Return to flip book view

Catalog

Page 1

1 I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S School Catalog Main Campus Institute of Health Sciences 11031 McCormick Road Hunt Valley, Maryland 21031 Phone: (410) 891-2514 Fax: 1.443.281.5562 www.IOHS.edu I July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2022 Version IV

Page 2

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E 2 This catalog contains policy regulations and procedures in existence at the time of the publication of this document. The school reserves the right to make changes at any time to reflect current school policies. The Institute of Health Sciences acknowledges that job placement and job salaries for any program cannot be guaranteed. This catalog is for informational purposes and does not constitute a contract, express or implied, between any applicant, student or adjunct faculty member and Institute of Health Sciences. May 15, 2020 Board of Directors Institute of Health Sciences

Page 3

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E 3 Catalog Here you'll find the information you need to become an informed consumer of a IOHS Education. From financial aid facts and forms to information from our Student Services and Career Services departments to academic information including course information, textbooks, and catalogs are all available here. IOHS will also provide any specific consumer information documents or reports upon request in writing. To receive a copy, please send a written request to the Financial Aid Office directly and allow the staff twenty-four hours to process your request and to send your requested information to you. If you are thinking about attending Institute of Health Sciences, go to our web page where you can learn about our programs and additional programs and consumer information. If you are a current student, you can log onto your school portal.

Page 4

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E 4 Table of Contents Organization .................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8 History ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8 Mission Statement .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8 Statement of Non-Discrimination ............................................................................................................................................................................. 8 Disability & Accommodations ................................................................................................................................................................................. 9 Title IX Education Act ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 9 Campus Facilities ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 11 Admission ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 11 School Directory ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 11 People and Numbers to Call for Assistance ............................................................................................................................................................ 11 School Officers ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 11 Administration Office ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 12 Application for Admission and Catalog .................................................................................................................................................................. 12 Cancellation of Classes or Programs ...................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Job Placement ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Clinical Internship .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Technology Admission Prerequisites ...................................................................................................................................................................... 13 Computer Requirements ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 14 Strategies for Success Course .............................................................................................................................................................................. 14 Health Declaration Form ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 14 Immunization Requirements: (IMR) ....................................................................................................................................................................... 15 Background Screening ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 15 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Certification ......................................................................................................................................................... 16 Entrance Requirements ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 17 Administrative Procedure for Admission ........................................................................................................................................................... 18 Financial Aid ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 20 Office of Financial Aid Mission Statement ............................................................................................................................................................. 20 Eligibility Requirements ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 20 Eligibility of Students ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 21 How to Apply ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 21 FERPA Policy ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 23 Types of Aid .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 25 Grant Aid ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 25 Loans ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Job Aid ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 26 Satisfactory Academic Progress .............................................................................................................................................................................. 28 (SAP) Policy ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 28 Impact of Multiple Return of Title IV Funds (R2T4) ............................................................................................................................................. 28 Notification ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 28 Warning .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 28 Title IV Refund Policy ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 29 Definitions .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 29 Class Attendance Policy and Procedures ................................................................................................................................................................ 29 Excused Absences ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 30 Unexcused Absences ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 30 Examples of attendance in an academic course include .......................................................................................................................................... 31 Faculty Responsibility ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 32 School Course Calendar........................................................................................................................................................................................... 33

Page 5

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E 5 School Holidays ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 35 Religious Holidays ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 35 Inclement Weather ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 35 Financial Information................................................................................................................................................................................................... 36 Tuition and Fees ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 36 Text Books and Materials ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 37 Withdrawal ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 37 Refund Policy ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 37 Financial Aid & Scholarships ................................................................................................................................................................................. 38 Student Conduct ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 39 Academic Misconduct ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 39 Non-academic Misconduct ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 39 Students Rights: Due Process ................................................................................................................................................................................. 39 Student Complaint ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 40 Academic Policy ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 44 Clock Hours ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 44 Academic Honesty ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 44 Academic Counseling ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 44 Completion Requirements: ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 45 Academic Grading ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 45 Transcripts / Student Records ............................................................................................................................................................................. 47 Academic Progress ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 47 Standards of Academic Progress ............................................................................................................................................................................ 47 Qualitative standard ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 48 Quantitative standard .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 48 Attendance Policy .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 51 Excused Absence .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 52 Unexcused Absence................................................................................................................................................................................................ 52 Federal Funding & Attendance ............................................................................................................................................................................... 52 Attendance Records ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 53 Documenting Academic Attendance in a Academic Long Distance Courses ....................................................................................................... 53 Financial Aid Probation .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 54 Makeup Policy........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 54 Leave of Absence ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 55 Previous Education and Training............................................................................................................................................................................ 55 Student Records........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 55 MoodleTM Data ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 56 Medical Policy ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 56 Health Insurance and Hospitalization ..................................................................................................................................................................... 57 Health Services Referral ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 57 Personal Image ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 57 Student Support ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 57 Help Desk ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 57 Library .................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 58 Placement Assistance ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 58 Student Activity ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 58 Student Activities ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 58 Drug and Alcohol Policy ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 59 Federal and State Law ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 59 Alcohol Regulations ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 59 Drug Regulations .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 59 Sanctions Covering Drugs and Alcohol Abuse ....................................................................................................................................................... 60 Record Keeping ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 60 Copyright Policy ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 60 Program Cancellation ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 61 Definitions .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 61 Review Process Initiation ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 61

Page 6

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E 6 Investigative Procedures ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 62 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology ............................................................................................................................................................................. 63 Occupational Description......................................................................................................................................................................................... 63 Scope of Practice ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 63 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology ....................................................................................................................................................................... 63 Distance Learning Platform .................................................................................................................................................................................... 64 Clinical Practicum .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 64 Clinical Affiliates ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 65 Orientation to Clinical Externship .......................................................................................................................................................................... 66 Malpractice Coverage ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 66 Competency and Assessment ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 67 END Technology Graduation Requirements: ......................................................................................................................................................... 67 Assessment Marks .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 68 Assessments Weights ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 68 Attendance Time Sheet ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 68 Logbook ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 69 Forums ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 69 Case Study .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 69 Physician Interaction Form ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 69 Tests/Quizzes ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 69 Clinical Assessment................................................................................................................................................................................................ 70 Final Core Clinical Assessment .............................................................................................................................................................................. 70 Quizzes and Tests Security ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 71 Proctored Exam Policy ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 71 Proctored Examination Procedure .......................................................................................................................................................................... 72 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology ............................................................................................................................................................................. 73 1st Quarter ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 73 2nd Quarter ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 74 3rd Quarter ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 74 4th Quarter ................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 75 School Faculty & Staff .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 77 Text Book List 2020 - 2021 .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 80 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology .......................................................................................................................................................................... 80

Page 7

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 7 This catalog is a catalog for the Maryland Main Campus. Communications Inquiries and requests for the Official School Catalog and for other printed materials, should be addressed to the main campus: Students and prospective students may obtain information regarding the School’s program performance from the: Maryland Campus Maryland Higher Education Commission 6 N. Liberty Street, 10th Floor Baltimore, Maryland 21201 Phone: (410) 767-3301 Fax: (410) 332-0270 Program Performance

Page 8

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 8 Organization History Institute of Health Sciences (IHS) is a private post-secondary school located in Hunt Valley, Maryland. The school was organized within the State of Maryland as a “C” corporation in 2007. The founder of the school, Richard L. Trader, who is appointed as the director, is also the owner of the school. Under the administrative organization of the school, the director is responsible for all administrative policies, personnel operations and academic programs of the school. The registrar of the school, who is the director’s designee, shall be present when the school is in operation. The main campus and administrative offices are located at Institute of Health Sciences, 11031 McCormick Road, Hunt Valley, Maryland 21031. The school operates as a blended long-distance educational provider, to provide a certificate program in Electroneurodiagnostic Technology; the faculty, students and diagnostic equipment are not located within the school facility. Students receive didactic instruction on-line through Moodle TM, a web-based course management system, which allows for 24/7 access to classes and materials. In addition, students receive resident clinical training at local neurology hospitals near them. Clock Hour The Electroneurodiagnostic Technology program is clock-hour based and is divided into separate quarters that must be sequential passed to move through the various courses. The program consists of two academic years consisting of the first academic year of 900 hours and a second academic year of 180 hours for a total of 1080 total clock hours. Of the total clock hours, there are 360 online clock hours and 720 clinical hours at a Neurology Institution, over the course of 48 weeks. Your attendance status in the program will be measured by four individual quarter periods of time. See: (SAP page 26 of catalog.) Mission Statement The mission of Institute of Health Sciences is to provide high-quality education and to prepare women and men for careers in allied health fields. Consistent with these principles, the school seeks to give opportunities to a diverse population of students to continue their education as mature adults and enhance their lives and the lives of those in their communities, through their professional work and service; locate employment opportunities for our graduates; and promote an environment for employees and students which fosters teamwork, personal growth and respect for the individual. Statement of Non-Discrimination IHS does not discriminate against anyone regarding political affiliation, sex/gender identity, sexual preference, religious/spiritual beliefs, age, race, physical handicap, creed and/or national origin.

Page 9

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 9 Disability & Accommodations The aim of the IHS Disability Services is to provide all persons an equal opportunity to participate in and benefit from programs and services afforded to others. The Office of Disability Services (ODS) assists eligible students in obtaining a variety of services (i.e., alternative testing, note taking, interpreting, advocacy, web-based visual help, podcasts, video, etc.) and ensures that all matters of equal access, reasonable accommodation, and compliance are properly addressed. Students who need accommodations must notify the school director and request services from IHS. The ODS honors and maintains confidentiality. Reasonable accommodations are available to eligible students with a documentable disability and/or medical condition covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Title IX Education Act Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects individuals from discrimination based on sex in any educational program or activity operated by recipients of federal financial assistance. Sexual harassment, which includes acts of sexual violence, is a form of sex discrimination prohibited by Title IX. IOHS does not discriminate on the basis of sex in the employment, education programs or activities it operates. IOHS is committed to providing an environment free from discrimination based on sex and provides a number of resources and services to assist students, faculty and staff in addressing issues involving sex discrimination, including sexual violence. Sexual violence, sexual harassment, stalking and relationship violence have a profound impact on a victim's academic, social, working, and personal life, and negatively affects victims' friends and families, other students, co-workers, and members of the school community. To combat this complex social problem, IOHS provides a variety of resources and educational programs designed to prevent sexual violence and other acts of sexual misconduct, including sexual harassment, provide information about what to do when an incident has occurred, and increase awareness of campus and community resources for support and response. Victims of sexual violence, sexual harassment, stalking, and relationship violence are encouraged to seek support and to report the incident. IOHS has appointed a Title IX Coordinator to oversee IOHS response to Title IX complaints, develop training and education programs/materials for faculty, staff and students, as well as monitor trends and effectiveness of Title IX education efforts. Inquiries concerning the application of Title IX may be referred to the Title IX Coordinator or to the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. Lynn K. Trader RN BSN is the IOHS Title IX Coordinator. She may be reached at 410-891-2517. Advisory Committee The school has a distinguished advisory committee consisting of physicians, technologists, and lay personnel. With numerous clinical affiliations across the US that include academic medical centers, community hospitals, and neurology centers, the school is committed to preparing its graduates to deliver patient-centered care as valued members of the health care team.

Page 10

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 10 The bodies are voluntary, on-governmental associations of institutions, programs and professionals or practitioner’s fields involved as a community in fulfilling two fundamental purposes: quality-assessment (evaluating an institution of program to determine whether it meets or exceeds stated standards of quality), and quality-enhancement (assisting the institution of program in continuing to improve itself). There are two basic types of accreditation: institutional and specialized or programmatic. Accreditation bodies that conduct accreditation are national or regional in scope and comprise the institutions that have achieved and maintain accredited status. Accreditation bodies that conduct accreditation of a program that prepares students for a profession or occupation are often closely associated with professional associations in the field. Institute of Health Sciences is approved as a post- secondary school by the Maryland State Department of Education. For additional information: National Accreditation - Accrediting Bureau of Health Education Schools The Maryland campus of the Institute of Health Science are Institutional Accredited by the Accrediting Bureau of Health Education Schools (ABHES), 7777 Leesburg Pike, Suite 314 N. Falls Church, VA 22043, (703) 917-9503 as. All school records are kept within the main campus. ABHES is recognized by the United States Secretary of Education for the accreditation of private, postsecondary institutions in the United States offering predominantly allied health education programs. The Electroneurodiagnostic Technology Program at the Institute of Health Science in Maryland is accredited by the Commission on of Allied Health Education Programs in cooperation with the Joint Review Committee on Education in Electroneurodiagnostic Technology representing the American Medical EEG Association and American Society of EEG Technologists. For additional Information: Programmatic Accreditation State and Institutional Accreditation Accreditation: Maryland Higher Education Commission 6 N. Liberty Street, 10th Floor Baltimore, Maryland 21201 Phone: (410) 767-3301 Fax: (410) 332-0270

Page 11

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 11 Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs 1361 Park Street Clearwater, Florida 33756 727-210-2350 Campus Facilities All clinical rotations are accomplished within an accredited medical institution close to the student’s home. All clinical institutions are accredited by the Joint Hospital Commission. The main campus of the school is a six-thousand square foot building located in Hunt Valley, Maryland. It is a one student building with offices, classrooms and video conference facilities. The sub-main campus is in class A office building in Wilmington, Del. The office has access for video conferencing facilities and consists of classrooms, offices and conference facilities. Admission School Directory People and Numbers to Call for Assistance: The school is required to designate an employee or group of employees to assist enrolled or prospective students in obtaining all of the information specified below. If the school has designated one person for an area of responsibility, that person shall be available, upon reasonable notice, to any enrolled or prospective student throughout the normal administrative working hours listed. If more than one person, often an entire office, is designated, their combined work schedules have been arranged so that at least one of them is available, upon reasonable notice, throughout the normal administrative working hours listed. Availability of Employees for Information Dissemination Purposes: This directory supplies the names, and phone numbers of individuals and offices at IHS, which provide services you may need throughout your admission to the school. School Officers Richard L. Trader MMsc PA-C FCCM President Lynn K. Trader RN BSN CCRN V. President – Title IX Coordinator Ms. Kellee Trice BS REEG.T Neurodiagnostic Program Director Denise Bates MBA Financial Aid Officer Richard Taylor, MD Medical Director

Page 12

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 12 The school administration is staffed from 9 am to 4:00 pm EST, Monday through Friday. Administration Office 1-410-891-2515 Fax: 443-281-5562 Mr. Richard Trader Director of Institute of Health Sciences 1-410-891-2513 Ms. Kellee Trice Director Electroneurodiagnostic Technology 1-410-891-2514 Ms. Lynn K. Trader Registrar – Title IX Coordinator 1-410-821-2517 Application for Admission and Catalog Applicants may call or write the administrative office to request an application and /or a current catalog. The prospective student may also download an application and a current catalog from the school website at http://www.Institueofhealthscience.org Correspondence or calls about requests for application or catalog information should be addressed to: Administrative Office Institute of Health Sciences 11031 McCormick Road Hunt Valley, Maryland 21031 Cancellation of Classes or Programs The school reserves the right to cancel or postpone a class or a program if student enrollment is insufficient. However, every effort will be made to cancel the class or program well in advance of the beginning date. Job Placement Job placements and / or job salaries cannot be guaranteed by the school. Clinical Internship The purpose of clinical internship is to provide practical, "hands-on" experience in Electroneurodiagnostic Technology. To comply with ABRET and ASET guidelines, clinical internship consists of a full calendar year (11 months) of full-time clinical experience (15 hours/week). Arrangements for a compatible clinical internship are made through the Neurophysiologic Department of the institution and School Administration. The individual is interviewed by the clinical institution and a shadow day is arranged for the student to spend a day in the hospital department. Students are selected based on the clinical interview and the school admission requirements. Criteria such as student suitability for a specific site, availability of a site at the time of placement, and department reorganization are considered for Internship placement.

