning webinar.
(It’s free to join us, and you’ll get some
additional gifts to help you protect
your pet even more!)
N
© HLM. All Rights Reserved.
Debra’s dad with his beloved Juni
Debra A. Vey Voda-Hamilton, Esq., Mediator
Hamilton Law and Mediation
www.hamiltonlawandmediation.com
By Debra A. Vey Voda-Hamilton, Esq., Mediator
Hamilton Law and Mediation, PLLC
12
Continued on page 14
1313
Conflict Coaching and Mediation
of Issues Over Animals
Hamilton Law and Mediation is a premier New York law firm focused on the resolution of conflicts over
animals using Mediation and Collaborative Process.
Conflicts between people over animals will always be with us. How we respond and resolve those con-
flicts is changing. At Hamilton Law and Mediation, our focus is on the needs of our clients involved in
a conflict about an animal BEFORE they resort to litigation.
We work with pet owners who want to solve a conflict over a pet in a way that serves them and their
pet. We also work with pet service providers who
need a skill set to manage their expectations and
their clients’ expectations in a way that addresses
conflict early or, if missed, empowers them to
solve conflicts for the benefit of all.
Give us a call! We’re here and happy to help!
Please contact us if you are having a conflict
involving a beloved animal or have questions
about our services.
Debra Vey Voda-Hamilton
info@hamiltonlawandmediation.com
(914) 273-1085
Visit our Web site at
hamiltonlawandmediation.com
Workshops and Seminars
MAPPING the Journey Your Pets Take When You Can’t Take Care of Them Yourself
Continuity of Care Workshop
For Professionals and Service Providers
4 Critical Steps To Keep Your Practice Profitable and Your Life Enjoyable
Evaluate and Examine current best practices in business and client relationships.
6 Tips to Address Disagreements and Make Every Client a Raving Fan
Evaluate and Examine current best practices in a veterinary business and in
client relationships
3 Peaceful Ways to End Destructive Conversations About Animals
One-day Conflict Conversation Workshop
16-Hour Pet Professional Practice Program for Vets and all Animal Service Providers
3 Critical Mistakes Breeders/Handlers and Owners Make That Nullify Their Contracts
Contact Debra directly at (914) 273-1085 to schedule a get-acquainted call prior
to scheduling your workshop or seminar.
13
14
W
hen you share your
life with an animal
companion, planning
for your loved one’s short-term and
long-term care is imperative. They
are counting on you to ensure their
care no matter what. The older your
pet is, the more they need a plan
for future care. Most people believe
setting up directives in their will
for the future care of their pet is
enough. But, what happens to your
pet if the will is inoperative because
you are not dead, or there is a delay
in accessing your directives, or funds
are in probate for six months to a
year? What if the need to care for
your pet is due to disaster, disability,
disease, delay, or divorce? In these
scenarios are you prepared? Have
you answered key questions? By
following four steps, you will gain
peace of mind for the future care of
your beloved companion.
These tips will create a future pet
care plan that your pets can live
with. Start with drawing a MAAP.
Make a plan outlining the care
that you would like to have your
pets receive.
Address each of your pets and
their unique needs.
Appoint at least three
caregivers; only one can be a
family member.
Publish your plans and keep
them readily available.
Make a plan outlining the kind of
care that you would like your pet to
receive. This directive assumes that
you are permanently or temporarily
incapable of personally providing
the care your pet needs to receive.
Your pet caregiver will be grateful
that you provided this unique and
individualized information.
Address your pet’s individual
uniqueness. List their identifying
characteristics, including color,
sex, age, and microchip number if
applicable. This information will
be invaluable to those left to care
for your beloved companions. This
outline should talk about their eating
habits and personality traits. By
creating this document, you enable the
person caring for your pet to know its
common behavior. This would allow
another to step into your shoes.
Appoint three pet caregivers to
take over the current needs of your
pet if life circumstances occur that
limit your ability to care for them.
Appointing three caregivers in
succession helps hedge your bet. Only
one family member can be appointed
as a caregiver. This is very important.
If you cannot care for your pets,
chances are that you are in need of
assistance with your own care. Your
family will be providing it. Enabling
them to have someone else look after
your pets will be a welcome relief.
Check in often to confirm with the
people you have appointed to care for
your pets that they still can. People
may agree to care for your dog or cat
when circumstances permit such care.
MAAP—
Navigating the Journey
Your Pet Will Take If You
Cannot Care for It
However, things change, and when
called upon to take your pet, they
may not be able to follow through.
You need to know that before
it occurs.
Publish the plans that you make.
Publishing your plan, your pet
information, and the names of the
three people whom you appointed
to care for your pet helps those who
have assumed the responsibility
of caring for your pets know the
who, what, and where of your pet
care plan. Make sure that everyone
in your life knows where this pet
directive is, so they can easily access
this important information upon
your death, disability, disaster,
disease, delay, or divorce.
Did you know that sometimes it
could take up to six months and
often 12 months, to probate a Will?
What happens to your pet in the
meantime? Your Will does not
protect your animals until it is read.
Yet your pet needs those around you
to know immediately how you want
them cared for, who is available to
help provide that care, and how
they will get reimbursed for their
generosity. You may consider
setting aside funds to pay for this
care. Setting money aside in a pet
trust or annuity can be a lifesaver
for your pet when it comes
to their future care. Ask your
financial advisor or estate planner
questions as to how to provide
funding to a pet trust or from
an annuity.
This MAAP for your pet’s future
care should be created before
something happens to you. It is
not just about end of life dispersal
of your pet. If you trip, fall, and
injure yourself, who will take care
of you and your companion while
you heal? You are still alive, yet
you cannot care for your pet, and
it needs care immediately. Having
a MAAP to follow, taking these
lifesaving steps now, will ensure
that your pet is well cared for in
the event you cannot provide that
care yourself.
Be sure to visit our website for more
information about creating a MAAP
for your pets and to register for our
next online pet care planning webinar.
(It’s free to join us, and you’ll get some
additional gifts to help you protect
your pet even more!)
N
© HLM. All Rights Reserved.
Debra’s dad with his beloved Juni
Debra A. Vey Voda-Hamilton, Esq., Mediator
Hamilton Law and Mediation
www.hamiltonlawandmediation.com
By Debra A. Vey Voda-Hamilton, Esq., Mediator
Hamilton Law and Mediation, PLLC
14
15
15
F
or older patients with multiple health problems, a comprehensive
geriatric assessment is a good way to get a better understanding of
your overall health and is a logical starting point for putting together
the best care program for you.
The benefits can be immediate and long-term, as was the case when my
mother had a geriatric assessment done a few months shy of her 87th
birthday. She was suffering from dementia, Parkinson’s, and depression, and
we were at wit’s end in trying to figure out how best to care for her.
As her primary caregiver, I accompanied her to the Geriatric Center. As staff
members met with my mother to evaluate her physical and mental health, I
met with other staff members so that they could get a fuller understanding
of how my mother was functioning day to day.
When we left about three hours later, we had a much better understanding
of my mother’s ailments and a comprehensive plan for her care, including
new prescriptions for treating the depression and dementia. In a matter
of days, my mother’s depression was gone, and over the next couple of
months, we noticed that her dementia had somewhat stabilized. And our
frustration level was much lower because we had confidence that she was
getting the right care.
Here is some information on what’s involved and what to expect
from a geriatric assessment.
What is a Geriatric Assessment?
What should I bring to a
geriatric assessment?
• All medicine containers
• Medical records
• Details of past illnesses, surgeries,
allergies, etc.
• Current insurance information
What should you expect during
a geriatric assessment?
A geriatric assessment may last
two hours or more. During the
assessment, geriatricians will
work closely with a team of
healthcare professionals−including
clinical nurse specialists, social
workers, physical therapists,
and pharmacists−to complete a
comprehensive evaluation.
The team will evaluate and assess
the patient’s physical health, mental
health, functional status, social
support system, and economic
status, as well as the accessibility
and safety of the person’s
living environment. During the
assessment, the person’s levels
of social and emotional support
and physical functioning will be
evaluated. The nurse also will
screen the patient for depression
and memory impairment and gather
information about social supports
and living conditions.
What is the cost of a geriatric
evaluation and management
assessment?
Medicare Part B covers costs of the
physician consultation and most
private insurance plans. Medicare
Part B also covers costs of diagnostic
tests. Specialists may bill separately,
but referrals for additional services
will be reviewed with you before
they are ordered.
N
What exactly is a geriatric
assessment?
A geriatric assessment is a
consultative resource for patients,
their family members and caregivers,
and their primary care physicians.
The assessment provides a
comprehensive assessment of an
older adult’s health issues in the
context of social and family needs,
and it provides a comprehensive plan
for managing the person’s conditions
and care.
A geriatric assessment also provides
education and patient-specific
information about health problems,
as well as information and access to
community and private supports for
patients and caregivers.
When is a geriatric assessment
appropriate?
A geriatric management assessment
is advised if you are concerned
about your loved one’s ability to live
independently or if the person is
experiencing any combination of the
following symptoms:
• Multiple health problems
• Confusion or memory loss
• Behavioral changes, including
sadness, depression, or anxiety
• Difficulty performing daily
activities
• Balance and walking problems
• Weakness, caused by
deconditioning of the muscles or
other health problems
• Nutritional concerns, including
unexplained weight loss
• Problems related to the use of
multiple medications, including
dizziness or falls
• Uncertainty about the person’s
ability to live independently.
by Thomas Gerrity, Publisher
T
here are many
misconceptions with financial
programs, and the Reverse
Mortgage is no exception. Many
people think that Reverse Mortgage
Loans are extremely complicated, but
the following discussion of myths
and tips will help guide you to make
a decision that is right for you and
your family’s needs as you navigate
through the process. At Atlantic
Home Loans, we make the process as
easy as possible.
Myth 1: The borrower is restricted on
how to use the loan proceeds.
Once any existing mortgage or
lien has been paid off, the net loan
proceeds from your Reverse Mortgage
(also called an HECM loan—Home
Equity Conversion Mortgage) can be
used for any reason. Many borrowers
use it to supplement their retirement
income, delay receiving Social
Security benefits, pay off debt, pay
for medical expenses, remodel their
home, or assist their adult children.
Myth 2: The home must be free of
any existing mortgages.
A large percentage of borrowers use
the reverse mortgage loan to pay off
an existing mortgage and eliminate
other monthly payments.
Myth 3: Once loan proceeds are
received, you pay taxes on them.
Reverse Mortgage loan proceeds
are tax free as they are not
considered income. However, it
is recommended that you consult
your financial advisor and any
government agencies for any
effect on your individual taxes or
government benefits.
Myth 4: The lender owns the home.
You will retain the title and
ownership during the life of the
loan, and you are free to sell your
home or pay down the loan at
any time. The loan is not due
as long as you continue to meet
loan obligations such as living in
this home, maintaining the home
according to the Federal Housing
Administration (FHA) requirements,
and keeping up to date the real
estate taxes and homeowner’s
insurance.
Myth 5: Only those with no
other assets typically need
reverse mortgages.
N
Quite the contrary. Many affluent
borrowers 62 and older with
million-dollar homes and healthy
retirement assets are using reverse
mortgage loans as part of their estate
planning. Many clients are working
with their financial professionals and
estate attorneys to use the reverse
mortgage as a part of enhancing the
quality and enjoyment of their life
and the lives of those they love.
Call me, Cindy Perham, Reverse
Mortgage Specialist at Atlantic
Home Loans, to see how a Reverse
Mortgage can change your life.
Cindy Perham
Reverse Mortgage Specialist
Atlantic Home Loans
222 Post Road, Suite 2621
Fairfield, CT 06824
(203) 521-0445 mobile
(203) 454-1000, X 2104 office
(203) 413-4423. fax
cperham@atlantichomeloans.com
NMLS #110424
Understanding the Myths and Realities of a Reverse Mortgage
by Cindy Perham,
Reverse Mortgage
Specialist,
Atlantic Home Loans
NEW INCREASED FHA LIMITS for Reverse Mortgages in 2019
Lower your cost of living during retirement
Increase your purchasing power
Eliminate monthly mortgage payments*
Rightsize to a smaller, lower
-
maintenance home
Buy a home closer to family and friends Enjoy carefree living in a senior housing community
*The borrower will be responsible for paying property charges, including
homeowner
'
s insurance, taxes, and maintenance of home for the term of the loan.
Please contact me today for mortgage questions, live rate quotes,
or a
R
everse
M
ortgage Proposal!
Atlan
LICENSED MORTGAGE BANKERS
Cindy Perham
Reverse Mortgage Specialist
Atlantic Home Loans
222 Post Road, Suite 2621
Fairfield, CT 06824
(203) 521-0445 mobile
(203) 454-1000, X 2104 office
(203) 413-4423. fax
cperham@atlantichomeloans.com
NMLS #11042
16
Cover story photo credits can be found on page 66.
T
here are many
misconceptions with financial
programs, and the Reverse
Mortgage is no exception. Many
people think that Reverse Mortgage
Loans are extremely complicated, but
the following discussion of myths
and tips will help guide you to make
a decision that is right for you and
your family’s needs as you navigate
through the process. At Atlantic
Home Loans, we make the process as
easy as possible.
Myth 1: The borrower is restricted on
how to use the loan proceeds.
Once any existing mortgage or
lien has been paid off, the net loan
proceeds from your Reverse Mortgage
(also called an HECM loan—Home
Equity Conversion Mortgage) can be
used for any reason. Many borrowers
use it to supplement their retirement
income, delay receiving Social
Security benefits, pay off debt, pay
for medical expenses, remodel their
home, or assist their adult children.
Myth 2: The home must be free of
any existing mortgages.
A large percentage of borrowers use
the reverse mortgage loan to pay off
an existing mortgage and eliminate
other monthly payments.
Myth 3: Once loan proceeds are
received, you pay taxes on them.
Reverse Mortgage loan proceeds
are tax free as they are not
considered income. However, it
is recommended that you consult
your financial advisor and any
government agencies for any
effect on your individual taxes or
government benefits.
Myth 4: The lender owns the home.
You will retain the title and
ownership during the life of the
loan, and you are free to sell your
home or pay down the loan at
any time. The loan is not due
as long as you continue to meet
loan obligations such as living in
this home, maintaining the home
according to the Federal Housing
Administration (FHA) requirements,
and keeping up to date the real
estate taxes and homeowner’s
insurance.
Myth 5: Only those with no
other assets typically need
reverse mortgages.
N
Quite the contrary. Many affluent
borrowers 62 and older with
million-dollar homes and healthy
retirement assets are using reverse
mortgage loans as part of their estate
planning. Many clients are working
with their financial professionals and
estate attorneys to use the reverse
mortgage as a part of enhancing the
quality and enjoyment of their life
and the lives of those they love.
Call me, Cindy Perham, Reverse
Mortgage Specialist at Atlantic
Home Loans, to see how a Reverse
Mortgage can change your life.
Cindy Perham
Reverse Mortgage Specialist
Atlantic Home Loans
222 Post Road, Suite 2621
Fairfield, CT 06824
(203) 521-0445 mobile
(203) 454-1000, X 2104 office
(203) 413-4423. fax
cperham@atlantichomeloans.com
NMLS #110424
Understanding the Myths and Realities of a Reverse Mortgage
by Cindy Perham,
Reverse Mortgage
Specialist,
Atlantic Home Loans
NEW INCREASED FHA LIMITS for Reverse Mortgages in 2019
Lower your cost of living during retirement
Increase your purchasing power
Eliminate monthly mortgage payments*
Rightsize to a smaller, lower
-
maintenance home
Buy a home closer to family and friends Enjoy carefree living in a senior housing community
*The borrower will be responsible for paying property charges, including
homeowner
'
s insurance, taxes, and maintenance of home for the term of the loan.
Please contact me today for mortgage questions, live rate quotes,
or a
R
everse
M
ortgage Proposal!
Atlan
LICENSED MORTGAGE BANKERS
Cindy Perham
Reverse Mortgage Specialist
Atlantic Home Loans
222 Post Road, Suite 2621
Fairfield, CT 06824
(203) 521-0445 mobile
(203) 454-1000, X 2104 office
(203) 413-4423. fax
cperham@atlantichomeloans.com
NMLS #11042
17
18
“mess mates”) in the strip. Begun
in 12 newspapers in 1950, by 1968
Beetle Bailey was in 1,100 papers,
and today the strip is in 1,800 plus
hundreds of online outlets. Mort won
the National Cartoonists Society’s
award as best cartoonist of the year
in 1953 and numerous other awards
since. Despite occasional Pentagon
grousing at his satire of the military,
Mort’s patriotism and philanthropy
also brought him many awards,
including the highest one that the
Secretary of the Army can bestow
on a civilian. Mort also organized
a museum of cartoon art, whose
notable collections are now at Ohio
State University. Mort Walker died
at his longtime home in Stamford
in 2018 at the age of 94. His home
had once been the studio of the
sculptor of Mount Rushmore. Mort
had a relief carved into a bar at his
home that shows Beetle alongside
the other faces on the monument.
2011, she served as news anchor
and substitute general anchor for
that popular program. From 2005
to 2011, she also was co-anchor or
primary anchor of Dateline NBC
and main substitute anchor on
the NBC Nightly News. In 2011
she became co-anchor with Matt
Lauer of the Today show. Various
tensions led to her leaving the
show in 2012 and serving through
2014 in various other capacities at
NBC. She left NBC News in 2015
after 25 years and founded her own
multi-platform media startup. She
continues to conduct major news
interviews for network television.
Ann has received numerous awards
for her journalism, including a
third Emmy for her reporting on
the Darfur crisis. She also supports
a number of charities, particularly
in the health care field. Ann Curry
and her husband, Bruce Ross, have
two children.
NEW CANAAN: ANN CURRY
Y
ou’ve seen her report from
all across the country and all
around the world, including
some of the most dangerous of areas.
And you also might come across her
in the placid streets and stores of
New Canaan, where she lives with
her husband, a software executive.
She’s Ann Curry, and she’s a
broadcast journalist extraordinaire,
one who for more than 30 years
has been focused on getting out the
news from war zones, crime scenes,
and locales of accidents and natural
disasters. Ann was born in 1956
in the U.S. Territory of Guam in
the Pacific. Her father was a career
Navy sailor of white and Native
American descent. He married her
mother, a streetcar conductor, in
Occupied Japan following World
War II. After graduating from the
University of Oregon, Ann became
the first female news reporter at
an Oregon TV station and then a
reporter and anchor for another.
In 1984 Ann moved to a Los
Angeles station, where she received
Emmy awards for her coverage of
an earthquake and a gas pipeline
explosion. In 1990 Ann joined
NBC News, first in Chicago, then
in New York. She anchored NBC
News at Sunrise from 1991 to 1996
and served as a substitute news
anchor from 1994 to 1997 at the
Today show. Then from 1997 to
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
Photo Source: beetlebailey.com
Material accumulated over the years
and the work of Mort’s sons will
ensure that Beetle Bailey continues
to go forth. Mission accomplished,
Mort Walker!
F
rom her Greenwich estate,
where she resides and
presides like the lady
of a manor, Diana Ernestine Earle
Ross looks back with well-deserved
pride on her 60-year career, one
of the most popular and honored
in the history of show business—a
career still continuing. Born in
Detroit in 1944, Diana was raised
in housing projects there by loving
parents, and in Alabama for several
years while her mother was ill with
tuberculosis. Gifted with a strong
sense of style, while going to high
school Diana also worked in a
department store, where it was said
that she was the first black employee
“allowed outside the kitchen.” But
Diana’s greatest gift was her musical
talent, which first manifested itself
in the choir of a church that her
grandfather served as pastor. At 15
Diana joined a “girl group” named
the Primettes, who had some
regional hits—many written by the
legendary “Smokey” Robinson, a
neighbor and rumored boyfriend of
Diana’s—for the also legendary Berry
Gordy’s Motown Records. In 1961
the Primettes became the Supremes.
The Supremes achieved a record-
setting 12 number-one hit singles
(including “Stop! In the Name of
Love” and “You Can’t Hurry Love”)
in the next four years, becoming
Motown’s most successful act, the
best-charting girl group in U.S.
history, and one of the world’s best-
selling girl groups of all time. For
her work with the Supremes, Diana
has been dubbed one of the “Five
Mighty Pop Divas of the Sixties.”
In 1970 Diana launched her solo
career with a number-one hit, “Ain’t
No Mountain High Enough.” She
also added acting to her resume,
receiving an Oscar nomination for
Over the years many celebrities in many different fields have
appreciated what Fairfield County has to offer as a place to
live and, perhaps, work. Here are a few of them.
by Peter J.O’Connell, Editorial and Research Associate
Celebrities IN THE COUNTY
GREENWICH: DIANA ROSS
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
STAMFORD: MORT WALKER
M
ort Walker drew up
his troops and sent
them forth from Camp
Swampy for many decades: Pvt.
Bailey, Sgt. Snorkel, Gen. Halftrack,
Plato, Lt. Flap, Cpl. Yo, Miss Buxley.
Their mission, however, was not
to wage war but to make people
laugh. You see, Mort Walker was the
creator of Beetle Bailey, the longest-
running comic strip drawn by its
original creator and the third-most
widely syndicated comic strip in the
world. The prolific Walker, who also
created eight other comic strips, has
been described as a “creative bridge
between today’s talented artists
and those of the earliest days of
cartooning.” Born in Kansas in 1923,
Mort loved those early cartoons and
sold his own first cartoon at the age
of 12. Soon he was selling cartoons
on a regular basis and working for
such companies as Hallmark. But
his seminal experience came with
his Army service in World War II.
Later he recalled: “Little did I know
. . . that I was going to get about
four years of research.” And: “I was
a private, a corporal, a sergeant and
a lieutenant and I was a goof-up
in every rank.” Mort drew on his
“research” for Beetle, the malingering
private and his messmates (and
Best Actress for her performance as
singer Billie Holiday in 1972’s Lady
Sings the Blues. Other films followed,
as did achievements as a record
producer. Diana has continued to be
popular both in the U.S. and abroad
for music in a variety of genres and
contexts. Billboard magazine named
her “Female Entertainer of the
Century” and the Guinness Book of
World Records in 1993 declared her
the most successful female music
artist in history for having more
hits on the charts than any other
female artist. Diana Ross has been
married and divorced twice and has
five children.
19
“mess mates”) in the strip. Begun
in 12 newspapers in 1950, by 1968
Beetle Bailey was in 1,100 papers,
and today the strip is in 1,800 plus
hundreds of online outlets. Mort won
the National Cartoonists Society’s
award as best cartoonist of the year
in 1953 and numerous other awards
since. Despite occasional Pentagon
grousing at his satire of the military,
Mort’s patriotism and philanthropy
also brought him many awards,
including the highest one that the
Secretary of the Army can bestow
on a civilian. Mort also organized
a museum of cartoon art, whose
notable collections are now at Ohio
State University. Mort Walker died
at his longtime home in Stamford
in 2018 at the age of 94. His home
had once been the studio of the
sculptor of Mount Rushmore. Mort
had a relief carved into a bar at his
home that shows Beetle alongside
the other faces on the monument.
2011, she served as news anchor
and substitute general anchor for
that popular program. From 2005
to 2011, she also was co-anchor or
primary anchor of Dateline NBC
and main substitute anchor on
the NBC Nightly News. In 2011
she became co-anchor with Matt
Lauer of the Today show. Various
tensions led to her leaving the
show in 2012 and serving through
2014 in various other capacities at
NBC. She left NBC News in 2015
after 25 years and founded her own
multi-platform media startup. She
continues to conduct major news
interviews for network television.
Ann has received numerous awards
for her journalism, including a
third Emmy for her reporting on
the Darfur crisis. She also supports
a number of charities, particularly
in the health care field. Ann Curry
and her husband, Bruce Ross, have
two children.
NEW CANAAN: ANN CURRY
Y
ou’ve seen her report from
all across the country and all
around the world, including
some of the most dangerous of areas.
And you also might come across her
in the placid streets and stores of
New Canaan, where she lives with
her husband, a software executive.
She’s Ann Curry, and she’s a
broadcast journalist extraordinaire,
one who for more than 30 years
has been focused on getting out the
news from war zones, crime scenes,
and locales of accidents and natural
disasters. Ann was born in 1956
in the U.S. Territory of Guam in
the Pacific. Her father was a career
Navy sailor of white and Native
American descent. He married her
mother, a streetcar conductor, in
Occupied Japan following World
War II. After graduating from the
University of Oregon, Ann became
the first female news reporter at
an Oregon TV station and then a
reporter and anchor for another.
In 1984 Ann moved to a Los
Angeles station, where she received
Emmy awards for her coverage of
an earthquake and a gas pipeline
explosion. In 1990 Ann joined
NBC News, first in Chicago, then
in New York. She anchored NBC
News at Sunrise from 1991 to 1996
and served as a substitute news
anchor from 1994 to 1997 at the
Today show. Then from 1997 to
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
Photo Source: beetlebailey.com
Material accumulated over the years
and the work of Mort’s sons will
ensure that Beetle Bailey continues
to go forth. Mission accomplished,
Mort Walker!
F
rom her Greenwich estate,
where she resides and
presides like the lady
of a manor, Diana Ernestine Earle
Ross looks back with well-deserved
pride on her 60-year career, one
of the most popular and honored
in the history of show business—a
career still continuing. Born in
Detroit in 1944, Diana was raised
in housing projects there by loving
parents, and in Alabama for several
years while her mother was ill with
tuberculosis. Gifted with a strong
sense of style, while going to high
school Diana also worked in a
department store, where it was said
that she was the first black employee
“allowed outside the kitchen.” But
Diana’s greatest gift was her musical
talent, which first manifested itself
in the choir of a church that her
grandfather served as pastor. At 15
Diana joined a “girl group” named
the Primettes, who had some
regional hits—many written by the
legendary “Smokey” Robinson, a
neighbor and rumored boyfriend of
Diana’s—for the also legendary Berry
Gordy’s Motown Records. In 1961
the Primettes became the Supremes.
The Supremes achieved a record-
setting 12 number-one hit singles
(including “Stop! In the Name of
Love” and “You Can’t Hurry Love”)
in the next four years, becoming
Motown’s most successful act, the
best-charting girl group in U.S.
history, and one of the world’s best-
selling girl groups of all time. For
her work with the Supremes, Diana
has been dubbed one of the “Five
Mighty Pop Divas of the Sixties.”
In 1970 Diana launched her solo
career with a number-one hit, “Ain’t
No Mountain High Enough.” She
also added acting to her resume,
receiving an Oscar nomination for
Over the years many celebrities in many different fields have
appreciated what Fairfield County has to offer as a place to
live and, perhaps, work. Here are a few of them.
by Peter J.O’Connell, Editorial and Research Associate
Celebrities IN THE COUNTY
GREENWICH: DIANA ROSS
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
STAMFORD: MORT WALKER
M
ort Walker drew up
his troops and sent
them forth from Camp
Swampy for many decades: Pvt.
Bailey, Sgt. Snorkel, Gen. Halftrack,
Plato, Lt. Flap, Cpl. Yo, Miss Buxley.