Page 13

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 13 In the latter portion of the first quarter, students will begin the combined didactic and clinical phase, and will be placed in a facility to continue learning under the supervision of clinical professionals. During this time, the student is expected to perform in a competent, ethical, professional manner, and to assist the clinical professionals in all matters requested within the scope of the student’s training. The School maintains Affiliation Agreements with multiple clinical facilities. In order to maintain formal and structured relationships with these clinical affiliates, a student, or his/her representative (parents, rehabilitation counselor, etc.), is not permitted to approach a site on their own. If a student has a interest in a clinical facility with which the School is not affiliated, the student must bring this to the attention of the Program Director, who will evaluate the clinical setting. Individual days or time of clinical practice may not be arranged by the student without consultation with the faculty and program director. Clinical Placement A professional attitude during a clinical Internship is required by the clinical facilities and the school. The clinical student is expected to follow all clinical protocols and rules and take pride in their clinical participation. The student is expected to be in attendance during all scheduled clinical hours times. Keeping with HIPAA standards, students must never reveal any confidential medical information. Personal hygiene is mandatory, and attire must meet Clinical Department requirements. The Electroneurodiagnostic Technology program clinical Internship requires a combined classroom and clinical commitment of 15 hours per week. The school maintains professional liability insurance on all students that are attending their clinical rotation Hospital Employees Internship Unless the student is a employee of the institution *, an individual contract must be signed between the school and the hospital prior to the student beginning their internship. Individuals that are now employed with a hospital or medical practice may have the requirement for a clinical contract waived based on the institution and school regulations. Please contact the school administrative office to discuss the requirements. An important part of the admission process is selecting a compatible licensed or registered clinical mentor for each intern. Our mentors and faculty mentors come from among the best professionals in the region and are supported by an intensive, personalized cohort experience, by professional workshops, readings, and reflection. During the 48-week program, clinical mentors support and provide clinical assessments for the intern daily. Technology Admission Prerequisites Applicants are required to meet several specific requirements prior to consideration for admission to the END Technology program. They are listed and delineated below: • All costs for obtaining and providing the admission requirements to IHS are the responsibility of the prospective student.

Page 14

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 14 • The course “Strategies for Success” conducted by the IHS adjunct faculty, are provided free to all prospective students but must be completed as part of the admission process. Computer Requirements To participate in the END Technology program, at a minimum, each student is required to own or have ready access during class hours to the following computer hardware and software: • Pentium 500mhz or higher/64MB memory (128MB recommended) / 500MB Free space • Web camera and Zoom Videoconferencing software. • Internet service at broadband bandwidth with e-mail and fax capability • Videoconferencing software – encrypted (supplied by school) • Word processing system which can create and access Microsoft documents and Power Point documents. • Audio/speaker capability to receive podcast or video lectures • Antivirus software • Laser or inkjet printer END Technology program applicants are required to demonstrate the knowledge and skills, needed to succeed in a long distance educational environment. Strategies for Success Course As part of entrance requirements to the END Technology program, students enrolling in the Neurodiagnostic Technology program either with or without previous health care experience will be required to take and pass the course “Strategies for Success”. This course will provide important information that is needed to become a successful health care worker. Students will learn what they can expect as a member of the health care team: information, behaviors, and the all-important communication skills in dealing with a variety of customers. Students will also learn the value of clinical internships and how this enhances academic instruction and prepares them for working in health care. To demonstrate computer skills the student will be required to go online and access the Health Strategies Course. In this course the student will take a practice math exam, write several short papers to demonstrate their writing ability and practice the skills of test taking and uploading assignments within the course. Faculty will be available to assist students with individual questions. They will download several power point slides, (PPT), review assignments and send and receive emails through their course management system. The ability of their computer hardware to access the program and skills exam will be documented and is requirement for admission into the END program. The ability of their computer hardware to access the sample program and skills exam results will be documented and become part of their application to the END Technology program. Health Declaration Form END Technologists are required to walk and stand for long periods of time within a clinical setting. In addition, they are required to have above-average manual dexterity, hand/eye coordination, good vision and hearing (or correctable), the ability to lift 40 lbs. and the ability to help in the positioning of ill or injured patients. In addition, the hospital

Page 15

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 15 environment can be stressful at times and you are expected to act in a mature manner throughout your career. For this reason, you are required to provide a signed Health Declaration (HC) letter from your licensed health care provider and/or providers as part of your entrance requirements. The provider will be asked to document that you are physically capable of working within a hospital environment, as an Electroneurodiagnostic Technologist. A pregnant student must also obtain a separate health declaration letter, signed by her obstetrician, as part of entrance or continued enrollment in her academic and /or clinical rotations. Student must also provide a statement of declaration from her physician of clearance to return to her internship. It should be noted that certain chemicals are used within various hospital environments and a health care provider should address that issue with the student on the form. The health care provider should e-mail or fax the HC form to the registrar at Institute of Health Sciences, 11031 McCormick Road Hunt Valley, Maryland 21031. Fax: 443-281-5562. This form will be entered into her permanent file. Immunization Requirements: (IMR) Based on state laws governing medical students and school policy, students are required to provide documentation of the following as part of their entrance requirements. Individual institutions (clinical sites) may include additional testing. • at least one dose of mumps and rubella vaccine(s) given at or after 12 months of age; • two doses of live measles-containing vaccine given at least one month apart beginning at or after 12 months of age. • a booster dose of Td (Tetanus/diphtheria) within the last ten years; and • 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine Students are also required to present proof of vaccination or immunity to chicken pox along with a negative PPD (Tuberculosis Test) or chest X-ray. In the case of measles, mumps, rubella, and hepatitis B, the student may present laboratory evidence of immunity. Co-Vid Testing and Vaccination At this publishing date the testing and Vaccination policy for Co-VID virus varies by each state and hospital. The student will be required to document the instructions of the individual state and hospital prior to clinical rotations You may get this information from your health care provider and you are required to provide this information as part of your entrance application. The health provider should provide the IMR information to the Registrar at Institute of Health Sciences, 11031 McCormick Road, Hunt Valley, Maryland 21031. The school reserves the right to release all health records to clinical sites. Background Screening Institute of Health Sciences and clinical sites associated with the END Technology program require background checks and drug screening on prospective students, to insure the safety of the patients treated by the students in the program. A background and drug screening is required as part of the entrance requirements to the END Technology program. Pregnancy

Page 16

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 16 To facilitate this process Institute of Health Sciences has joined The Hospital Association background check program, known as Student Checks • Prospective students go online and enter their demographic information. • The school can then go online and review background checks to decide eligibility for the END Technology program. • The school reserves the right to make available all background information to the intern clinical site A complete description of the program may be found at the Hospital Association web site at: http://www.marylandhealthcareers.org. Additional information on the program may be found at www.PreCheck.com. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Certification All students are required to have a current certification in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) from either the American Heart Association, or the equivalent, as part of clinical requirements. The program must have included a hands-on practical training evaluation segment. Online CPR classes are not acceptable. • The American Heart Association has a web site that provides a list of approved CPR training sites located close to your home. You must enter your ZIP code to receive the list. The web site address is http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=3011764

Page 17

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 17 Entrance Requirements 1. Prospective students must be 18 years of age within 6 months of entering the program. 2. As part of your application for entrance to the school, applicants are required to submit a completed Health Declaration letter and Immunization records to the school. This information can be acquired from your medical provider and is required to attest to your physical ability to enter the END Technology program. • In addition, a pregnant student is required to obtain a separate health clearance letter signed by her obstetrician to gain entrance to the Electroneurodiagnostic Technology program. • Students are required to carry a student health care insurance policy while in school. This policy can be purchased online through various companies. A web link may be found online at the school web site. 3. An approved clinical affiliate (CA) site must be available for the student to be placed in a clinical practicum prior to admission or re-admission to the program. The student must interview with the clinical site and be accepted prior to admission or re-admission to the IOHS program. 4. Applicant is required to have a dedicated access to a broadband Internet-connected computer with audio capabilities and speakers for video/pod casts, at least during program hours. The prospective student is required to demonstrate the knowledge and computer skills necessary to succeed in a distance–learning environment. Computer competency will be verified by the required course for admission “Strategies for Success”. Applicant is required to have ready access to a facsimile machine available and Internet e-mail account for receiving and transmitting documents. 6. Students are required to furnish evidence of completion of high school to be granted admission to the END Technology program. A high school diploma or its equivalent, the GED is required. Documentation of the GED and or High School Diploma may be required by the financial aid office. • Achievement at the 50th percentile (or greater) is required for applicants with a General Educational Development equivalency diploma (GED). • School preparatory background, including one year of math (requires algebra I and either geometry or algebra II) and one life science with laboratory component (requires biology or chemistry) are helpful for admission but not mandatory. • Applicants whose native language is not English and who have not graduated from American high schools but have a post-secondary degree from American schools, must achieve no less than 550 (paper) or 213 (computer) on the Test of English, as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) examination. 7. Applicants are required to provide a current certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) from a licensed provider, such as the American Heart Association or American Red Cross, prior to their internship rotations.

Page 18

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 18 8. In general, applicants are required to provide a current background check and drug screening (within the last 60 days) as part of entrance requirements. Individual hospitals may require different standards for their institution and clinical rotation. 9. Applicants are required to use the Hospital Association Student CheckTM procedure. • Students who are presently employed within the intuition where they are doing their internship may receive a clinical waiver for the background, drug screening, and health insurance - if the institution is willing to sign a waiver. The waiver must be kept within the student record and signed by a hospital supervisor. Procedure • Go to www.mystudentcheck.com online. • Select the school name – Institute of Health Sciences • Select your program from the drop-down menu. • Complete all required fields and hit continue to enter your payment information Your background check takes approximately three days to complete. You may then log into www.mystudentcheck.com and click on “here”, put in your SSN and DOB. You may then print a copy of the report for your records. • Evidence of a criminal record from the Criminal History Systems Board (CHSB) or a positive drug screen will disqualify a student from acceptance into the END Technology program. Administrative Procedure for Admission Admission to the school is conditioned upon the applicant’s providing accurate and current admissions information and upon the applicant’s updating such data if circumstances arise that makes the previously provided information inaccurate, misleading, or incomplete. Final acceptance of the applicant into the END Technology program is contingent on the telephone / video interview and, a Pass (P) grade for the course “Strategies for Success”, plus an acceptable background and drug screening test and the availability of an accredited clinical rotation site The Electroneurodiagnostic Technology application requires you to submit materials and official transcripts from various sources to the registrar of Institute of Health Sciences School through the mail of fax. Some institutions will not release official transcripts to students. In that case, the transcripts and other data should be sent directly from the issuing institution to: Registrar Lynn Kuser-Trader BSN RN Institute of Health Sciences 11031 McCormick Road Hunt Valley, Maryland 21031 lkt@instituteofhealthscience.org Transcripts received by the school become the property of the school and will not be released to the student or forwarded to any other institution.

Page 19

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 19 Step One: Application Fill out your completed application on the web site (IOHS.edu) and provide for other documentation to be delivered or made available to the registrar office. • Submit completed application. • Fill out FAFSA online with our school code. (verify school year with administrative office) • Provide transcripts of all academic work to the registrar. Transcripts may be unofficial prior to final acceptance into the program You must provide official transcripts prior to final admission. • Documentation of Home Schooling or transcripts out-side the US must be documented prior to final acceptance. • Provide any other documentation that you wish the school to consider for your admission. Step Two: Admission Process At this point, you will be asked to contact the admission office to arrange (410-891-2514) for a telephone interview to discuss your application and qualifications for your program. After receiving all written application materials, The Admission Committee will review the application and your phone interview and will then recommend to the Chairman of the Admission Committee your provisional acceptance or non-acceptance into the program. Decisions are based on the quality of your academic record, as presented in the application, transcripts, recommendations, and previous medical training or work experience (if relevant). Step Three: Provisional Acceptance You will receive a letter (e-mail) or phone call from the Administrative Office notifying you of your provisional acceptance into the program. This acceptance is granted based on your academic and school interview. Final Acceptance will not be granted until a clinical site has been arranged and accepted by the hospital and you for your clinical internship hours. Step Four: Final Acceptance Final acceptance to the program will depend on the hospital and student accepting a clinical relationship that is available for the internship. The clinical site must have a board-certified technician (R.EEG.T) who will function as the student mentor and have the staff and patient cases to provide the student with an acceptable clinical rotation. Applicants are required to provide a current background check and drug screening as part of the final acceptance requirements. Based on results of the criminal background check and drug screen, the Institute of Health Science school may deny you access to the program. Upon review of your background and drug screening the school will arrange for your clinical interview. The interview will consist of you meeting with the hospital staff and your preceptor.

Page 20

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 20 The clinical site may be interviewing several Individuals for the clinical rotation, so it is to your advantage to treat the internship “shadow experience” exactly as a job interview. You will be notified of the results of your clinical site interview and that you have been accepted or not accepted by the institution for the upcoming program. Individuals may have to be delayed for enrollment in the program if a clinical site cannot be arranged or additional requirements need to be met. Step Five: 1. Please review your entire enrollment agreement. If the agreement meets your approval, sign one (1) copy and return it to the registrar office at Institute of Health Sciences, 11031 McCormick Road Hunt Valley, Maryland 21031. Upon final acceptance to your program, an original will be returned to you. • The Director of IHS will sign the original enrollment agreement, place one in your student records, and return one signed copy to you by postal mail. Make sure you keep a copy of this signed agreement within your financial records associated with the school • Your tuition payment is due (5) days prior to the start of your program. Failure to pay or arrange for tuition with the financial office may result in the non-acceptance into the health science program.

Page 21

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 21 Financial Aid Office of Financial Aid Mission Statement The mission in the financial aid office is to assist you and your family in meeting the cost of an accredited education, and to make it possible for every qualified applicant to enroll at our school. This goal is met through the awarding of grant and job aid when available, and low- interest student loans, and by providing you and your family with appropriate counseling with respect to college costs and the application for and awarding of financial aid. Eligibility Requirements Eligibility for federal student aid programs is based on financial need and other criteria as determined by the information reported on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). If you are enrolling in higher education for the first time on or after July 1, 2012, to be eligible for federal student aid, you must have either a high school diploma or a recognized equivalent (such as a General Educational Development certificate (GED) or have been home schooled). Eligibility of Students • High School or GED Diploma (Home School Documentation from the Home State) • Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen. • Have a valid Social Security number or SIN number (Canada) • Maintain “Satisfactory Academic Progress” (SAP) toward degree requirements per Institute of Health Sciences policy and Department of Education if student is receiving financial aid. • Not owe a refund on a federal student grant or be in default on a federal student loan. • Not be convicted of selling or possessing illegal drugs during a period of enrollment for which you were receiving federal student aid (grants, loans, and/or work-study). • If you are a male student, you must be registered with the Selective Service. For more information go to www.sss.gov. • Students must certify that they will use federal student aid only for educational purposes only. • Students may receive financial aid for required courses in only one program at a time. Clock hours may not exceed those allowed under Title IV regulations, and programs may be audited to ensure compliance. Courses will not be approved for financial aid if they do not meet the program requirements for which the student is currently admitted. Note: Financial aid does not cover school application fee, late fees, non-clock hour’s courses, CLEP/ Dante’s testing, transcript fees or certificate program costs.

Page 22

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 22 How to Apply To apply for financial aid, you must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Completion of the FAFSA is required for consideration of federal, state and ANY IOHS College financial aid. The quickest and easiest way to apply is online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. To fully utilize the online application, you (and your parent if applicable) should obtain a PIN from the U.S. Department of Education so that you may electronically sign your application. Otherwise, you will need to print, sign and mail a signature page at the end of the FAFSA on the Web process, and this will significantly increase the amount of time required to process your application. You may obtain a PIN at www.pin.ed.gov. Many high schools and public libraries have Internet access, as well. You may also contact the Financial Aid Office at (410) 821-9620, for assistance. You must provide the school's federal school code of 042096 when you complete the FAFSA FAFSA. Remember to read all instructions and answer questions accurately. Please respond in a timely manner to requests for information by the financial aid office. You may be required to submit a signed copy of your federal tax return and other information. Let's review the steps to complete the financial aid application. STEP 1: Apply for a Federal Student Aid PIN at www.pin.ed.gov. STEP 2: Complete the FAFSA application at www.fafsa.ed.gov using the Institute of Health Science School code: 042096. Once complete, you will receive an Expected Family Contribution (EFC) report from the US Department of Education. STEP 3: Institute of Health Sciences will also receive and review an official Student Aid Report (SAR) from the Department of Education that includes your EFC. Your IOHS FAO will contact you to review this report with you, explain your options, and finalize a financial plan. For more detailed information on the Federal Financial Aid Process, please contact an IOHS Financial Aid Office by calling 1-410-891-2517. Privacy and Confidentiality Institute of Health Sciences keeps all your personal, financial and identifying information strictly confidential. To this end, we ask for a personal identifier such as your social security number whenever you contact us for information. This is done not merely for our convenience, but as a protective measure to safeguard your information. Furthermore, federal FERPA laws govern and restrict the information we can give to others (parents, for instance). The Annual Notice The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) provides eligible students

Page 23

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 23 certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include: 1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days after the day IOHS official receives a request for access. A student should submit to the appropriate official, a written request that identifies the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The school official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the school official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall

Page 24

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 24 advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. 2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student's privacy rights under FERPA. FERPA Policy FERPA is a Federal law that is administered by the Family Policy Compliance Office (Office) in the U.S. Department of Education (Department). 20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99. FERPA applies to all educational agencies and institutions (e.g., schools) that receive funding under any program administered by the Department. Parochial and private schools at the elementary and secondary levels generally do not receive such funding and are, therefore, not subject to FERPA. Private postsecondary schools, however, generally do receive such funding and are subject to FERPA. Once a student reaches 18 years of age or attends a postsecondary institution, he or she becomes an "eligible student," and all rights formerly given to parents under FERPA transfer to the student. The eligible student has the right to have access to his or her education records, the right to seek to have the records amended, the right to have control over the disclosure of personally identifiable information from the records (except in certain circumstances specified in the FERPA regulations, some of which are discussed below), and the right to file a complaint with the Department. The term "education records" is defined as those records that contain information directly related to a student and which are maintained by an educational agency or institution or by a party acting for the agency or institution A complete description of the FERPA policy can be reviewed at the government website at the following link. Family & Educational Rights. https://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html A student who wishes to ask the school to amend a record should write the school official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record the student wants changed and specify why it should be changed. This process does not apply to grades assigned to a professor. For the grade appeal process go to the catalog table of contents. If the school decides not to amend the record as requested, the school will notify the student in writing of the decision and the student's right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing. 3. The right to provide written consent before the school discloses personally identifiable information (PII) from the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. The school discloses education records without a student's prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. FERPA allows schools to disclose those records, without

Page 25

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 25 consent, to the following parties or under the following conditions (34 CFR § 99.31): • School officials with legitimate educational interest. • Other schools to which a student is transferring. • Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes. • Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student. • Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school. • Accrediting organizations. • To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena. • Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and • State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law Postsecondary institutions may also disclose personally identifiable information from education records, without consent, to appropriate parties, including parents of an eligible student, in connection with a health or safety emergency. Under this provision, colleges and universities may notify parents when there is a health or safety emergency involving their son or daughter, even if the parents do not claim the student as a dependent. FERPA also permits a school to disclose personally identifiable information from education records without consent when the disclosure is to the parents of a student at a postsecondary institution regarding the student's violation of any Federal, State, or local law, or of any rule or policy of the institution, governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance. The school may non-consensually disclose information under this exception if the school determines that the student has committed a disciplinary violation with respect to that use or possession and the student is under 21 years of age at the time of the disclosure to the parent. Another exception permits a school to non-consensually disclose personally identifiable information from a student's education records when such information has been appropriately designated as directory information. "Directory information" is defined as information contained in the education records of a student that would not generally be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. The Institute of Health Sciences had designated the following information under the Directory Information Policy. Directory information will include information: The student's name, address, e-mail address, telephone listing, photograph, date and place of birth, major field of study, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended, grade level or year, and enrollment status (undergraduate or graduate; full-time or part- time).

Page 26

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 26 Deadlines Priority Deadline is April 1. You must meet this deadline to receive maximum consideration for all types of financial aid. Applications received after this deadline will be considered for financial aid on a fund’s available basis. This is a priority deadline, not an absolute deadline. You may complete the FAFSA after the priority deadline, but you will be considered for financial aid on a fund’s available basis. All students are strongly encouraged to complete the FAFSA by the priority deadline. Types of Aid Grant Aid Federal Pell Grant The amount of the grant is determined by federal government regulations. Maximum Pell Grant for 2021/2022 is $6,345.00 Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) A companion grant to the Federal Pell Grant, this is also for exceptionally needy students who have not earned a bachelor's degree. Students must be at least half-time (six clock hours). Limited funding. Loans Federal Stafford Loan - Subsidized and Unsubsidized This is a low-interest government loan program. The Stafford loan is the basic undergraduate loan in the United States. The interest rate changes once per year, on July 1, and it will never be higher than 8.25 percent. There are lifetime Stafford loan limits. For Independent students, the lifetime limit is $57,500 with no more than $23,000 in subsidized loans. For Dependent students, the lifetime limit is $31,000 with no more than $23,000 in subsidized. Repayment of your loans starts six months after you cease to be a half-time student (this is called a 6-month Grace Period). Generally, you will have ten years to repay your Stafford loans, there are various payment plans available that may allow a borrower to increase the ten-year period, you may also pay them off more quickly with no prepayment penalty, and you will save money in interest charges. Subsidized means the government pays the interest while you're a half-time student and you must qualify for a subsidized loan by having need. For the 2020/2021 award year, the interest rate will be a fixed 3.8 percent. By regulation, the annual amount you may receive for IOHS articulation degree programs is $3,700 as a first-year student, $4,500 as a second-year student, or $5,500 as a third-year student or higher. Unsubsidized means you are responsible for the interest. You may pay the interest while you are student, or you may capitalize the interest and pay it when you enter repayment on your loans. You do not have to have financial need to qualify for an unsubsidized loan. Independent students may borrow annually $6,000 in unsubsidized loan as first- and second-year students. Combined with the subsidized amount, this is$9,500 in Stafford loans per year for first year students, $10,500 in Stafford loans per year for second year students.

Page 27

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 27 Third years’ students and beyond can borrow up to $7,000 per year for a combined total of $12,500 in Stafford loans per year. Dependent students may borrow annually $2,000 in unsubsidized loan. This means that first year dependent students can borrow up to a total of $5,500, second year students can borrow up to a total of $6,500 and third year or higher students can borrow up to a total of $7,500 in Stafford loans a year Also, dependent students whose parent cannot obtain a Federal Parent PLUS loan may borrow up to and additional $4,000. Federal Parent PLUS Loan This is a low-interest unsubsidized federal loan for the parent of a dependent student. For the 2019/2020 year, the interest rate is a fixed 5.3 percent. The lender may keep up to a 4 percent fee that will be deducted from the loan proceeds. There is a clock hour attendance check on the borrower. The funds come from the federal government. If a dependent student's parent cannot obtain a Parent PLUS loan, then the dependent student may borrow up to $4,000 in unsubsidized Stafford loan. This is an excellent educational financing option for dependent students. Federal Perkins Loan This is a fixed rate (5 percent) federal loan that gets repaid after a nine-month grace period. The monthly payment will be at least $40 per month, perhaps more depending on amount borrowed. It is awarded to students who are exceptionally needy, and you must be receiving the maximum Stafford loan available to you to also receive a Perkins loan. If you decline or cancel your Stafford loan, then your Perkins loan will be cancelled. Limited funding. Alternative Loan This is known as a private loan. Students apply directly to financial institutions and must have a worthy co-signer. Private loans are often used by students who need assistance in addition to the Federal Stafford Loan, who need money for living expenses, or who don't have access to the Federal Stafford Loan. Job Aid Federal Work-Study This is a federal program that provides funding for part-time jobs on campus. Students must be enrolled at least half-time and have financial need. Students typically work up to 20 hours per week and get paid directly biweekly. The Financial Aid Office has a list of available openings. Scholarships are available throughout your college education. The federal guide to financial aid is a source, not only for loans, but for researching scholarship information. The Internet can be a source for locating additional scholarship money. The sites identified below will bring you to online tools that may help you find additional sources of revenue for your college expenses.

Page 28

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 28 Other Financial Aids The federal guide to financial aid is a source, not only for loans, but for researching scholarship information. The Internet can be a source for locating additional scholarship money. The sites identified below will bring you to online tools that may help you find additional sources of revenue for your college expenses. • You can access the federal guide at the following site. You can access the federal guide at the following site. (www.studentaid.ed.gov) • The College Board created an online tool to help you locate scholarships. This tool can be accessed at the following site. (www.studentaid.ed.go Types of Financial Aid Available Federal Direct PLUS Loans (Federal Parent Loan) Available to parents of dependent undergraduate students who are enrolled at least half-time. Student's Cost of Attendance - Another Aid Student Received = Maximum PLUS Loan Amount Disclaimer: Descriptions of financial aid programs are subject to change, due to possible changes in federal, state, and college policies, and/or due to changes in funding levels. The Office of Financial Aid will make every reasonable effort to keep applicants and students aware of such changes. Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Policy A student receiving federal financial aid, or other financial aid that is directly administered or certified by the school, must maintain satisfactory academic progress towards the completion of a program of study. Satisfactory academic progress is measured for financial aid recipients by using a quantitative and qualitative standard. These standards are an assessment of a student’s cumulative academic record at IOHS. These two measurements, along with maximum clock hours/clock hour standards and the college’s multiple Return of Title IV Funds (R2T4) policy, are used by the Office of Financial Aid to track satisfactory academic progress for financial aid eligibility at the end of each Quarter. Impact of Multiple Return of Title IV Funds (R2T4) Financial aid will be terminated for any student who has two consecutive Quarters of a “Return of Title IV Funds” calculation. A student, who either withdraws or fails to attend all their classes, has a Quarter GPA of 0.00, and who does not return from an approved leave of absence, or who stops attending classes, will have a “Return of Title IV Funds” calculation performed by the Office of Financial Aid. The calculation determines a student earned and unearned Title IV aid based on the percentage of the enrollment period (attendance if indicated by the program) completed by the student. Please note that earned aid is not related in any way to institutional charges. In addition, the schools’ refund policy and Return of Title IV funds

Page 29

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 29 procedures are independent of one another. A student who withdraws from a course may be required to return unearned aid and still owe the school for the program. Notification A student will receive notification of his or her satisfactory academic progress status prior to the start of his or her period of enrollment and at each quarter period. All SAP communications will be sent via the student’s email account. Warning Students who fail to meet the college’s minimum SAP standards will be placed on financial aid warning. The warning period will be the student’s next Quarter or next period of evaluation. The Office of Financial Aid will communicate the warning status via the student’s email account. The warning will include information that the student must meet with the faculty and program director to develop a academic improvement plan. The student must meet the academic progress standard by the end of the subsequent enrollment period and/or evaluation to maintain eligibility in the financial aid programs at IOHS.

Page 30

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 30 Title IV Refund Policy IOHS revised Refund Policy complies with the amended 34 CFR Section 668.22 of the Higher Education Amendment of 1998. This policy reflects new regulations that became effective 7/1/2011. The concept behind the policy is that the college and the student can retain only the amount of Title IV (federal) aid that is earned. Earned aid is not related in any way to institutional charges. Additionally, the College’s refund policy and Return of Title IV funds procedures are independent of one another. A student who withdraws from a course may be required to return unearned aid and still owe the college for the course. If a student withdraws or stops attending classes, whether any clock hours have been earned for the term or not, a portion of the aid received is unearned and must be returned to the Title IV programs from which it was received. For Title IV purposes, the last date of attendance for IOHS courses is determined by the last documented date of attendance in an academically related activity. If a student attends through 60 percent of the payment period, all Title IV aid is considered earned. Definitions Return of Title IV Calculation (R2T4) – A required calculation to determine the amount of aid earned by the student when the student does not attend all days scheduled to be completed within a payment period. (Student is considered withdrawn, whether any clock hours were completed or not) Over-award – [not the same as Return of Title IV calculation] A required recalculation of Pell Grant and other aid due to the student dropping or not attending courses required for the status awarded (full‐time, three‐quarter time, half‐time, less than half‐time). This is required at any point information is received that changes student status. Reductions in aid will always be required for students whose status changes due to dropped classes or classes not attended. Class Attendance Policy and Procedures IOHS students are expected to maintain regular and successive attendance in all the lecture, laboratory and classes for which they have registered and are enrolled during a Quarter. Class attendance is an essential part of the student’s intellectual development, success, retention and timely graduation Applicability The IOHS Attendance Policy is applicable to all registered students. Individual faculty members can choose to make the policy more rigorous but in no case, should they be more lenient than the school policy stated below. Occasionally, students may miss class due to an emergency (health, accident, etc.) or, other compelling circumstances beyond their control. Such students must justify, with appropriate documentation, unplanned absences no later than 24 hours upon return to the campus. In all cases, the faculty members can permit students with excused absences to make up missed work. In such cases, instructors can assign reasonable and relevant compensatory work for excused absences at a time mutually

Page 31

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 31 convenient to both the student and the instructor. Students remain bound always by the absolute maximum of ten percent (10%) of unexcused absence rate in any class per program. Attendance Policy Statement Attendance in class is strictly required by school policy. In each course, students who miss more than ten percent (10%) of the scheduled class meetings (including labs) due to unexcused absences will be in danger of failing the course and / or losing financial aid. More strenuous requirements can be applicable, as stated by individual instructors, in their respective course syllabi. It is the student’s responsibility to understand each instructor’s requirements No Show Policy A “no show” is a student whose name appears on the class roster but who fails to have his or her attendance verified the first week of class. In all courses, regardless of the method of delivery (face-to-face, hybrid, blended or online), faculty will conduct a graded activity the first week of class to verify student attendance. This graded activity will document the student’s intent to take the course. Any student not completing the graded activity will be reported as a “no-show” regardless of his or her attendance in the classroom. Any student reported as a “no show” by an instructor will be administratively withdrawn from the course and will show no enrollment history. Excused Absences Defined: Unexpected events of life events that result in missed classes. Examples may include: significant illness or injury, death in the immediate family, doctor’s appointments and severe weather conditions. Policy: When unexpected events cause students to miss class; individual faculty must allow students to either make-up the missed material or assign appropriate substitute material by recognizing the absence as an “excused” absence. Course work must be mad up prior to the end of the quarter. In some cases, the faculty member may ask for verification of the event (doctor’s appointment, injury, death, etc.). If a student believes he or she is being treated unfairly regarding the denial of an excused absence, he or she may appeal the matter to the Program Director. Unexcused Absences Defined Absences which are not “approved” or “excused” shall be considered unexcused. Policy: Faculty members are under no obligation to allow students to complete course work missed from unexcused absences. However, unexcused absences may not be made up for attendance

Page 32

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 32 purposes. An excess of unexcused absences above 10% of the payment period may result in the student being excused from the program Students who abuse either the approved excused and excused absences policy will be considered to have committed academic misconduct. Examples of abuse include falsifying an illness or family emergency, falsely claiming that attendance at the event is required, falsely claiming to have attended an event, or falsely claiming that an absence is school approved. If an instructor determines that a student is guilty of an abuse, the instructor should treat it as any other instance of academic misconduct. The specific attendance policy for each course is stated on the course syllabus, which is distributed in each class during the first week of the quarter. Faculty may develop their own scoring system for lateness of assignment for unexcused absences but cannot vary from stated school policy. Failure to comply with the attendance policies will undoubtedly jeopardize the student and the grade in the course. In addition, Title IV federal guidelines mandate that institutions receiving federal aid regularly verify student class attendance to ensure that all awarded federal aid monies are used for educational purposes. It is the policy at IOHS that faculty members verify and report student class attendance multiple times (weekly) each quarter. This reporting allows the school to identify students who: (1) are enrolled in classes but are not attending, (2) have officially or unofficially withdrawn from the University, (3) are attending classes for which they are not registered and/or (4) students who are erroneously enlisted in classes for which they did not register. Students listed in any of the four categories will be contacted and adjustments will be made to financial aid packages and money returned to the federal government, as necessary. Failure to report accurate data jeopardizes institutional eligibility for federal financial aid services. • A student who attends and completes at least one course that spans the entire payment period will have earned the aid for the payment period (as adjusted for dropped courses or courses not attended). School must be able to demonstrate that student attended each course, including any course with a failing grade. Student must demonstrate attendance by participating in an academically related activity for academic courses and by physically attending their clinical internship hours. Documentation of attendance must be made by the student and verified by the course instructor. A student’s self‐certification of attendance is NOT acceptable unless supported by school’s documentation. Examples of attendance in an academic course include: • Submitting an academic assignment. • Participation in clinical hours and cases. • Exam, an interactive tutorial, or complete computer‐assisted instruction. • Study group attendance that is assigned by the school. • Participating in an online discussion about academic matters; and • Initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a question about the academic subject studied in the course.