Their mission, however, was not
to wage war but to make people
laugh. You see, Mort Walker was the
creator of Beetle Bailey, the longest-
running comic strip drawn by its
original creator and the third-most
widely syndicated comic strip in the
world. The prolific Walker, who also
created eight other comic strips, has
been described as a “creative bridge
between today’s talented artists
and those of the earliest days of
cartooning.” Born in Kansas in 1923,
Mort loved those early cartoons and
sold his own first cartoon at the age
of 12. Soon he was selling cartoons
on a regular basis and working for
such companies as Hallmark. But
his seminal experience came with
his Army service in World War II.
Later he recalled: “Little did I know
. . . that I was going to get about
four years of research.” And: “I was
a private, a corporal, a sergeant and
a lieutenant and I was a goof-up
in every rank.” Mort drew on his
“research” for Beetle, the malingering
private and his messmates (and
Best Actress for her performance as
singer Billie Holiday in 1972’s Lady
Sings the Blues. Other films followed,
as did achievements as a record
producer. Diana has continued to be
popular both in the U.S. and abroad
for music in a variety of genres and
contexts. Billboard magazine named
her “Female Entertainer of the
Century” and the Guinness Book of
World Records in 1993 declared her
the most successful female music
artist in history for having more
hits on the charts than any other
female artist. Diana Ross has been
married and divorced twice and has
five children.
20
Godfrey and Garry Moore. But he
also wrote for public affairs and
documentary programs. Andy was
married to his wife, Marguerite, for
62 years until her death in 2004.
The couple had four children and
maintained a home in the Rowayton
section of Norwalk for many years.
Andy retired in 2011, after 1,097
essays on 60 Minutes. He died a
month later at age 92.
NORWALK: ANDY ROONEY
F
or decades he was
America’s “favorite
curmudgeon,” a status,
it has been said, that Andy Rooney
“wore like a uniform.” He gained
the status by his essays—delivered
from behind a walnut desk, which
he, an expert woodworker, had
made himself—that constituted
the “end of show” segment on the
very popular CBS News program
60 Minutes. Andy appeared on the
show from 1978 to 2011. In his
segment, “A Few Minutes With
Andy Rooney,” he typically offered
satire on trivial everyday issues—
for example, the price of groceries,
annoying relatives, faulty Christmas
presents, the contents of his desk’s
drawers—or presented whimsical
lists, such as of types of milk, car
brands, sports mascots. But he
also addressed weightier topics—
politics, race, same-sex marriage,
the existence of God. His essays
which have been described as
“wry, humorous and contentious”
and “splenetic, drily humorous”--
brought him four Emmy Awards.
Born in Albany in 1919, Andy
donned the uniform of the U.S.
Army in 1941 and began writing
for the independent military
newspaper Stars and Stripes the
next year. He was one of the
first reporters to go on bombing
flights over Germany, to enter
liberated Paris, to reach the bridge
at Remagen, and to view Nazi
concentration camps. After the war,
Andy went to work for CBS as a
writer for the hit shows of Arthur
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
retiring in 2001. Beginning in 1994,
Steve also worked for the Springer
show as a bodyguard for the star,
Jerry Springer, and as Security
Director, breaking up the “fights”
that took place between participants
on the show. Beginning in 2001,
Steve worked exclusively for the
show, becoming a kind of cult
figure in his own right and often
substituting for Jerry Springer as
almost operatic, theatricality.
Rachelle, born in Michigan in 1971
as Rachelle Consiglio, joined the
Springer show as a senior producer
at the young age of 23. Then from
2008 to 2015, she was executive
producer. Steve Wilkos, born in
1964, served in the Marine Corps
for seven years and then joined
the Chicago Police Department,
of which he was a member until
host. In 2007 Steve began his own
talk show, The Steve Wilkos Show,
which emphasizes criminal justice
issues more than the Springer show
did. Rachelle, whom he married in
2000, has been executive producer
of Steve’s show since 2008.
Rachelle and Steve Wilkos have two
children, and their Darien home
has been highly praised for its
beauty by HGTV.
WILTON: THEODORE BIKEL
T
heodore Bikel, a longtime
resident of Wilton, was
one of the most talented
and versatile performers in the
history of American theater, film,
and television. He could portray
everything from a Southern sheriff,
to an Armenian merchant, to a Polish
professor, to German, Russian, and
French officers. He is best known,
however, for creating the role of
Captain von Trapp in the original
Broadway production of the beloved
musical The Sound of Music (1959)
and for his taking over in 1967 of
the role of Tevye in Fiddler on the
Roof, which he performed some
2,000 times, more than any other
actor. Theodore was born into a
Jewish family in Vienna in 1924.
After the Nazi takeover of Austria
in 1938, Theodore’s family fled to
what was then the British Mandate
of Palestine. Theodore moved to
London to study drama in 1945. There
he attracted praise from the likes of
Michael Redgrave, Lawrence Olivier,
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
and Vivian Leigh. Theodore moved
to the U.S. in 1954 and became a
naturalized citizen in 1961. From
his London days until just a few
years before his death in 2015,
Theodore appeared in play after
play, film after film, TV episode after
TV episode. He received Tony and
Oscar nominations and numerous
other awards. He was also noted as
a folksinger. He could sing in 21
different languages and brought out
20 albums. Theodore cofounded the
Newport Folk Festival and engaged
in civil rights activism with the likes
of Pete Seeger, Bob Dylan, and Joan
Baez. He also promoted unionism
in show business and held office
in several unions and performers’
organizations. Theodore Bikel was
married four times and had two sons
with his second wife.
DARIEN: RACHELLE AND STEVE WILKOS
S
ome people mistakenly think
of Fairfield County as a land
of snooty cultural elitists.
The reality, of course, is that the
County over the years has been
hospitable to those involved in all
types of arts and entertainment,
including some of the most
popular—and “populist”—kind,
including endeavors derided as
“lowbrow” or “freak shows.” These
include the “cabinets of curiosities”
and Midway of P.T. Barnum, the
“rassling” of WWE, and tabloid TV,
such as The Jerry Springer Show and
Maury, both produced in Stamford
for a number of years. Speaking of
Springer, a Darien couple, Rachelle
and Steve Wilkos, for years were
important figures in that raucous,
controversial, and very popular
show, which for more than a
Photo Source: Pinterest
quarter of a century highlighted
all kinds of dysfunction. The
Springer show outraged some, but
savvy critics saw it as a mixture
of diversity on display, tongue-
in-cheek satire, and over-the-top,
21
Godfrey and Garry Moore. But he
also wrote for public affairs and
documentary programs. Andy was
married to his wife, Marguerite, for
62 years until her death in 2004.
The couple had four children and
maintained a home in the Rowayton
section of Norwalk for many years.
Andy retired in 2011, after 1,097
essays on 60 Minutes. He died a
month later at age 92.
NORWALK: ANDY ROONEY
F
or decades he was
America’s “favorite
curmudgeon,” a status,
it has been said, that Andy Rooney
“wore like a uniform.” He gained
the status by his essays—delivered
from behind a walnut desk, which
he, an expert woodworker, had
made himself—that constituted
the “end of show” segment on the
very popular CBS News program
60 Minutes. Andy appeared on the
show from 1978 to 2011. In his
segment, “A Few Minutes With
Andy Rooney,” he typically offered
satire on trivial everyday issues—
for example, the price of groceries,
annoying relatives, faulty Christmas
presents, the contents of his desk’s
drawers—or presented whimsical
lists, such as of types of milk, car
brands, sports mascots. But he
also addressed weightier topics—
politics, race, same-sex marriage,
the existence of God. His essays
which have been described as
“wry, humorous and contentious”
and “splenetic, drily humorous”--
brought him four Emmy Awards.
Born in Albany in 1919, Andy
donned the uniform of the U.S.
Army in 1941 and began writing
for the independent military
newspaper Stars and Stripes the
next year. He was one of the
first reporters to go on bombing
flights over Germany, to enter
liberated Paris, to reach the bridge
at Remagen, and to view Nazi
concentration camps. After the war,
Andy went to work for CBS as a
writer for the hit shows of Arthur
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
retiring in 2001. Beginning in 1994,
Steve also worked for the Springer
show as a bodyguard for the star,
Jerry Springer, and as Security
Director, breaking up the “fights”
that took place between participants
on the show. Beginning in 2001,
Steve worked exclusively for the
show, becoming a kind of cult
figure in his own right and often
substituting for Jerry Springer as
almost operatic, theatricality.
Rachelle, born in Michigan in 1971
as Rachelle Consiglio, joined the
Springer show as a senior producer
at the young age of 23. Then from
2008 to 2015, she was executive
producer. Steve Wilkos, born in
1964, served in the Marine Corps
for seven years and then joined
the Chicago Police Department,
of which he was a member until
host. In 2007 Steve began his own
talk show, The Steve Wilkos Show,
which emphasizes criminal justice
issues more than the Springer show
did. Rachelle, whom he married in
2000, has been executive producer
of Steve’s show since 2008.
Rachelle and Steve Wilkos have two
children, and their Darien home
has been highly praised for its
beauty by HGTV.
WILTON: THEODORE BIKEL
T
heodore Bikel, a longtime
resident of Wilton, was
one of the most talented
and versatile performers in the
history of American theater, film,
and television. He could portray
everything from a Southern sheriff,
to an Armenian merchant, to a Polish
professor, to German, Russian, and
French officers. He is best known,
however, for creating the role of
Captain von Trapp in the original
Broadway production of the beloved
musical The Sound of Music (1959)
and for his taking over in 1967 of
the role of Tevye in Fiddler on the
Roof, which he performed some
2,000 times, more than any other
actor. Theodore was born into a
Jewish family in Vienna in 1924.
After the Nazi takeover of Austria
in 1938, Theodore’s family fled to
what was then the British Mandate
of Palestine. Theodore moved to
London to study drama in 1945. There
he attracted praise from the likes of
Michael Redgrave, Lawrence Olivier,
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
and Vivian Leigh. Theodore moved
to the U.S. in 1954 and became a
naturalized citizen in 1961. From
his London days until just a few
years before his death in 2015,
Theodore appeared in play after
play, film after film, TV episode after
TV episode. He received Tony and
Oscar nominations and numerous
other awards. He was also noted as
a folksinger. He could sing in 21
different languages and brought out
20 albums. Theodore cofounded the
Newport Folk Festival and engaged
in civil rights activism with the likes
of Pete Seeger, Bob Dylan, and Joan
Baez. He also promoted unionism
in show business and held office
in several unions and performers’
organizations. Theodore Bikel was
married four times and had two sons
with his second wife.
DARIEN: RACHELLE AND STEVE WILKOS
S
ome people mistakenly think
of Fairfield County as a land
of snooty cultural elitists.
The reality, of course, is that the
County over the years has been
hospitable to those involved in all
types of arts and entertainment,
including some of the most
popular—and “populist”—kind,
including endeavors derided as
“lowbrow” or “freak shows.” These
include the “cabinets of curiosities”
and Midway of P.T. Barnum, the
“rassling” of WWE, and tabloid TV,
such as The Jerry Springer Show and
Maury, both produced in Stamford
for a number of years. Speaking of
Springer, a Darien couple, Rachelle
and Steve Wilkos, for years were
important figures in that raucous,
controversial, and very popular
show, which for more than a
Photo Source: Pinterest
quarter of a century highlighted
all kinds of dysfunction. The
Springer show outraged some, but
savvy critics saw it as a mixture
of diversity on display, tongue-
in-cheek satire, and over-the-top,
driver and an active supporter of
liberal causes and candidates. Many
honors came his way. He was, for
example, one of only four actors
to have been nominated for an
Academy Award in five different
decades, winning for The Color of
Money. Paul particularly appreciated
the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian
Award and the Award for Greatest
Public Service Benefiting the
Disadvantaged, both of which he
received in 1994. Paul’s charitable
activities were supported by direct
donations and by an innovative
form of philanthropy that he
developed with friend and author
A.E. Hotchner. In 1982 the two
established Newman’s Own, a
company selling food products.
Paul established a policy that all
of the company’s profits after
taxes would be donated to charity.
That amount has now passed a
half a billion dollars! Paul and
Hotchner wrote a memoir about
Newman’s Own under the title
Shameless Exploitation in Pursuit
of the Common Good. Paul died in
2008. A newspaper close to the
Vatican commented: “Newman
was a generous heart, an actor of a
dignity and style rare in Hollywood
quarters.” Newman’s estate gifted
land to Westport, his beloved town
of residence for many years—just
one of the many gifts that Paul
Newman gave the world in his
wonderful life. Paul Newman
shared that life for 50 years with a
wonderful wife, the beautiful and
greatly talented Joanne Woodward.
Born in Georgia in 1930 and raised
there and in South Carolina, Joanne,
named after Joan Crawford, was,
like her husband, interested from an
early age in acting. After graduating
from Louisiana State University,
she headed straight to New York
City. There she managed to get
roles in a number of TV shows
and understudied in the stage
production of Picnic, where she
met one of its leads, Paul Newman.
After appearing in a Western movie,
Joanne was signed to a long-term
contract with 20th Century Fox.
She was given the lead role in
her third feature, The Three Faces
of Eve (1957). This story of a
woman with multiple-personality
disorder was both a commercial
and a critical success and brought
Joanne the Oscar for Best Actress.
In 1958 Joanne Woodward and
Paul Newman co-starred in The
Long, Hot Summer and also began
starring in family life by marrying
following Paul’s divorce from
his first wife. The couple would
move to Westport and have three
daughters by 1965. Joanne’s career
continued, and in 1968 she starred
in Rachel, Rachel, a sensitive story
of a lonely Connecticut woman.
The film was Paul’s directorial
debut and brought both Joanne
(acting) and him (directing) Oscar
nominations. In 1982 Paul directed
Joanne again in The Effect of Gamma
Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds.
The poignant film dealt with a
single mother in Bridgeport and her
efforts to raise her two daughters,
one of whom was played by the
actual daughter of Joanne and
Paul. In 1978 Joanne was called
upon to comfort Paul during a
wrenching tragedy. His son by his
first wife died of a drug overdose.
In her career Joanne appeared to
excellent reviews in another “split-
personality” story, the TV movie
Sybil, with Sally Field in 1976. For
the next 30 years, Joanne appeared
in a variety of productions on the
big and small screen and the stage.
For some she also did writing,
directing, or producing. Some were
with Paul. But whether in show
business or in family life, Joanne
Woodward was always with her
beloved husband--if not physically
in mind, heart, or spirit. And she
still is today!
N
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
C
hristopher Plummer
appeared in The Man Who
Would Be King. In that 1975
film he played Rudyard Kipling. But
Christopher has played a number of
kings on stage and screen (big and
small) in his long and distinguished
career since he first took up acting
after seeing Laurence
Olivier’s film
WESTON: CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
of Shakespeare’s Henry V in 1944,
when he was in college. Those
kings include: Oedipus, Atahuallpa,
Macbeth, Henry V, Leontes, Lear,
Richard III, Henry II, Commodus,
Herod Antipas, Wilhelm II. Other
noted figures from history, literature,
and the news that Christopher,
born in Toronto, Canada, in 1929,
has played include: Arturo Ui,
Pizarro, Cyrano, Chekhov, John
Barrymore, Hamlet, Philip the
Bastard, Mark Antony, Julius Caesar,
Prospero, Danton, James Tyrone,
Argonaut Jason, Rommel, the Duke
of Wellington, Sherlock Holmes,
Mike Wallace, Aristotle, Tolstoy,
the Grand Duke of Owls, Captain
Chang, Iago, Prince Albert, J. Paul
Getty. Christopher, however, has
been most widely seen in the role he
likes least, that of Captain von Trapp
in the enormously popular classic
movie musical The Sound of Music, a
role first created by fellow Fairfield
County resident Theodore Bikel.
Christopher has been
showered with
numerous awards over the years for
his performances in the U.S., Britain,
and Canada. At the 84th Academy
Awards in 2012, Christopher’s win
as Best Supporting Actor made
him, at age 82, the oldest actor to
win an Academy Award. When he
accepted the Oscar, he quipped:
“You’re only two years older than
me, darling. Where have you been all
my life?” Christopher’s consummate
professionalism showed itself in
2017 when he stepped in on sudden
notice to play J. Paul Getty in All the
Money in the World in a reshooting of
the J.P. Getty scenes in the already
completed film, necessitated by the
replacement of the actor who had
played Getty in it. Christopher went
on to receive an Oscar nomination
for his performance in the film.
Christopher Plummer and his third
wife, whom he married in 1970,
enjoy life in Weston, where they
have lived for a number of years. It
should also be noted that the great
actor fondly remembers performing
at the American Shakespeare Festival
Theatre in Stratford.
WESTPORT: PAUL NEWMAN AND JOANNE WOODWARD
I
t’s interesting to note that
Paul Newman’s first acting
role was at the age of 7,
playing in a school production
of Robin Hood. Robin Hood, of
course, stole from the rich to give
to the poor. Paul Newman never
stole from anyone (though he
did play some notable robbers!).
But Paul gave of his talent to
audiences around the country and
the world and of the wealth that
his talent brought him to those in
need around the country and the
world. He was a star of both show
business and philanthropy. The star
was born in a Cleveland suburb in
1925. His developing interest in the
theater was interrupted by service
with Naval air units in the Pacific
during World War II. After the
war he studied at Kenyon College,
Yale School of Drama, and the
famed Actors Studio in New York.
In New York he acted in television
and made his Broadway debut in
1953 in the stage production of
Picnic. Paul lost a chance to co-star
with James Dean in the classic film
East of Eden, but he did make it to
Hollywood for The Silver Chalice in
1954. That film was a failure, but
praise came to Paul for his role as
boxer Rocky Graziano in Somebody
Up There Likes Me (1956). And after
he co-starred with Elizabeth Taylor
in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958),
pretty much every moviegoer liked
him. And they liked his movies
as hit followed hit for decades.
Just a few: Exodus (1960), The
Hustler (1961), Hud (1963), Cool
Hand Luke (1967), Butch Cassidy
and the Sundance Kid (1969), The
Sting (1973), The Towering Inferno
(1974), The Verdict (1982), The
Color of Money (1986). Paul also
appeared in various television
and stage productions (some in
Westport) and directed five films. In
addition, Paul was a notable racecar
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
22
22
driver and an active supporter of
liberal causes and candidates. Many
honors came his way. He was, for
example, one of only four actors
to have been nominated for an
Academy Award in five different
decades, winning for The Color of
Money. Paul particularly appreciated
the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian
Award and the Award for Greatest
Public Service Benefiting the
Disadvantaged, both of which he
received in 1994. Paul’s charitable
activities were supported by direct
donations and by an innovative
form of philanthropy that he
developed with friend and author
A.E. Hotchner. In 1982 the two
established Newman’s Own, a
company selling food products.
Paul established a policy that all
of the company’s profits after
taxes would be donated to charity.
That amount has now passed a
half a billion dollars! Paul and
Hotchner wrote a memoir about
Newman’s Own under the title
Shameless Exploitation in Pursuit
of the Common Good. Paul died in
2008. A newspaper close to the
Vatican commented: “Newman
was a generous heart, an actor of a
dignity and style rare in Hollywood
quarters.” Newman’s estate gifted
land to Westport, his beloved town
of residence for many years—just
one of the many gifts that Paul
Newman gave the world in his
wonderful life. Paul Newman
shared that life for 50 years with a
wonderful wife, the beautiful and
greatly talented Joanne Woodward.
Born in Georgia in 1930 and raised
there and in South Carolina, Joanne,
named after Joan Crawford, was,
like her husband, interested from an
early age in acting. After graduating
from Louisiana State University,
she headed straight to New York
City. There she managed to get
roles in a number of TV shows
and understudied in the stage
production of Picnic, where she
met one of its leads, Paul Newman.
After appearing in a Western movie,
Joanne was signed to a long-term
contract with 20th Century Fox.
She was given the lead role in
her third feature, The Three Faces
of Eve (1957). This story of a
woman with multiple-personality
disorder was both a commercial
and a critical success and brought
Joanne the Oscar for Best Actress.
In 1958 Joanne Woodward and
Paul Newman co-starred in The
Long, Hot Summer and also began
starring in family life by marrying
following Paul’s divorce from
his first wife. The couple would
move to Westport and have three
daughters by 1965. Joanne’s career
continued, and in 1968 she starred
in Rachel, Rachel, a sensitive story
of a lonely Connecticut woman.
The film was Paul’s directorial
debut and brought both Joanne
(acting) and him (directing) Oscar
nominations. In 1982 Paul directed
Joanne again in The Effect of Gamma
Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds.
The poignant film dealt with a
single mother in Bridgeport and her
efforts to raise her two daughters,
one of whom was played by the
actual daughter of Joanne and
Paul. In 1978 Joanne was called
upon to comfort Paul during a
wrenching tragedy. His son by his
first wife died of a drug overdose.
In her career Joanne appeared to
excellent reviews in another “split-
personality” story, the TV movie
Sybil, with Sally Field in 1976. For
the next 30 years, Joanne appeared
in a variety of productions on the
big and small screen and the stage.
For some she also did writing,
directing, or producing. Some were
with Paul. But whether in show
business or in family life, Joanne
Woodward was always with her
beloved husband--if not physically
in mind, heart, or spirit. And she
still is today!
N
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
C
hristopher Plummer
appeared in The Man Who
Would Be King. In that 1975
film he played Rudyard Kipling. But
Christopher has played a number of
kings on stage and screen (big and
small) in his long and distinguished
career since he first took up acting
after seeing Laurence
Olivier’s film
WESTON: CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
of Shakespeare’s Henry V in 1944,
when he was in college. Those
kings include: Oedipus, Atahuallpa,
Macbeth, Henry V, Leontes, Lear,
Richard III, Henry II, Commodus,
Herod Antipas, Wilhelm II. Other
noted figures from history, literature,
and the news that Christopher,
born in Toronto, Canada, in 1929,
has played include: Arturo Ui,
Pizarro, Cyrano, Chekhov, John
Barrymore, Hamlet, Philip the
Bastard, Mark Antony, Julius Caesar,
Prospero, Danton, James Tyrone,
Argonaut Jason, Rommel, the Duke
of Wellington, Sherlock Holmes,
Mike Wallace, Aristotle, Tolstoy,
the Grand Duke of Owls, Captain
Chang, Iago, Prince Albert, J. Paul
Getty. Christopher, however, has
been most widely seen in the role he
likes least, that of Captain von Trapp
in the enormously popular classic
movie musical The Sound of Music, a
role first created by fellow Fairfield
County resident Theodore Bikel.
Christopher has been
showered with
numerous awards over the years for
his performances in the U.S., Britain,
and Canada. At the 84th Academy
Awards in 2012, Christopher’s win
as Best Supporting Actor made
him, at age 82, the oldest actor to
win an Academy Award. When he
accepted the Oscar, he quipped:
“You’re only two years older than
me, darling. Where have you been all
my life?” Christopher’s consummate
professionalism showed itself in
2017 when he stepped in on sudden
notice to play J. Paul Getty in All the
Money in the World in a reshooting of
the J.P. Getty scenes in the already
completed film, necessitated by the
replacement of the actor who had
played Getty in it. Christopher went
on to receive an Oscar nomination
for his performance in the film.
Christopher Plummer and his third
wife, whom he married in 1970,
enjoy life in Weston, where they
have lived for a number of years. It
should also be noted that the great
actor fondly remembers performing
at the American Shakespeare Festival
Theatre in Stratford.
WESTPORT: PAUL NEWMAN AND JOANNE WOODWARD
I
t’s interesting to note that
Paul Newman’s first acting
role was at the age of 7,
playing in a school production
of Robin Hood. Robin Hood, of
course, stole from the rich to give
to the poor. Paul Newman never
stole from anyone (though he
did play some notable robbers!).
But Paul gave of his talent to
audiences around the country and
the world and of the wealth that
his talent brought him to those in
need around the country and the
world. He was a star of both show
business and philanthropy. The star
was born in a Cleveland suburb in
1925. His developing interest in the
theater was interrupted by service
with Naval air units in the Pacific
during World War II. After the
war he studied at Kenyon College,
Yale School of Drama, and the
famed Actors Studio in New York.
In New York he acted in television
and made his Broadway debut in
1953 in the stage production of
Picnic. Paul lost a chance to co-star
with James Dean in the classic film
East of Eden, but he did make it to
Hollywood for The Silver Chalice in
1954. That film was a failure, but
praise came to Paul for his role as
boxer Rocky Graziano in Somebody
Up There Likes Me (1956). And after
he co-starred with Elizabeth Taylor
in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958),
pretty much every moviegoer liked
him. And they liked his movies
as hit followed hit for decades.
Just a few: Exodus (1960), The
Hustler (1961), Hud (1963), Cool
Hand Luke (1967), Butch Cassidy
and the Sundance Kid (1969), The
Sting (1973), The Towering Inferno
(1974), The Verdict (1982), The
Color of Money (1986). Paul also
appeared in various television
and stage productions (some in
Westport) and directed five films. In
addition, Paul was a notable racecar
Photo Source: Wikimedia Commons
23
23
M
ore than 400,000 long-
term-care insurance
policies were sold in
1992, according to figures published
by The Wall Street Journal. These are
the policies that help seniors cover
the costs of nursing home stays
at the end of life. At least 400,000
additional policies were purchased
each year in the subsequent ten
years, peaking at about 750,000
in 2002.
Then sales collapsed, and never
again reached the 400,000 level. Last
year, reportedly only 66,000 such
policies were sold. The need for
long-term-care insurance has never
been greater. What happened to
the market?
A New Kind of Long-Term-Care Insurance
by Thomas Gerrity, Publisher
Actuarial errors
A series of actuarial errors were
made when long-term-care insurance
was first introduced. The most
important of these was the “lapse
rate,” the number of policies that
will be terminated without ever
paying a benefit. This occurs
either because the insured stops
paying premiums or the insured
dies without making a claim. The
actuaries chose a fairly conservative
lapse rate of 5%. At that rate, if
1,000 policies were sold in year one,
only 400 would be in force 20 years
later. As it turned out, the buyers of
long-term-care insurance thought
of their purchase as an investment,
not as insurance, and so the lapse
experience was closer to 1%, which
implies that 800 of every 1,000
policies still will be in force after 20
years. That led to far higher payouts
than projected.
Two more errors compounded the
damage. The first is that medical
advances have lengthened life
expectancies, which, in turn,
increases the likelihood of making
a claim on a long-term-care
insurance policy. The second is that
the actuaries generally assumed a
7% rate of return on the invested
premiums on these policies. That
assumption was fine in the 1990s,
but interest rates have been at
historic lows since 2008.
Hybrid insurance
The new approach in this area
combines life insurance with long-
term-care insurance. An estimated
260,000 such policies were sold last
year. There is wide variation among
such policies, but they may offer:
a death benefit;
guaranteed level premiums;
a return of premium feature should
the buyer have a change of heart;
fully paid-up insurance after
10 years.
When the product offers more,
it will cost more. In an example
published recently in The Wall Street
Journal, coverage for a couple in
their mid-50s came to over $32,000
per year for 10 years, a total of
$320,000. That compares to some
$8,500 per year for a traditional
long-term policy, in which the
premiums must continue to be
paid. After 30 years, the traditional
policy will require $255,000 in total
premiums, assuming no premium
increases, so the disparity is not as
large as it may at first appear.
What’s more, the minimum death
benefit of the hybrid policy was
$180,000 per spouse, which will be
larger than the total premiums paid.
Still, the hybrid policy requires most
of the premium payment early. For
this couple, the policy will be paid
up when they are in their mid-60s,
and they may well not make a claim
for another 20 years. Such coverage
will be most attractive for individuals
with high current income, sufficient
to comfortably cover the premiums,
who wish to protect a large estate
from being eroded by private nursing
home costs. Maximum coverage in
the illustration was $1,371,891
per spouse.
Look to the future
If you already have a long-term-care
policy, you probably want to hang
on to it. For the most part, those
who have purchased these policies
have profited from them.
Planning is necessary. Despite
the price increases, long-term-
care insurance will prove to be an
important part of that plan for many
affluent families.
N
SHORT TAKES
A Tax Break for the Elderly—With Strings
by James B. Gust, Senior Editor, Merrill Anderson Company
Many cities and towns offer some tax
relief for their elderly citizens. There
may be some generosity behind the
offer, or it may be part of an attempt
to compete with lower-tax states for
retiree citizens. That competition may
heat up now that the state and local
tax deduction is limited to $10,000.
The tax relief takes different forms
around the country:
tax credits that phase out at
higher income levels;
homestead exemptions to lower
property taxes;
freezes on assessed valuations; or
property taxes deferred until
death, payable when the home
is sold.
Deferred property taxes may
include interest charges, as in a
recent Massachusetts case.
Frances Arntz filed for property
tax deferral on her home in 1989,
when she was 76 years old. Her
son suspects that she mistook
“deferral” for “forgiveness,” and did
not understand that the tax would
eventually have to be paid, because
she had the financial resources to pay
the tax. Frances never told anyone
what she had done.
Frances moved out of the home in
2008, so the deferrals ended. Her
son began to rent the home, and he
took charge of paying the property
tax every year. The tax bills included a
notation at the bottom: “Prior tax bills
outstanding.” Unfortunately the son
overlooked that warning.
When Frances died in 2018, her
children expected to inherit the house
free and clear, as the mortgage had
been paid long ago. Instead, they
received a property tax bill from the
town for $170,000. Some $50,000
was for the deferred taxes, the rest
was interest that had been charged
at 8%. About $70,000 of the interest
was incurred after 2008, from the
time Frances moved out until
she died.
The heirs are understandably upset
that the town didn’t warn them about
the tax time bomb. But the town did
follow the letter of the law, and in
fact had that notice on the bottom of
every tax bill. The notice just didn’t
spell out how big the bomb was, or
the interest that was running.
Financial discussions between
elderly parents and their adult children
can be difficult, even emotional. But
they are very important to have.
Money and Satisfaction
Lotteries have become enormously
popular in the United States. There is
a widespread perception that many
lottery winners burn through their
newfound wealth rather quickly, and
don’t end up better off in the long run.
Swedish researchers have examined
this question more rigorously, in a
manner akin to a randomized test of a
drug’s efficacy. They surveyed winners
of major prizes in the Swedish lottery
as well as minor winners and lottery
players who did not win, a total of
3,362 players. The surveys were taken
from five to 22 years after the event.
The findings are interesting.
Lottery winners were significantly
more satisfied with their lives, and that
extra satisfaction lasted for decades.
Those who won hundreds of
thousands were measurably more
satisfied than those who won tens
of thousands.
The winners did not rapidly spend
their winnings, and did not quit their
jobs. They did tend to retire earlier.
Oddly, the researchers found
that winning the lottery did not affect
happiness. It is thought that questions
about happiness go to mood or
feelings, while questions on life
satisfaction trigger more broadly
based introspection.
Winning the lottery had no
discernable effect on physical or
mental health of the winners or
their children.
So, although money can’t buy
happiness, it can—at least in Sweden—
buy satisfaction.
24
M
ore than 400,000 long-
term-care insurance
policies were sold in
1992, according to figures published
by The Wall Street Journal. These are
the policies that help seniors cover
the costs of nursing home stays
at the end of life. At least 400,000
additional policies were purchased
each year in the subsequent ten
years, peaking at about 750,000
in 2002.
Then sales collapsed, and never
again reached the 400,000 level. Last
year, reportedly only 66,000 such
policies were sold. The need for
long-term-care insurance has never
been greater. What happened to
the market?
A New Kind of Long-Term-Care Insurance
by Thomas Gerrity, Publisher
Actuarial errors
A series of actuarial errors were
made when long-term-care insurance
was first introduced. The most
important of these was the “lapse
rate,” the number of policies that
will be terminated without ever
paying a benefit. This occurs
either because the insured stops
paying premiums or the insured
dies without making a claim. The
actuaries chose a fairly conservative
lapse rate of 5%. At that rate, if
1,000 policies were sold in year one,
only 400 would be in force 20 years
later. As it turned out, the buyers of
long-term-care insurance thought
of their purchase as an investment,
not as insurance, and so the lapse
experience was closer to 1%, which
implies that 800 of every 1,000
policies still will be in force after 20
years. That led to far higher payouts
than projected.
Two more errors compounded the
damage. The first is that medical
advances have lengthened life
expectancies, which, in turn,
increases the likelihood of making
a claim on a long-term-care
insurance policy. The second is that
the actuaries generally assumed a
7% rate of return on the invested
premiums on these policies. That
assumption was fine in the 1990s,
but interest rates have been at
historic lows since 2008.
Hybrid insurance
The new approach in this area
combines life insurance with long-
term-care insurance. An estimated
260,000 such policies were sold last
year. There is wide variation among
such policies, but they may offer:
a death benefit;
guaranteed level premiums;
a return of premium feature should
the buyer have a change of heart;
fully paid-up insurance after
10 years.
When the product offers more,
it will cost more. In an example
published recently in The Wall Street
Journal, coverage for a couple in
their mid-50s came to over $32,000
per year for 10 years, a total of
$320,000. That compares to some
$8,500 per year for a traditional
long-term policy, in which the
premiums must continue to be
paid. After 30 years, the traditional
policy will require $255,000 in total
premiums, assuming no premium
increases, so the disparity is not as
large as it may at first appear.
What’s more, the minimum death
benefit of the hybrid policy was
$180,000 per spouse, which will be
larger than the total premiums paid.
Still, the hybrid policy requires most
of the premium payment early. For
this couple, the policy will be paid
up when they are in their mid-60s,
and they may well not make a claim
for another 20 years. Such coverage
will be most attractive for individuals
with high current income, sufficient
to comfortably cover the premiums,
who wish to protect a large estate
from being eroded by private nursing
home costs. Maximum coverage in
the illustration was $1,371,891
per spouse.
Look to the future
If you already have a long-term-care
policy, you probably want to hang
on to it. For the most part, those
who have purchased these policies
have profited from them.
Planning is necessary. Despite
the price increases, long-term-
care insurance will prove to be an
important part of that plan for many
affluent families.
N
SHORT TAKES
A Tax Break for the Elderly—With Strings
by James B. Gust, Senior Editor, Merrill Anderson Company
Many cities and towns offer some tax
relief for their elderly citizens. There
may be some generosity behind the
offer, or it may be part of an attempt
to compete with lower-tax states for
retiree citizens. That competition may
heat up now that the state and local
tax deduction is limited to $10,000.
The tax relief takes different forms
around the country:
tax credits that phase out at
higher income levels;
homestead exemptions to lower
property taxes;
freezes on assessed valuations; or
property taxes deferred until
death, payable when the home
is sold.
Deferred property taxes may
include interest charges, as in a
recent Massachusetts case.
Frances Arntz filed for property
tax deferral on her home in 1989,
when she was 76 years old. Her
son suspects that she mistook
“deferral” for “forgiveness,” and did
not understand that the tax would
eventually have to be paid, because
she had the financial resources to pay
the tax. Frances never told anyone
what she had done.
Frances moved out of the home in
2008, so the deferrals ended. Her
son began to rent the home, and he
took charge of paying the property
tax every year. The tax bills included a
notation at the bottom: “Prior tax bills
outstanding.” Unfortunately the son
overlooked that warning.
When Frances died in 2018, her
children expected to inherit the house
free and clear, as the mortgage had
been paid long ago. Instead, they
received a property tax bill from the
town for $170,000. Some $50,000
was for the deferred taxes, the rest
was interest that had been charged
at 8%. About $70,000 of the interest
was incurred after 2008, from the
time Frances moved out until
she died.
The heirs are understandably upset
that the town didn’t warn them about
the tax time bomb. But the town did
follow the letter of the law, and in
fact had that notice on the bottom of
every tax bill. The notice just didn’t
spell out how big the bomb was, or
the interest that was running.
Financial discussions between
elderly parents and their adult children
can be difficult, even emotional. But
they are very important to have.
Money and Satisfaction
Lotteries have become enormously
popular in the United States. There is
a widespread perception that many
lottery winners burn through their
newfound wealth rather quickly, and
don’t end up better off in the long run.
Swedish researchers have examined
this question more rigorously, in a
manner akin to a randomized test of a
drug’s efficacy. They surveyed winners
of major prizes in the Swedish lottery
as well as minor winners and lottery
players who did not win, a total of
3,362 players. The surveys were taken
from five to 22 years after the event.
The findings are interesting.
Lottery winners were significantly
more satisfied with their lives, and that
extra satisfaction lasted for decades.
Those who won hundreds of
thousands were measurably more
satisfied than those who won tens
of thousands.
The winners did not rapidly spend
their winnings, and did not quit their
jobs. They did tend to retire earlier.
Oddly, the researchers found
that winning the lottery did not affect
happiness. It is thought that questions
about happiness go to mood or
feelings, while questions on life
satisfaction trigger more broadly
based introspection.
Winning the lottery had no
discernable effect on physical or
mental health of the winners or
their children.
So, although money can’t buy
happiness, it can—at least in Sweden—
buy satisfaction.
25
Estate Plan Essentials
A
surprising number of people have not
yet attended to their estate planning.
Perhaps this is because estate planning
has become so much more complicated in recent
years, even though the burden of taxes at death has
been in decline. Estate planning now usually covers
medical and financial decisions before the end of
life, as well as after death.
HERE ARE THE DOCUMENTS THAT WILL BE
DRAFTED FOR MANY ESTATE PLANS TODAY.
Document What it does
FINANCIAL:
Will
Identifies beneficiaries. May establish one or
more trusts for ongoing asset management.
Nominates the person or organization to be
responsible for estate settlement.
Power of attorney
Delegates authority to an agent to make
financial decisions. The agent’s authority ends
when the principal is incapacitated.
Durable power of attorney
Delegates financial decision power to an
agent, even if the principal is incapacitated. In
some cases, the power “springs” into being
upon incapacity or other identified event.
Revocable living trust
Transfers assets and full financial manage
-
ment authority to a trustee. The trust may
continue into incapacity, even beyond the
death of the trustor.
MEDICAL:
Power of attorney for
health care (sometimes
called a health care proxy)
Identifies an individual to make medical
decisions when one is unconscious or
incapacitated.
Living will
Provides guidelines for medical decisions
when an individual becomes terminally ill,
such as whether feeding tubes or ventilators
should be used to prolong life.
Do not resuscitate order
(DNR)
Specifically requests that cardiopulmonary
resuscitation not be used if one’s heart or
breathing stops.
Source: Merrill Anderson Company
STAMFORD HEALTH
Stamford Health is a not-for-profit healthcare system in Lower
Fairfield County. The system provides inpatient, outpatient, and
ambulatory services through: Stamford Hospital, a 305-bed,
acute care hospital; Stamford Health Medical Group, a network
of local primary care physicians and healthcare specialists; and
a diverse and growing number of ambulatory locations across
the region. Stamford Health is a major teaching affiliate of the
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. HSS
Orthopedics at Stamford Health is a collaboration with Hospital
for Special Surgery to provide access to advanced orthopedic
care. Stamford Hospital received Magnet
®
Designation for
nursing excellence in 2016.
Main Hospital Address:
One Hospital Plaza
Stamford, CT 06902
StamfordHealth.org
203-276-1000
Find the doctor that’s right for you.
From arthritis care to wound care, our medical providers are
located throughout Fairfield County. Find the doctor that’s
right for you today by calling our physician referral line at
1.877.233.WELL (9355) or visiting StamfordHealth.org.
Some of our services and
specialties include:
Bennett Cancer Center
203.276.2695
The Carl & Dorothy Bennett Cancer Center
combines state-of-the-art technology and
advanced clinical knowledge with care
that treats each patient as an individual.
The Bennett Cancer Center is proud to be
a member of the Dana-Farber/Brigham
and Women’s Cancer Care Collaborative,
providing our staff and patients access to
the latest and most effective, evidence-
based best practices and standards in
cancer treatment and research.
Heart & Vascular Institute
203.276.2328
The Heart & Vascular Institute is a full-
service cardiovascular program with
specialties ranging from prevention and
screening to the most innovative treatments
in cardiology and cardiovascular surgery.
Cardiac Rehabilitation
203.276.2183
Whether you have just had a cardiac
procedure, or if you have cardiovascular
disease, we’ll help you learn how to
exercise safely, improve your stamina,
and strengthen your muscles with an
individualized treatment plan.
HOSPITAL services for seniors
Geriatric Assessment Center
203.276.2516
Located in Stamford and Greenwich, our
Geriatric Assessment Center helps seniors
manage age-related conditions. Services
include evaluation of physical, cognitive,
and mental health; medication review;
home safety assessments; and more.
Outpatient Rehabilitation
203.276.2660
Stamford Health offers a variety of
outpatient rehabilitation services in friendly,
supportive environments. Our expert team
of rehabilitation professionals includes
occupational and physical therapists,
speech and language pathologists, a
rehabilitation psychologist, and respiratory
therapists. Offices are located in Stamford,
New Canaan, and Greenwich.
Wound Care and Hyperbaric Center
203.276.2486
The Wound Care and Hyperbaric Center
offers outpatient clinical wound care and
hyperbaric medicine. Patients with a wound
that has not begun to heal in two weeks
or is not completely healed in six weeks
may benefit from the proven best practice
methodologies of our physician driven,
multidisciplinary approach to outpatient
wound care.
Radiology
For appointments, call 203.276.2602.
Our radiology department effectively
diagnoses, monitors, and treats disease
seven days a week, and our radiologists
have the expertise and experience to
deliver you the best experience possible.
Radiology services are located in Stamford,
Darien, Greenwich, and Wilton.
Laboratory Draw Stations
For lab customer service, call
203.276.7222.
We offer blood draw services at various
locations, all provided by Stamford Hospital.
Test results are often ready the same day
and always by the next day. Lab draw
stations are conveniently located in Darien,
Stamford, New Canaan, Wilton, Norwalk,
and Greenwich.
26
Estate Plan Essentials
A
surprising number of people have not
yet attended to their estate planning.
Perhaps this is because estate planning
has become so much more complicated in recent
years, even though the burden of taxes at death has
been in decline. Estate planning now usually covers
medical and financial decisions before the end of
life, as well as after death.
HERE ARE THE DOCUMENTS THAT WILL BE
DRAFTED FOR MANY ESTATE PLANS TODAY.
Document What it does
FINANCIAL:
Will
Identifies beneficiaries. May establish one or
more trusts for ongoing asset management.
Nominates the person or organization to be
responsible for estate settlement.
Power of attorney
Delegates authority to an agent to make
financial decisions. The agent’s authority ends
when the principal is incapacitated.
Durable power of attorney
Delegates financial decision power to an
agent, even if the principal is incapacitated. In
some cases, the power “springs” into being
upon incapacity or other identified event.
Revocable living trust
Transfers assets and full financial manage
-
ment authority to a trustee. The trust may
continue into incapacity, even beyond the
death of the trustor.
MEDICAL:
Power of attorney for
health care (sometimes
called a health care proxy)
Identifies an individual to make medical
decisions when one is unconscious or
incapacitated.
Living will
Provides guidelines for medical decisions
when an individual becomes terminally ill,
such as whether feeding tubes or ventilators
should be used to prolong life.
Do not resuscitate order
(DNR)
Specifically requests that cardiopulmonary
resuscitation not be used if one’s heart or
breathing stops.
Source: Merrill Anderson Company
STAMFORD HEALTH
Stamford Health is a not-for-profit healthcare system in Lower
Fairfield County. The system provides inpatient, outpatient, and
ambulatory services through: Stamford Hospital, a 305-bed,
acute care hospital; Stamford Health Medical Group, a network
of local primary care physicians and healthcare specialists; and
a diverse and growing number of ambulatory locations across
the region. Stamford Health is a major teaching affiliate of the
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. HSS
Orthopedics at Stamford Health is a collaboration with Hospital
for Special Surgery to provide access to advanced orthopedic
care. Stamford Hospital received Magnet
®
Designation for
nursing excellence in 2016.
Main Hospital Address:
One Hospital Plaza
Stamford, CT 06902
StamfordHealth.org
203-276-1000
Find the doctor that’s right for you.
From arthritis care to wound care, our medical providers are
located throughout Fairfield County. Find the doctor that’s
right for you today by calling our physician referral line at
1.877.233.WELL (9355) or visiting StamfordHealth.org.
Some of our services and
specialties include:
Bennett Cancer Center
203.276.2695
The Carl & Dorothy Bennett Cancer Center
combines state-of-the-art technology and
advanced clinical knowledge with care
that treats each patient as an individual.
The Bennett Cancer Center is proud to be
a member of the Dana-Farber/Brigham
and Women’s Cancer Care Collaborative,
providing our staff and patients access to
the latest and most effective, evidence-
based best practices and standards in
cancer treatment and research.
Heart & Vascular Institute
203.276.2328
The Heart & Vascular Institute is a full-
service cardiovascular program with
specialties ranging from prevention and
screening to the most innovative treatments
in cardiology and cardiovascular surgery.
Cardiac Rehabilitation
203.276.2183
Whether you have just had a cardiac
procedure, or if you have cardiovascular
disease, we’ll help you learn how to
exercise safely, improve your stamina,
and strengthen your muscles with an
individualized treatment plan.
HOSPITAL services for seniors
Geriatric Assessment Center
203.276.2516
Located in Stamford and Greenwich, our
Geriatric Assessment Center helps seniors
manage age-related conditions. Services
include evaluation of physical, cognitive,
and mental health; medication review;
home safety assessments; and more.
Outpatient Rehabilitation
203.276.2660
Stamford Health offers a variety of
outpatient rehabilitation services in friendly,
supportive environments. Our expert team
of rehabilitation professionals includes
occupational and physical therapists,
speech and language pathologists, a
rehabilitation psychologist, and respiratory
therapists. Offices are located in Stamford,
New Canaan, and Greenwich.
Wound Care and Hyperbaric Center
203.276.2486
The Wound Care and Hyperbaric Center
offers outpatient clinical wound care and
hyperbaric medicine. Patients with a wound
that has not begun to heal in two weeks
or is not completely healed in six weeks
may benefit from the proven best practice
methodologies of our physician driven,
multidisciplinary approach to outpatient
wound care.
Radiology
For appointments, call 203.276.2602.
Our radiology department effectively
diagnoses, monitors, and treats disease
seven days a week, and our radiologists
have the expertise and experience to
deliver you the best experience possible.
Radiology services are located in Stamford,
Darien, Greenwich, and Wilton.
Laboratory Draw Stations
For lab customer service, call
203.276.7222.
We offer blood draw services at various
locations, all provided by Stamford Hospital.
Test results are often ready the same day
and always by the next day. Lab draw
stations are conveniently located in Darien,
Stamford, New Canaan, Wilton, Norwalk,
and Greenwich.
27
28
GREENWICH HOSPITAL
Greenwich Hospital offers a comprehensive care for older adults
through its Center for Healthy Aging. The Center has received
national recognition from the American Geriatrics Society as a
Center of Excellence. Services are available to ensure that older
patients and their families get the care and support they need in
the hospital and at home.
Elderly patients often have special requirements while they are
hospitalized. A geriatrician and social worker from the Center meet
with individual patients as needed. The Center also trains nurses
to identify and address any age-related issues that may arise.
Pharmacy, nutrition, physical therapy, case management, and
other resources are available to help prevent physical and mental
decline and ensure a successful stay.
The Center offers a wide range of outpatient programs to improve
quality of life for older adults and their families.
Main location:
5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich, CT 06830
203-863-3000
www.greenwichhospital.org
Comprehensive Aging Assessment
People with age-related medical,
psychological, cognitive, or social issues that
interfere with daily life may benefit from
an aging assessment. It provides detailed
information about current health status
and recommendations to help prepare for
the future. Individuals may be referred to
the Center by a family physician, relatives,
concerned friends, social service agencies, or
other health care providers. The assessment
is conducted by an interdisciplinary team
headed by a board-certified geriatrician who
specializes in aging issues. Medicare covers
some or all of the cost.
Geriatric Psychiatry Services
Depression and behavioral issues that
accompany memory loss or dementia
are common later in life. Counseling,
medication, or a combination of both often
help patients feel better, more productive,
and more satisfied with life. The Center’s
geriatric psychiatrist is highly trained in the
management of emotional and behavioral
problems related to aging.
Caregiving Support Groups
Support groups offered through the Center
are FREE. Please call ahead before attending
to make sure that the group is suitable for
your needs. Please call 203-863-4375 for
specific information about support groups
and meeting sites.
Women’s Spousal Support is designed for
women who provide care for a chronically
ill spouse. Find new friends, practical
information, and emotional support. The
group provides a forum to address the
many concerns of spousal caregivers. It
also gives caregivers a much-needed break
or respite to be with others living with a
similar situation. The group meets twice a
month (the second and fourth Thursdays)
at the hospital’s Center for Healthy Aging
from 1:00-2:15pm. Group size is limited
to 10 members, call 203-863-4375 to
preregister. FREE.
Family Caregiver Support Group
Become a savvy caregiver. This group
provides support for adults who care for a
family member with Alzheimer’s disease
or other types of dementia. Individuals
meet twice a month to talk with caregiving
peers and share advice about common
difficulties and challenges. The group led
by a clinical social worker with expertise in
family counseling and caregiver concerns.
The group meets the first and third Thursday
of each month at the hospital’s Center for
Healthy Aging, 1:00-2:15pm. Group size is
limited to 10 members, so please call 203-
863-4375 to preregister. FREE.
Generations Program
This free membership program is offered
to adults age 50 and older. Members
enjoy stimulating seminars ranging from
the science of laughter to the joys of late-
life learning. From disease prevention
to caring for older relatives, the program
aims to stimulate the mind and encourage
discussion. Eligibility: Any person age 50 or
older who resides in the Greenwich Hospital
service area can join.
To join, call toll free 877-838-4888.
Greenwich Hospital Outpatient Services
Long Ridge Medical Center
260 Long Ridge Road, Stamford, CT 06902
For all appointments
475-240-5762
Blood Draw
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Closed: Noon-1 p.m. daily
Infusion
Services to patients that require IV fluids
or medications, including monoclonal
antibodies. Hours: by appointment
475-619-6152
Occupational Health Medicine
and Wellness Services
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
203-846-3483
Radiology
Hours: 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Rehabilitation
Physical and Occupational Therapy
Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 7 am - 6:30 p.m.;
Fri. 7 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Northeast Medical Group
Internal Medicine, Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-
4:30 p.m.
475-619-6035,
Yale Medical Center for
Musculoskeletal Care
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
866-470-YALE (9253)
NORWALK HOSPITAL
Established in 1893, Norwalk Hospital is a 366-bed, not-
for-profit community hospital providing Fairfield County and
Westchester County residents convenient access to exceptional
care, close to home. As a proud member of Western
Connecticut Health Network, we are united by our mission to
improve the health and well-being of those who live in the
communities that we call home. We remain the local community
providers that you know and trust, only better. As a teaching
hospital, we are associated with Yale University School of
Medicine, University of Vermont College of Medicine, and Ross
University School of Medicine.
Norwalk Hospital, a Level II Trauma Center, is accredited as a
Stroke Center and certified to provide emergency angioplasty for
heart attack.
Main Location: Offsite urgent care::
34 Maple Street New Canaan Immediate Care
Norwalk, CT 06856 38 East Avenue
203-852-2000 New Canaan, CT 06840
www.norwalkhospital.org 203-594-9520
Norwalk Hospital provides a wide range of Clinical
Programs, including:
• Bone, Joint & Spine Care • Cancer Care
• Digestive Diseases • Emergency Care
• Heart and Vascular Care • Primary Care
• Weight Loss Surgery • Women and Children’s Health
Medical Information Technology
Norwalk Hospital has implemented Cerner,
a new electronic health record, billing,
and scheduling system to better serve its
patients. The new integrated system provides
a single repository of patient information
and supports our goal of improving your
experience with our clinicians. It also gives
you access to a new and enhanced patient
portal called “Be Well.” Through the portal
you can access your medical information,
schedule appointments and save
appointment details to your calendar, request
prescription renewals or refills, manage
health records of family members through
appropriate proxy access
HOSPITAL services for seniors
Chuck and Terry Tennen Cardiac
Rehabilitation Center
The new 6,200-square-foot Chuck and
Terry Tannen Cardiac Rehabilitation Center
optimizes Norwalk Hospital’s existing
cardiac rehabilitation program to better
help patients recover from heart surgery
and major cardiac events.
C. Anthony and Jean Whittingham
Cancer Center
Through a pioneering collaboration with
the world-renowned Memorial Sloan
Kettering Cancer Center, Norwalk Hospital
is taking its respected cancer program
to an even higher level. Memorial Sloan
Kettering medical and radiation oncologists
are onsite leading and delivering team-
based care alongside Norwalk Hospital’s
own cancer experts. It’s a powerful
collaboration that offers both advanced
science and highly personalized care. And,
for patients, that adds up to more than a
fighting chance.
Phyllis and David Komansky Cardiac
and Vascular Center, utilizes the latest
technology and the expertise of many
renowned physicians specializing in
cardiology, cardiovascular surgery, and
interventional cardiology.
HOSPITAL services for seniors
29
GREENWICH HOSPITAL
Greenwich Hospital offers a comprehensive care for older adults
through its Center for Healthy Aging. The Center has received
national recognition from the American Geriatrics Society as a
Center of Excellence. Services are available to ensure that older
patients and their families get the care and support they need in
the hospital and at home.
Elderly patients often have special requirements while they are
hospitalized. A geriatrician and social worker from the Center meet
with individual patients as needed. The Center also trains nurses
to identify and address any age-related issues that may arise.
Pharmacy, nutrition, physical therapy, case management, and
other resources are available to help prevent physical and mental
decline and ensure a successful stay.
The Center offers a wide range of outpatient programs to improve
quality of life for older adults and their families.