Page 33

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 33 • Office hours must be assigned at a specific time and date or the student for attendance to be counted. Open office hours (attend at leisure) cannot be accepted for attendance. Logging in to an on‐line class does NOT count as attendance A student who withdraws from a course/program within the term or session is withdrawn for Title IV Aid unless they are attending another course for the same term or session. A student is considered to have withdrawn even if they are registered for future term or session dates and a Return of Title IV calculation must be completed. The school will use the last date of attendance verified by the program course instructor to compute the R2T4 formula. The last date of attendance is based on student attendance in courses and is defined as the active participation in the course. This date is used by administration to determine retention rate and return of funding under Title IV. Active participation may vary depending on the individual course. Faculty will report to the Registrar’s Office any student who is not in participation on a weekly basis. Active participation may vary depending on the individual course. Faculty Responsibility Just logging-in is not considered “active participation”. “Active Participation” includes completion of tests/quizzes; submission/completion of formal assignments; participation in threaded discussions; contact with the instructor regarding the content or expectations of the course. Students who do not contact their instructor through the Learning Platform by the end of the first week will be administratively withdrawn from the course. Students who fail to maintain active participation for at least 90% of the payment period will be excused from the program. An administrative withdrawal will not relieve a student of responsibility for the fees related to the program. When instructors report grades at the end of the quarter, they must report additional information for any student who is receiving a failing grade. Instructors are required to report and document whether the student attended class throughout the Quarter. If the student stopped attending, the instructor must indicate the last date of attendance. Once the deadline for posting grades has passed, the Office of Financial Aid identifies all Title IV students who received no passing grades. Students in the following categories will have all charges recalculated under the Return of Title IV Funds calculation formula: • Students who withdraw and/or fail all courses. • Students with a quarter GPA of 0.00. • Students who do not return after an approved leave of absence. • Students who stop attending – based on school policy.

Page 34

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 34 In accordance with federal regulations, when financial aid is involved, refunds are returned in the following order: 1. Unsubsidized FFELP/ Direct Stafford Loan 2. Subsidized FFELP/ Direct Stafford Loan 3. Federal Perkins Loan 4. FFELP/ Direct PLUS Loan (Graduate) 5. FFELP/ Direct PLUS Loan (Parent) 6. Federal Pell Grant Repayment of Federal Funds Policy All students need to be aware of how IOHS implements these requirements. This policy affects students who completely withdraw, officially or unofficially, from all courses during a Quarter. This policy also affects students who fail and/or are administratively withdrawn (AW) from all courses during a Quarter. When a financial aid recipient withdraws, or fails all courses, the student is considered to have “earned” a portion of financial aid equal to the percentage of the payment period completed. The last date of attendance is determined by the last date of course activity by the student. This record is kept by the faculty member of the course. If the student withdraws after 60% (or more) of the payment period, the student is considered to have “earned” all his or her federal aid for the term. No repayment is necessary. A Return of Title IV calculation is required under all circumstances. Payment Periods are determined by the dates of enrollment, and the attendance. For example: ➢ A student is enrolled in Term 1 and Term 2 courses. Term 1 begins August 29 and ends October 22. Term 2 begins October 24 and ends December 17. The payment period is determined by using the start date of Term 1 (August 29) and the end date of Term 2 (December 17). The student must attend 60% of the payment period, in this example 67 days, to have earned 100% of their aid. A copy of the Return of Title IV Fund Worksheet used to determine the return of Title IV funds will be provided to the student from the Schools Business Office. If you have questions regarding the calculation, please contact the Office of Financial Aid at (410) 821-9620. School Course Calendar This schedule may vary depending on the school and course requirements.

Page 35

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 35 Academic Year 2020-2021 Class Schedule Electroneurodiagnostic Quarter Begins Quarter Ends Summer First Quarter Academic 06/09/2020 Clinical 06/30/2020 Academic 08/29/2020 Clinical 08/29/2020 Fall Second Quarter Academic 09/08/2020 Clinical 09/08/2020 Academic 11/28/20 Clinical 11/28/2020 Winter Third Quarter Academic 12/08/2020 Clinical 12/08/2020 Academic 03/06/2021 Clinical 03/06/2021 Spring Fourth Quarter Academic 03/15/2018 Clinical 03/15/2018 Academic 06/05/2018 Clinical 06/05/2018 Electroneurodiagnostic Quarter Begins Quarter Ends Winter First Quarter Academic 02/03/2019 Clinical 02/03/2019 Academic 04/26/2019 Clinical 04/26/2019 Spring Second Quarter Academic 05/05/2019 Clinical 05/05/2019 Academic 7/26/2019 Clinical 7 /26/2019 Summer Third Quarter Academic 08/12/2019 Clinical 08/12/2019 Academic 11/01/2019 Clinical 11/01/2019 Fall Fourth Quarter Academic 11/11/2019 Clinical 11/11/2019 Academic 02/07/2020 Clinical 02/07/2020 School Calendar Schedule: The total amount of time for completion of the Electroneurodiagnostic Technology program is 1080 total clock hours. This requires the student to attend four sequential Quarters (4) of twelve weeks (12) each for forty-eight weeks. (48) Constitution Day: September 17 is designated as Constitution Day to commemorate the signing of the U.S. Constitution in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787. The Federal Convention had first convened in May to revise the Articles of Confederation, but the need for an entirely new frame of government became clear. State delegates debated issues, such as federalism and representation, all through the summer as they drafted the articles of the new Constitution. • Academic Lectures Each Courses is scheduled for 2.5 clock hours a week and (7.5 clock hours a week) required for the academic course work. Individuals enrolled within a blended long-distance program have different requirements for documentation of your didactic and clinical hours needed for accreditation. Please check with your program director for your log-in requirements if your program is given via via long distance course management. • Clinical Practicum The clinical internship requires. Fifteen (15) clock hours a week and are required for the

Page 36

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 36 clinical practicum internship. Individual clinical schedules are based on the clinical site requirements and hours may vary. Vacation or Periods of School Closure: There is no vacation or periods of scheduled school closure during the END Technology program. School Holidays November 11 Veterans Day November 22 Thanksgiving July 4th Independence Day December 24 25 Xmas Religious Holidays Any student who is unable, because of his religious beliefs, to attend classes or to participate in any examination, study, or work requirement on a particular day shall be excused from any such examination or study or work requirement, and shall be provided with an opportunity to make up such examination, study or work requirement which he may have missed because of such absence on any particular day; provided, however, that such makeup examination or work shall not create an unreasonable burden upon the school. The school, for making available to the said student such opportunity, shall charge no fees of any kind. No adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to any student because of his availing himself of the provisions of this section. Students are required to obtain “excused” absence permission from the END Technology program director and are reminded that the excused absence will affect the total program attendance rate, which must be maintained at or above a minimum 90% criterion, or the student will be dismissed from the END Technology program. Inclement Weather All students have the responsibility to check their Moodle TM site and to contact their clinical site/instructor to determine whether class must be canceled due to weather or illness. Each clinical site will have individual procedures and it is the student responsibility to become aware of his/her site instructions. Each clinical affiliate will provide specific procedures and phone numbers for closure and notification of illness, etc. during the first clinical practicum session.

Page 37

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 37 Financial Information Tuition and Fees Since every student comes to us with a unique set of circumstances, the cost of completing a program varies for everyone. Academic Year: January 2020 – January 2021 Includes cost for students completing the program in normal time. Neurodiagnostic Technology Total Tuition: $14,400 includes clinical rotation Student Malpractice Insurance Zoom Videoconference Software – iPhone and Computer Blackboard Course Management System Contact the Financial Aid office for additional information on grants and Federal Aid. Fees (approximate) that are not included in tuition: • Computer with appreciate software and printer ( see Equipment) • Textbooks and Materials $500 Approximate New – may be purchased used. • Background & Drug Screening $90 (Mandatory for Admission) Preclinical Requirement • Graduation Fee $100 – Paid in 3rd Quarter • Travel and Parking – Variable (May be included in Financial aid package)) • ASET Membership $45 • Student ID Badge $22 • Transcripts – $15 (first one included in tuition) • Late Fee or return of checks $25 (General estimated cost and subject to change) Fees and tuition are subject to change by the Board of Directors Payment of tuition bill is the responsibility of the student. The tuition notice is communicated to each student via their email. Payment is required within 5 days of start of quarter. Failure to satisfy the statement balance does not discharge the financial obligation or late payment assessment and may result in the cancellation of your class schedule. The Billing schedule and due dates are presented below. If you have not received a tuition notification at least one week prior to your payment due date, call the Registrar Office at 410-821-9620 to arrange payment. Third Party Letter of Tuition Payment • Student has the understanding that they are responsible for any amounts covered / or not covered by third-party payer. (Hospitals or Employers) The student is responsible for the tuition payment to the school and arranging for the reimbursement.

Page 38

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 38 • Tuition may be paid by check or credit card. To receive permission to pay on a payment plan approved by the school, (by electronic checking or clock hour’s card) the student must give the school approval to bill their credit card or checking account upon the date the funds are due. (General estimated cost and subject to change) Textbooks and Materials The costs for textbooks required within the END Technology program are the responsibility of the student and not included in tuition. Books may be purchased new or used at any medical bookstore or online at web sites such as amazon.com. A copy of the required books for each course is located within the back of the catalog and attached to the student enrollment contract. Withdrawal To officially withdraw from all courses, students notify the school registrar and program director before the term deadline. The term deadline is set at the end of the first twenty-one calendar days of the Quarter. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR WITHDRAWING • Students can not withdraw from a course through instructors or departments. • Students withdrawing after the course start date period, but before the Withdrawal Deadline, will receive a "W" grade, which does not affect averages or academic totals. • Students who fail to officially withdraw prior to the 21-day period withdrawal deadline then drop-out will receive an F grade for the course. • Talk to a financial aid officer and your insurance carriers before dropping your program or course. You could lose financial aid and/or student insurance coverage. Withdrawal is defined as completely withdrawing enrollment from all courses. Student withdrawal cannot be done for one course but includes all courses in their program. This policy applies to all Institute of Sciences students. Complete withdrawal from all classes after the term start date will result in tuition charges and fee charges per the withdrawal schedule as stated below. Insofar as refunds apply, withdrawal will be as of the last date of attendance or the date of receipt of written notice from the student. The students last day of attendance is the last day the student had academically related activity, which may include projects, clinical experience, or examinations. All refunds are based on the student’s time in attendance, tuition costs for the program, and the Schools Withdrawal and Refund Policy. Refund Policy • If the school closes or discontinues a course or program, the school shall refund to each currently enrolled student monies paid by the students for tuition and monies for which the student is liable for tuition.

Page 39

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 39 • All tuition paid by the student shall be refunded if the student chooses not to enroll or withdraws within 7 calendar days after having signed the enrollment contract. • If, after the 7-day cancellation period expires, a student withdraws or drops-out after instruction begins, refunds shall be based on the total contract price for the course or program and shall include all tuition, except for materials or books which have been purchased by, and are the property of the student. • The minimum refund that a school shall pay a student who withdraws or is terminated after the 7-day cancellation period has expired and after instruction has begun, is as follows: Tuition Refund Policy: 100% of the tuition will be refunded if the student withdraws within 7 calendar days after having signed the enrollment agreement. After the 7th day tuition is refunded based on a proportion of total program taught by date of withdrawal. Less than 10% 90% Refund 10% up to but not including 20% 80% 20% up to but not including 30% 60% 30% up to but not including 40% 40% 40% up to 49% 20% 50% or more No Refund State of Maryland Return of Funds Refunds will be based on the period of enrollment computed on the basis of course time that is expressed in clock hours. The effective date of the termination for refund purposes will be the earliest of the following: • The date of withdrawal or termination is the last date of attendance by the student or the date of receipt of written notice from the student. A refund due a student shall be based on the date of withdrawal or termination and paid within 45 days from the date of withdrawal or termination. • In the case of an official leave absence, if a student fails to return to training by the end of the leave of absence, a refund due a student shall be based on the date of the withdrawal or termination and paid within 45 days of the scheduled last day of the leave of absence. Financial Aid & Scholarships Students earn financial aid by earning it through academic excellence and attendance. Please review the policy for attendance with the financial aid officer of the school. Our mission is to assist you in meeting the cost of a high-quality education, and to make it possible for every qualified applicant to enroll at the school. IHS keeps a list of scholarships available through employers or organizations in END Technology.

Page 40

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 40 Student Conduct The school requires each student to respect the rights and privileges of others, to adhere to acceptable standards of personal conduct, to follow the moral and ethical standards of the health care profession and to follow policies and procedures of the clinical site. The school reserves the right to take any reasonable and appropriate action to protect the rights, safety and well-being of all members of the school community and patients, and to review the behavior of any student who, in the judgment of the school, conducts himself/herself in a manner incompatible with the purpose and mission of the school. Academic Misconduct Academic misconduct shall include, but not limited to: 1. Acts of cheating, fabrication, plagiarism, or the assisting of another in the commission of such acts. Non-academic Misconduct Non-academic misconduct shall include, but not be limited to: 1. Acts of violation of local, state, or federal laws. (Note: students may also be held accountable to civil authorities for infringements of local, state, or federal statutes). 2. Acts (not considered as academic misconduct), which threaten the safety, rights, or wellbeing of the school or patient community. 3. Violation of School Drug and Alcohol Policy. Students Rights: Due Process Although the school reserves the right to suspend or dismiss a student for conduct considered not in the best interests of the school community, the school firmly believes that students are entitled to due process and the protection of rights. To that end, the school provides objective review procedures in matters pertaining to misconduct. Documentation Any member of the school community or clinical site may bring charges of academic or non- academic misconduct against a student. The complainant must submit to the Electroneurodiagnostic Technology program director, a signed statement of the charges, including all relevant facts Investigation The END Technology program director will have the responsibility to investigate both academic and non-academic misconduct of the student. If there is substance to the allegations, a written notice of charges shall be presented to the alleged offender by certified mail. The Director of the END Technology program will schedule a meeting within two calendar days of the written notice of charges, to allow the alleged offender to respond. A written report of that meeting will be made to the Director of IHS within three calendar days. The written report from the END Technology program director will become a part of the student permanent records. • In the case of alleged misconduct occurring at a clinical facility, the alleged offender will not be allowed on the clinical site, while the allegation is under investigation.