Main location:
5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich, CT 06830
203-863-3000
www.greenwichhospital.org
Comprehensive Aging Assessment
People with age-related medical,
psychological, cognitive, or social issues that
interfere with daily life may benefit from
an aging assessment. It provides detailed
information about current health status
and recommendations to help prepare for
the future. Individuals may be referred to
the Center by a family physician, relatives,
concerned friends, social service agencies, or
other health care providers. The assessment
is conducted by an interdisciplinary team
headed by a board-certified geriatrician who
specializes in aging issues. Medicare covers
some or all of the cost.
Geriatric Psychiatry Services
Depression and behavioral issues that
accompany memory loss or dementia
are common later in life. Counseling,
medication, or a combination of both often
help patients feel better, more productive,
and more satisfied with life. The Center’s
geriatric psychiatrist is highly trained in the
management of emotional and behavioral
problems related to aging.
Caregiving Support Groups
Support groups offered through the Center
are FREE. Please call ahead before attending
to make sure that the group is suitable for
your needs. Please call 203-863-4375 for
specific information about support groups
and meeting sites.
Women’s Spousal Support is designed for
women who provide care for a chronically
ill spouse. Find new friends, practical
information, and emotional support. The
group provides a forum to address the
many concerns of spousal caregivers. It
also gives caregivers a much-needed break
or respite to be with others living with a
similar situation. The group meets twice a
month (the second and fourth Thursdays)
at the hospital’s Center for Healthy Aging
from 1:00-2:15pm. Group size is limited
to 10 members, call 203-863-4375 to
preregister. FREE.
Family Caregiver Support Group
Become a savvy caregiver. This group
provides support for adults who care for a
family member with Alzheimer’s disease
or other types of dementia. Individuals
meet twice a month to talk with caregiving
peers and share advice about common
difficulties and challenges. The group led
by a clinical social worker with expertise in
family counseling and caregiver concerns.
The group meets the first and third Thursday
of each month at the hospital’s Center for
Healthy Aging, 1:00-2:15pm. Group size is
limited to 10 members, so please call 203-
863-4375 to preregister. FREE.
Generations Program
This free membership program is offered
to adults age 50 and older. Members
enjoy stimulating seminars ranging from
the science of laughter to the joys of late-
life learning. From disease prevention
to caring for older relatives, the program
aims to stimulate the mind and encourage
discussion. Eligibility: Any person age 50 or
older who resides in the Greenwich Hospital
service area can join.
To join, call toll free 877-838-4888.
Greenwich Hospital Outpatient Services
Long Ridge Medical Center
260 Long Ridge Road, Stamford, CT 06902
For all appointments
475-240-5762
Blood Draw
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Closed: Noon-1 p.m. daily
Infusion
Services to patients that require IV fluids
or medications, including monoclonal
antibodies. Hours: by appointment
475-619-6152
Occupational Health Medicine
and Wellness Services
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
203-846-3483
Radiology
Hours: 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Rehabilitation
Physical and Occupational Therapy
Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 7 am - 6:30 p.m.;
Fri. 7 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Northeast Medical Group
Internal Medicine, Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-
4:30 p.m.
475-619-6035,
Yale Medical Center for
Musculoskeletal Care
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
866-470-YALE (9253)
NORWALK HOSPITAL
Established in 1893, Norwalk Hospital is a 366-bed, not-
for-profit community hospital providing Fairfield County and
Westchester County residents convenient access to exceptional
care, close to home. As a proud member of Western
Connecticut Health Network, we are united by our mission to
improve the health and well-being of those who live in the
communities that we call home. We remain the local community
providers that you know and trust, only better. As a teaching
hospital, we are associated with Yale University School of
Medicine, University of Vermont College of Medicine, and Ross
University School of Medicine.
Norwalk Hospital, a Level II Trauma Center, is accredited as a
Stroke Center and certified to provide emergency angioplasty for
heart attack.
Main Location: Offsite urgent care::
34 Maple Street New Canaan Immediate Care
Norwalk, CT 06856 38 East Avenue
203-852-2000 New Canaan, CT 06840
www.norwalkhospital.org 203-594-9520
Norwalk Hospital provides a wide range of Clinical
Programs, including:
• Bone, Joint & Spine Care • Cancer Care
• Digestive Diseases • Emergency Care
• Heart and Vascular Care • Primary Care
• Weight Loss Surgery • Women and Children’s Health
Medical Information Technology
Norwalk Hospital has implemented Cerner,
a new electronic health record, billing,
and scheduling system to better serve its
patients. The new integrated system provides
a single repository of patient information
and supports our goal of improving your
experience with our clinicians. It also gives
you access to a new and enhanced patient
portal called “Be Well.” Through the portal
you can access your medical information,
schedule appointments and save
appointment details to your calendar, request
prescription renewals or refills, manage
health records of family members through
appropriate proxy access
HOSPITAL services for seniors
Chuck and Terry Tennen Cardiac
Rehabilitation Center
The new 6,200-square-foot Chuck and
Terry Tannen Cardiac Rehabilitation Center
optimizes Norwalk Hospital’s existing
cardiac rehabilitation program to better
help patients recover from heart surgery
and major cardiac events.
C. Anthony and Jean Whittingham
Cancer Center
Through a pioneering collaboration with
the world-renowned Memorial Sloan
Kettering Cancer Center, Norwalk Hospital
is taking its respected cancer program
to an even higher level. Memorial Sloan
Kettering medical and radiation oncologists
are onsite leading and delivering team-
based care alongside Norwalk Hospital’s
own cancer experts. It’s a powerful
collaboration that offers both advanced
science and highly personalized care. And,
for patients, that adds up to more than a
fighting chance.
Phyllis and David Komansky Cardiac
and Vascular Center, utilizes the latest
technology and the expertise of many
renowned physicians specializing in
cardiology, cardiovascular surgery, and
interventional cardiology.
HOSPITAL services for seniors
Choice What is it? Considerations
Homemaker services
or companion services
Assistance with household tasks
(cleaning, preparing meals, shopping, can
accompany to doctor’s visits, etc.).
Keeps individual in familiar setting. Companionship. Medication
reminders. Can be isolating. No social or recreational opportunities.
Personal care assistant
(PCA) services
Personnel hired to help with activities of
daily living so that an older adult or
disabled person may continue to
live independently.
Keeps individual in familiar setting. Individual care and attention.
Can be isolating. No social or recreational opportunities. Insurance
reimbursements generally not available.
Home health care
Nursing and related care that is provided
in the home. Licensed by the state.
Keeps individual in familiar setting. Individualized care and
attention. Can be isolating. No social or recreational opportunities.
Strict limits on insurance reimbursements.
Adult day care
Day programs where transportation to and
from the program is often available. Meals
may be served.
Nursing supervision, rehabilitation services and other assistance
may be available. May not work well if the program is the only
source of care. Works best if informal caregivers are available.
Limited financial support is available.
Independent
senior housing
Homes, condos or apartments for people
who can maintain an independent
lifestyle.
Often have built-in opportunities for socializing. In some cases there
may be rental assistance from the federal government. Generally,
household help provided. No home health care provided.
Congregate housing
and retirement
communities
Retirement housing that may offer meals,
transportation, recreational activities and
other services.
Noninstitutional. When supplemented with services, the residence
can meet the needs of a frail person who may maintain indepen-
dence at a lower cost than in a nursing home. These facilities may
not be appropriate for individuals with significant care needs.
Continuing care
retirement
communities
Residential living that often includes con-
tracts guaranteeing lifetime medical care.
Communities often offer premium residential settings and ameni-
ties. Security of knowing that there is guaranteed care. There are
entry and monthly fees, and the communities may not be eligible to
take Medicaid residents.
Assisted living
Personal care services that are provided in
a congregate-housing setting that meets
state requirements.
Facility is primarily a residence and is noninstitutional. No state fund-
ing available at this time. Facility may not be appropriate for indi-
viduals with significant care needs.
Home for the aged
A facility where seniors requiring some
daily assistance share meals and enjoy
social and recreational services. State
licensed.
Ongoing supervision is available. Less institutional than a nursing
facility. A full array of health services may not be available within the
home. Group living involves some loss of privacy and autonomy.
Intermediate care
nursing unit
A separate type of nursing home level for
individuals with fewer medical and nursing
needs than skilled nursing. State licensed.
Nursing care and social and recreational programming available.
Medicaid may be a source of payment for eligible individuals. An
institutional setting.
Skilled nursing unit
A nursing home in which residents may
live either for short periods of time for
rehabilitation or for extended periods.
State licensed.
Nursing supervision and social and recreational programming
available for long-term stays. Medicaid may be a source of
payment for eligible individuals. An institutional setting.
Continuing Care
at Home Programs
A membership program that offers
healthy, independent seniors the ability
to stay at home with personal care
management and a lifetime of care in the
home, or in a facility as needed.
Members live in their own homes as long as possible, moving to
assisted living or skilled nursing settings only when required. There
is a membership fee and monthly fees. Programs are licensed in
specific geographical areas. There are a limited number of programs
nationally as this is a new concept in life care.
Senior home care and residential living options
30
VA CONNECTICUT
HEALTHCARE SYSTEM—
WEST HAVEN CAMPUS
The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
(VA) offers a variety of health services to
meet the needs of America's veterans. In
Connecticut those services encompass an
inpatient facility and Ambulatory Care
Center in West Haven (a/k/a VA Connecticut
West Haven Campus); an Ambulatory Care
Center in Newington; and six primary care
Community Based Outpatient Clinics located
around the state. All veterans who have
met the service and duty requirements
for eligibility are encouraged to enroll in
the VA Healthcare System by completing
an Application for Health Benefits and
providing certain documents.
An Eligibility Office is located at the West
Haven Campus and can be reached at
203-937-5711, ext. 3328 or 3131.
VA Connecticut Healthcare System West
Haven Campus • 203-932-5711
950 Campbell Ave., West Haven, CT 06516
Once enrolled in the VA Healthcare System,
each veteran will receive a personalized
Veterans Health Benefits Handbook. The
purpose of the Handbook is to provide
a current and accurate description of VA
healthcare benefits and services, tailored
specifically to the individual veteran.
VA Connecticut offers information and
assistance to older veterans through its
Geriatrics and Extended Care Program.
The Program seeks to help veterans with
their needs in regard to: community living;
nursing home entry; hospice and palliative
care; spinal cord injuries; home-based
primary care; geriatric consults; home and
community-based care. The Program can be
reached at 203-932-5711, ext. 2121, Mon.-
Fri., 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
VA Connecticut also offers a wide range of
health and wellness educational programs.
Information about these can be obtained
from the Veteran Health Education
Coordinator at 203-932-5711,
ext. 5189, Mon.-Fri., 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
For further information about VA
Connecticut Healthcare System—West Haven
Campus, contact the Public Affairs Office at
203-937-3824.
Honoring all who served.
A veteran is someone who wrote a blank check, payable to the United States of America,
for an amount of up to and including his life.”
—Gene Castagnetti, Director, National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific
31
W
here
M
ain
S
treet
is
M
emory
L
ane
.
Waveny’s Award-Winning Memory Care Community,
The Village,
provides
a therapeutic approach to Alzheimer’s and dementia care. Conveniently located in
New Canaan, our world-renowned indoor “Main Street” is a bustling site for meaningful
interaction, fun activities and fulfilling programs for seniors.
Discover more about everything we have to offer, including long-term care and short-term
overnight respite stays for caregiver relief, by calling
203.594.5302,
dropping by,
or visiting
waveny.org.
Enjoy long-range confidence knowing that Village residents have priority access to Waveny’s
entire nonprofit continuum of care, including Waveny Care Center, our 5-star Medicare and
Medicaid accredited skilled nursing facility, should personal or financial needs change.
32
32
DENTISTS
Professionals, Businesses and Services
Hearing Specialists
Hearing, Balance and Speech Center
148 East Avenue, Suite 3L, Norwalk, CT 06851 (203) 287-9915
2661 Dixwell Avenue, Hamden, CT 06518 ...(203) 287-9915
info@hearingbalance.com • www.hearingbalance.com
Hearing, Balance and Speech Center is committed not only to
helping you hear better, but also to helping you live better.
With 3 Audiologists, 1 Hearing Aid Specialist, and the latest
hearing-aid technology and diagnostic equipment, we pride
ourselves on being leaders in the hearing healthcare field.
We have 6 convenient locations in Branford, Bristol, Hamden,
Norwalk, Wallingford and Waterbury. See ad, page 11.
Medical Equipment and Supplies
The Senior Depot Store
770 Connecticut Ave, Norwalk, CT 06854 ....(203) 956-0962
195 Federal Rd, Brookfield, CT 06804 .......(203) 775-1095
www.cornerstonest.net
Senior Depot offers a large variety of top-quality medical
supplies and aids for daily living. Our knowledgeable staff
is committed to meeting your needs while supporting you
through the natural transitions and complications of aging.
Stop in today and let us show you what we truly believe:
Getting older doesn’t have to be so hard! See ad, Page 5.
A SURPRISING PROBLEM UPON TURNING 100
Last century, when life insurance com-
panies calculated premiums needed to
fund a whole life policy, they expected
that no one would live beyond age 100.
Accordingly, most whole life insurance
issued then includes a termination date.
When the insured reaches age 100, the
policy has matured.
As life expectancy grew, the insurance
industry updated their actuarial tables to
provide coverage to age 121. However,
this change took place in 2001. Policies
issued before 2001 may still include ter
-
mination provisions.
This phenomenon was explored and
explained by financial planner Barry
Flagg in his recent article, “What Happens
to My Life Insurance at Age 100, and
What Can I Do About it?” (Leimberg
Information Services, November 6, 2018).
When the policy terminates
Termination of a life insurance policy is
not likely to be welcomed by the insured.
At that moment the insurance company
pays out the accumulated cash value of
the policy, and the insurance ends before
the death of the insured.
If the coverage were designed as an
“endowment” policy, the cash value
would be equal to the face value of
the insurance. If the insured amount
were $500,000, for example, the entire
$500,000 would be paid to the policy
owner upon reaching age 100. However,
unlike insurance death benefits, which
are free from income tax, this payment
would be subject to state and local
income taxes in the year of receipt.
Endowed policies are the exception, not
the rule, according to Mr. Flagg. Given
the increases in the cost of insurance in
recent years, coupled with declines in
policy earnings, the cash value in most
policies will be less than the face value
of the insurance, and could be as low as
$1.00. The insured then loses the death
benefit after receiving the cash value.
Still worse are those policies that allowed
for borrowing from cash values to pay
additional premiums. When the policy
terminates, the loan is forgiven—but a
loan forgiveness is taxable income! The
phantom income could be taxed at a
moment when the insured has no money
to pay the tax.
Alternatives
There may be a way out for some poli-
cyholders who bought whole life insur-
ance before 2001 and who might live to
100. Some insurance companies offer
a Maturity Extension Rider to continue
the policy. The terms of such extensions
need to be thoroughly understood,
however. In some cases the value of the
extension is defined as the cash value of
the policy at age 100—if the cash value
is low, so is the value of the continued
insurance. Still, at least an income tax has
been avoided.
The next best option to consider, accord-
ing to Mr. Flagg, is to exchange the
limited policy for a new one that defines
maturity beyond age 100. This approach
works best with younger insureds (in
their 70s) who are still insurable. As one
approaches age 90, the chance of obtain
-
ing a new life insurance contract dimin-
ishes rapidly.
As a last resort, Mr. Flagg suggests that
the policy may be exchanged tax free
for a deferred annuity. Income taxes are
not avoided, but at least they may be
deferred until death. The gain from the
policy would then be taxed as income in
respect of a decedent.
If you are the owner of a whole life insur
-
ance policy issued before 2001, you’ll
want to meet with your financial advisors
soon to read the fine print and explore
your alternatives.
W
here
M
ain
S
treet
is
M
emory
L
ane
.
Waveny’s Award-Winning Memory Care Community,
The Village,
provides
a therapeutic approach to Alzheimer’s and dementia care. Conveniently located in
New Canaan, our world-renowned indoor “Main Street” is a bustling site for meaningful
interaction, fun activities and fulfilling programs for seniors.
Discover more about everything we have to offer, including long-term care and short-term
overnight respite stays for caregiver relief, by calling
203.594.5302,
dropping by,
or visiting
waveny.org.
Enjoy long-range confidence knowing that Village residents have priority access to Waveny’s
entire nonprofit continuum of care, including Waveny Care Center, our 5-star Medicare and
Medicaid accredited skilled nursing facility, should personal or financial needs change.
33
34
ADULT DAY PROGRAMS
Adult Day Programs
Adult Day Program at Waveny
3 Farm Road, New Canaan, CT 06840 .......(203) 594-5200
www.waveny.org. The Adult Day Program at Waveny is dedi-
cated to improving the quality of life for older adults who are
still living at home, but who may require personal assistance,
more social interaction or medical monitoring throughout the
day. The program is available weekdays with flexible hours and
transportation provided to and from Norwalk, Stamford, Wilton,
Darien and New Canaan.
Our Adult Day Program participants benefit from the immediate
access they have to Waveny LifeCare Network’s comprehensive
network of professional experts and healthcare services. While
they are attending the program, we can arrange for on-site
physical, occupational and speech rehabilitative therapies, short-
term respite stays at either The Village or Care Center, geriatric
evaluation, nutritional counseling, bathing, hairdressing and
other services—all under the same roof.
See ad, pages 7, 33, and back cover.
Aging in Place Solutions
Waveny LifeCare Network
3 Farm Road, New Canaan, 06840 ..........(203) 594-5200
www.waveny.org. Conveniently located in New Canaan, Waveny
LifeCare Network is a not-for-profit organization that provides a
comprehensive continuum of healthcare to serve the growing
needs of older adults from all areas.
With two campuses in New Canaan, Waveny offers a progres-
sion of programs, services and living options for the senior com-
munity and their families. It offers independent living at The Inn,
assisted living for people with Alzheimer’s and memory loss at
The Village, and skilled nursing at Waveny
Care Center.
It also includes Waveny Home Healthcare, in- and out-patient
Rehabilitation Services, the Brown Geriatric Evaluation Clinic, a
professional Geriatric Care Management team, an Adult Day
Program, available weekdays with flexible hours and transporta-
tion from New Canaan, Stamford, Norwalk, Darien and Wilton,
and respite programs at both The Village and Care Center. See
ad, pages 7, 33, and back cover.
Assisted Living and Independent
Living Communities
Edgehill Community
122 Palmers Hill Rd., Stamford, CT 06902 .....(203)244-7698
www.edgehillcommunity.com
Edgehill is a full Continuing Care Retirement Community offer-
ing independent living, assisted living, memory care and sub-
acute rehabilitation/post-hospital care. Its beautiful 22-acre
neighborhood setting is right on the Stamford/Greenwich
border and offers elegant apartments, gourmet dining and
upscale amenities and services. Call to learn how retirement is
“Done Right” at Edgehill. See ad, inside back cover.
The Inn
Part of Waveny LifeCare Network
73 Oenoke Ridge, New Canaan, CT 06840 ...(203) 594-5450
www.waveny.org. Nestled in a scenic neighborhood that is
walking distance from New Canaan’s lovely town center, The
Inn is a cozy, not-for-profit rental community for independent
living that welcomes seniors from everywhere.
With three delicious meals served daily, a caring and attentive
professional staff and just 40 private apartments, residents at
The Inn enjoy the benefits of living in a thriving, yet intimate
retirement community. Wonderful amenities are all included in
a modest rental fee. Inn residents also have priority access to
Waveny LifeCare Network’s continuum of healthcare services,
programs and facilities, including Waveny Care Center and
Waveny Home Healthcare. See ad, pages 7, 33, and
back cover.
The Village at Waveny
Assisted Living Dedicated to Caring for People
with Memory Loss & Dementia
3 Farm Road, New Canaan, CT 06840 .......(203) 594-5200
www.waveny.org. Featuring our award-winning “Main Street”
replica of a quaint New England town, The Village at Waveny
is uniquely designed to provide the most advanced therapeutic
benefits for people with memory loss. Our innovative programs
and quality of care serve as benchmarks of excellence through-
out the nation. A licensed nurse and certified nursing assistants
are always on-site and are devoted to helping every resident
feel secure, comfortable and happy so that each day is a
fulfilling one.
Residents of The Village also benefit from priority access to
Waveny LifeCare Network’s comprehensive continuum of
healthcare services, programs and professional resources. This
includes on-site physical, occupational and speech rehabilitative
therapies, a geriatric evaluation clinic, a team of professional
care managers, a wonderful skilled nursing facility and more.
We welcome short-term guests for respite stays as brief as four
days or longer. Like our residents, respite guests enjoy all amenities,
including a private apartment, personal care, delicious meals and
therapeutic, social, recreational and spiritual activities.
See ad, pages 7, 35, and back cover.
CTSeniorHelpCenter.com
Fast, easy, and always FREE!
Caregivers, Residential Facilities and Rehabilitation Facilities
GERIATRIC ASSESSMENTS AND
GERIATRIC CARE MANAGEMENT
35
I Want to Stay in My Own Home!
We Help People Remain Safe & Independent
Affordable Non-Medical In-Home Care
Companionship Meal Preparation
Personal Care Incidental Transportation
Grocery Shopping & Errands Light Housekeeping
Laundry & Linen Washing Grooming & Dressing Guidance
Family Respite Care 24-Hour & Live-In Care Available
Our staff is caring and compassionate
Carefully screened, bonded and insured
CT DCP Reg. #HCA 108 & 141
www.comfortkeepers.com
Most offices independently owned and operated.
Lower Fairfield County
203-629-5029
Upper Fairfield &
Lower N. Haven Counties
203-924-4949
For Service or Referrals, Call:
203-227-5040
www.homechoicect.com
The Right Choice ~ Right at Home
Home Choice Senior Care
Home Choice Senior Care of Westport
Proudly serving Fairfield County with
Nurse’s Aides, Companions, Home Health Aides
Customized Homecare Services
For people of all ages!
Live-In or Daily Services Available
Geriatric Assessments and
Geriatric Care Management
The Brown Geriatric Evaluation Clinic
3 Farm Road, New Canaan, CT 06840 ......................
(203) 594-5200
www.waveny.org. Opened in 1998, the Drs. Charlotte & David
Brown Geriatric Evaluation Clinic is a comprehensive evaluation
and management program that provides specialized services
to older adults, their families and other professionals.
Our outpatient program addresses common, but often complex,
medical issues in older adults—especially memory loss. Our
expert team provides patients and families with individualized
needs assessments, baseline evaluations and ongoing manage-
ment to help optimize their quality of life.
The purpose of a geriatric evaluation is to review an individual’s
cognitive, psychological, social, medical, functional and caregiv-
er status. Our assessments are conducted by a neuropsycholo-
gist, board-certified geriatrician or an advanced practice nurse.
Professional recommendations by our experts assist in maximiz-
ing the patient’s safety, functions of daily living and quality of
life. See ad, pages 7, 33, and back cover.
Geriatric Care Management at Waveny
3 Farm Road, New Canaan, CT 06840 .......(203) 594-5300
www.waveny.org. Waveny LifeCare Network’s professional
Geriatric Care Management team helps family members and
friends navigate the complex issues, questions and difficult
decisions involved in caring for an older adult. Our cutting-
edge team of professional, certified care consultants offers a
depth and breadth of experience, provides 24/7 coverage,
and is touted for its continuity of care and quick response
times in crisis situations.
Our care managers help caregivers access appropriate
resources to maintain their loved one’s maximum level of
independent function. They also develop and implement per-
sonalized care plans to help clients remain safely at home for
as long as possible, or live with dignity in a structured setting.
See ad, pages 7, 33, and back cover.
Please patronize our advertisers to thank
them for making this directory possible.
Home Care/Home Health Care
Comfort Keepers
Greenwich, CT ...........................(203) 629-5029
email: CKofLFC@comfortkeepers.com
Shelton, CT ..............................(203) 924-4949
email: shelton@comfortkeepers.com
Comfort Keepers enables both seniors and those suffering
from non-age-related conditions with services needed to help
them remain safe and independent in the comfort of their own
homes. We offer an extensive range of non-medical care ser-
vices, tailored to the unique needs of each individual, including
companionship, rehab recovery, chronic care and
end-of-life support. Service is available hourly, 24/7, and live-in.
Comfort Keepers is part of a nationwide network of over 750
quality providers, all dedicated to help people live happy,
independent and dignified lives. See ad, page 35.
Griswold Home Care
Stratford • 1122 Broadbridge Ave., Stratford, CT 06615
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (203) 380-2700
Bethel/Danbury • 43 Grassy Plain St., Bethel, CT 06801
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (203) 744-9200
Norwalk • 193 East Ave., Norwalk CT 06855
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (203) 852-9707
www.GriswoldHomeCare.com
Personal care, homemaking and companionship in Fairfield
County for 26 years. All caregivers receive a rigorous interview
and background check. A free in-home assessment is conducted
on all cases. Low-cost, high-quality care ensured through quality
audits. Covered by worker’s compensation, general liability and
bonding insurance. Call for info on Parkinson and Alzheimer’s
respite grants. Hourly and live-in. See ad, this page.
Home Choice Senior Care, Inc.
Westport, CT .............................(203) 227-5040
Customized Homecare Services for people of all ages! Live-in
or daily services available. Proudly serving Fairfield County with:
Nurse’s Aides, Companions and Home Health Aides.
See ad, page 35.
HOME CARE/HOME HEALTH CARE
Stratford 203.380.2700
Norwalk 203.852.9707 | Danbury 203.744.9200
GriswoldHomeCare.com
If you have a loved one who needs in-home, non-medical
assistance, we can help. A compassionate caregiver can provide a
wide array of support — everything from assisting with personal
care, preparing meals, and doing light housekeeping to being
there when you can't be so people can stay home and remain
independent. Hourly and live-in options are available.
© 2017 Griswold International, LLC
We give people the
help they need to live
in the place they love.
36
Please patronize our advertisers to thank
them for making this directory possible.
37
HOSPICES
Waveny at Home
3 Farm Road, New Canaan, CT 06840 .......(203) 594-5249
www.waveny.org. Waveny at Home offers professional non-med-
ical homemaker and companion services to help enable clients
to remain safely in their own homes and the community.
Based on a plan developed for each client’s distinct and indi-
vidual needs, Waveny at Home staff will assist with household
tasks, including light housekeeping, meal preparation and laun-
dry, as well as help facilitate or provide transportation to and
from personal appointments, events, shopping and errands.
See ad, pages 7, 33, and back cover.
Waveny Home Healthcare
3 Farm Road, New Canaan, CT 06840 .......(203) 594-5249
www.waveny.org. Waveny Home Healthcare proudly offers a
full spectrum of high-quality licensed and certified professional
in-home services.
Our interdisciplinary team is comprised of Registered Nurses,
Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapists, and Medical
Social Workers who are dedicated to meeting the needs of our
clients. Supportive services are provided by trained and certified
Home Health Aides under the supervision of our professional
staff. Care is coordinated with the client’s physician and is pro-
vided by our team of experienced, fully insured and carefully
screened Home Health professionals and paraprofessionals.
We accept Medicare, private-pay and long-term care insurance
clients living in the greater Fairfield County area.
See ad, pages 7, 33, and back cover.
Hospices
Greenwich Hospital Home Hospice Care
500 West Putnam, Suite 150, Greenwich, CT 06830
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (203) 863-3883
When cure is no longer the goal, let Greenwich Hospital Home
Hospice lend a helping hand. This group of experienced pro-
fessionals provides support to help families care for a loved
one in the comfort of their own home. Our expert Home
Hospice team can improve quality of life for patient and fam-
ily. Comprehensive, coordinated services include nursing care,
home health aides, spiritual care and the assistance of a social
worker. www.greenwichhospital.org. See page 28
Hospitals
Greenwich Hospital
5 Perryridge Rd., Greenwich, CT 06830 ......(203) 863-4373
Greenwich Hospital’s Center for Healthy Aging provides a wide
range of programs designed to enhance the quality of life for
older adults and their families. Professional clinical services
are offered for memory evaluations, care giving consultations,
home safety assessments, medication interactions and psychia-
try. The Center works closely with the ACE (Acute Care for the
Elderly) Unit by providing specialized care to hospitalized older
patients. www.greenwichhospital.org. See page 28.
Norwalk Hospital
34 Maple St., Norwalk, CT 06856 ...........(203) NHB-WELL
Norwalk Hospital is a partner hospital of the Western
Connecticut Health Network, Connecticut’s premier, patient-
centered health care organization. Norwalk Hospital was
established in 1893 by our devoted community and built for
the people we continue to serve in Western Connecticut and
adjacent New York. The 325-bed hospital is a place where
patients always come first, where our talented staff takes
pride in keeping people well and providing compassionate,
contemporary care when our patients need our help. We offer
Cardiovascular, Cancer, Orthopedic, Neurologic and Digestive
Disease care with advanced diagnostics, innovative therapies
and state-of-the-art surgery. We take heart that no matter
how great the challenge, every medical history can become a
brighter medical future–here. Norwalkhospital.org.
See page 29.
Introducing Our NEW Intensive Stroke Rehabilitation Program
DIRECTED BY
Neurologist: Daryl Story, Physiatrist: Claudio Petrillo and Pulmonologist: Donald McNichol
A CARING
Place Between
Hospital & Home
76 West Rocks Rd., Norwalk, CT • 203.847.5893 • ndhrehab.org
NOTRE DAME
Health and Rehabilitation Center
FORMERLY NOTRE DAME CONVALESCENT HOME
38
NURSING HOMES/SKILLED NURSING
Stamford Health
One Hospital Plaza, P.O. Box 9317, Stamford, CT 06902
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (203) 276-1000
For more than 115 years, Stamford Hospital has cared for our
friends and neighbors in Fairfield and Westchester Counties.
The Hospital is the cornerstone of Stamford Health, a regional
network of inpatient and outpatient healthcare services that
also includes the Stamford Health Medical Group and a
growing number of ambulatory care locations across Lower
Fairfield County.
Opened in September 2016, the new Stamford Hospital
features all-private patient rooms with private baths and
spectacular views. Stamford Hospital received Magnet
®
designation for nursing excellence in 2016 and is a Planetree
Designated
®
person-centered hospital. For more information,
visit StamfordHealth.org.
Nursing Homes/Skilled Nursing
Notre Dame Health and Rehabilitation Center
76 West Rocks Road, Norwalk, CT 06851 ......203-847-5893
www.ndhrehab.org
Our goal is to optimize the quality of life. We are a caring
place between Hospital and Home with our New Intensive
Stroke Rehabilitation Program. Our welcoming and home-like
60-bed residence, including 6 private rooms, is located on five
landscaped acres in Norwalk, CT, and is operated under the
loving sponsorship of The Sisters of Saint Thomas of Villanova.
See ad, page 37.
The Nathaniel Witherell
70 Parsonage Road, Greenwich, CT 06830
George Cossifos ..........................(203) 618-4232
www.nathanielwitherell.org
Nursing home residents at The Nathaniel Witherell receive
the highest level of clinical care from a professional and car-
ing staff, which has a turnover rate that is six times lower than
the national nursing home average. Witherell respects resi-
dents’ wishes, from menu choices and dining times, to schedul-
ing of daily services. Family and pets are always welcome.
See ad, page 9.
Waveny Care Center
3 Farm Road, New Canaan, CT 06840 .......(203) 594-5200
www.waveny.org. Waveny Care Center is an award-winning
not-for-profit skilled nursing and rehabilitation facility that offers
short- and long-term care and a special unit for individuals
with advanced memory loss. Our inpatient and outpatient
rehabilitation services feature state-of-the-art equipment, expert
therapists and a comfortable environment to help patients
achieve their highest potential. Since 1975, the Care Center
has maintained its high standards of excellence in providing
quality care to those we serve through our patient-oriented phi-
losophy and highly experienced, compassionate staff. We assist
individuals in maintaining their dignity and encourage them to
live as independently as circumstances permit. See ad, pages
7, 33, and back cover.
Rehabilitation Facilities/Short-Term
Rehabilitation
Notre Dame Health and Rehabilitation Center
76 West Rocks Road, Norwalk, CT 06851 ......203-847-5893
www.ndhrehab.org
Our goal is to optimize the quality of life. We are a caring
place between Hospital and Home with our New Intensive
Stroke Rehabilitation Program. Our welcoming and home-like
60-bed residence, including 6 private rooms, is located on five
landscaped acres in Norwalk, CT, and is operated under the
loving sponsorship of The Sisters of Saint Thomas of Villanova.
See ad, page 37.
Rehabilitation Services at Waveny Care Center
3 Farm Road, New Canaan, CT 06840 .......(203) 594-5340
www.waveny.org. Waveny Care Center’s outpatient
Rehabilitation Services are available to people from all areas
who are recovering at home from an injury, illness or other
type of medical condition that requires rehabilitative therapy.
We also offer short-term rehabilitation services on an inpatient
basis. (See Waveny Care Center.)
We provide state-of-the-art physical, occupational and speech
therapies as well as therapeutic massage. To complement
these services, we also offer nutritional counseling and health
promotion programs.
Our highly experienced rehabilitation therapy staff will effec-
tively treat and support you in reaching your highest potential,
while strictly adhering to your doctor’s orders. Patients benefit
immediately from our staff’s enthusiasm and clinical expertise,
as well as from the facility’s state-of-the-art equipment and indi-
vidualized care. See ad, pages 7, 33, and back cover.
The Nathaniel Witherell
70 Parsonage Road, Greenwich, CT 06830
George Cossifos ..........................(203) 618-4232
www.nathanielwitherell.org
Short-term rehab at The Nathaniel Witherell is designed to fit
your life and style. There are 46 private rooms with WiFi access
and live/work space. State-of-the-art therapy is available seven
days a week, and you’ll enjoy excellent patient-centered care.
The Witherell offers the following comprehensive short-term
rehab programs: Orthopedic, Cardiac, Pulmonary, Neurological,
and General Medical. Outpatient therapies are also available.
See ad, page 9.
39
Elder Law|Estate Planning|Probate
Real Estate|Medicaid|Business Law
STATIONHOUSE SQUARE
2505 Main Street, Building 1, Suite 221,
Stratford, CT 06615
T: 203-386-1282 F: 203-386-1795
www.kevinkellylaw.com
Attorneys
Braunstein & Todisco, P.C.
One Eliot Place, Fairfield, CT 06824 .........(203) 254-1118
Committed to Protecting the Dignity, Financial and Legal
Rights of Seniors. See ad, page 40.
Eliovson & Tenore/Elderlaw & Family Counseling
Associates, LLC
117 Tunxis Hill Rd., Fairfield, CT ............(203) 259-7195
Specializing in Elder Law and Estate Planning.
See ad, this page.
Debra Vey Voda-Hamilton
Hamilton Law & Mediation, PLLC
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (914) 273-1085
info@hamiltonlawandmediation.com
hamiltonlawandmediation.com
Fostering Peaceful Solutions in Conflicts Over Animals.
See ad, page 13.
Kevin Kelly & Associates Attorneys at Law
STATIONHOUSE SQUARE
2505 Main Street, Building 1, Suite 221, Stratford, CT 06615
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .203-386-1282
Fax: 203-386-1795 • www.kevinkellylaw.com
Elder Law Estate Planning Probate • Real Estate
• Medicaid • Business Law See ad, this page..
Eliovson & Tenore
. . . because experience matters
Probate & Conservatorship
Estate Planning
Asset Protection
Medicaid/Title XIX Eligibility
Wills & Trusts
Special Needs Trusts
ATTORNEYS
Legal, Insurance, Real Estate, Mortgages/Reverse
Mortgages, and Financial Professionals
eldercare with care
LAW OFFICES OF
JOEL D. MUHLBAUM, LLC
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
Joel D. Muhlbaum, Esq.
Sharon H. Rosen, Esq.
(203) 323-1818
www.ctnyelderlaw.com
1100 Summer Street
Stamford, CT 06905
191 Post Road West
Westport, CT 06880
(by appt. only)
Medicaid Planning/Eligibility/Applications
Estate Planning and Administration
Powers-of-Attorney and
Advance Medical Directives
Probate and Conservatorships
Nursing Home Admissions/Advocacy
Interstate Considerations (Attorney
Muhlbaum is licensed in CT and NY.)
Compassionately representing local area
seniors and their families since 1997
40
BANKS
Providing
Professional Personal
Service
Amy E. Todisco*
amy@btlawfirm.com
One Eliot Place Fairfield, CT 06824-5154
Phone: (203) 254-1118 Fax: (203) 254-2453 www.btlawfirm.com
*President, Connecticut Chapter National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, Inc. 2009-2010; Connecticut Bar Association Elder Law Committee, Executive Committee member.
Medicaid (“Title 19”) Eligibility,
Planning and Protection of Asset
Strategies; Medicaid Applications
and Appeals
Involuntary Conservatorships
Powers of Attorney and
Advance Directives
Estate Planning
Probate
Wills,Trusts & Estates
Special Needs Trusts
and Planning
&
Braunstein
Todisco, P.C.
Attorneys at Law
Committed To Protecting the Dignity, Financial
and Legal Rights of Seniors
Please patronize our advertisers to thank
them for making this directory possible.
Law Offices of JOEL D. MUHLBAUM, LLC,
Attorneys at Law
Joel D. Muhlbaum, Esq. • Sharon H. Rosen, Esq.
1100 Summer Street, Stamford, CT 06905 ...(203) 323-1818
191 Post Road West, Westport, CT 06880
www.ctnyelderlaw.com
Compassionately representing local area seniors and their
families since 1997.
• Medicaid Planning/Eligibility/Applications
• Estate Planning and Administration
• Powers-of-Attorney and Advance Medical Directives
• Probate and Conservatorships
• Nursing Home Admissions/Advocacy
• Interstate Considerations
(Attorney Muhlbaum is licensed in CT and NY.)
See ad, page 39.
Banks
People’s United Bank
Call. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-800-772-1090
With over 400 branches, including our 7-day Stop & Shop
locations. For all your banking and wealth management
needs. www.peoples.com. See ad, inside front cover.
Mortgages/Reverse Mortgages
Atlantic Home Loans
Cindy Perham, Mortgage Banker NMLS#110424
222 Post Road, Suite 2621, Fairfield, CT 06824
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Office: (203) 454-1000 x 2104
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cell: (203) 521-0445
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fax: (203) 413-4423
cperham@atlantichomeloans.com • www.atlantichomeloans.com
At Atlantic Home Loans, we pledge to provide you with profes-
sional service that is honest, efficient, and courteous. We offer
a wide variety of mortgage options to fit your needs.
See ad, page 17.
41
Funeral Homes
Magner Funeral Home
12 Mott Ave., Norwalk, CT 06850 ...........(203) 866-5553
www.magnerfuneralhome.com No one wants to think about
the loss of a loved one or their own mortality. This reality,
however, is unavoidable. The Magner Funeral Home staff has
pre-arranged funeral services for hundreds of families in the
greater Norwalk area and has accepted pre-payments for
these services since it became legal to do so. Whether you
chose this approach to ease the burden of other family mem-
bers or to apply for state assistance, we are here to help in
any way that we can. Your monies are placed into guaranteed,
interest-bearing escrow accounts for your peace of mind. We
have been family owned and operated since 1912.
See ad, this page.
Magner
Funeral Home
12 Mott Ave., Norwalk, CT 06850
Tel: 1-203-866-5553
www.magnerfuneralhome.com
Cemeteries and Funeral Homes
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What the Great Poets had to say about Aging and the Last of Life
A lively presentation at your facility for a modest fee by a professional writer/editor/researcher and former college instructor.
To sponsor this presentation, contact: Peter J. O’Connell
800 Quinnipiac Avenue • New Haven, CT 06513 • (203) 469-5192 • pjpoconnell@gmail.com
Southwestern Connecticut
Agency on Aging
The Southwestern Connecticut Agency on Aging (SWCAA)
is a private, not-for-profit corporation established in 1974
and designated as one of a number of Area Agencies on
Aging functioning under the Older Americans Act of 1965.
(There are five such Agencies in Connecticut.) SWCAA
utilizes federal and state funds to benefit the elderly in
the 14-town region of southwestern Connecticut. These
funds help support such services as nutrition, health care,
in-home care, adult day care, respite care, legal assistance,
transportation, senior centers, and outreach and social
support. SWCAA researches and evaluates elderly issues,
offers community education related to the needs of the
elderly, and serves as an advocate for older individuals. It
is a resource for information on and referrals to services
for older adults, including health insurance, housing and
in-home care. The Agency administers the CHOICES
Program, Statewide Respite Program and the National
Caregiver Support Program for the region. SWCAA is also
an “Access Agency,” under contract with the Department
of Social Services of the State of Connecticut, to provide
care management to clients who receive home and
community-based services through the Connecticut
Home Care Program for Elders.
Southwestern CT Agency on Aging, Inc.
1000 Lafayette Blvd. • Bridgeport, CT 06604
Telephone Number (203) 333-9288
Toll-Free Number 1-800-994-9422
Fax Number (203) 332-2619
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First Selectman • Jayme Stevenson
E-mail: jstevenson@darienct.gov
Darien Town Hall
2 Renshaw Rd. • Darien, CT 06820
203-656-7300 • Web site: www.darienct.gov
Hours: 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
COMMISSION ON AGING
Develops policies and exercises oversight concerning
needs of Darien’s seniors regarding health, recreation,
transportation and economics.
Chairman • Joseph M. Pankowski, Jr.
Christine Castles Peter F. Eder
Jennifer Geddes Geraldine Genovese
Francie George Ronald Heinbaugh
Mary McCarthy James Metzger
Anne Marie Rayhill Raymond Slavin
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
Staff available to assist residents by phone, by e-mail, in
Town Hall offices or in residents’ homes. Director is also
Municipal Agent for Elderly Persons and serves as liaison
with Commission on Aging and other resources and
programs serving elderly.
Town Hall, Room 109 • 203-656-7328 • Fax: 203-656-7486
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. or by appointment.
Director • Ali Ramsteck, LCSW • 203-656-7494
E-mail: aramsteck@darienct.gov
Case Manager • Cynthia Hall, LMSW • 203-656-7494
E-mail: chall@darienct.gov
Department programs and services include:
• Counseling, Information, Referrals
• Loan Closet: free, short-term loans of convalescent
equipment.
• Household Supply Closet: augments food pantries with
personal and home cleaning supplies, paper goods, etc.
Financial Assistance: To eligible applicants. Short term.
• Energy Assistance: To eligible applicants.
• Rebate for Elderly and Disabled Who Rent.
• Holiday Programs.
• Emergency Support Services: list of individuals who
would require assistance in event of emergency.
Handicapped Parking Permits Applications.
• Resource Library: wide range of reading material on
human services topics. Department publishes the
SENIOR RESOURCE DIRECTORY.
DARIEN SENIOR PROGRAMS
AT THE MATHER CENTER
2 Renshaw Rd. • Darien, CT 06820 • 203-656-7490
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Director • Elizabeth Paris
E-mail: eparis@darienct.gov
Program Specialist • Marcy Rand
E-mail: mrand@darienct.gov
Clerk/Receptionist • Eileen Manhart
E-mail: emanhart@darienct.gov
Programs include: Chef Prepared Noon Meal ($5.00)
Creative Pursuits: Stain Glass Instruction, Water Color,
Acyrlic & Oil Painting; Woodshop Repair Program; Bridge
and Pinochele Instruction; Computer Room; 19 Exercise
Classes; Health and Wellness Lectures; Languages Classes;
Crafts Themes, Knitting and Crocheting; Writing Work Shop;
Short Story Discussion; History Presentations; Global Issues;
Musical Entertainments and Special Monthly Programs
and more….
Services include: Bi Monthly Health Counseling & Blood
Pressure Screening; Ask a Social Worker; Ask a Lawyer
montly; Caregiver Educational Support Group; Audioligy
Screening; AARP Driving ; VA Counselor by appointment;
Volunteer Opportunities
AT HOME IN DARIEN
A nonprofit agency that helps Darien seniors live inde-
pendently, comfortably and with dignity in their homes
and the community as long as possible. The organization
helps Darien residents, age 60-plus, and those who care
about them. It provides free services, including transporta-
tion; information, advice and agency referrals; referral to
trustworthy and reliable vetted service providers, such as
home and property maintenance professionals; volunteer
services, including grocery shopping, home visits, driving
and small chores; social, cultural and wellness programs
and activities; and communication via the Out and About
newsletter and monthly e-mails that highlight senior
programs and services throughout town, health tips and
ideas for living at home safely. For more information, call
203-655-2227 or visit www.athomeindarien.org.
Executive Director • Gina Zarra Blum
E-mail: gina@athomeindarien.org • 2 Renshaw Rd
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
At Home In Darien provides free transportation for Darien
seniors and the disabled to any destination in Darien,
Norwalk, Stamford and New Canaan, Mon. through Fri., 9
a.m-4 p.m. Reservation required (24-hour advance notice),
and voluntary contributions appreciated ($5 per round
trip suggested). For service to other locations, or at other
times, or when a person is needed to pick senior up from a
Town of Darien
DARIEN
44
DARIEN
medical appointment, call to request a Friendly Volunteer
Driver. Call 203-655-2227 or visit www.athomeindarien.
org for more information.
• Easy Access/Dispatch a Ride: run by Norwalk Transit
District, serves disabled riders with curb-to-curb service
within Darien, Greenwich, Norwalk and Stamford.
• 203-299-5180 • Web site: www.norwalktransit.com
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
Town Assessor administers state programs under which
taxes are reduced for eligible residents. Call for informa-
tion and guidelines.
Town Hall, Room 102 • 203-656-7310
Fax: 203-656-7380
Assessor • Anthony Homicki
E-mail: ahomicki@darienct.gov
DARIEN LIBRARY
Consistently ranked among top ten libraries in the country
in its category.
1441 Post Rd. • Darien, CT 06820 • 203-655-1234
Fax: 203-655-1547 • Web site: www.darienlibrary.org
E-mail: askus@darienlibrary.org
Library Director • Alan Gray • 203-669-5224
E-mail: agray@darienlibrary.org
Hours: Monday-Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Children’s Library closes at 8 p.m. Mon.-Thurs.
Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. • Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Dial-A-Book: Free service for homebound residents.
Staff deliver borrowed items to homes and return them
to Library. • 203-655-2568
Museum Passes: NYC and Connecticut are home to some
of the greatest museums in the country. Renaissance
masterpieces, visionary modern art, and celebrations of
great historical figures are an easy train or car ride away.
As part of our continuing dedication to enriching the
lives of our patrons, Darien Library is pleased to provide
a variety of museum passes that will engage, excite, and
inform you in a cultural learning experience. Contact the
Welcome Desk at 203-669-5239 for more information.
PROBATE COURT
Town Hall • 203-656-7342
Judge • William P. Osterndorf
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
POLICE DEPARTMENT
25 Hecker Ave. • Darien, CT 06820
Non-emergencies: 203-662-5300
Fax: 203-662-5344 • Web site: www.darienpolice.org
Chief • Ray Osborne • 203-662-5311
E-mail: rosborne@darienct.gov
Medication Disposal: Citizens looking to dispose of
unwanted, excess and expired prescriptions and over-
the-counter medications can use the safe, anonymous
and secure permanent drop off box located in the
lobby of the Darien Police Department. Properly dis-
posing unwanted drugs is everyone’s responsibility as
a matter of public health and safety.
The lobby of Darien Police Headquarters is open to
the public, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
FIRE DEPARTMENTS
Darien has three volunteer fire departments, each
covering a different section of town.
Darien Fire Department (eastern part)
848 Post Rd. • Darien, CT 06820
Non-emergencies: 203-655-1216
Web site: www.darienfire.org
Chief • Vic Pensiero
E-mail: vicpen@att.net
Noroton Fire Department (southern part)
1873 Boston Post Rd. • Darien, CT 06820
Non-emergencies: 203-655-0653
Web site: www.norotonfd.org
Chief • John Hessmer
Email: hawkeyehess@gmail.com
Noroton Heights Fire Department (northern part)
209 Noroton Ave. • Darien, CT 06820
Non-emergencies: 203-655-1033
Chief • Shaun Volin
E-mail: svolin@norotonheightsfd.com
Web site: www.nhfd.us
Darien Fire Marshal’s office
Town Hall, Room 117 • 203-656-7345
Fire Marshal • Robert J. Buch
E-mail: bbuch@darienct.gov
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES (POST 53)
Darien’s Emergency Medical Services provided by Post
53, Explorer Post open to both boys and girls. Unique,
award-winning, all-volunteer organization of highly
trained young people and adult advisors. Operates
three fully equipped, state-of-the-art ambulances 24-7
year-round. The Town of Darien Paramedic Service is
provided 24/7 by Stamford EMS.
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60-64 899
65-74 1,252
75-84 761
85+ 365
Total 60+ 3,277
Total population of Darien:
20,732
Percentage 60 years of
age or over: 16.8%
Land area: 14.8 sq. mi.
0 Ledge Rd. • Darien, CT 06820
Non-emergencies: 203-655-8980
E-mail: info@post53.org
OTHER IMPORTANT CONTACTS
Animal Control • 203-662-5345
Animal Control • Officer Chip Stahl
E-mail: cstahl@darienct.gov
Building Dept.
Town Hall Room 212 • 203-656-7347
Head Building Official • Peter E. Solheim
E-mail: psolheim@darienct.gov
Harbor Master • Tom Bell • Cell: 203-253-9519
E-mail: darienharbor@darienct.gov
Health Dept.
Town Hall • Room 109 • 203 656-7320
Director of Health • David A. Knauf, MPH, MS, RS
E-mail: dknauf@darienct.gov
Parks and Recreation Office
Town Hall • Room 110 • 203-656-7325
Director of Parks and Recreation • Pamela Gery, CPRP
E-mail: parkrec@darienct.gov
Public Works Department
Town Hall • Room 208 • 203-656-7346
Director of Public Works • Edward L. Gentile Jr., P.E.,
E-mail: egentile@darienct.gov
Registrars of Voters
Town Hall • Room 106 • 203-656-7316
Democratic Registrar of Voters • Susan K. Gray
203-656-7319 • E-mail: sgray@darienct.gov
Republican Registrar of Voters • John Visi
203-656-7301 • E-mail: jvisi@darienct.gov
Tax Collector’s Office
Darien Town Hall, Room 104 • 203- 656-7314
Tax Collector • Kathleen M. Larkins, CCMC
E-mail: klarkins@darienct.gov
Town Clerk’s Office
Town Hall • Room 101 • 203-656-7307
Town Clerk • Donna E. Rajczewski
E-mail: drajczewski@darienct.gov
DARIEN’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
First Selectman • Peter J. Tesei
Greenwich Town Hall
101 Field Point Rd. • Greenwich, CT 06830
For information: 203-622-7710
COMMISSION ON AGING BOARD
Appointed to help meet needs of older residents by: iden-
tifying and documenting needs; planning and coordinat-
ing services to meet needs; providing education, informa-
tion and referral about elder issues; advocating for elder
issues at local, state, national levels.
299 Greenwich Ave. (Senior Center)
203-862-6710 • Greenwich, CT 06830
Fax: 203-862-6701 • Hours: 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Director • Lori Ann Contadino • 203-862-6711
Customer Service Representative • Maria Higble
203-862-6710
Programs include: Directory of Aging and Disability
Services for Greenwich, comprehensive directory of local
and regional programs available to Greenwich seniors.
Published by Commission and available at its office or
online. Other important Greenwich-specific reports and
resource directories also available on senior transporta-
tion, housing, legal access and respite care.
• Share-the-Fare Taxi Program. Reduced fare taxi vouch-
ers are available for purchase at Commission on Aging
office, Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Individuals must be 62
years of age or older and a resident of Greenwich.
Vouchers can be used for transportation within the town.
To arrange a ride, call Greenwich Taxi at 203-869-6000.
• Health Insurance Counseling Program makes
volunteers available on free, confidential basis for indi-
vidual counseling on Medicare, Medicare D, supplemental
insurance and the Medicare Savings program,
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
Department’s mission is to enhance the quality of life of
Greenwich residents through support in meeting basic
human needs and promoting services that foster self-
sufficiency and economic independence. We connect
residents to the essential resources of the community.
These resources provide the support such as food, shel-
ter, educational and employment opportunities, personal
safety and access to health care services. The available
services are diverse and support all ages. Our services
are provided by a dedicated professional staff and a
network of community partners. We also have bi-lingual
staff available to assist.
Town of Greenwich
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Town Hall, 3rd Floor • 203-622-3800 • Fax: 203-622-7762
Office Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
After hours by appointment Mon.-Fri. 5 p.m.-7 p.m.
Commissioner • Alan D. Barry, Ph.D.
Director of Admissions/Programs
Monica Bruning, LCSW • 203-622-7793
Director of Case Management
George O’Loughlin, LCSW • 203-622-3802
Homecare and Transportation Supervisor
Marcia Parkin Lawrence • 203-622-3801
• Admission and Applications services include: Assessment
and referral (including home visits if needed) • Assistance
with applications for benefit and entitlement programs,
such as Social Security, SSI, Medicare, Medicaid, Energy
Assistance, Renter’s Rebate, Veteran’s Benefits. • Guidance
and evaluation for hous¬ing, including eviction concerns. •
Holiday Aid • Senior camp • English as a Second Language
classes • Salvation Army Assistance
• Case Management Services include: Assistance with
employment and training • In-home assessments for
Department’s Homecare Service. • Protective services
for those over the age of 60 who may be experiencing
finan¬cial exploitation, abuse, neglect by others or self-
neglect. • Guidance through the petition process of Probate
Court for those who may need a conservator. • Assistance
with finding legal services. • Temporary (Emergency)
Financial Assistance.
• Homecare Service and Client Transportation assists elder-
ly and disabled who have difficulty with everyday activities
or need help during times of illness or disability. Homecare
staff are available to assist with light housekeeping, laundry,
meal preparation, dressing assistance and assistance with
bathing. Client Transportation includes door-to-door trans-
portation to medical and legal appointments, Neighbor to
Neighbor food delivery, benefit application appointments
and language class attendance.