Page 41

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 41 Resolution Within seven calendar days of receiving the report of the END Technology program director, the Director of Institute of Health Sciences will notify the alleged offender, by certified mail, regarding the resolution to the case. In the case of non-academic misconduct that is proven factual or in the case of academic misconduct such as cheating, fabrication, or plagiarism the student will be dismissed from the Electroneurodiagnostic Technology program. The report from the IHS director will become a part of the student permanent records Student Appeal The alleged offender may request an appeal of the resolution of the case to the Director of Institute of Health Sciences. Examples of possible appeals: 1. Introduction of new evidence. 2. Failure to follow procedures of the student conduct policy. A written, signed request delivered by certified mail, citing appropriate grounds and the appeal, must be submitted to the Director of Institute of Health Sciences, within the time- frame specified below: A. Within seven calendar days of the case resolution. B. The Director of Institute of Health Sciences will review the appeal and notify the alleged offender, by certified mail, of the appeal results. This notice will be sent from the IHS director within three calendar days of receipt of the appeal. The report from the IHS director will become a part of the student permanent records C. If the student has exhausted the school’s grievance procedure and stills feels to be aggrieved, the student has his or her right to appeal to the Secretary of Higher Education within the State of Maryland. Address Maryland Higher Education Commission 6 N. Liberty Street, 10th Floor Baltimore, Maryland 21201 Phone: (410) 767-3301 Fax: (410) 332-0270 Student Complaint The complaint procedure is designed to assist students who have perception of unfair and/or unlawful treatment. A student is defined as any person enrolled full or part-time in courses at the school. A complaint of unfair and/or unlawful treatment formally charged by a student against a school employee, regarding the application of school rules, policies, procedures, and regulations, should be resolved without initiating the formal procedure, if possible. Please note that it is generally beneficial to the student to discuss the problem with school personnel prior to filing a formal complaint. School personnel are available to advise students.

Page 42

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 42 Students should not hesitate to contact a faculty member, counselor, or any other school staff person. See Title IX policy: School procedure states that "if an Institute of Health Science student alleges that he or she has been grieved because of perceived discrimination based on race, sex, or handicap, or because a faculty member official failed to follow established procedure, the student may utilize the student grievance procedure." This policy is not to be used for academic or non-academic misconduct of the student. Student conduct policies are listed on page 17 of the catalog. Categories of Grievances Student grievance complaints generally fall into 3 categories: • Grade complaints: a claim that an inappropriate grade has been assigned because of a faculty member’s bias or failure to follow an established standard for assigning a grade. A grade complaint may not be based solely on a claim that a faculty member exercised allegedly erroneous academic judgment (i.e., a student may not complain that class standards are too high, reading is too heavy, the grade curve too low, and so on). • Sexual harassment complaints: a claim that alleges any instance of abuse, ill- treatment, or exploitation involving the irresponsible or unjust misuse of a position of authority, power, or trust. • Other grievances not described above. Grade Grievance and Other Related Academic Complaints The procedure to file a grade grievance and other related academic complaint is as follows: 1. A student with a complaint should, where appropriate, first try to reach agreement with the faculty member. This concern will be forwarded to the faculty member, in writing, within 3 business days of the end of the Quarter. Upon being notified of a student complaint, the faculty member must meet with the student to discuss the complaint within 3 business days. 2. If the faculty member does not meet with the student within 3 business days, or if such a meeting would be inappropriate under the circumstances, or if the issue remains unresolved after a meeting between the student and the faculty member, the student may submit a written appeal to the faculty member’s department chairperson (or his or her designee), who will attempt to mediate the complaint. The appeal must be submitted within 2 business days of the meeting between the student and the faculty member. a. The department chair, or his or her designee, must issue a written decision on the appeal and a description of the proposed resolution, if any, no later than 5 business days after its submission.

Page 43

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 43 b. A student may appeal a decision by the department chair, or his or her designee, to the Director of the School. This appeal request must be submitted no more than 5 business days after the student’s receipt of the department chair’s decision. c. The Director will establish a hearing panel within 5 business days of his or her receipt of the appeal or, if that is too close to the end of a Quarter or session, within 5 days after the beginning of the next Quarter. This hearing panel shall consist of 3 members, including 2 faculty members and the Director of the School. d. The hearing panel shall: i. Make available to the student and faculty member, at least 5 business days prior to the hearing, all material that has been furnished to the hearing panel and the names of any witnesses who may give testimony. ii. Provide the student and faculty member with the opportunity to hear all testimony, state all facts, and examine all documents or other materials presented to the hearing panel. iii. Permit the faculty member and student to make a summary statement after the hearing. e. Within 3 days after the conclusion of the hearing, the hearing panel shall prepare a written decision and proposed resolution, if any. The hearing panel shall inform the Registrar’s Office and the Director of the School. f. A student or faculty member who is not satisfied with the decision by the hearing panel may appeal to the Director of the school. This appeal must be submitted within 5 business days after receipt of the hearing panel’s decision. This Director, on reviewing the case, may uphold the decision of the school committee without a hearing or decide the appeal should be heard. g. The decision of the Director of the School shall be final. h. No grade shall be changed because of a grade grievance complaint, except as follows. In the case of a grade grievance, the school Registrar’s Office is authorized to change the student’s grade in the following situations: i. When the student and the faculty member agree; ii. If the department chair approves the student's appeal and the faculty member does not appeal that decision; iii. If the Director approves the student's appeal based on the hearing panel's recommendation.

Page 44

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 44 iv. Based on the Director of the School final decision after the hearing panel recommendation Sexual Harassment Grievance A student who is sexually harassed by a student, students or hospital staff may seek resolution through the Student Conduct Non-Academic Policy and Title IX Coordinator. A student who believes that he or she has been harassed by a faculty member or other school or clinical externship employee may seek resolution through the following complaint procedures: Lodging a Complaint: Students who believe that they are being subjected to unlawful harassment, including sexual harassment, should discuss the matter with their supervisor/advisor, if appropriate, or directly contact the Title IX Coordinator at the school. Lynn K. Trader RN BSN 410-891-2517. i. Procedures: Upon receipt of an allegation of sexual or other unlawful harassment against a full-time or part-time student, the Title IX coordinator will meet ( talk) with the individual against whom the complaint has been made, his/her department chairperson and immediate clinical supervisor. ii. The investigation will proceed in a timely manner and every effort will be made to conclude the investigation within ten working days of its inception. All reports of unlawful harassment are confidential. All individuals involved in reviewing an allegation of sexual or other unlawful harassment maintain confidentiality fully possible within the requirements of conducting a complete investigation. iii. If the Director of the School, after deliberating with the parties named in paragraph above, finds that there has been a violation of this policy, corrective or remedial action will be promptly taken. iv. This may include one or more of the following actions depending on the severity of the offense: A. A verbal warning that a repetition of the reported impropriety will result in written action. B. Placement of a letter in the individual’s personnel files indicating the nature of the improper behavior. The letter may include a notation about required counseling and any action that will be taken in the future should there be a repetition of the offensive behavior(s). C. Immediate removal of the individual from the classroom/work site and placement on a leave of absence while the incidents or actions are reviewed. Return to clinical sites and/or professional duties will be guided by the actions and response of the student.

Page 45

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 45 The director will, as soon as practicable, notify the complainant(s) when the investigation has been concluded and indicate the nature of any corrective or remedial action taken to eliminate the problem. b. Non-Retaliation: It is a violation of school policy to retaliate in any way against students because they have raised allegations of sexual or unlawful harassment. Other Alleged Grievances The school may, at its discretion, permit a student to submit a grievance for problems other than those described above. A request must be submitted by the student to the office of the Director of the school within 5 days after the last event giving rise to the alleged violation. If the request is granted, the school will decide upon the appropriate process to govern its resolution and may, but need not, follow the process set forth above for grade complaints. Academic Policy The program provides a broad academic background that prepares the student to assist in the delivery of patient-centered care as a valued member of the health care team. Along with courses in the theory and application of Electroneurodiagnostic Technology, the program has clinical practicum requirements within an accredited neurology center. The school records student grades by clock hours. One hour of clock hours is earned for 15 clock hours of didactic lecture and classroom activity and/or 30 clock hours of laboratory/clinical work. Clock Hours IHS reports their program in clock hours: Didactic Lectures 15 Clock Hour 45 Clock Hours Clinical Laboratory 30 Clock Hours 90 Clock Hours Clock hours earned are for determining progress to program completion only, and the hours are not necessarily transferable to another private school or to a collegiate institution. Class, laboratory and clinical education clock hours are defined as follows: One clock hour equals fifty minutes. One clinical educational hour equals fifty minutes. Academic Honesty By registering for a Distance Learning course, a student attests that all assignments submitted, and examinations completed are the work of the enrolled student. Academic Counseling Students in need of a tutor should contact the director of the END Technology program. adjunct faculty members offer one on one tutoring, during the school year, to provide additional instruction for the student. The individual time for the tutoring must be scheduled and arranged through the END Technology director.

Page 46

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 46 Workshops and supplemental instruction will be offered at the various clinical affiliate sites, for any student that needs supplemental instruction. Arrangements for the additional workshops are arranged through the END Technology program director. Completion Requirements: Students are required to take and pass twelve sequential END Technology courses to receive a certificate, academic transcript and attendance record, in the Electroneurodiagnostic Technology program. A grade of C- (70) is considered the minimum passing grade. Students receiving any grade below this will be required to repeat the course (when offered) in order to obtain credit. Students are not eligible to enroll in any course for which the failed/withdrawn course is a prerequisite until the prerequisite course is successfully completed To meet program completion requirements and graduate, students also must also have clinical competence verified and documented by a Registered Electroneurodiagnostic Technologist, (R.EEG. T.). In addition, students must have: 1. Completion of all course’s requirements in Electroneurodiagnostic Technology 2. Completion of all clinical site requirements 3. Completion of a 90% minimum attendance rate or greater. 4. Fulfillment of all financial obligations to the school. 5. Satisfactory Academic Progress Status Academic Grading Grading Scale Numeric Grade Point Average A (Excellent) 93-100 4.00 A- 90-92 3.70 B+ 87-89 3.30 B (Good) 83-86 3.00 B- 80-82 2.70 C+ 77-79 2.30 C (Average) 73-76 2.00 C- 70-72 1.70 D+ 66-69 1.30 D 60-65 1.00 F (Failure) IN (Incomplete) 0-59 0.00 0.00 W (Withdrawn) 0 0.00 AD – Administrative Drop Administrative drops can occur for two reasons: no-attendance for the first seven days of the course and missing required course clinical rotation prerequisites.

Page 47

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 47 W – Drop / Withdrawal What is the difference between a drop and a withdrawal? An academic drop occurs when you remove yourself from a course before or during IOHS drop (1-7 Days) period. There are no academic consequences from this action, but there may be financial aid repercussions for this drop if you no longer meet aid qualifications. The course will show on your registration history as dropped but will not post on any unofficial or official transcripts and does not count as attempted clock hours. An academic withdrawal from a course occurs when you remove yourself from a course after the drop period has passed. There will be financial repercussions for this withdrawal based on the refund schedule. The academic consequences from this action include receiving the grade of "W" for the course, which will appear on any unofficial or official transcripts. A grade of "W" will not impact your GPA, but does not count as completed clock hours toward your program... To officially drop courses or withdraw from the program, students must notify the school registrar and program director before the drop date or withdrawal deadline. The student is responsible for either dropping their classes by week 1 of each Quarter or withdrawing from classes by week 4. Students who withdraw are considered withdrawing from school and must reapply if they wish to return. The maximum time frame a student may withdraw is the next time that the program is offered. • The date of withdrawal or termination is the last date of attendance by the student or the date of receipt of written notice from the student. A refund due a student shall be based on the date of withdrawal or termination and paid within 45 days from the date of withdrawal or termination. I- Incomplete A grade issued by an instructor indicating a student has not completed required coursework. Students have until the end of the quarter to complete the course work before the grade becomes a failed incomplete (FIN). As the name suggests, it means you haven’t finished the class. It’s incomplete and you have that quarter to make it up or it becomes an “F” Some classes are offered on a rotating basis (i.e., fall Quarter only, every other year), so students who plan to take a leave of absence should review their graduation plan with their school administration or program director and consider how to stay “on sequence” with their program Financial Aid Dropping or withdrawing from classes may affect students’ financial aid. In accordance with federal regulations, the Financial Aid Office will recalculate the amount of Title IV assistance the student is eligible for based on the date of withdrawal. The student will be financially responsible for any account balance that results from this recalculation. Students are encouraged to consult with a financial aid counselor prior to initiating these processes to inform themselves of their financial responsibilities and possible repercussions.

Page 48

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 48 Make-up Work All assignments such as quizzes, exams and clinical competency assessments are required to be made up to achieve the requirements for each course. • Students who miss a scheduled assignment, clinical competency assessment session or exam because of an excused absence must make it up within that quarter or have administrative approval for an extension. • Students who miss a scheduled assignment, clinical competency assessment session or exam because of an unexcused absence may be allowed to make it up based on the faculty syllabus marking schedule. Students are required to make and maintain a minimum grade of C- (70%) for each course they are enrolled in to move on to the next course or quarter within the END Technology program. Each daily assessment period, the school will record on the approved permanent student form each student’s attendance and record of academic achievement. The grade will be reviewed, and discussed with the student, by the adjunct faculty, and reported to the student within MoodleTM. Any academic/clinical competency or attendance concern will be addressed with the student during this time, and noted within the student permanent record. Transcripts / Student Records Grades are issued from the registrar office approximately one week following the close of each quarter. The school will assume records are correct if students do not report an error within one week of the date reports are issued. A statement of attendance and achievement shall be issued, upon request by the student, if withdrawal occurs before completion of graduation, provided the student has satisfied all obligations to the school. Withdrawn Grade for Leave If the student does not resume attendance at the school on or before the end of a leave of absence; the school shall treat the student as a Withdrawal (W). The effective date of termination shall be the last date of attendance. Students must re-enroll and discuss their requirements with the academic advisor. Academic Progress Standards of Academic Progress SAP applies to all students within the school. Satisfactory academic progress (SAP) is used to define successful completion of coursework to maintain eligibility within the Institution. Accreditation regulations require the school to establish, publish and apply standards to monitor your progress toward completion of your certificate or program. The courses within Institute of Health Science are taught in 12 week modules (Quarter) and consist of four quarters. SAP is reviewed at the end of each Quarter (25%, 50% 75% of total program length), including summer, after grades are posted. Once the review is completed, you will be notified of your SAP status via your school email account. If you fail to meet the SAP standards you will be placed on

Page 49

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 49 probation, termination and/or timeframe warning based on the standards of the school SAP. If you have had a recent grade change or have questions regarding SAP standards contact the registrar. Your academic performance must meet the SAP standards below. Qualitative standard: • Represented by your grade point average (GPA). You must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA (C-) to remain “Good Academic Standing”. Quantitative standard: This standard has two parts. • First, you must complete your program or certificate program within a maximum timeframe, not to exceed 150% of the normal program length. Increments of 25%, 50%, and 75% of the program length are used as measures of the minimum percentage of work that is to be completed. • Second, you must successfully complete a required percentage of the clock hours you attempt. This component is referred to as your clock hours’ completion ratio. (CC) DEFINITION OF STANDARDS OF ACADEMIC PROGRESS: A student must maintain minimum standards in the following measures: • Minimum 1.7 cumulative grade point average. (70 or C-) • Minimum at 75% of above of cumulative completion rate. i) The course completion rate is calculated as: Total clock hours successfully completed / Total clock hours attempted • Maximum Time Frame: You must complete your degree or certificate program within a maximum timeframe, not to exceed 150% of the normal program length, which may vary per your program. ii) Example: If a student’s program requires 60 clock hours, then the maximum timeframe is 60 x 1.5, or 90 clock hours. Satisfactory Academic Progress Increments SAP standards apply to all Quarters you attend. At the end of each Quarter, the Institution will assess the qualitative and quantitative progress of the student. The student will be notified of their SAP status by the registrar via written or electronic media. Institute of Health Sciences SAP standard:

Page 50

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 50 Student SAP Status (a) Good Standing: Student is in good standing at the school if: • Student has cumulative GPA at or above 1.7. (C-) • Student has cumulative completion rate of clock hours at or above 75%. • Student has not attempted more than 125% of required number of clock hours for program or certificate program. (b) Maximum Timeframe Warning Once your record shows you have attempted more than 125% percent of your program or certificate clock hours’ requirements you will receive a timeframe reminder in your school email account. This is meant to inform you that you are approaching your maximum timeframe. You are still academic eligible but will want to plan your coursework to complete your program within the maximum time frame. If you exceed the timeframe before you have finished your studies, you will be terminated from your program. (B) SAP Probation: Students who fail to meet either the quantitative or the qualitative criteria will be placed on SAP Probation and will be notified electronically or in writing of their status by the registrar office. Individuals who have exceeded their MTF by 125% will receive a warning from the registrar that they are close to exceeding their maximum timeframe. • Once students are placed on probation, they have until the next SAP evaluation point to raise their academics to the minimum standards or they will be terminated from school. In addition: • Once placed on Academic Probation, students are required to develop a written Academic Improvement Plan with the instructor and Program Director. Students who do not meet with the program director or faculty to develop a AIP (Academic Improvement Plan) will not be allowed to continue in the program. Academic Improvement Plan (AIP): A student on academic probation will be expected to adhere to specific terms and conditions outlined in an individual probation contract or Academic Improvement Plan (AIP). An Academic Improvement Plan is a written course of action, agreed upon between the faculty, student, and the program director that specifies actions to be taken by the student that will help raise their grades and remove themselves from academic probation. It includes such tasks as: • Assigned reading or content that will help provide clarity to the student. • Assistance e.g., tutoring, selecting peer mentored classes, additional scheduled meetings with adjunct faculty and/or END Technology director. • Time management strategies.