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
Under aegis of Board of Health, Department is dedicated
to protecting, promoting and improving the health of
Greenwich residents through programs that help prevent
disease, illness, disability and premature death. Public
health services create a healthy and safe environment so
that all may obtain a healthier lifestyle.
Town Hall, 3rd Floor • 203-622-6488
Fax: 203-622-7770 • Office Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Director of Health • Caroline Calderone Baisley, MPH, RS
Division of Family Health Director
Deborah C. Travers, MSN, APRN, FNP-BC • 203-622-3782
The programs and services of the Family Health Division
are provided to enable individuals to achieve and maintain
optimum physical, emotional and social health. All pro-
gram areas include: preventive health care sessions; early
identification of health problems through screenings and
surveillance; health maintenance; health education; home
visits; consultation and communication with medical and
social service providers.
Senior Home Health Maintenance Program
Contact • 203-622-7859
Program provides nursing care and case coordination to
homebound frail and/or senior residents with chronic
illness who strive to remain independent in their homes.
Public health nurses provide health monitoring—such as
hypertension screening, preventive care (particularly adult
immunization), and anticipatory guidance through weekly
clinics at Town Hall and the Senior Center and monthly
clinics at six other locations in the community. Flu and
pneumonia clinics are held annually in October; call
203-622-3774 or 203-622-6495 for information on
these clinics.
Town Hall Hypertension Screening and (Adult)
Immunization Clinics • Offer recommended vaccines for
adults, such as Shingles, Pneumonia and TDAP vaccines.
Mon., Wed., Fri., 2:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. No appointment
necessary. Call 203-622-6495.
SENIOR CENTER
Operates as a division of the Commission on Aging. Free
to Greenwich residents 62+.
299 Greenwich Ave. • Greenwich, CT 06830
203-862-6700 • Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Administrator • Laurette Helmrich • 203-862-6720
Program Specialist • Lynn Mason • 203-862-6721
Senior programs and services include: daily continental
breakfast and full hot luncheon, including lunches “to
go”; health forums; wellness lectures; crossword puzzles
and word games; Silvertones traveling chorus; profession-
ally led discussions; Italian classes; painting classes with
instructor; day excursions; fitness classes—pilates, t’ai chi,
chair/floor yoga, zumba gold, year-round water aerobics,
Feldenkreis-style movements, more—facilitated by creden-
tialed instructors. Also on premises: Computer Center;
Utilize Senior Energy (USE); public health nurse; offices of
the Commission on Aging. Fees apply only to: meals; day
trips; special events; annual parking pass. Free daily TAG
bus transportation available. Lantern newsletter available
at the Senior Center, Town Hall and Greenwich libraries.
GREENWICH
47
GREENWICH
SUPPORTIVE SERVICES FOR FAMILIES
AND CAREGIVERS
Commission on Aging’s Directory of Aging & Disability
Services contains information on number of public and
private agencies and facilities in the Greenwich area
providing for-free or for-fee alternative care for patients in
need of temporary substitute care to allow family members
respite-short times away-from their caregiving duties. Direct
services include health insurance counseling and Share the
Fare Taxi program.
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
• Call-A-Ride of Greenwich
203-661-6633 • Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Free door-to-door service for those 60 and older, who
are ambulatory, to anywhere in Greenwich. Reservations
necessary—as far in advance as possible.
• Share-the-Fare Taxi Program
See Commission on Aging entry for information on
this program.
TAG (Transportation Association of Greenwich)
13 Riverside Ave. • Riverside, CT 06878 • 203-637-4345
• E-mail info@ridetag.org
Hours: Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat., 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
Transportation provided for eligible elderly or disabled
to programs, hospitals, medical appointments and rec-
reational activities in Greenwich, Stamford and Norwalk.
Fee charged.
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
Town Assessor receives applications between February
1 and May 15 for tax relief for certain property owners
over 65 under Elderly Homeowners’ Tax Relief Act (State
program) and Elderly Property Tax Relief (Town pro-
gram). Assistance offered to new applicants.
Town Hall, 1st Floor • 203-622-7885
Fax: 203-618-7655 • Hours: 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Assessor • Lauren Elliott
Department of Social Services receives applications for
Renter’s Rebate Program under State’s Elderly Renters’
Tax Relief Act. Applicants can make appointment to
receive information and assistance in applying.
GREENWICH LIBRARY SYSTEM
The Town of Greenwich has four public library facilities—
The Main Library in Central Greenwich which is the prima-
ry library for the entire Town, as well as two branch librar-
ies servicing the communities of Byram and Cos Cob. In
addition, there is the independent Perrot Memorial Library
in Old Greenwich. Greenwich Library’s bookmobile ser-
vices the Town’s senior centers and other sites. Its online
library allows access for cardholders to eBooks,
eAudiobooks, movies, and music from home.
Library System Director • Barbara Ormerod-Glynn
Deputy Director • Joseph A. Williams
Main Greenwich Library
101 W. Putnam Ave. • 203-622-7900
www.greenwichlibrary.org Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-9 p.m.;
Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 1 p.m.-5 p.m.
Byram Shubert Library
21 Mead Ave., Greenwich, CT 06830 • 203-531-0426
Hours: Mon., Wed., Fri., and Sat.: 9 a.m.-5 p.m.;
Tues: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Thurs: 12 p.m.-8 p.m.;
Sun: Closed
Cos Cob Library
5 Sinawoy Road, Greenwich, CT 06807 • 203-622-6585
Hours: Mon., 12 p.m.-8 p.m., Tues.-Sat., 9 a.m. -5 p.m.,
Sun. Closed
Perrot Memorial Library
90 Sounds Beach Avenue, Old Greenwich, CT 06870
203-637-1066 • Hours: Mon., Wed., Fri. 9 a.m.-6 p.m.,
Tues., Thurs., 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun., 1
p.m.-5 p.m. (during the school year)
PROBATE COURT
Town Hall, First Floor • 203-622-7879
Fax: 203-622-6451 • Hours: Sept.-June, Mon.-Fri.,
8 a.m.-4 p.m.; July/Aug., Mon.-Thurs., 8 a.m.-4 p.m.,
Fri., 8 a.m.-12 p.m.
Judge • David W. Hopper
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
POLICE DEPARTMENT
Headquarters: 11 Bruce Place, Greenwich, CT 06830
Main number: 203-622-8000 • Fax: 203-618-8866
Chief • Jim Heavey • 203-622-8010
General services/records • Hours: 8:30 a.m.- 4:15 p.m.
FIRE DEPARTMENT
15 Havemeyer Place • Greenwich, CT 06830
Main: 203-622-3950 • Fax: 203-622-8062
Office Hours: 8 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Chief • Peter Siecienski
The Greenwich Fire Department consists of 106-uni-
formed career and approximately 85 volunteer firefight-
ers who work together to accomplish their mission. The
department responds to over 4,200 emergency calls
annually, the men and women of the GFD are trained
and equipped to handle a wide range of threats.
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GREENWICH EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE,
INC. (GEMS)
GEMS is an independent not-for-profit organization
providing emergency medical services 24/7 by highly
trained teams utilizing emergency response vehicles
(including three ambulances) based at four strategi-
cally located stations. GEMS raises about half of its own
financing.
The File of Life program was designed to help GEMS
quickly obtain your medical and contact information in
the event of an emergency. It consists of a refrigerator
magnet labeled File of Life, with an attached red plastic
pocket holding a card on which residents can record
vital information about medical conditions, medications,
and emergency contact names and phone numbers.
Stick it on the outside of your refrigerator door. It could
help save your life or the life of a loved one. You can
request a File of Life by mail or download a copy from
our Web site. www.greenwichems.org
Executive Director • Tracy Schietinger
Main Business Office: 1111 E. Putnam Ave.
Riverside, CT 06878
Non-emergencies: 203-637-7505 • Fax: 203-637-1762
OTHER IMPORTANT CONTACTS
Animal Control • 203-622-8299
Health Dept. • 203-622-6488, 203-622-7836
Parks & Recreation Dept. • 203-622-7814
Public Works • 203-622-7740
Registrars of Voters • 203-622-7890 and 203-622-7889
Tax Collector • 203-622-7891
Town Clerk • 203-622-7897
GREENWICH’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
60-64 3,468
65-74 4,967
75-84 3,359
85+ 1,732
Total 60+ 13,526
Total population of
Greenwich: 61,171
Percentage 60 years of
age or over: 22.2%
Land area: 47.8 sq. mi.
NEW CANAAN
First Selectman • Kevin Moynihan
kevin.moynihan@newcanaanct.gov
New Canaan Town Hall
77 Main St. • New Canaan, CT 06840 • 203-594-3000
Administrative Officer • Tom Stadler • 203-594-3002
E-mail: Tom.Stadler@newcanaanct.gov
Executive Assistant • Pam Flynn,
E-mail: Pam.Flynn@newcanaanct.gov
HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMMISSION
Combination of Commission on Aging, Youth Commission,
Board of Human Services. Develops and coordinates
information concerning needs of all age groups, analyzes
services for them, makes recommendations for new or
revised programs. Also provides oversight for New Canaan
Public Health.
Chairman • Judy Dunn
Contact Commission by e-mail at:
Carol.Mcdonald@newcanaanct.gov
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
The mission of Health & Human Services is to direct and
coordinate critical community needs and programs for
health, food, shelter, and general wellbeing for the
Town’s citizens.
Vine Cottage, 61 Main St. • New Canaan, CT 06840
203-594-3076 • Fax: 203-594-3132
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Director of Health & Human Services
Carol McDonald, R.N. • 203-594-3079
E-mail: Carol.McDonald@newcanaanct.gov
Assistant Director of Health & Human Services
Bethany Zaro, RN, MPH • 203-594-3093
E-mail: Bethany.Zaro@newcanaanct.gov
Program Assistant • Enza Albano • 203-594-3076
E-mail: Enza.Albano@newcanaanct.gov
Youth and Family Services Coordinator • Jacqueline
D’Louhy, LCSW • 203-594-3081
E-mail: Jacqueline.DLouhy@newcanaanct.gov
Community Nurse • Robin Boccuzzi, R.N. • 203-594-3083
E-mail Robin.boccuzzi@newcanaanct.gov
Programs include: Insurance assistance with Husky,
Medicare, Medicaid and supplemental policies; visits to
homebound seniors; more.
Among helping agencies, organizations and institutions
that Department refers residents to is:
Town of New Canaan
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WAVENY LIFECARE NETWORK
3 Farm Rd. • New Canaan, CT 06840 • 203-594-5200
Conveniently located in New Canaan, Waveny LifeCare
Network provides a compassionate continuum of world-
class care to serve the changing needs of seniors from
all areas. Committed to the community for over 40 years
as a trusted nonprofit, Waveny has sought to provide
the highest quality of person-centered care since 1975.
Waveny proudly offers an array of eldercare choices rang-
ing from residential options and outpatient programs to
community-based services to meet the growing needs
and changing preferences of older adults and their fami-
lies. Like a river, Waveny’s continuum of care flows fluidly
within a single organization, without any expensive buy-in
fees or long-term commitments.
LAPHAM COMMUNITY CENTER/
SENIOR CENTER OF NEW CANAAN, INC.
Lapham Community Center in beautiful Waveny Park
offers variety of programs and services to adult residents
of New Canaan and is home of the Senior Center.
Waveny Park • New Canaan, CT 06840 • 203-594-3620
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 83 • New Canaan, CT 06840
Web site: www.laphamcenter.org
E-Mail: laphamcenter@newcanaanct.gov
Director • Lyn Bond
E-mail: director@laphamcenter.org
Program Manager • Aggie Aspinwall
Hours: Mon. to Thurs. 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m., Fri. 8:30 a.m.-
4:00 p.m.
Lapham Center has large community room, computer
center, teaching kitchen, game room and classrooms that
enable Center staff to offer over 100 classes and pro-
grams each season.
Programs include: Lunch, Tues., at noon; reservation
and $5 fee required. • Blood Pressure Clinic, Thurs., 10:30
a.m.-11:30 a.m. • Crafts, Tues., 9:30 a.m.-noon. • Knitting,
Thurs., 10 a.m.-noon. • Day trips organized to nearby plac-
es of interest 4-6 times a year. • Three Book Groups meet
monthly. • Frequent lectures on health, financial, and legal
issues. • Free Medicare and supplemental plans insurance
counseling. • Free tax counseling • Adult Education classes
in art, exercise, history, cooking, languages, music, games,
technology, writing, and more; fees charged for some pro-
grams; others free. • Volunteer Opportunities, active and
varied program.
NEW CANAAN
STAYING PUT IN NEW CANAAN
Staying Put in New Canaan, Inc., is a membership-based,
volunteer-supported nonprofit organization dedicated
to helping seniors live safely in their homes and actively
engaged in the community as they age. With the help of
dozens of volunteers, Staying Put provides the following
for its members: friendly calls or visits; handyman assis-
tance; health consultations; help with errands; referrals to
vetted vendors; transportation to medical appointments
and social events; tech support. Members are invited to
attend some 80 programs each year, including cultural
outings, educational programs on issues associated
with aging, social events. Staying Put is open to seniors
65+ residing in New Canaan. Annual membership
dues are $400 for individuals and $525 for households.
Scholarships are available for those with
financial limitations.
PO Box 484 • 58 Pine St. • New Canaan, CT 06840
www.stayingputnc.org
Executive Director • Barbara Achenbaum
203-966-7762 • director@stayingputnc.org
SUPPORTIVE SERVICES FOR FAMILIES
AND CAREGIVERS
Department of Human Services can make referrals to
number of respite programs and other such services at
Waveny Care Center and other agencies, organizations
and institutions in New Canaan area.
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
New Canaan’s only public transportation.
Door-to-Door rides for New Canaan residents, seniors &
others unable to drive to destination within New Canaan,
Seven Vans, some built to carry wheelchair bound pas-
sengers. Service is available Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
203-972-7433
Norwalk Transit District’s Town-to-Town, regional
door-to-door transportation service—only for people
who wish to travel between towns in southwestern
Connecticut. Fee is $4 for one-way trip across one town
line. • 203-299-5180
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
Applications for Renters/Homeowners tax rebates
available at Assessor’s Office. Department of Human
Services can provide help with filling out application.
237 Elm St., 2nd. Fl. • 203-594-3005 • Fax: 203-594-
3130 Assessor • Sebastian Caldarella
E-mail: Sebastian.Caldarella@newcanaanct.gov
50
LIBRARY
151 Main St. • New Canaan, CT 06840
Main tel.: 203-594-5000 • Fax: 866-245-6033
Web site: www.newcanaanlibrary.org
Library Director • Lisa Oldham
E-Mail: loldham@newcanaanlibrary.org
PROBATE COURT
Darien Town Hall
2 Renshaw Rd., Darien, CT 06820 • 203-656-7342
Fax: 203-656-0774 • Judge • William P. Osterndorf
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
POLICE DEPARTMENT
174 South Ave. • New Canaan, CT • 06840
Non-emergencies: 203-594-3500 • Fax: 203-594-3553
Chief • Leon Krolikowski
TRIAD: Special program of Department to bring together
senior citizens, law enforcement, business people and
other interested parties and conduct crime prevention
activities, educate about personal safety issues, address
crime trends that target seniors, and learn and act on
concerns, needs, problems of seniors.
TRIAD developed from program started in 1988 by
AARP and National Sheriffs Association and is operated
in New Canaan by S.A.L.T. Council (Seniors and Law
Enforcement Working Together). For information or to
volunteer, contact: Officer Roy Adams.
Medication Disposal Program is available to residents
at all times. There is a drop box located in the Police
Station lobby for household disposal of any unwanted
prescription or over-the-counter medications, including
pet medications.
FIRE DEPARTMENT
Dept. has long history as New Canaan Fire Company
No. 1. Has career firefighters and volunteers.
60 Main St. • New Canaan, CT 06840
Non-emergencies: 203-594-3140
Chief • John M. Hennessey
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES (EMS)
Emergency Medical Services Commission formulates
policy and guidelines and exercises oversight over
New Canaan Volunteer Ambulance Corps (NCVAC).
Trained volunteers of NCVAC supported by professional
paramedic on duty at all times to provide emergency
medical care and transportation. All 911 calls go to the
Police Department, which dispatches Fire Department
and/or NCVAC as appropriate. Police are also dispatched
on all calls.
Emergency Medical Services Commission
Chairperson • Larry Kessler
E-mail: EMS.Commission@newcanaanct.gov
Commission meets 3rd Tues. of month at Police
Department Training Room, 7:30 p.m.
New Canaan Volunteer Ambulance Corps NCVAC
182 South Ave. (next to Police Headquarters)
New Canaan, CT 06480 • 203-594-3535
www.newcanaanems.org
President • Alison Bedula
OTHER IMPORTANT CONTACTS
Animal Control Officer • Allyson Halm • 203 594 3510.
E-mail: animalcontrol@newcanaanct.gov
Health Dept. • Medical Director • David M. Reed, MD, MPH
203-594-3018 • E-mail: dreedmd@gmail.com
Highway Superintendent • Mose Saccary • 203-594-3709
E-mail: Mose.Saccary@newcanaanct.gov
Superintendent of Parks • John Howe • 203-594-3100
E-mail: John.Howe@newcanaanct.gov
Registrar of Voters • Main number 203-594-3060
Joan McLaughlin (R) • 203-594-3096
Debra Lyon (R) Deputy Registrar
E-mail: Joan.McLaughlin@newcanaanct.gov
George F. Cody (D) • 203-594-3095
E-mail: George.Cody@newcanaanct.gov
John Amarilios • 203-594-3094
E-mail: John.Amarilios@newcanaanct.gov
Town Clerk • Claudia A. Weber, CMC • Town Clerk &
Registrar of Vital Statistics • 203-594-3070
E-mail: Claudia.Weber@newcanaanct.gov
NEW CANAAN’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
60-64 1,126
65-74 1,387
75-84 973
85+ 427
Total 60+ 3,913
Total population of New
Canaan: 19,738
Percentage 60 years of
age or over: 19.7%
Land area: 22.5 sq. mi.
NEW CANAAN
51
Mayor • Harry W. Rilling
203-854-7701 • E-mail: hrilling@norwalkct.org
City Hall
125 East Ave. • Norwalk, CT 06851-5125
Main no.: 203-854-3200 • Web site: www.norwalkct.org
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
SENIOR SERVICES COORDINATING COUNCIL/
THE SENIOR UMBRELLA
11 Allen Rd., Room 8 • Norwalk, CT 06851
203-847-2830 • Fax: 203-849-1285 • Hours: 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
E-mail: seniorumbrella@sbcglobal.net
Municipal Agent for the Elderly (City of Norwalk) and
Case Managers provide seniors and their families with:
information about appropriate services and programs;
application assistance for services and programs, including
medical insurance counseling; advocacy for seniors having
difficulty getting the help that they need. The Council works
closely with many public and private agencies, and Case
Managers make home visits when needed.
NORWALK SENIOR CENTER, INC.
Nonprofit organization, operating in two locations, with the
mission of “empowering adults 55+ for personal indepen-
dence, healthy aging, social connection and lifetime learn-
ing.” Annual $25 membership fee. Center provides trans-
portation to its locations. Detailed information
available: Web site: www.norwalkseniorcenter.org
NORWALK SENIOR CENTER
11 Allen Rd. • Norwalk, CT 06851 • 203-847-3115
Fax: 203-849-1285 • Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Executive Director • Beatrix Winter
203-847-3115, ext. 103 • E-mail: bwinter@norwalksc.org
Program Coordinator • Jane Wenk
203-847-3115, ext. 108 • E-mail: jwenk@norwalksc.org
Outreach Director • Eva Beau
203-847-3115, ext. 112 • E-mail: ebeau@norwalksc.org
Transportation Manager • Remy Exantus
203-847-3115, ext. 107 • E-mail: rexantus@norwalksc.org
Activity Programs include: Senior Cafe lunch, $3-$5 con-
tribution requested—reservations must be made at least
24 hours in advance; bingo, Thurs., 12:45 p.m. Thursday
nights, Bingo at 6:30 PM at 11 Allen Road—attendees are
eligible for cash prizes. Players must be at least 12 years
of age. $1.00 entry fee and a minimum purchase of 2 all
night games required. Food & soft drinks are available for
purchase.; bocce, Wed.,10 a.m. (weather permitting); bil-
liards, card and tile games, variety of regularly scheduled
games—call for information; Tech Learning Center; a vari-
ety of exercise programs ranging from aerobics to Zumba,
to fit a multitude of fitness levels; Health & Wellness
presentations on medical issues by Norwalk Hospital and
area physicians; also: individual health screenings; blood
pressure monitoring; nutritional counseling.
Homebound and Community Outreach Programs hosted
by Center include:
Meals on Wheels: Not-for-profit program in which meals
are delivered at low cost to homes of residents unable
to shop and/or prepare meals because of injury, illness
or disability. For info, call Eva Beau at 203-847-3115,
ext 112, or e-mail at ebeau@norwalksc.org
Medicare Counseling: Trained counselors will meet one-
on-one with those on Medicare and guide them through
maze of issues involved.
• Individual and Group Counseling: Around Issues of
Bereavement, Stress Management, and Family Conflicts.
Senior Housing Assistance Fund: Interest-free loans
available to eligible seniors to help secure safe, afford-
able housing in Norwalk.
Caregiver’s Resource Center: Senior Center joins with
Southwestern Connecticut Agency on Aging to provide
information, counseling and referrals to those caring for
older loved ones or for grandparents who are raising
grandchildren.
NORWALK SENIOR CENTER SOUTH
Center features multicultural, bilingual programming.
92 Cedar St. • Norwalk, CT 06854 • 203-299-1500
Fax: 203-299-0441 • Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Social Service Coordinator • Maureen Eustache
E-mail: nscs92@sbcglobal.net
Program Coordinator • Giovan Ramirez
E-mail: nscs-nsc@snet.net
Programs and services include: lunch (offsite); health
programs and screenings; counseling services; support
groups; help in filing for financial assistance and hous-
ing programs; document translation; special trips, parties,
luncheons; citizenship preparation classes; English as a
Second Language; armchair aerobics exercise; sewing
classes; pokeno; penny bingo and dominoes; computer
classes; Spanish classes for beginners; crafts; shopping
trips; line dancing; blood pressure clinics; Tai Chi
and Zumba.
NORWALK
City of Norwalk
52
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
Senior Center Transportation:
Norwalk Senior Center provides door-to-door transporta-
tion for members to and from Center (11 Allen Rd.) and
Norwalk Senior Center South (92 Cedar St.) in
wheelchair-accessible vehicles for those who cannot
transport themselves. Modest fee of $5 per month
charged. Reservations required.
Morning Pickup Routes: 8:30 a.m. & 10 a.m.
Afternoon Trips Home: Mon. & Wed.,12:30 p.m., 3 p.m.
Weekly Shopping Trips: from Center and Center South,
Mon. & Wed., 1:00-3:30 p.m.
Senior Center Transportation Manager:
Remy Exantus • 203-847-3115, Ext. 107
E-mail: rexantus@norwalksc.org
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
Office of the Assessor manages tax exemption/credits/
deferral programs. Department’s “goal is to help taxpay-
ers to remain in their homes and in Norwalk.”
City Hall, Room 106 • 203-854-7888
Fax: 203-854-7986 • Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
Assessor • Michael Stewart, CCMAII • 203-854-7852
E-mail: mstewart@norwalkct.org
Tax relief programs include:
• State and City Elderly (“Circuit Breaker”) Credits •
Veteran’s Exemption • Disability Exemption • Blind
Person Exemption • Given Year Tax Deferral
NORWALK LIBRARIES
Norwalk has four libraries open to the general public.
Norwalk Public Library and South Norwalk Branch Public
Library are City institutions. East Norwalk Library is
project of civic group, East Norwalk Improvement
Association, and housed in Community Center.
Rowayton Library is an independent library.
For information on Norwalk libraries, access:
Web site: www.norwalklib.org
NORWALK PUBLIC LIBRARY
1 Belden Ave. • Norwalk, CT 06850 • 203-899-2780
Hours: Mon., Wed., Thurs., 9 a.m.-8:30 p.m.
Tues., Fri., Sat., 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sun. 1 p.m.-5 p.m.
Library Director • Christine Bradley
203-899-2780, ext. 15126
E-mail: cbradley@norwalkpl.org
SOUTH NORWALK BRANCH LIBRARY
10 Washington St. • Norwalk, CT 06854 • 203-899-2790
Hours: Mon., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat., 9 .a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Tue., 12 p.m.- 8:30 p.m., • Sun. 1. p.m.- 5 p.m.
Assistant Director of Library System • Sherelle Harris
203-899-2780, ext. 15123
E-mail: sharris@norwalkpubliclibrary.org
EAST NORWALK LIBRARY
51 Van Zant St. • East Norwalk, CT 06855
203-838-0408, ext. 100
E-mail: infor@eastnorwalklibrarty.org
Web site: www.eastnorwalklibrary.org
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 12:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m.;
Sat., 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m
Librarian • Maureen Tovish
E-mail: maureen@eastnorwalklibrary.org
ROWAYTON LIBRARY
33 Highland Ave. • Rowayton, CT 06853
203-838-5038 • Web site: www.Rowayton.org
Library Director • Melissa Yurechko
E-mail: myurechko@rowayton.org
PROBATE COURT
City Hall, Room 232 • 203-854-7737
Fax: 203-854-7825
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 2009
Norwalk, CT 06852-2009
Judge • Anthony J. DePanfilis
Email: adepanfilis@ctprobate.gov
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
POLICE DEPARTMENT
Department emphasizes “citizen input . . . to help us to
improve and achieve our goals.”
The department conducts numerous events through out
the year to help seniors avoid becoming victims of crime.
Programs that the department offers include Project
Lifesaver, Yellow Dot and Life Pack. Anyone with any
questions about these programs can contact Sgt. Gulino
at 203-854-3197 for additional information.
One Monroe St. • Norwalk, CT 06854
Non-emergencies: 203-854-3000
Web site: www.norwalkpd.com
Chief • Thomas E. Kulhawik
E-mail: policehqunit@norwalkct.org
NORWALK
53
FIRE DEPARTMENT/EMERGENCY MEDICAL
SERVICES (EMS)
Department responsible for responding to residents’
calls and emergencies involving fire, medical services,
hazardous materials, rescues and vehicle extractions.
Headquarters (Station 2)
121 Connecticut Ave., Norwalk, CT 06854
203-854-0200 • Fax: 203-866-7768
Web site: www.norwalkfd.com
Chief • Gino Gatto
203-854-0233 • E-mail: ggatto@norwalkct.org
Fire Stations:
• Station 1, 90 New Canaan Ave.
Non-emergencies: 203-854-0201
• Station 2 (Headquarters), 121 Connecticut Ave.
Non-emergencies: 203-854-0200
• Station 3, 56 Van Zant St.