Page 51

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 51 • Additional support services, as appropriate to help student. The academic probation or warning and corrective actions (AIP) to be taken by the student will be documented in the students’ permanent record. At the next SAP evaluation point, if students successfully raise their cumulative GPA and clock hours earned to the minimum standards, they will be removed from probation and considered to be making satisfactory academic progress. If, however, they fail to meet the standards of the SAP, they will be terminated from the school. APPEAL PROCEDURE FOR NOT MEETING SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP) Students found not to be meeting the school standards for SAP will be notified in writing by the registrar. Students will not be allowed to file an appeal of their SAP if they have not met with faculty and developed a Academic Improvement Plan. If a student believes that his or her situation deserves special consideration due to extenuating circumstances, a written appeal may be submitted to the School Director within five (5) business days of notification. Now, the School Director will discuss the requirements of the SAP policy and conditions for extenuating circumstances. Extenuating circumstances are significant occurrences beyond the control of the student, such as prolonged illness, family crisis, jury duty, or military. A complete written appeal package from the student will include the following: • An explanation of extenuating circumstances which prevented the student from making the required academic progress AND documentation to support all written comments. • Extenuating circumstances are generally those that were beyond the student’s control. • The student must supply an explanation of actions taken to ensure that circumstances have been resolved AND documentation to support all written comments. If your SAP appeal is approved, you will be placed on academic probation. During your probation term(s), you must attain the required cumulative GPA, clock hour’s completion ratio and conditions set forth by the School Director. You will also need to successfully follow the academic plan that was submitted with your appeal form. If you fail to meet the conditions, you will be terminated from your program. REINSTATEMENT Criteria: After a student is placed on academic probation, the student must complete the prescribed academic guidelines to qualify for eligibility reconsideration. IMPORTANT NOTE: It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of, not only the initial eligibility requirements, but also minimum academic requirements to ensure continued eligibility and academic success. Adherence to these policy standards and regulations is required by all students at Institute of Health Sciences. The school reserves the right to review and modify this policy annually.

Page 52

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 52 Re-Matriculation If a student has been terminated based on SAP or institutional academic problems, the student shall submit a written petition requesting readmission to the institution in compliance with institution procedures. The request must include the circumstances that caused the student to fail to meet SAP, and what has changed that will allow the student to meet the SAP standards including any supporting documentation, i.e. transcripts, grade reports, etc. The minimal dismissal period is one twelve-week quarter. Re-admission may be granted, denied, or postponed subject to fulfillment of conditions prescribed by the institution. Definitions: When determining if you are meeting standards, your grades and clock hours are tallied per these guidelines: Clock hours Successfully Completed Clock hours successfully completed include all courses for which a student receives a passing grade of C- or better. In addition, all transfer clock hours with a C- or above are counted as clock hours successfully completed. Clock hours Attempted Clock hours attempted include all courses for which a student receives a passing grade of C- or better, pass, “I” (incomplete), “W” (withdrawn) or “F” (Failure). In addition, all transfer clock hours are counted as clock hours attempted. All repeated courses or clock hours attempted must be counted toward the maximum time frame. Incompletes All courses for which a student receives a provisional designation of “incomplete” must be counted toward the maximum timeframe and included in the calculation of a student’s cumulating completion rate. Withdrawals All courses for which a student receives a “W” on the permanent record must be counted toward the maximum timeframe and included in the calculation of a student’s cumulative completion rate. Remedial courses, Proficiency Clock hours or non-Punitive (Pass/Fail) These courses are not offered nor accepted at the school. Therefore, remedial course, etc. are not counted toward the maximum timeframe and are not included in the calculation of a student’s SAP.

Page 53

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 53 Attendance Policy Institute of Health Sciences expects each student to take full responsibility for his or her clinical work and academic progress. The student, to progress satisfactorily, must meet all the requirements of course for which he or she is registered. Students are required to maintain a minimum attendance rate of 90% of the total program clock hours to graduate from the END Technology program. Excused Absence For excused absences, the student is required to personally inform the instructor in advance of the planned absence. This notice should be given no later than the last class before the anticipated absence. When unexpected or life changing events (Ex: Title IX) cause students to miss class, adjunct faculty will allow students to have an excused “absence”. The student is required to request that the absence be “excused” by submitting a written request (e-mail), listing the reason, for approval to the instructor. It is expected that all Excused Absences granted will allow “academic and internships” to be made up without penalty. All excused absences are to be noted in the class record book as Excused and kept for accreditation purposes. Student Excused absences must be documented after seven calendar days based on IOHS school policy. Faculty members may request documentation of any excused absence. Excused absences must not exceed 10% of the clock hours of the program without proper documentation to the Director of the School. Ex: Medical Health issue, Pregnancy, etc. Proper documentation requires health care provider signatures or school administration approval of documentation of the “Life Event”. Unexcused Absence Absences which are not “excused” shall be considered “unexcused”. The absence and type of absence will be noted on the students’ daily time sheet and within the course management system (by the individual course instructor) and the permanent attendance record by the registrar office. Unexcused absences cannot exceed more than 10% of the total program hours and cannot be made up for attendance purposes. Any excess in the 10% absence rate and the student may be dismissed from the program of given an incomplete for the course.

Page 54

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 54 Federal Funding & Attendance Students that receive Federal Funding receive Pell Grants and Loans based on by their attendance record. All assignments such as quizzes, exams and clinical competency assessments are required to be made up to achieve the requirements for each course. • Students who miss a scheduled assignment, clinical competency assessment session or exam because of an excused or unexcused absence must make up the assignment. However, no penalty for lateness, etc. is allowed for an excused absence. • Adjunct faculty members will work with students to allow them to complete appropriate make-up clock hours and work, but students bear the ultimate responsibility for all missed class material.

Page 55

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 55 Attendance Records The record of daily attendance, indicating the number of scheduled clock hours for each session attended, the total clock hours present, and the clock hours absent, are recorded on a daily time sheet within the CMS or log sheet for each student by the individual course instructor. For clinical hours, the record of attendance includes the start and end of each instruction session and accounts for tardiness and any early departure or absence within the clinical site. Documenting Academic Attendance in a Academic Long Distance Courses Changes to Federal financial aid regulations in recent years have highlighted the importance of accurate reporting on student attendance and participation in all courses, including distance education courses (online and hybrid/blended courses). Federal Student Aid Handbook: In a distance education context, documenting that a student has logged into an online class is not sufficient, by itself, to demonstrate academic attendance by the student. A school must demonstrate that a student participated in class or was otherwise engaged in an academically related activity, such as by contributing to an online discussion or initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a course‐related question. FSA Handbook 2014‐2016, Volume 5, 5‐60. To comply with this federal financial aid regulation, the school is providing the following procedural guidance to students and faculty. A student attends an online course (or the online portion of a hybrid/blended course) by participating in class or otherwise engaging in an academically related activity. Examples of such activity include but are not limited to: contributing to an online discussion or text chat session; submitting an assignment or working draft; working through exercises; taking a quiz or exam; attending a forum; viewing and/or completing a tutorial; initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a course‐related question. Such academically related activities are readily tracked and documented through the schools learning management system, email system, and in some cases our published websites and database. Documenting that a student has logged into an online class or website is not sufficient, by itself, to demonstrate academic attendance by the student. For example, if a student simply logs into an online course on September 15 and logs out, without any further activity, the student did not attend the online class on that day.

Page 56

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 56 All attendance clock hours are recorded cumulatively daily. Clinical hours are documented by adjunct faculty and log clock hours on the student daily attendance sheet or within the CMS. Any absence must be documented as Excused or Unexcused by the course instructor. Excused absences may be made up by the student prior tthe end of the quarter but may not exceed ten (10%) of the total course without proper documentation. Notations must be made on the student attendance sheet by the instructor that the required hours or sessions were made up by the student • The clinical affiliate supervisor must sign the daily attendance sheet. • Any academic/clinical competency or attendance problems will be addressed with the student on a weekly basis and noted within the permanent student record. • The faculty will enter the absence into the CMS. The registrar office will enter the daily clock hours and absence (excused or unexcused) into the student permanent attendance record. Financial Aid Probation The student will be placed on probation and receive a warning notice ( e-mail) from the school registrar, if the student unexcused absence rate exceeds a level of 5% of the clock hours during that financial aid payment period. The written notice will include the warning that the student may be terminated from Financial Aid, if the student cumulative unexcused absence rate rises to 10% (108 clock hours) of the total clock hours (1080) of the program, to the extent that they cannot make up missed assessments. Makeup Policy 1. Session clock hours may be made up by arrangement with the individual instructor for academic and clinical excused absences. The student must complete their assigned make up clock hours and confirm that the makeup time is noted on their daily time sheet. 2. Students have until the end of that quarter to make up excused absence hours. Extension of this time may be required based on the life event accounting for the absence. Faculty will make every effort to assign appropriate make up assignments for students that may miss assignments. 3. Students who miss a scheduled assignment, clinical competency assessment session or exam because of unexcused absence must make it up depending on the individual faculty member requirements. Transcripts Student academic records are issued only at the request of the student concerned. Requests for transcripts must be submitted in writing to the registrar. Transcripts sent by mail to the person or institution designated by the student will include the signature of the registrar and director of the school. Students who intend to transfer credits to a individual college will need to speak to the registrar of IOHS prior to requesting a formal transcript.

Page 57

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 57 Transcripts given to the student will be marked "unofficial copy." The school will withhold transcripts if the student has not met all financial obligations to the school. Leave of Absence The school shall grant a leave of absence (LOA) in accordance with sound educational practice. Additional charges may not be imposed upon the student related to an official leave of absence. The school will make resources available for the students to resume instruction upon return from the leave of absence. A leave of absence, for reasonable purposes as determined by the school director, shall not exceed THE CUMULATIVE LEAVE from the school for more than 180 days. A student shall be granted only one (1) leave of absence per END Technology program enrollment. The school shall document the leave of absence in the student’s file, report the student’s last date of attendance as the start of the leave, record the reason for the leave, and specify, with the consent of the student, an end date of the leave of absence. Students who miss a clinical competency assessment session or exam because of a leave of absence must make it up within seven calendar days from the termination date of the leave of absence, or no grade will be given for that assignment. A written signed dated request from the student for the leave of absence must reflect approval by the registrar office and the individual program director. The request and must be signed by both the student and the registrar. The request shall then be placed in the student's permanent record. If the student does not resume attendance at the school on or before the end of a leave of absence, the student will be treated as a withdrawal, the student will automatically be terminated from the program and a refund made under the CANCELLATION AND REFUND POLICY. The effective date of termination shall be the last date of attendance. Students must re-apply and sign a new enrollment form prior to acceptance into the END program. Previous Education and Training IOHS will accept transfer clock hours for previous Electroneurodiagnostic Technology training provided for clock or credit hours from other institutions by an agency recognized by the United States Department of Education (USDE), Council on Accreditation of Allied Health Education (CAAHAP) or the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). Students must attend the Institute of Health Science for two quarters (50% of program) prior to graduation from the program. At the present time the school does not allow for experimental learning or portfolio development for clock hour approval. Student Records The registrar’s office develops an official student file and transcript for every matriculated Institute of Health Science student, which includes: 1. Evidence of compliance with the school’s admission and entrance requirements 2. Dates of admission start dates, and withdrawal or completion date 3. Documentation of academic and attendance satisfactory progress 4. Documentation (signed by student and adjunct faculty) of all student disciplinary actions, counseling/advising sessions, any probation measures. 5. Daily attendance records. 6. Students transcripts including achievements 7. All tuition and financial records 8. All changes to a student’s status at the time the change occur such as withdrawn or terminated students.

Page 58

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 58 Additional Information for: Withdrawn/Terminated students: 1. Daily attendance records up to and including the last day of attendance 2. Most recent progress report and student status up to last day of attendance. 3. Official student transcript 4. Withdrawal/Termination documentation (supporting information) 5. Mandatory refund calculations, even if student is not owed a refund. Graduated Students 1. The complete official transcript with daily attendance 2. A photocopy of the school’s certificate 3. Placement and employment information Student records are maintained for five (5) years after a student terminates training or graduates. After that date, original records will be converted to a digitized format and stored within the permanent records of the school. All records are kept within locked file cabinets within a secure location at Institute of Health Sciences. All records are open to the Department of Education, State of Maryland at any reasonable time. In addition: All public documents, including audited financial statements, are available in the IHS administrative office at 11031 McCormick Road Hunt Valley, Maryland 21031 MoodleTM Data Student data sent to MoodleTM are minimal and consist primarily of the student name and application logon data. Optionally demographic data may be provided. All data is uploaded to the FTP server via secure FTP. Once in the system, access to a student account is by logon and password provided by the school with the passwords being modifiable by the student. Access to the MoodleTM CMS application is via a secure encrypted server logon (HTTPS). In the spirit of considering the delivery of the Moodle software suite as a “mission critical” task, MoodleTM Incorporated considers customer (student and otherwise) data highly confidential material. Individual e-mails and addresses to student data are locked by the administrator of the Moodle application. Individuals will have to contact the administration upon any changes or loss of password. MoodleTM personnel are required to sign a non-disclosure agreement prior to working with client data in any capacity. The agreement is mandated for personnel such as support personnel, developers, and training personnel. The agreement (copy) between MoodleTM and IHS can be obtained by calling the administrative office at 1.410.821.9623 and requesting a copy Medical Policy Maintenance of personal health is extremely important in the health care field. Should a student develop a medical condition that would adversely affect the student, fellow students or patient, the Director of the END Technology program and the clinical affiliate must be informed.

Page 59

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 59 If the END Technology director or the clinical affiliate feels the condition may pose a threat to the health and safety of others, including patients, the student will be required to withdraw from classes and clinical education sites until the situation is resolved. The school may require the student at any time, to obtain a health clearance before continuing a clinical assignment. A student, who has a pregnancy while in the END Technology program, must obtain a health clearance letter signed by her obstetrician to continue in the END Technology program. The school reserves the right to release health records to clinical sites. Health Insurance and Hospitalization The school assumes no responsibility for expenses incurred by students requiring hospitalization. The school is not responsible for any condition existing before or after enrollment or for any special treatments, medications or diagnostic procedures a student may require. The school does not offer health insurance to its students. Health Services Referral Any student who becomes ill or injured while on their clinical rotation may utilize the services of the hospital and or clinical site. The student will be responsible for all medical charges. The school assumes no financial responsibility for these services. Students are advised to consult with their insurance carriers to determine if such visits are covered. Personal Image It is important that students portray a professional image to those with whom they come in contact. Inappropriate dress, grooming, or conduct often detracts from patients’ confidence in the quality of their care. In addition, individual hospitals have various standards for personal conduct and appearance. All clinical affiliate (Hospital Policy) standards and guidelines for professional conduct and dress are required to be followed by all students of the END Technology program. These guidelines will be reviewed with the student during the orientation by the clinical affiliate staff. Adjunct faculty or a clinical affiliate may dismiss a student from class for failing to observe the dress or grooming code requirements. Students will be allowed to return to the class/building when the requirement is resolved. Certain standards of grooming and behavior are mandatory for all IHS students. 1. Students are expected to be neat and well-groomed and act professionally always. 2. Students are required to wear the clinical uniform for clinical and field experiences. 3. When in uniform, jewelry other than a wedding band and stud earrings should not be worn. 4. Lab coats should be worn during short-term observations in the clinical area. 5. Fingernails should be maintained in a professional manner, closely trimmed, and should not Interfere with patient safety and comfort during treatments.