Non-emergencies: 203-854-0203
• Station 4, 180 Westport Ave.
Non-emergencies: 203-854-0204
• Station 5, 23 Meadow St.
Non-emergencies: 203-854-0205
OTHER IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS
Animal Control • 203-854-3240
13 S. Smith Street
City Clerk • 203-854-7701
Norwalk Motor Vehicle Dept. • 800-842-8222
Public Works • 203-854-3200 (customer service)
Registrars of Voters • 203-854-7996
Tax Collector • 203-854-7731
Town Clerk • Richard McQuaid • 203-854-7747
E-mail: rmcquaid@norwalkct.org
NORWALK’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
60-64 4,553
65-74 5,755
75-84 3,662
85+ 1,536
Total 60+ 15,506
Total population of
Norwalk: 85,603
Percentage 60 years of
age or over: 18.1%
Land area: 22.8 sq. mi.
STAMFORD
Mayor • David R. Martin
E-mail: mayorsoffice@stamfordct.gov
Government Center
888 Washington Blvd. • Stamford, CT 06901
Mayor’s Office: 203-977-4150
Citizen Services Center: 203-977-4140
City Web site: www.stamfordct.gov
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES
Director • Ellen E. Bromley • 203-977-4112
Government Center
Front Desk, 8th Floor • 203-977-5652
Social Services, 9th Floor • 203-977-4050
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Municipal Agent for the Elderly • 203-977-4747
9th Floor of Government Center
Municipal Agent for the Elderly assists city residents aged
60+ by providing information and referrals to local, state
and federal services and benefit programs. The Agent also
can help seniors fill out applications for benefits or hous-
ing. Appointments are preferred. Appointments may be
with individuals, family members or caregivers and can be
scheduled as either office or home visits.
Programs and services include:
• Senior Health Program provides free health screening,
education, counseling and referrals for low-income and
minority older adults aged 60+. The program’s goal is to
increase healthy outcomes for seniors through prevention,
education and access to health care. Services are pro-
vided at various senior housing sites, senior centers and
churches. For more information, contact Rochak Prudhan,
R.N., at 203-977-4390 or rpradhan@stamfordct.gov.
• MedAssist Choices is free service with trained counsel-
ors. Mission is to help residents understand how they
can best handle health care choices. Counselors help
residents file forms and collect benefits to which they are
entitled. Information provided on Medicare supplemental
insurance, HMOs, etc.
Government Center, 9th Floor • 203-977-5297
Hours: By appointment only.
City of Stamford
54
STAMFORD SENIOR CENTER, INC.
The Stamford Senior Center is a 501(c)(3) Non profit,
non sectarian organization established in 1996 to help
serve the needs of Stamford’s older adult population.
Our Mission is to provide affordable opportunities for
older adults in the greater Stamford area to be active and
healthy in mind and body and remain connected to their
community in a welcoming, safe and diverse environ-
ment.
Government Center, 2nd Floor • 203-977-5151
Fax: 203-977-5152 • Web Site: www.stamfordseniorct.org
Program Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Executive Director • Christina K. Crain, MSW
E-mail: ccrain@stamfordct.gov
Assistant to Director • Gina Compolattaro
E-mail: gcompolattaro@stamfordct.gov
Hispanic Program Coordinator • Lili Winsor
E-mail: lwinsor@stamfordct.gov
Program Assistant • Esther Bramble
Executive Director Receptionist • Ada Caro
E-mail: acaro@stamfordct.gov
Programs and services include: Art classes, Community
Café Program, exercise classes, language classes, Hispanic
Senior Club, Technology classes and news trips.
SILVERSOURCE, INC
A leading resource for older adults, SilverSource provides
supportive services and direct assistance to those in need
to ensure the safety, health and quality of life of older
residents. SilverSource is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organiza-
tion founded in 1908. All services are provided free of
charge. SilverSource helps the over-60 population and their
families navigate emergency situations, manage immedi-
ate, short-term issues and plan for long-term transitions.
A team of experienced social workers meets the needs of
older adults in a spirit of dignity and respect.
Programs and Services: Case Management and Outreach
for Benefits Eligibility, Emergency Financial Assistance,
Housing, Energy Assistance, Nutrition, and Medical Care,
including prescription, vision, dental and hearing needs;
Ride to Wellness Medical Transportation; Consultation,
counseling and referrals for older adults and their fami-
lies seeking help or advice regarding a loved one; Aging
Information Resource Center; Volunteer Program; Friendly
Visitor/Friendly Shopper programs.
2009 Summer Street • Stamford, CT 06905
203-324-6584 • E-mail: questions@silversource.org
Web site: www.silversource.org
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9am - 5pm
See website for holiday or weather-related closings.
Please call us regarding Volunteer Opportunities.
Executive Director • Kathleen Bordelon
SilverSource Ride to Wellness Medical Transportation
The Ride to Wellness transportation program is avail-
able for over-60 Stamford residents in need of affordable
transportation to and from a doctor or a medical profes-
sional’s office in Stamford. Now serving both ambulatory
clients and wheelchair-users. Small, voluntary contribu-
tions are appreciated to support the service.
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9am - 2pm, except holidays. For an
appointment, please call 203-324-6584.
SUPPORTIVE SERVICES FOR FAMILIES
AND CAREGIVERS
Municipal Agent for the Elderly has information on sup-
port groups, respite programs, more. 203-977-4050
Groups and programs covered include:
• Access Ambulance Company of Stamford Emergency
Medical Services, which has Family and Friends CPR
Program. Call 203-637-2351 for information.
• Stamford Health System, which has Spousal Support
Group meeting semimonthly for spouses of persons
with Alzheimer’s or other dementia. Moderated by clinical
psychologist. No fee.
26 Palmers Hill Rd. • Stamford, CT 06902
203-967-6139
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
• Access Ambulance Company, Inc. Cooperative effort
between Greenwich EMS and Stamford EMS to provide
some non-emergency medical transportation by ambu-
lance or Invalid Coach. Hours: 24/7 by appointment.
Call 203-637-2351 for information.
• Dispatch-a-Ride/Easy Access/Town-to-Town. Services
that provide transportation for disabled persons meet-
ing eligibility requirements to various points in Stamford/
Norwalk area • 203-299-5180
• Share the Fare. All Stamford elderly and disabled
individuals are eligible for the Share the Fare Program,
which is a reduced fare taxi voucher program. Taxi
vouchers are sold in books of 10 each and are valued
at $50, but sold for $25. Taxicab companies that accept
the vouchers are listed on the back of the vouchers. Four
books valuing $100 may be purchased in one month.
Those who wish to purchase must bring photo identifi-
cation with a Stamford address listed. Vouchers are sold
in the Cashiering and Permitting Office located in the
lobby of the Government Center, 888 Washington Blvd.,
Stamford, CT 06901. This office is open Mon.-Fri.,
8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., except in the summer, when it is open
8 a.m.-4 p.m. Cash or checks are the only acceptable
STAMFORD
55
STAMFORD
forms of payment. For more information, please call 203-
977-4050.
• Ride to Wellness. SilverSource, Inc. drives ambulatory,
over-60 Stamford residents, in need of affordable trans-
portation, to and from doctor or medical professional’s
office. Voluntary contributions appreciated to support the
service. Hours: Monday-Friday 9a.m.-3p.m., except holi-
days. Call for an appointment 203-324-6584.
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
Information regarding various tax/rent circuit breakers,
freezes, exemptions and rebates for residents who are
elderly, disabled or veterans available from Taxation
Services Representatives in Office of Assessment and
Tax Collection.
Government Center, 6th Floor • 203-977-5888
Fax: 203-977-5553
Assessor • Greg Stackpole
Connecticut Rent Rebate Program takes place April 1-
Oct. 1. The program is open to persons 18 years and older
who have been deemed disabled or persons who have
turned 65 years of age during the previous calendar
year. There are income limits. For information, call
203-977-4747.
SENIOR MEN’S ASSOCIATION OF STAMFORD
Nonprofit organization open to all men age 55 and older.
The group, numbering in the hundreds, is nondenomi-
national but meets every Thurs., Sept.-June, at 10 a.m.
at Congregation Agudath Shalom on Strawberry Hill Ave.
at Colonial Rd. for speakers, discussions, refreshments,
socializing. Additionally, the group organizes: visits to vari-
ous attractions; card games; golf tournaments; picnics;
luncheons. The group is committed to community services
and outreach, such as food drives, Songsters’ visits to
nursing homes.
301 Strawberry Hill Ave, Stamford, CT 06902
Tel.: 203-539-0636 • E-mail: info@stamfordmen.org
Web site: www.stamfordmen.org
U.S. Mail: SMAS, P.O. Box 8237, Stamford, CT 06905
LIBRARY
www.fergusonlibrary.org.
President • Alice Knapp
E-mail: aknapp@fergusonlibrary.org
Main Library/DiMattia Bldg.
One Public Library Plaza • 203-964-1000
Mon.-Thurs., 10 a.m.-9 p.m.• Fri., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. • Sun. 1-5 p.m.
Harry Bennett Branch
115 Vine Rd.• 203-351-8291
Mon. & Wed., 10 a.m.-8 p.m. • Thurs., 1-6 p.m.
Fri., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.• Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Weed Memorial & Hollander Branch
1143 Hope St. • 203-351-8285
Tues. & Thurs., 10 a.m.-7 p.m.• Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
South End Branch
34 Woodland Ave. • 203-351-8280
Tues. & Wed., 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.• Thurs., 12-7 p.m.
Sat., 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Bookmobile
Tues.-Thurs., 9:15 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Itinerary available at: www.fergusonlibrary.org
PROBATE COURT
Government Center • 203-323-2149
Fax: 203-964-1830
Mailing Address: 888 Washington Blvd.
P.O. Box 10152 • Stamford, CT 06904-2152
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Judge • Gerald M. Fox, III
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
POLICE DEPARTMENT
Headquarters: 805 Bedford St. • Stamford, CT 06901
Non-emergencies: 203-977-4444 • Fax: 203-977-5583
Chief • Jonathan Fontneau • 203-977-4681
FIRE DEPARTMENTS
Fire Chief • Trevor Roach • 203-977-4671
Station 1: Central Fire Headquarters
629 Main Street, Stamford • Stamford, CT 06901
(203) 977-4763
Station 2: South End Fire
215 Washington Blvd. • Stamford, CT 06902
(203) 977-5201
Station 3: West Side Fire
80 Fairfield Avenue • Stamford, CT 06902
(203) 977-5202
Station 4: East Side/Shippan Fire
364 Shippan Avenue • Stamford, CT 06902
(203) 977-5203
Station 5: Woodside Fire
1600 Washington Blvd. • Stamford, CT 06902
(203) 977-5204
56
60-64 6,170
65-74 7,806
75-84 5,531
85+ 2,756
Total 60+ 22,263
Total population of
Stamford: 122,643
Percentage 60 years of
age or over: 18.1%
Land area: 37.8 sq. mi.
COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM
Stamford’s Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)
Program educates people about disaster preparedness
and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as
fire safety, light search and rescue, and disaster medical
operations. Using their training, CERT members are able to
assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following
an event and can take a more active role in preparing their
community. To join Stamford’s CERT team, please contact
the Coordinator.
Coordinator • Chris Munger • E-mail: ChrisMun@aol.com
STAMFORD EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES,
INC. (SEMS)
Motto: “A Matter of Life.”
Headquarters: 684 Long Ridge Rd. , Stamford, CT 06902
Non-emergencies: 203-968-1118
Web site: www.stamfordems.org
Ambulance stations are located at: West Side Fire Station,
Tully Health Center, Glenbrook Fire Department and 24
Vine Road.
Community Education and Outreach Programs include:
• Senior Awareness for Emergencies (SAFE). SEMS arrang-
es visits to senior buildings to discuss emergency pre-
paredness and medical care. Blood pressure screenings
also performed.
• File of Life Program. SEMS educates residents on
this program in which seniors place medical and other
pertinent information in magnetic folder kept on refrig-
erator. In emergency, responders can obtain information
if individual unable to offer it.
OTHER IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS
Animal Care and Control • 203-977-4437
Recreation Services • 203-977-5214
Registrars of Voters • 203-977-4009 and 203-977-4011
Town and City Clerk • 203-977-4054
STAMFORD’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
WESTON
First Selectman • Chris Spaulding
E-mail: cspaulding@westonct.gov
Weston Town Hall
56 Norfield Rd. • Weston, CT 06883
203-222-2656 • Fax: 203-222-8871
Web site: www.westonct.gov
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1007 • Weston, CT 06883
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
COMMISSION ON AGING
Seven-member commission studies needs of Weston
seniors and makes recommendations to Board of
Selectmen. Usually has public meeting first Mon. of
month, 9:15 a.m., Senior Center.
Chair • Bruce Lorentzen
Peggy A. Anderson
Helen R. de Keijzer
Francine Goldstein
Don Gumaer
Dale Robinson
Richard Wolf
SOCIAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT
Offers variety of confidential services to residents,
regardless of income, to assist those having problems
by reason of age, disability, illness, financial status or
family situation.
Town Hall Annex • 24 School Rd., Weston, CT 06883
Hours: Monday-Thursday 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Social Worker • Allison Lisbon, MSW, LCSW
203-222-2663 • E-mail: alisbon@westonct.gov
Assistant Social Worker • Rose Cruz
203-222-2556 • E-mail: rcruz@westonct.gov
Services include: Information, referral, advocacy • diag-
nosis and referral • coordination of Meals on Wheels
• assistance with applications for programs such as
Medicare, Medicaid • screening for eligibility for holiday
programs, energy assistance • camperships/scholarships
• work with Senior Center and Youth Services Programs.
WESTON SENIOR ACTIVITIES CENTER
9 School Rd., Weston, CT • 203-222-2608
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Program Director • Wendy Petty • 203-222-2608
Program Coordinator • Carla Jegen • 203-222-2508
Assistant Program Coordinator • Linda Gilmore
203-222-2508
Activities include: Senior Luncheon, Wed., noon $4 fee;
special programs, bingo, or musical entertainment
follows luncheon • Films, Thurs., 12:30 p.m., popcorn
Town of Weston
57
provided • Knitting Club, Mon., 10 a.m. • Feldenkrais, Mon.
& Wed., 10 a.m.; • Tai Chi, Tues., 9:30 a.m. & Thurs., 9:30
a.m. • Tap Dancing, Mon., 10 a.m. • Pilates, Mon., noon &
Thurs., 12:30 p.m. • Strength and Fitness Training, Tues. &
Thurs., 11 a.m. • Yoga, Wed., 10 a.m. & Fri. 9 a.m. • Dance,
Mon., 11 a.m. • Pickleball, Mon., Thurs, Fri., 11 a.m.,
• Lectures, Mah-Jong, Mon., 10:30 a.m., Bridge, Tues.,
12:45 p.m., • Various Art Classes, Day trips (various times),
fee charged.
SUPPORTIVE SERVICES FOR FAMILIES
AND CAREGIVERS
Social Services Department has information on and
can make referrals to agencies, organizations and
institutions providing such services.
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
• Dial-a-Ride: Bus takes residents over 60 or people with
disabilities to medical, dental, therapy appointments in
Weston, Westport, Wilton, Georgetown, Norwalk. Service
also for Senior Center or shopping trips. Call to schedule
appointments. 24-hour notice required. 203-222-2576
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Driver • Roy Marsh
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
Applications for Elderly Tax Abatement, Tax Freeze and Tax
Deferred Programs available for residents 65 and older in
Tax Collector’s Office. Information about Transfer Station
charges relief also available.
Town Hall • Weston, CT 06883 • 203-222-2696
E-mail: cmclellan@westonct.gov
Assessor • Denise Hames, CCMA II • 203-222-2607
E-mail: dhames@westonct.gov
Assistant to Assessor • Donna Werfelman
203-222-2606 • E-mail: dwerfelman@westonct.gov
Tax Collector • Cathleen Neblett • 203-222-2696
E-mail: cneblett@westonct.gov
PROBATE COURT
Weston is part of Probate District 50.
Westport Town Hall
110 Myrtle Ave., Room 100 • Westport, CT 06880
203-341-1100 • Fax: 203-341-1153
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Judge • Lisa Wexler
E-mail: lisa@lisawexler.com
WESTON
WESTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
56 Norfield Rd. • Weston, CT 06883 • 203-222-2665
Mailing Address: PO Box 1146, Weston, CT 06883
E-mail: westonlibrary@westonct.gov
Web site: www.westonpubliclibrary.org
Director • Karen Tatarka
Museum/Attraction Passes courtesy of the Friends of the
Weston Library. Passes/discount cards are available for
checkout at the front desk.
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
POLICE DEPARTMENT
Chief • Ed Henion
56 Norfield Rd. • Weston, CT 06883
Non-emergencies: 203-222-2600
Web site: www.westonpolice.com
E-mail: info@Westonpolice.com
WESTON VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT
Department is private, nonprofit membership corpora-
tion made up for its entire history of unpaid, but highly
trained, volunteers. Organized into two divisions—
Fire/Rescue and Emergency Medical Services (EMS).
Combined membership is about 90 volunteers. Eleven
vehicles, including two ambulances, operate out of two
fire stations.
Chief • John Pokorny
Main dispatch phone (non-emergencies):
203-222-2647 • Fax: 203-222-2579
E-mail: contactus@wvfd.com
Fire/Rescue (general business): 203-222-2647
EMS (general business): 203-222-2649
Web site: www.wvfd.com
Fire Stations:
• Station 1 (Headquarters), 52 Norfield Rd.
Weston, CT 06883 • Non-emergencies: 203-222-2644
• Station 2, Lyons Plains • Weston, CT 06883
Non-emergencies: 203-222-2515
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES (EMS)
One of two divisions of Weston Volunteer Fire
Department. Utilizes two state-of-the-art ambulances
operating out of Fire Station 2. Motto: “Neighbors
Helping Neighbors.”
Director • Jon Weingarten
Fire Station 2, Lyons Plains • Weston, CT 06883
General business (non-emergencies): 203-222-2649
58
Special programs:
• Weston Injury Prevention (WIP). Ongoing education and
training program for home safety and prevention of acci-
dents and injury.
• Heart Smart. Comprehensive program aimed at train-
ing individuals and groups to deal with cardiac events.
General information regarding many facets of cardiac
health distributed. CPR training provided to schools,
community service organizations and other residents
periodically or upon request.
Special Programs Coordinator • Nisan Eventoff
203-222-2600
OTHER IMPORTANT CONTACTS
Animal Control • 203-222-2642
Assessor • 203-222-2606
Health District (Westport/Weston) • 203-227-9571
Public Works • 203-222-2662
Registrars of Voters • 203-222-2686
Town Clerk • 203-222-2616
WESTON’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
60-64 609
65-74 677
75-84 336
85+ 102
Total 60+ 1,724
Total population of
Weston: 10,179
Percentage 60 years of
age or over: 17.0%
Land area: 20.7 sq. mi.
WESTPORT
First Selectman • Jim Marpe
Westport Town Hall
110 Myrtle Ave. • Westport, CT 06880
203-341-1111 • Web site: www.westportct.gov
Hours: 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
E-Mail: selectman@westportct.gov
COMMISSION FOR SENIOR SERVICES
Provides public forum for the study and discussion of
needs of Westport’s seniors and advocates for appropri-
ate change. The Commission serves to advise and consult
with the First Selectman, Department of Human Services,
and the senior community on issues and resources
pertaining to seniors in Westport.
Chair • Les Wolf
Robert Fox Peter Kolbener
MUNICIPAL AGENT FOR SENIORS
Appointed by First Selectman, under state law, to rep-
resent elderly and their families and caregivers. Assists
seniors by providing information and referrals to com-
munity resources and by helping with applications for
benefits.
Kristen Witt, LCSW • 203-341-1067
E-mail: kwitt@westportct.gov
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
Promotes independence, personal development, and
enhanced quality of life for Westport’s senior residents.
Department works in partnership with other community
organizations, service providers, and funding sources.
Town Hall • 110 Myrtle Ave. • Westport, CT 06880
203-341-1050 • Fax: 203-341-1973
E-mail: humansrv@westportct.gov
Director • Elaine Daignault, MS, NCC • 203-341-1165
E-mail: elained@westportct.gov
Finance Manager • Susan Stefenson, MBA
203-341-1072 • E-mail: sstefenson@westportct.gov
Social Worker/Municipal Agent for the Elderly
Kristen Witt, LCSW • 203-341-1067
E-mail: kwitt@westportct.gov
Social Worker/Municipal Agent for People with
Disabilities • Michelle Bottone, M.A., LMFT
203-341-1068 • E-mail: mbottone@westportct.gov
Administrative Assistant • Margaret Pinheiro
203-341-1050E-mail: mpinheiro@westportct.gov
Programs and services for eligible Westport seniors,
including Town relief programs, fuel assistance, rent
Town of Westport
59
and sewer relief, short-term financial assistance. Also:
Counseling, information, and referrals regarding alterna-
tive living resources, such as independent living, assisted
living, skilled facilities, home care, and day care. And pro-
tective services in cases of elder abuse. Various transpor-
tation services are made available as are programs offer-
ing volunteer opportunities. Department publishes The
New Perspective, a newsletter for Westport seniors, and
the Community Resource Directory for Seniors.
CENTER FOR SENIOR ACTIVITIES
Offers nutrition program and multifaceted recreational
and educational programming.
21 Imperial Ave. • Westport, CT 06880
203-341-5099 • Fax: 203-341-1187
www.westportct.gov/seniorcenter
Search on Facebook by typing in “Westport Senior
Center.”
Hours: Mon.-Wed. & Fri., 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.;
Thurs., 7:30 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat., 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Director • Susan Pfister • 203-341-5098
Program Manager • Holly Betts • 203-341-5096
Administrative Assistant • Denise Puskas • 203-341-5095
Receptionist • Benjamin Palmer • 203-341-5099
Nutrition Program Coordinator • Kristin Malagise
203-341-5097
Programs and services—call for times and possible fees—
include: Senior Cafe. Noon meal Mon.-Fri. Reservations
required at least 24 hrs. in advance. Suggested dona-
tion: $5. • Arts/Crafts. • Classes/ Lectures/Discussions.
• Music/Drama/Films • Exercise/Dance. • Culinary Arts
Presentations • Games. • Blood pressure/glucose screen-
ings and flu clinic.
SUPPORTIVE SERVICES FOR FAMILIES
AND CAREGIVERS
Municipal Agent for Seniors and Department of Human
Services have information on such services.
203-341-1050.
Information covers any programs or services useful to
seniors in local and regional areas. Many services
available on sliding-scale fee schedules.
WESTPORT/WESTON HEALTH DISTRICT
Regional health department providing full-time
professional public health services. Programs of immuni-
zation, counseling, testing, screening include ones target-
ing ailments that afflict seniors.
180 Bayberry Lane • Westport, CT 06880 • 203-227-9571
WESTPORT
Director of Health • Mark A. R. Cooper, MPH, RS
Senior-oriented programs include: Pneumonia Vaccine
Clinic. Once-in-a-lifetime vaccine for those 65 years and
older. Fee covered by most Medicare plans.
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
• American Cancer Society, volunteer drivers take ambu-
latory patients anywhere in the area for cancer appoint-
ments. No cost but requires 72-hours’ notice.
1-800-227-2345 (Dial option 1.)
• Family & Children’s Agency—Home Care Plus, offers
assisted transportation in wheelchair-accessible van for
those at least 60 years of age to appointments, bank,
post office and shopping. 203-831-2900
• Westport Transit District’s Door-to-Door Service for
Westport Residents, offers door-to-door transportation
services to New Cannan, Norwalk and Wilton for Westport
residents 65 years or older or certified as disabled.
Mon.-Fri., 8 a. m.-6 p.m. • Application and tickets ($3.50
per ticket or 10 for $35.00) available at Town Hall/Room
200 or Senior Center. Contact the Department of Human
Services for additional options.
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
The Assessor’s Office administers State and Town programs
for tax relief (credits, deferrals and exemptions)
for Seniors, Totally Disabled and Veterans.
Applications are taken at Town Hall by the Assessor’s Office
(203-341-1070) and the Department of Human Services
(203-341-1050) for homebound clients only.
Assessor • Paul Friia • E-mail: pfriia@westportct.gov
WESTPORT PUBLIC LIBRARY
Active community programming features noted authors,
artists, musicians, performers. One of Library’s emphases is
drawing users’ attention to informative Web sites, including
those relating to senior concerns.
Services include:
Large print books and other publications with large type
and increased spacing between lines to make the print
easier to read.
E-readers • The Library lends Kindle e-readers, which have
large type settings.
Mail-A-Book • At-home service. For information
contact Margie Freilich-Den at 203.291.4845 or
mfreilich-den@westportlibrary.org
20 Jesup Rd. • Westport, CT 06880 • 203-291-4800
Hours: Mon.-Thurs 9 a.m.- 9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., Sun.
1 p.m.- 5 p.m.
60
Fax: 203-227-3829 • Web site: www.westportlibrary.org
Executive Director • Bill Harmer • 203-291-4801
E-mail: bharmer@westportlibrary.org
PROBATE COURT
Town Hall, Room 100 • 203-341-1100
Fax: 203-341-1153
Judge • Lisa K. Wexler
E-mail: lisa@lisawexler.com
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
POLICE DEPARTMENT
All officers also certified as Emergency Medical
Technicians or Medical Response Technicians and
function as First Responders to all emergency medical
calls, with assistance of Westport Volunteer Emergency
Medical Services in ambulance crews.
50 Jesup Rd. • Westport, CT 06880
Non-emergencies: 203-341-6000 • Fax: 203-341-6092
Chief • Foti Koskinas • 203-341-6008
FIRE DEPARTMENT
515 Post Road East • Westport, CT 06880
Non-emergencies: 203-341-5000 • Fax: 203-341-5009
Chief • Robert Yost
E-mail: ryost@westportct.gov
WESTPORT VOLUNTEER EMERGENCY
MEDICAL SERVICES (WVEMS)
Not-for-profit organization whose volunteers work with
Police Department to assist in providing emergency
medical care to community. WVEMS staffs ambulance
service 24 hours a day every day.
50 Jesup Rd. • Westport, CT 06880
Non-emergencies: 203-341-6081 • Fax: 203-454-6157
Web site: www.westportems.org
Deputy Director • Marc Hartog • 203-341-6056
WVEMS promotes File of Life Program. Information
about residents’ medical conditions and medications is
placed in magnetic holder on refrigerator, with sticker
for front door to notify responders in emergency. Card to
carry also provided.
OTHER IMPORTANT CONTACTS
Animal Control • 203-341-5076
Public Works • 203-341-1120
Registrars of Voters • 203-341-1115
Tax Collector • 203-341-1060
Town Clerk • 203-341-1110
60-64 1,576
65-74 2,177
75-84 1,421
85+ 628
Total 60+ 5,802
Total population of
Westport: 26,391
Percentage 60 years of
age or over: 21.9%
Land area: 20.0 sq. mi.