Page 60

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 60 Student Support Help Desk Long Distance Technical Problems: MoodleTM, the online course management system which is used for content delivery, has a 24/7 Helpdesk for support. • An on-demand Helpdesk 24/7/365 telephone and email support system is available for students if they should have problems with access or delivery of the END Technology program course material. The number is (888) 326-4058 Ext. 703 to be connected. E- mail support can be accessed at info@Moodle.com • In addition, individual sample courses may be arranged through the END Technology director to review and help operate any component of the Moodle TM course management system. Library All clinical affiliate sites have extensive facilities for accessing databases, library materials and outside resources that are located within their Neurology Department and hospital libraries. These materials are available to all students while on clinical rotation and you are encouraged to use them for your research and training. The student will receive instruction on how to access these materials during orientation sessions with the clinical affiliate site. Placement Assistance Institute of Health Sciences job placement assistance is a vital part of the students’ educational program. The Job Placement Service is an active placement service, and, although the securing of positions cannot be guaranteed, every avenue is pursued to assist students in obtaining desirable employment. IHS will do everything possible to provide students with the best and most up-to-date job placement opportunities. While locating a clinical site as close to the student’s home is desirable, sometimes the best jobs are located within a reasonable distance from the student’s home. Students are encouraged during the END Technology program and after completion, to take advantage of the ASET website, which lists a national database of employment opportunities. In addition, IHS encourages students to list their resume on the ASET site. This service is available at no charge to student members. Student Activity Student Activities The American Society of Electroneurodiagnostic Technologists, Inc. is the premier membership organization for the profession. The American Society of Electroneurodiagnostic Technologists, Inc. provides leadership, advocacy and resources that promote professional excellence and quality patient care in Electroneurodiagnostic. As a membership organization, ASET advances the field by serving member needs; defining and endorsing standards of practice; providing innovative educational opportunities; promoting the profession; and building coalitions in allied health and other communities of interest. Membership forms are available online at ASET.org

Page 61

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 61 Drug and Alcohol Policy Federal and State Law The school upholds all federal, state, and local laws relating to the use of drugs and alcohol and is committed to maintaining a safe and healthy environment conducive to work and study. The school will not tolerate conduct that disrupts the campus or the academic environment. In compliance with the Drug-free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, Public Law 101-226), and the Drug-free Workplace Act of 1988, (41USC ~01), the school adopts and implements the following program: The unlawful possession, use, distribution, dispensation, or manufacturing of controlled substances (illegal drugs and unauthorized prescription drugs), as well as possession of and/or consumption of alcohol, are strictly forbidden on the school premises, as well as any work site or location at which students or employees representing the school are engaged in school-related activities or events. Violations of the policy will result in disciplinary action up to and including referral for prosecution and termination. Notification • The administrative office shall distribute the school’s policy on drugs and alcohol to each student taking one or more classes for any type of clock hours. • Distribution will take place at the time of matriculation and will part of the school catalog of the school. • Employee’s known to have a drug or alcohol problem are required to be referred to their director/supervisor. • Appropriate school personnel will handle student or employee violations. The non-academic misconduct section of the student catalog will prevail. (page 17 of the school catalog) Alcohol Regulations Many state laws, applicable to all attending the school, makes it illegal for anyone under age 21 to purchase, arrange to have purchased, transport, possess, consume or carry alcoholic beverages. Drug Regulations The school unequivocally prohibits the illegal possession and/or professionally unsupervised use of all prescription drugs, hallucinogenic drugs, and controlled substances, including marijuana, by any member of its community. It is an equally serious offense to sell, provide, share or distribute drugs illegally. Current state law also prohibits the sale of drug paraphernalia and such items are subject to confiscation on clinical sites. Selling or distributing drugs will result in dismissal from the school.

Page 62

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 62 Sanctions Covering Drugs and Alcohol Abuse The school reserves the right to take any reasonable and appropriate action to protect the rights, safety, and well-being of all members of the school community and to review the behavior of any student or employee who conducts himself/herself in a manner incompatible with the purpose and mission of the school. Record Keeping a.) All records pertaining to the drug and alcohol policy must be maintained for at least three years. b.) If selected for review by the Secretary of the Department of Education, the school must provide access to personnel records, documents, and any other information requested. c). There will be a biennial review of the drug and alcohol policy to assess its effectiveness, to implement changes if necessary and to ensure that disciplinary sections are consistently enforced. Copyright Policy It is the policy of IOHS School to comply with the United States Copyright Law of 1976, as amended (Title 17, United States Code). Thus, all faculty, staff, and students of IOHS Schools are required to respect the proprietary rights of owners of copyrights and refrain from actions that infringe on the rights of the individua. Policies were developed to assist members of the IOHS community in complying with federal copyright law and to enable them to distinguish between permitted and prohibited uses of copyrighted materials. Members of the IOHS School community are expected to familiarize themselves with these documents and to comply conscientiously with their requirements. The guidelines contain extensive information about copyright law as well as directions to resources on campus that will assist members of the community in complying with this policy and the law. All departments are responsible for posting notices reflecting this policy at all photocopying stations that may be used for reproducing copyrighted materials (e.g., those in the library and in departmental copy rooms) and at or near all computer stations. (Clinical Sites Included) The penalties for violation of United States copyright law can be severe. Employees and students who willfully disregard copyright law place themselves at risk of civil and criminal legal action. Individuals who engage in infringing activities also place the School at risk of legal action. The School will defend any faculty or staff member against a civil action alleging copyright infringement: • where the use is in accordance with the provisions of a valid software or database license agreement. • where the permission of the copyright owner has been obtained; or • Where the school has assisted in determining that the use was permissible. Otherwise, the faculty or staff member will be personally responsible for the defense of a civil action for copyright infringement. Students who are sued for copyright infringement are

Page 63

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 63 generally, not entitled to a defense provided by the school. In addition, members of the School community who willfully violate this Policy are subject to disciplinary action by the School up to and including termination, consistent with established School procedures. (See academic policy) Program Cancellation Definitions Cancellation of a program can signify either of two things: discontinuance or deactivation. • Discontinuance. Filing for formal permission to stop enrolling and graduating students in a certificate program and taking the program off the roster of approved programs for the school is called discontinuance. The school can stop offering a certificate yet maintain some of the courses that were integral to that certificate in service of other programs. The date on which the school stops awarding the certificate is the discontinuance date. • Deactivation. Deactivation differs from the above. This occurs if the school decides not to admit any new students to a program, usually “to allow time for a campus to determine whether to continue the program offering or to reorganize the program structure and/or resources.” After a school, based decision has been made to terminate or suspend a program, deactivation requires permission from the school Board of Directors. Discontinuance ultimately requires permission from the IHS Board of Directors as well. Cancellation of a group of courses not specifically required for a certificate is entirely a campus-based decision. Review Process Initiation The Faculty Curriculum Committee will investigate the need for deactivation or discontinuance of a program under the following circumstances: 1. The Program Director provides the Curriculum Committee with trend information indicating serious problems. These may include: o Significant decrease in enrollment not parallel to school-wide trends. o Insufficient enrollment to maintain full-time faculty loads. o Significant decrease in students graduating. o Negation of articulation agreements by external institutions. o Significant problems with students’ ability to transfer. o Poor review by an external accreditation or licensing body. o Problems with maintaining or updating facilities. o Significant changes in actual or projected employment opportunities in the field. o Serious concerns about adherence to academic standards. o Program costs appear to exceed the school’s ability to support the program.

Page 64

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 64 None of these in themselves will automatically trigger a review for discontinuance. Investigative Procedures 1. To be considered, any request for an investigation must be accompanied by compelling data and/or testimony. If the evidence suggests that a program should be considered for deactivation or discontinuance, an appropriate review process and timetable must be agreed upon by a joint meeting of the curriculum committee. Together, they will draw up the list of questions to be answered by the faculty. 2. The Panel will have up to two months to prepare a report covering these topics: o Are the assertions that initiated the investigation true? If so how does the data gathered suggest the program should be deactivated, reorganized, or discontinued? o Would deactivation or discontinuance of the program leave a serious gap in the school’s efforts to fulfill its mission? If so, are there other ways to make up for the loss? o If it is a certificate program, are there students currently enrolled who would be unable to complete their studies? What provisions can be made for them? o Specific questions for the committee will depend on the nature of the alleged problem, but they must consider the feasibility of solutions other than deactivation or discontinuance. For instance: 1. If the concern is low enrollment, what is the perceived cause (e.g. poor reputation, irrelevance to the job market, lack of public knowledge or understanding, lack of recruitment or marketing activities)? 2. Are there ways to solve this problem, and, if so, at what cost, and how long a trial is reasonable? 3. If the problem is financial, what is the cost per student? What revenues does the program generate for the school? A detailed budget should be included in the report. How does this compare with similar programs at the Institution and at other schools? Are there untried and untapped sources of funding available? 4. How much outside help would be needed, who would be available or responsible to pursue the funds, and how long a trial is reasonable?

Page 65

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 65 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology Occupational Description Electroneurodiagnostic (END) technology is the medical diagnostic field devoted to the recording and study of electrical activity in the brain and nervous system. END technologists possess the knowledge, skills, and attributes to obtain interpretable recordings of patients’ nervous system function. The END Technology program consists of 1080 total clock hours given over four quarters of 12 weeks each. Scope of Practice The END technologists can be involved in one or more of the following diagnostic procedures after graduation: electroencephalography (EEG), evoked potential (EP), Polysomnography (PSG), nerve conduction studies (NCS), and intraoperative monitoring (IOM). The technologist takes the medical history; documents the clinical condition of patients; understands and employs the optimal use of EG, EP, PSG, and NCS equipment; and applies adequate recording electrodes. Among other duties, the END technologists also understands the interface between EEG, EP, PSG, and NCS equipment and other electrophysiological devices and procedures; recognizes and understands EEG/EP/NCS/sleep activity displayed; manages medical emergencies in the laboratory; and prepares a descriptive report of recorded activity for the interpreting physician. The responsibilities of the technologist may also include the laboratory management and the supervision of END technologists. END personnel work primarily in neurology-related departments of hospitals, but many also work in clinics and the private offices of neurologists and neurosurgeons. Growth in employment within the profession is expected to be greater than average, owing to the increased use of EEG and EP techniques in surgery; in diagnosing and monitoring patients with epilepsy; and in diagnosing sleep disorders. Technologists generally work a 40-hour week, but may work 12-hour days for sleep studies and on-call for emergencies and intraoperative monitoring. In addition to performing a wide variety of tests on patients, the employer expects the graduate to evaluate the results to assess the performance of the test equipment and perform quality control procedures on equipment and basic calibration/maintenance functions The American Society of Electroneurodiagnostic Technologists, Inc. (ASET) has a list of entry-level salary structures on their web site. Electroneurodiagnostic Technology The mission of the school guides the Electroneurodiagnostic Technology (END) curriculum. Inherent in the identity of the school is the mission to provide opportunities to a diverse population of students to become Electroneurodiagnostic Technologists. The program fosters individual growth and prepares graduates to work as valued members of the health care team. Institute of Health Sciences is committed to the training of EEG technologists through a series of education courses which are delivered via a mixed (hybrid) delivery of instruction: a combination of distance education and resident clinical site instruction. Through Clinical Educational Agreements (CEA) with institutions that have received Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAHO). Institute of Health Sciences can offer an END Technology program that utilizes both online didactic instruction and practical

Page 66

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 66 application of content in a clinical setting. At the completion of the END Technology program, the student meets the requirements to take the national board exams by the American Board of Electroencephalographic and Evoked Potential Technologists (ABRET). The END Technology program consists of 1080 total clock hours or 48 clock hours. Distance Learning Platform MoodleTM is a fully hosted online learning platform for virtual course delivery, and classroom instruction. The platform enables any course content to be customized or personalized by faculty of IHS and universally accessed by students via standard Internet browser such as Microsoft(R) Internet Explorer(TM) or Netscape Navigator(TM). In addition, it allows the adjunct faculty to store, catalog and manage any instructional material, audio clips, video segments, or any content in multiple learning formats. MoodleTM includes the ability to deliver content through synchronous and asynchronous learning. The school licensing agreement includes both Course Stream which allows for streaming video of any custom material and Course Live which is customized content directly recorded from the desktop. Adjunct faculty and students can combine video via a webcam with power point presentations or other content. In addition, the system allows for students to access lectures and content 24/7 from anywhere that an online connection can be attained. Previous weeks assignments, video, lectures, etc. are archived into a weekly “Time Line” format that allows for previous work and assignments to be accessed for review. The objective with the use of MoodleTM, along with the practical experience at the clinical affiliate site, is to establish a Networked Learning Environment (NLE), in which any student or teacher can view instructional content, collaborate with the clinical site, evaluate academic performance and access any learning resource at any time in order to achieve their educational objectives. Building a NLE enables IHS to realize important benefits such as student-centered learning, greater instructor efficiency, anytime anywhere access, improved evaluation and outcomes management and 24/7 access to high quality learning content. Clinical Practicum This clinical practicum portion of the program provides ongoing clinical experience and allows students to demonstrate clinical competency in performing Electroneurodiagnostic testing procedures. Students work 1:1 with a registered technologist, at a local approved clinical site and will be assessed daily on clinical competencies and attendance. During the first Quarter, students will begin a two-day a week (15 total clock hours, a week) clinical training program at a local hospital or neurology laboratory (clinical affiliate). The clinical affiliate will be responsible for the clinical supervision of the student. The facility staff will provide formative and summative feedback concerning the development of clinical skills and a foundation for subsequent clinical training. At the completion of program students will be able to accurately perform a variety of Electroneurodiagnostic procedures on patients of different ages, diagnosis and levels of cooperation. The evaluation of clinical competencies is progressive in that students begin being evaluated on simple fundamental skills and progress to more complex skills, patients and procedures as they advance through the program. Evaluation forms were developed so that student grades will improve over the course of each Quarter as their skills, accuracy and knowledge improve.