WILTON
First Selectwoman • Lynne A. Vanderslice
E-mail: lynne.vanderslice@wiltonct.org
Executive Assistant •Jacqueline Rochester
E-mail: jacqueline.rochester@wiltonct.org
Wilton Town Hall
238 Danbury Rd. • Wilton, CT 06897
203-563-0100 • Fax: 203-563-0299
E-mail: mail@wiltonct.org
Web site: www.wiltonct.org
Town Hall • Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES
Department “provides crisis intervention; short-term coun-
seling; information and referral to local, state,
federal human service programs.” Emphasis on
“services to keep older people safe and independent in
their homes.” Operates Free Food Pantry at Comstock
Community Center. Services for Wilton residents only.
180 School Rd. • Wilton, CT 06897 • 203-834-6238
Hours: Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Director • Sarah Heath, MS, MA, LPC, Municipal Agent
203-834-6238 • E-mail: sarah.heath@wiltonct.org
Senior Services Coordinator • Lauren M. Hughes, L.C.S.W.
203-834-6238 • E-mail: lauren.hughes@wiltonct.org
Adult and Family Social Worker • Phoebe Musico, L.C.S.W.
203-834-6238 • E-mail: phoebe.musico@wiltonct.org
Senior Activities Coordinator • Stephanie Belcher, M.A.
203-834-6240 • E-mail: Stephanie.belcher@wiltonct.org
WILTON SENIOR CENTER
Department of Social Services operates Senior Center as
part of Comstock Community Center.
180 School Rd. • Wilton, CT 06897 • 203-834-6240
Town of Wilton
WESTPORT’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
61
Among wide range of programs that Center sponsors are:
Weekly: Hot lunch, Wed. & Thurs., with entertainment on
Wed.; reservations required; donations requested • line
dancing • t’ai chi • Comstock Writers Group • yoga • fitness
& exercise activities • bingo • mah-jongg • chess • Scrabble
• card games (including lessons for beginners in bridge) •
Wii bowling • billiards.
Bimonthly: Corridors newsletter provides schedules and
details of Center offerings. Mailed to registered voters 60
and older. Also available on Town Web site.
Monthly: Garden Club and lunch • jewelry workshop
• Comstock Knitters and Crafters (biweekly) • Book
Discussion Group and lunch • play reading • blood-pres-
sure screenings • painting and sketching.
Also offered: Computer skills instruction covering com-
puter fundamentals, Excel, Word, graphic tools, Internet
usage.
Senior Center also works closely with the following,
among other agencies, organizations, institutions:
• Meals on Wheels of Wilton
Provides low-cost, high-quality, hot and cold meals deliv-
ered Mon., Wed., Fri. as needed to those who qualify.
Some financial assistance possible.
439 Danbury Rd. • Wilton, CT 06897 • 203-762-0566
• Riverbrook Regional YMCA
Wilton Family YMCA Branch,offers many programs
specifically for older adults.
404 Danbury Rd. • Wilton, CT 06897 • 203-762-8384
www.wiltonymca.org
Programs include:
Enhance Fitness
The Wilton Family Y offers a new program for those suf-
fering from arthritis or other chronic pain diseases. The
enhanced fitness program fosters improved health and
well-being in members, including enhanced balance and
flexibility, leading to stronger, healthier, more confident
individuals. Enhance Fitness focuses on dynamic cardio-
vascular exercise, strength training, balance, and flexibil-
ity—everything older adults need to maintain health and
function as they age. Free for members, $5 drop-in fee for
non-members
SilverSneakers
®
Classic
Have fun and move to the music through a variety of
exercises designed to increase muscular strength, range
of movement and activities for daily living. Hand-held
weights, elastic tubing with handles and a SilverSneakers
®
ball are offered for resistance. A chair is available if need-
ed for seated or standing support. Free for members,
$5 drop-in fee for non-members
WILTON
SilverSneakers
®
Splash
Senior Water Exercise Class in the 25Y pool Activate your
urge for variety! Splash offers fun, shallow-water move-
ment to improve agility and flexibility while addressing
cardiovascular, strength and endurance conditioning.
No swimming ability is required and a SilverSneakers
®
kickboard or other aquatic equipment is used to improve
strength, balance and coordination. Free for members,
$5 drop-in fee for non-members.
• Wilton Continuing Education, offers a wide choice of
courses in many areas of interest to seniors; most free.
395 Danbury Rd. • Wilton, CT 06897 • 203-834-7694
• Wilton Parks and Recreation Department, offers a
variety of leisure activities for seniors of all physical
capabilities, including barbecues and day trips. Seasonal
pass to Merwin Meadows park available free to those
65 or older.
Director • Steve Pierce • E-mail: steve.pierce@wiltonct.org
Program Coordinator • Jim Lewicki
E-mail: jim.lewicki@wiltonct.org
Administrative Secretary • Bev Hodge
E-mail: beverly.hodge@wiltonct.org
180 School Rd. • Wilton, CT 06897 • 203-834-6234
www.wiltonparksandrec.org
STAY AT HOME IN WILTON, INC.
Nonprofit membership organization that, for a modest
fee, provides services to senior citizens who desire to stay
in their homes with an independent lifestyle rather than
move to congregate or assisted living residential complex-
es. Services include: information and referrals; emergency
planning; home repairs; safety services and adaptation;
home office problem solving; help with pets; suggestions
for household cleaning; transportation for a variety of
purposes; more.
Social events are scheduled for participation in various
activities. Service is provided by Coordination Directors
with professional backgrounds. Using a pool of volunteers
and vetted paid providers, Coordinators schedule services
to meet the needs of members.
P.O. Box 46 • Wilton, CT 06897-0046 • 203-423-3225
Web site: www.stayathomeinwilton.org
Email: info@shwil.org
Executive Coordinator • Janet Johnson
Membership & Publicity Director • Debbie Louis
TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
• Dial-a-Ride, Town program operated out of Parks and
Recreation Department. Directed toward senior citizens
and disabled. Limited to Wilton and Norwalk. Reservations
required. Nominal fee. • 203-834-6235 • Hours: Mon.-Fri.,
9:15 a.m.-11:30 a.m.; 1:15 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
62
Total population of
Wilton: 18,062
Percentage 60 years of
age or over: 19.4%
Land area: 27.4 sq. mi.
60-64 1,003
65-74 1,255
75-84 794
85+ 441
Total 55+ 3,493
TAX RELIEF PROGRAMS
Assessor determines eligibility of elderly homeowners
and renters requesting tax relief/grants.
Town Hall • 203-563-0121 • Assessor’s Office
E-mail: assessor@wiltonct.org
LIBRARY
Wilton Library Association, Inc., facility is Town’s center
for business research, leisure reading, cultural activities.
Several programs and services designed with older adults
in mind.
137 Old Ridgefield Rd. • Wilton, CT 06897
203-762-3950 • Fax: 203-834-1166
Web site: www.wiltonlibrary.org
Director • Elaine Tai-Lauria • 203-762-6322
E-mail: etailauria@wiltonlibrary.org
Services for seniors include:
• Aids for access and reading for those with handicaps
and vision difficulties: handicapped-access entry doors;
large-print collection; magnifying glasses; special
computers and devices (e.g., Optelec Reader).
• Senior Resources Center: easy access to information
sources especially relevant to senior interests.
• At Your Service: At Home Program: books, magazines,
audiobooks mailed to homes of those unable to get to
Library; special pouch provided for postage-paid return.
PROBATE COURT
Wilton is in Probate District 51.
Norwalk City Hall
125 East Ave., Room 232 • Norwalk, CT 06852-2009
203-854-7737 • Fax: 203-854-7825
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 2009
Norwalk, CT 06852-2009
Judge • Doug Stern
CALL 911 FOR ALL EMERGENCIES.
POLICE DEPARTMENT
Chief • John Lynch
E-mail: john.lynch@wiltonct.org
240 Danbury Rd. • Wilton, CT 06897
Non-emergencies: 203-834-6260
Web site: www.wiltonpolice.org
“Are You OK?” Program: Telephone reassurance program
available free to any resident homebound, medically dis-
abled or over 60. Each morning, call placed to individual’s
home via automatic system. If no response, second call
placed. If still no response, officer dispatched to residence
and relative or key holder contacted.
For information on Crime Prevention or to set up a
Neighbored Watch contact Officer Diane MaClean by
e-mail at diane.maclean@wiltonct.org or by calling the
Police Department at 203-834-6260
FIRE DEPARTMENT
Chief • Ronald Kanterman
E-mail: ronald.kanterman@wiltonct.org
Web site: www.wiltonfire.org
Headquarters/Station 1
236 Danbury Rd. • Wilton, CT 06897
Non-emergencies: 203-834-6260
Station 2 (Marhoffer Station)
707 Ridgefield Rd. • Wilton, CT 06897
Non-emergencies: 203-834-6246
Georgetown Fire District of Town of Redding responds to
calls from part of Georgetown section in Wilton.
Non-emergencies: (203) 544-8800
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES (EMS)
Wilton Volunteer Ambulance Corps (WVAC)
President • John Miscioscia
34 Danbury RD. • Wilton, CT 06897
Non-emergencies: 203-834-6245
www.wiltonambulance.org
OTHER IMPORATNT PHONE NUMBERS
Animal Control • 203-563-0150
Health Department • 203-563-0174
Public Works • 203-563-0152
Registrar of Voters • 203-563-0111
Town Clerk • 203-563-0106
WILTON’S POPULATION BY AGE
(Source: Latest Decennial U.S. Census)
WILTON
Alliance for Aging Research, 1700 K St. NW, Suite 740,
Washington, DC 20006, Phone: 202-293-2856,
www.agingresearch.org.
Alzheimer’s Association, 225 North Michigan Avenue, Floor 17,
Chicago, IL 60601, Phone: 1-800-335-8700 (toll free),
E-mail: info@alz.org, www.alz.org.
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 9400 West
Higging Rd. Rosemont, IL 60018, Phone: 847-823-7186,
www.aaos.org.
American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry, 6728 Old
McLean Village Drive, McLean, VA 22101, (703) 556-9222,
www.aagponline.org
American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary
Rehabilitation, 330 N. Wabash Ave., Suite 2000, Chicago, IL
60611, Phone: (312) 321-5146, E-mail: aacvpr@tmahq.com,
www.aacvpr.org.
American Cancer Society, 250 Williams St., NE, Atlanta, GA
30303, Phone: 1-800-ACS-2345 (227-2345) (toll free),
www.cancer.org.
American College of Surgeons, 633 North St. Clair St., Chicago,
IL 60611-3211, Phone: 1-800-621-4111 (toll free), E-mail: post-
master@facs.org, www.facs.org.
American Council of the Blind, 1703 N. Beauregard St., Suite
420, Alexandria, VA 2220, Phone: (800) 424-8666, www.acb.org
American Diabetes Association, 1701 North Beauregard St.,
Arlington, VA 22301, Phone: 1-800-DIABETES (342-2383)
(toll free), www.diabetes.org.
American Heart Association, 7272 Greenville Ave., Dallas,
TX 75231, Phone: 1-800-AHA-USA1 (242-8721) (toll free),
1-888-4-STROKE (478-7653) (toll free), www.heart.org.
American Lung Association, 55 W. Wacker Drive, Suite 1150
Chicago, IL 60601, Phone: 1-800-LUNG-USA (586-4872) (toll
free), E-mail: info@lung.org, www.lung.org.
American Parkinson Disease Association, 135 Parkinson Ave.,
Staten Island, NY 10305, Phone: 1-800-223-2732
(toll free), E-mail: apda@apdaparkinson.org.
American Physical Therapy Association, 1111 North Fairfax St.
Alexandria, VA 22314, Phone: 1-800-999-2782, ext. 3395 (toll
free), www.apta.org.
American Podiatric Medical Association, 9312 Old Georgetown
Rd, Bethesda, MD 20814, Phone: 1-800-FOOT-CARE (366-8227)
(toll free), E-mail: askapma@apma.org, www.apma.org.
American Society on Aging, 575 Market Street, Suite 2100,
San Francisco, CA 94105, Phone: 1-800-537-9728 (toll free),
E-mail: info@asaging.org, www.asaging.org.
Connecticut Health and Service Organizations
AARP Connecticut. Suite104, Capitol Place, 21 Oak St., Hartford,
CT 06106. Tel. (866) 295-7279; Fax: (860) 249-7707;
http://states.aarp.org/category/connecticut/;
www.facebook.com/AARPCT; twitter.com/AARPCT
Alzheimer’s Association, Connecticut Chapter. Main Office:
Suite 4b, 200 Executive Blvd, Southington, CT 06489.
Tel: (860) 828-2828; http://www.alz.org/ct/
in_my_community_contact.asp
Center for Medicare Advocacy, Inc. P.O. Box 350, Willimantic,
CT 06226. Tel. (860) 456-7790; Fax: (860) 456-2614;
www.medicareadvocacy.org/; http://www.medicareadvocacy.org
Connecticut Commission on Aging. State Capitol, 210 Capitol
Ave., Hartford, CT 06106. Tel.: (860) 240-5200; coa@cga.ct.gov;
www.cga.ct.gov/coa;
Connecticut Home Care Program for Elders. Administered by
Connecticut Department of Social Services, Alternate Care Unit:
25 Sigourney St., Hartford, CT 06106. Tel.: (800) 445-5394;
www.ct.gov/dss/cwp/view.asp?a==2353&q=305170
Elderly Nutrition Program (South Central and Southwestern
Connecticut). Bridgeport area—congregate meals: CW Resources,
Inc. 215 Warren St., Bridgeport, CT 06604. Tel. (203) 332-3264.
Bridgeport area—home-delivered meals: FSW, Inc. CT.
475 Clinton Ave., Bridgeport, CT 06605. Tel. (203) 368-4291;
Fax: 203-332-7631. Derby area—TEAM Project Manna.
30 Elizabeth St., Derby, CT 06418. Tel. (203) 736-5420;
Fax: (203) 736-5425. New Haven area—LifeBridge Community
Services. Tel. (203) 752-9919; Fax: (203) 752-9691.
Stamford area—Catholic Charities of Fairfield County. Suite 10,
30 Myano Lane, Stamford, CT 06902. Tel. (203) 324-6175; Fax:
(203) 323-1108
Retired and Senior Volunteer Program. South Central
Connecticut RSVP (sponsored by Agency on Aging of South
Central Connecticut): One Long Wharf Dr., New Haven, CT
06511. Tel. (203) 752-3059. Southwestern Connecticut RSVP
(sponsored by Norwalk Economic Opportunity Now/N.E.O.N.):
95 South Main St., Norwalk, CT 06854. Tel. (203) 663-7332.
For additional information: www.ct.gov/agingservices/cwp/view.
asp?a=2513&q=313072
Senior Community Service Employment Program. Greater
Bridgeport Area: Southwestern Connecticut Agency on Aging,
1000 Lafayette Blvd., Bridgeport, CT 06604. Tel. (800) 994-9422.
Greater New Haven Area: Agency on Aging of South Central
Connecticut, One Long Wharf Dr., New Haven, CT 06511.
Tel. (203) 785-8533. Greater Stamford Area: Jewish Family
Service, 733 Summer St., 6th Floor, Stamford, CT 06901.
Tel. (203) 921-4161. For other locations in Fairfield and New
Haven Counties: Associates for Training and Development.
Tel. (800) 439-3307. For additional information:
www.ct.gov/agingservices/cwp/view.asp?a=2513&q=313068
National Health and Service Organizations
63
HEALTH & SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS
American Stroke Association c/o American Heart
Association, 7272 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, TX 75231, Phone:
1-888-4STROKE (478-7653) (toll free), E-mail: strokeassociation@
heart.org, www.strokeassociation.org.
Arthritis Foundation National Office, 1335 West Peachtree
Street, Atlanta, GA 30309, U.S. Mail: P.O. Box 7669, Atlanta, GA
30357, Phone: (404) 872-7100, E-mail: help@arthritis.org, www.
arthritis.org.
Bright Focus Foundation, 22512 Gateway Center Dr., Clarksburg,
MD 20871, Phone: 1-800-437-2423, (437-2423) (toll free),
www.brightfocus.org.
Captioned Media Program National Association of the Deaf,
1447 East Main Street, Spartanburg, SC 29307, Phone:
1-800-237-6213 (toll free), E-mail: info@cfv.org, www.cfv.org.
Caregiver Action Network,1130 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite
500, Washington, DC 20036, Phone: (202) 454-3970, Email:
info@caregiveraction.org, www.carwegiveraction.org.
Community Transportation Association of America, 1341 G
Street, NW, 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Phone:
1-800-891-0590, Fax: 202-737-9197, www.ctaa.org.
Hearing Loss Association of America, 7910 Woodmont Avenue,
Suite 1200, Bethesda, MD 20814, Phone: 301-657-2248, E-mail:
info@hearingloss.org, www.hearingloss.org.
Lighthouse Guild, 15 West 65th St., New York, NY 10023, Phone:
1-800-829-0500 (toll free), E-mail: info@lighthouse.org, www.
lighthouseguild.org.
Medicare Rights Center, 266 W 37th St, Third Fl., New York, NY
10018, Phone: 1-800-333-4114, www.medicarerights.org
National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive,Bethesda,
MD 20892-9760, Phone: 1-800-4-CANCER, www.cancer.gov
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Clearinghouse, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892,
Phone: 1-888-644-6226, www.nccih.nih.gov
National Center on Elder Abuse, c/o University of Southern
California Keck School of Medicine, Department of Family
Medicine and Geriatrics, 1000 South Fremont Avenue, Unit 22
Bld. A-6, Alhambra, CA 91803. Phone: 1-855-500-3537,
www.ncea.aoa.gov/index.aspx
National Council on Aging, 251 18th Street South, Suite 500,
Arlington, VA 22202, Phone: 571-527-3900, www.ncoa.org
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Information Center,
PO Box 30105, Bethesda, MD 20824-0105, Phone: 301-592-
8573, E-mail: nhlbiinfo@nhlbi.nih.gov, www.nhlbi.nih.gov.
National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization,
1731 King St., Alexandria, VA 22314,
Phone: (703) 837-1500, E-mail: nhpco_info@nhpco.org,
www.nhpco.org.
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases,
5601 Fishers Lane, Bethesda, MD 20892-6612, Phone:
866-284-4107 (toll free), E-mail: niaidoc@nih.gov,
www.niaid.nih.gov.
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, 9000
Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892-2290, Phone: 301-402-4261,
E-mail: nidcrinfo@mail.nih.gov, www.nidcr.nih.gov/.
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney
Diseases, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892. Phone:
(301) 496-3583, www.niddk.nih.gov.
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke,
P.O. Box 5801, Bethesda, MD 20824, Phone: 1-800-352-9424
(toll free), www.ninds.nih.org.
National Institute on Aging, Building 31, Room 5C27,
31 Center Drive, MSC 2292, Bethesda, MD 20892-2292, Phone:
1-800-222-2225 (toll free), E-mail: niainfo@mail.nih.gov,
www.nih.gov/nia.
National Kidney Foundation, 30 East 33rd Street, New York, NY
10016, Phone: 1-800-622-9010 (toll free) www.kidney.org.
National Library Service for the Blind and Physically
Handicapped, Library of Congress, 1291 Taylor Street, NW,
Washington, DC 20542, Phone: 1-800-424-8567 (toll free),
E-mail: nls@loc.gov, www.lcweb.loc.gov/nls/.
National Osteoporosis Foundation, 1251 18th St., Arlington, VA
22202, Phone: 1-800-223-2226 (toll free), www.nof.org,
National Stroke Association, 9707 East Easter Lane, Englewood,
CO 80112-3747, Phone: 1-800-STROKES (787-6537)
(toll free), www.stroke.org.
Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, 1395 Broadway, Suite 1509,
New York, NY 10018, Phone: 1-800-457-6676 (toll free),
E-mail: info@pdf.org.
Pension Rights Center, 1350 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 206,
Washington, DC 20036, Phone: 202-296-3776,
E-mail: pnsnrights@aol.com.
Skin Cancer Foundation, 149 Madison Avenue, Suite 901, New
York, NY 10016, Phone: 1-800-SKIN-490 (754-6490) (toll free),
www.skincancer.org.
United Seniors Health Council, www.unitedseniorshealth.org.
Vision Council. 225 Reinekers Ln., Suite 700, Alexandria, VA
22314, 1-866-826-0290 (toll free) http://www.thevisioncouncil.
org.
Well Spouse Association, 63 West Main Street, Suite 14,
Freehold, NJ 07728, Phone: 1-800-838-0879 (toll free),
E-mail: info@wellspouse.org, www.wellspouse.org.
U.S. Social Security Administration
The Social Security Administration is a federal government
agency and has offices around the country. Information from
the SSA can be obtained by calling 1-800-772-1213 or by
contacting one of the Connecticut offices, which include:
Bridgeport • 3885 Main St. • 866-331-6399
Meriden • 1 West Main St. • 877-409-8429
New Haven • 150 Court St. • 866-331-5281
Stamford • 2 Landmark Sq. • 866-770-1881
Find additional and expanded information at
www.seniorgotoguide.com
HEALTH & SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS
64
65
Index
PROFESSIONALS, BUSINESSES AND SERVICES
Hearing Specialists
Hearing, Balance and Speech Center ..................11, 32
Medical Equipment and Supplies
The Senior Depot Store ..............................5, 32
Poetry Presentation
What the Great Poets Had to Say About Aging
and the Last of Life ....................................41
CAREGIVERS AND RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES
Adult Day Programs
Adult Day Program at Waveny
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, back cover
Aging in Place Solutions
Waveny LifeCare Network
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, back cover
Assisted Living and
Independent Living Communities
Edgehill..............................34, inside back cover
The Inn • Part of Waveny LifeCare Network
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, , back cover
The Village at Waveny • Assisted Living Dedicated to Caring for
People with Memory Loss ................................
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, back cover
Geriatric Assessments and Care Management
Geriatric Care Management at Waveny
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, back cover
Home Care/Home Health Care
Comfort Keepers ..................................... 35
Home Choice Senior Care, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Waveny at Home ...........7, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, back cover
Waveny Home Healthcare ................................
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, back cover
Hospices
Greenwich Hospital....................................37
Hospitals
Greenwich Hospital....................................28
Norwalk Hospital ......................................29
Stamford Health ......................................27
Nursing Homes/Skilled Nursing
Notre Dame Health and Rehabilitation Center. .............37
The Nathaniel Witherell .............................9, 38
Waveny Care Center .........7, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, back cover
Rehabilitation Facilities/Short-term Rehabilitation
Notre Dame Health and Rehabilitation Center..............37
Rehabilitation Services
at Waveny Care Center.......7, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, back cover
The Nathaniel Witherell .............................9, 38
LEGAL, INSURANCE, REAL ESTATE,
MORTGAGES/REVERSE MORTGAGES, AND
FINANCIAL PROFESSIONALS
Attorneys
Braunstein & Todisco, P.C. ..........................39, 40
Eliovson & Tenore/
Elderlaw & Family Counseling Associates, LLC ..............39
Debra Vey Voda-Hamilton
Hamilton Law & Mediation, PLLC .....................13, 39
Kevin Kelly & Associates ................................39
Law Offices of Joel D. Muhlbaum, LLC,
Attorneys at Law ..................................39, 40
Banks
People’s United Bank ..................inside front cover, 40
Mortgage/Reverse Mortgages
Atlantic Home Loans............................16, 17, 40
CEMETERIES AND FUNERAL HOMES
Magner Funeral Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
66
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IN BUSINESS TO HELP SENIORS? Let them know at CT SENIOR HELP CENTER FOR FREE!
66
This Guide is intended to assist senior citizens, older adults and their families in obtaining information about products and services of interest. However,
because of the constant changing and updating of information contained herein, it is not possible to guarantee complete accuracy of all the information or
the complete absence of errors or omissions. The publisher, therefore, does not assume liability for any inaccuracy, errors or omissions in the information, nor
assume any liability for inaccurate or misleading information or errors or omissions contained in advertisements in this Guide.
Published annually by The Merrill Anderson Co., Inc., Stratford, CT 06614. Copyright 2019 by The Merrill Anderson Co., Inc. All rights reserved.
Get detailed information on:
City/Town Services for Seniors
Senior Living
Independent Living
Assisted Living
Skilled Nursing and Rehab
Alzheimer’s and Memory Care
Hospice
Adult Day Care
Home Care Services
Medical and Non-medical
Medical Equipment and Supplies
Healthcare Professionals
Dentists
Eye Care
Hearing
Geriatric Care Management
Professional Services
Elder Law Attorneys
Seniors Real Estate Specialists
Medicare Advisors
Reverse Mortgage Specialists
Financial Advisors
Long-term Care Specialists
End of Life Services
Funeral Services
Cemeteries
Transportation Services
Linda O’Leary, First Selectman’s Office,
Town of Darien
Elizabeth Paris, Director of Senior Programs
at the Mather Center, Darien
Ali Ramsteck, Director, Human Services,
Town of Darien
Marcella Rand, Program Specialist, at the
Mather Center, Darien
Lori Ann Contadino, Director, Commission
on Aging, Town of Greenwich
George O’Loughlin, Director of Case
Management, Town of Greenwich
Barbara Ormerod-Glynn, Library Director,
Greenwich Library
Josephine Sargeant, First Selectman’s Office,
Town of Greenwich
Deborah C. Travers, Director, Division of
Family Health, Town of Greenwich
Barb Achenbaum, Executive Director,
Staying Put in New Canaan
Lyn Bond, Director, Lapham Community
Center, Senior Center of New Canaan
Carol McDonald, RN, Director of Health &
Human Services, Town of New Canaan
Sally Johnson, Executive Assistant to the
Mayor, City of Norwalk
Beatrix Winter, Executive Director, Senior
Center, City of Norwalk
Kathleen Bordelon, Executive Director,
SilverSource, Stamford
Christina Crain, Executive Director, Stamford
Senior Center,
Marianne Delaney, Director of Development,
SilverSource, Stamford
Randi Derene, Administrative Assistant,
Selectman’s Office, Town of Weston
Wendy Petty, Director, Weston Senior
Activities Center, Town of Weston
Susan Pfister, Director, Center for Senior
Activities, Town of Westport
Margaret Pinherio, Administrative Assistant,
Human Services, Town of Westport
Lauren M. Hughes, Senior Services
Coordinator, Town of Wilton
Phil Richards, Board Chairman, Stay at
Home in Wilton
Thanks also to everyone who is helping to distribute copies of the Guide.
We extend a special thanks to everyone who helped make the
Senior GO TO Guide possible, especially:
Publisher
Thomas Gerrity
Art Director
Paula R. Soli
Graphic Designer
Jean Venditti
Advertising Sales
Jennifer VanGele
Editorial &
Research Associate
Peter J. O’Connell
Customer Service
Sarah Scalzo
Web Master
Sirvydas Vebra
Disribution
Dave Chirico
Done Right
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EDG-31_SeniorGoToGuide_Ad_8.375x10.875_VF.indd 1 1/16/19 4:33 PM
M
anaging a loved one’s healthcare can be taxing and all-consuming, which is why it’s so
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