Page 67

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 67 • For example: Students are allowed 30 minutes to accurately measure a patient per the 10-20 system of measuring to obtain a grade of 75%. In the first Quarter, most students can perform this task in 25-30 minutes and obtain a grade of 75-80%. Using the same time constraints in the 2nd Quarter students have advance and perfected their skills and are completing this task in 10-15 minutes earning a grade of 90 -95%. The clinical practicum portion of the program reinforces classroom learning and prepares students to become independent working technologists. Clinical Affiliates To provide excellence of care and the latest in END Technology, each clinical affiliate hospital chosen for the END Technology student, must be certified by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAHO). To obtain JCAHO accreditation, the clinical affiliate hospital must also be able to verify that every staff member at their END laboratory can demonstrate proficiency within their field, meet the specific standards for equipment and diagnostic testing, and receives a performance evaluation based upon his or her specific job description. In addition: Diagnostic Equipment The student will have access to state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment while at the neurology laboratory such as: electroencephalography (EEG), evoked potential (EP), Polysomnography (PSG), nerve conduction studies (NCS), long-term epilepsy monitoring (LTM) and intraoperative monitoring (IOM) equipment. • All clinical affiliates are required to have END Technology staffs that are registered in END Technology. (R.EEG.T) o Clinical Laboratory: Instructor / Student ratio is maintained at a 1 to 1 ratio • The clinical affiliate library at each site is available for students seeking health information or researching biomedical information. All hospital clinical sites have an in- house librarian to help in the orientation of the student to the hospital library. • The clinical affiliate will designate appropriate personnel to coordinate the student’s learning experience. • Clinical affiliates will maintain daily records and reports on each student’s performance as specified by the END Technology course outlines and provide evaluations to the school on forms provided by the school. • Each student will have numerous opportunities to explore MRI, and EEG reports on rounds with the individual physician. • The clinical affiliate staff assigned to supervise the END Technology student will use the Electroneurodiagnostic equipment located within their hospital to provide the practical training for the student. • At the minimum, the END Technology student will be exposed to Caldwell, Nates, and Biologic Vision Equipment, along with various types of ambulatory EEG equipment. In

Page 68

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 68 addition, students will be exposed to full feature video equipment that is used to monitor video EEG. Orientation to Clinical Externship At the beginning of the first Quarter, students are assigned to a clinical affiliate site within their local area. The clinical site is required to have a Joint Commission of the Accreditation of Healthcare Organization standing prior to accepting students. The accreditation process documents that the laboratory meets certain standards for equipment and staff qualifications. Once assigned to the clinical site, an orientation to the site is arranged for the student where he/she meets the staff and has a tour of the laboratory. Now, center policies, important phone numbers, access to library and a general overall tour of the facility is given to the student. The student and registered technician sign a check off form to document specific activities have been reviewed with the student. This form becomes part of the permanent student record. A few examples are: • The proper attire required by the clinical affiliate (lab coats, etc.) during clinical practicum. • Clinical site hours and days, closing /inclement weather policy and any additional supplies needed. • A review of health/background checks and verification of vaccination requirements. • Specific phone numbers to call in case of illness and or inclement weather. • Specific personnel policies, such as personal appearance, will be provided to the student. The policies will govern students’ activities while at the hospital. • The clinical site assigns lockers (during orientation) for the students during clinical rotations. The school does not accept responsibility for lost or stolen items; therefore, students are urged to keep their possessions locked up always. • Students are responsible for all travel, commuting charges and meals during the “Clinical Practicum” rotation. Property Damage • Students who damage clinical site property (accidentally or otherwise) will be responsible for the repair or replacement costs. Malpractice Coverage Students are provided with malpractice coverage while acting within the course and scope of any approved clinical assignment. Copies of the policy are filed with each Cooperative Education Agreement. A copy of the policy is kept at the Institute of Health Science office. Institute of Health Sciences, 11031 McCormick Road Hunt Valley, Maryland 21031 Attention: Director of School

Page 69

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 69 Competency and Assessment END Technology Graduation Requirements: Students are required to take and pass twelve sequential courses to receive a certificate, academic transcript, and record of attendance, in the Electroneurodiagnostic Technology program: To meet program completion requirements, students also must also have clinical competence verified and documented by a registered Electroneurodiagnostic Technologist. (R.EEE. T.) In addition, students must have: 1. Completion of all courses in Electroneurodiagnostic Technology 2. A grade of C- or higher in each course 3. Completion of all clinical site requirements 4. Completion of a 90% minimum attendance rate or greater 5. Fulfillment of all financial obligations to the school Assessment Purpose and Context Institute of Health Sciences aims to ensure congruence between the stated student outcomes, the content and the assessment methods of all courses in the Electroneurodiagnostic Technology program. The primary purpose of assessment is to: • Provide feedback to students on levels of attainment. • Indicate to student areas of misunderstanding or conceptual difficulties and assist with improvement. • Provide feedback to teaching staff to indicate areas, in which students are experiencing difficulties, and to identify and diagnose if there is a need for a change/modification of teaching method. • Determine whether the student is sufficiently well prepared in a subject area to proceed to the next level of instruction. During each END Technology course, the adjunct faculty will review the academic, clinical competence and attendance performance of the student daily. A weighted grade will be assigned to the student for that session. The student will be notified of their grade for that session and it will be posted in MoodleTM for their review. This grade will also be recorded within the student’s permanent records by the registrar office. The following formative and summative tools are utilized to provide learning outcome assessment: • Attendance • Daily and weekly clinical competency assessments. • Course content mastery: forums, online quizzes with time limits, tests, practice quizzes, case studies. • Frequency/timing/duration of participation via passive back-end data collected with course software. (e.g., hits, links, test quiz results, podcasts, etc.) • Final Core Competency Exams

Page 70

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 70 Assessment Marks Unless otherwise stated, the final assessment mark for each student in an assignment or course shall be determined on the scale of 0 to 100%. Grades will comply with the grading standards, as stated of this catalog and will consist of formative and summative assessments. A student will receive a final mark and grade in relation to how well they have performed against the assessment criteria and standards of the course. Assessments Weights • Normally there will be more than one item of assessment from which the final mark and grade for a course is derived. A specific weighting for each item of assessment will be nominated (e.g.10%). END Technology Assessment Tools Academic Assessments: Attendance/Assignments/ Forums/Tests/Quizzes 80% Final Research Paper/Case Study 10% Final Core exam 10% Academic progress will be measured by having formative and/or summative assessments. Attendance will be monitored daily. At the end of each course there is a final core exam. Clinical Assessment: Daily Evaluations/Clinical Competency assessments/Log Book /Attendance/Assignments 80% Case Study 10% Final Clinical Competency Assessment 10% Clinical progress will be measured by having daily evaluations on clinical competency, logbook submission, attendance, and assignments. At the end of each course, there is a final core competency exam. • Clinical practicum courses required the student to submit daily/weekly assessments (and note them in their logbook) of the patients they tested, type of tests, comments, and daily time sheets. In addition, they are required to undergo a final Clinical Competency exam each Quarter. • Starting in the second quarter students is required to perform two to three END Technology studies a week. • By the time the student has completed the END Technology program, they will have performed over one hundred (100) END diagnostic tests on various types of patients. Attendance Time Sheet • Clinical affiliates and adjunct faculty document clock hours on the student daily attendance sheet. The clinical affiliate supervisor will sign the attendance sheet and return it daily to the END Technology program director and registrar, who will record it in the student permanent attendance record. This record will be discussed

Page 71

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 71 with the student and a written copy provided daily to him/her. Any attendance problems will be verbally addressed with the student daily. Logbook Students are required to keep a daily log of their patient studies performed in the clinical practicum courses. The logbook notes the diagnosis, type of procedure, equipment any specific comments. The students submit the log daily to the END Technology program director daily. This is kept on file and counted as part of their clinical practicum grade. The logbook also allows for verification of the various types of END Technology studies performed by the student. Forums Are used during the externship to review specific reading material or to get knowledge of what the student gained from the material that was assigned to be read. The forum is held within Moodle, the online course management system and can be synchronous (real time) or asynchronous where the student just may leave comments to questions posted. The forum is graded based on a rubric which utilizes a graded serious of questions, on-time posting of answers, use of proper grammar, punctuation and spelling and proper medical language to generate a measurable score. Case Study A case study is required during a clinical practicum course. This requires the student to provide a written report about one of their patients for that Quarter. This report will address the present illness and a review of that disease. Included here, would also be a discussion of the EEG findings and relevance of those findings related to the patients’ prognosis. The case study is marked using a rubric which includes a graded system for each component required within the case study. The case study score is used as weighted measure in construction of the final grade. Physician Interaction Form The student is required to have 1:1 with a physician for record review, grand rounds or any other physician educational activity four times during each Quarter. The assessment form is used to document the student attending these events. They are graded based on completion 4/4 =100, ¾ = 75%, 2/4 = 50% and if not submitted or accomplished they receive a “0” for this assessment. Tests/Quizzes Are used to evaluate specific formative knowledge of the student. For the clinical practicum courses, these tests tend to be short and address very specific areas. A test grade is generated and averaged into the other clinical components for the final grade.

Page 72

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 72 Clinical Assessment Clinical practicum courses require the student to submit daily assessments of the individual patients they tested that week. Starting in the second Quarter students is required to perform two to three END Technology studies a week. By the time the student has completed the END Technology program, they will have performed one hundred (100) END diagnostic tests utilizing head measurements and precise electrode placement. The evaluation of clinical competencies is progressive in that students begin being evaluated on simple fundamental skills and progress to more complex skills, patients and procedures as they advance through the program. Evaluation forms were developed so that student grades will improve over the course of each Quarter as their skills, accuracy and knowledge improve. Final Core Clinical Assessment The purpose of the final Clinical Competency Assessment (CCA), at the end of each quarter, is to enable IHS to assess and compare students to the requirements of the “National Competencies for Performing an Electroencephalogram” published by American Society of Electroneurodiagnostic Technologists. http://www.aset.org Those students, that meet or exceed those minimum requirements, can go forward to the next quarter of the END Technology program. The final Clinical Competency Assessment each quarter consists of two parts. Each component is tested separately and then added to the other to get an average grade. 1. A Yes or No assessment is used by the clinical affiliate to provide an evaluation of the student’s cognitive ability, skill acquisition, and behavioral traits. 2. A final Electrode Measurement and Head Measurement assessment. 3. The Final Core Competency Exam in the clinical practicum course counts as only 10% of final grade; however, the student is required to pass the final clinical competency exam each quarter, to pass the course and be eligible to take the next clinical practicum course. Late Submission of Assessments • A student who submits a late assessment will be penalized by 10% per calendar day up to ten calendar days, i.e. marks equal to 10% of the assignment's worth will be deducted as a 'flat rate' from the mark awarded. For example, for an assignment with a possible highest mark of 50, the student's awarded mark will have 5% deducted per late calendar day. Saturday and Sunday each count as one calendar day. Circumstances for Consideration of the “Re-marking” of an Assessment Task • If a student does not receive a passing mark for an assessment item and wishes to discuss their result with their adjunct faculty member, the student should review the

Page 73

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 73 quality of their responses against the assessment criteria prior to arranging a meeting. A meeting is required to take place no later than one week after the assessment task has been returned. • If at the end of the meeting with the student, the adjunct faculty agrees that one or more of the student's responses to the assessment criteria require re-marking, the adjunct faculty will inform the END Technology director that a re-mark will be undertaken and the reasons for the re-mark will be documented within the student’s records. • If at the end of the meeting, the adjunct faculty does not agree that a re-mark is justified the student will be advised that the assessment item will not be re-marked. • The outcome of the discussion with the student will be recorded within the student record. Quizzes and Tests Security The assessment method used in MoodleTM is one that enhances exam security, during online testing. It is called “Single questions, no backtrack”. In this type of exam only one question is delivered at a time. A student decides about that question, answers the question and submits it. Then the next question is presented. It is not possible to go back to previous questions. MoodleTM Validation MoodleTM, the course management software, validates all admissions to lessons, assignments, forums, and quizzes by the assigned PASSWORD and IP address of the student. In addition, all logins, access of material, etc. by the student are recorded and saved within the database for review, assessment and printing for the students’ permanent record. MoodleTM exams are required to be “password” protected. Proctor Students are required to have a proctor (a member of student’s clinical affiliate medical staff) approved by the school registrar and must submit the proctor approval form to the by the first week of each course. All clinical practicum assessments, core competency exams and MoodleTM final exams are required to be proctored by a member of the clinical affiliate medical staff, which the student is assigned to. Proctored Exam Policy 1. The student selects a member of his clinical affiliate medical staff and decides by the first week of the course to have his/her examinations supervised per the following guidelines: • The student and the proctor must complete the “Application for Examination” section of the proctor form and return it to the registrar one week after the Quarter starts. Signed forms are required to be faxed to the registrar at 1-410-821-9624. 2. Location: The online examination must be administered in an educational or professional location, such as the clinical affiliate classroom, hospital or the proctor’s office.

Page 74

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 74 3. A sample proctor form is attached at the back of the catalog and may be downloaded at the IHS website: http://www.Instituteofhealthscience.org Proctored Examination Procedure To ensure the integrity of Institute of Health Sciences Testing Program, certain procedures must be followed. Listed below are procedures under which the examination must be administered. Any deviation from these procedures will invalidate the examination. 1. If taken online, an adjunct faculty enters a password into the MoodleTM exam that the student is scheduled for. This password allows access to the exam material. The password is then shared with the proctor via e-mail or phone by the faculty. The password must be entered by the student before the student can start the test. 2. The student must not have access to any books, notes or other materials unless specifically authorized by the examination. 3. The student is to be allowed only the time specified for completing the examination. 4. The proctor must personally observe the student throughout the examination period. 5. No one may make a copy of any part of the examination.

Page 75

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 75 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology 1st Quarter Fundamentals of Healthcare for the END Technologists END 101 45 lecture clock hours This course is designed to prepare students for working in a health care setting. The course focuses on various aspects of END and other allied health professions. Major components include nervous system and other relevant medical terminology, infection control practices and patient safety assessments. Students will also be introduced to the historical perspectives of Electroneurodiagnostic as well as The Scope of Practice of an END Technologist and related professional ethics. Electroneurodiagnostic END 102 45 lecture clock hours This course will provide students with the fundamental concepts necessary for performing routine EEG’s. Students will become familiar with the published guidelines for performing routine adult EEG and will learn the basic concepts of montage development, history taking, and activation procedures performed along with the advantages and contraindications. Students will also be able to describe and identify normal awake and sleep patterns. Information in this course will be applied in END 103. Clinical Practicum I END 103 90 Clinical and 90 Internship Hours This clinical practicum portion of the program provides ongoing clinical experience and allows students to demonstrate clinical competency in performing basic EEG skills and routine EEG testing procedures. Students will learn about various departmental operations and will be oriented to END lab equipment as well as lab policies and procedures. Students will work 1:1 with a registered technologist who will assess the student daily on clinical competencies and the online lecture material in 101 and 102 at the completion of this course students will be able to accurately perform a routine EEG on a cooperative patient in 2 hours or less per the ACNS guidelines. Students are required to spend a minimum of 15 clock hours a week (for 12 weeks) in the clinical setting.

Page 76

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 76 2nd Quarter Anatomy & Physiology for the END Tech END 201 45 lecture clock hours This course is designed for the student enrolled Electroneurodiagnostic Technology with at least one Quarter in the clinical setting. Students will have a basic overview of the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. Students will also be able to demonstrate knowledge of the organizational levels associated with anatomy and physiology along with directional and anatomical terms associated with other organ systems. Electroneurodiagnostic II END 202 45 lecture clock hours This course expands on the basic concepts learned in EEG technology I to introduce the advanced concepts of EEG technology. It includes maturation of the EEG, abnormal patterns, and patterns of unknown significance. This course also covers the basic concepts of polarity & localization and filters. Clinical Practicum II END 203 180 Internship clock hours The course is a continuation of EEG Clinical Practicum I and will allow you to expand the technical skills and knowledge you gained in Level I. This course provides ongoing clinical instruction and an evaluation method for students to demonstrate clinical competency for EEG procedures. Students will learn American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) Guidelines for more complex EEG recordings, such as cerebral brain death studies and pediatric recording requirements. This course will also focus on basic effects of medications on END studies and sedation practices. Students are required to spend a minimum of 15 clock hours a week (for 12 weeks) in the clinical setting. 3rd Quarter Neurological Disorders I (EP & NCV) END 301 45 lecture clock hours This course provides detailed information on a variety of neurological disorders, nerve conductions studies and evoked potential testing. Students will learn about the Neurological Exam, have a general review of the nervous system, and learn specific information about the central nervous system and abnormalities that affect the CNS such as Neoplasm’s, infections, trauma. Students will also learn detailed information about the peripheral nervous system and Nerve conduction testing used to evaluate the peripheral nervous system. Detailed information about multiple sclerosis, demyelinating diseases, spinal cord disease will also be included in this course with a general overview of the different types of Evoked Potential testing procedures.

Page 77

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 77 Electroneurodiagnostic III (LTM) END 302 45 lecture clock hours This course is a continuation of Electroneurodiagnostic II and is designed to prepare students for the duties involved in performing advanced END procedures. Students will learn in detail about seizure classification and epileptic syndromes. This course will also focus on EEG interpretation as associated with seizure disorders, epileptiform abnormalities, and artifact recognition. Student will also be introduced to digital EEG concepts and an overview of Seizures, Epileptic Syndromes, and advanced seizure monitoring and recording. This course also provides instruction for basic digital concepts used in EEG recording. Clinical Practicum III END 303 180 Internship clock hours This course is a continuation of EEG Clinical Practicum II and will allow you to expand the technical skills and knowledge you gained in Level II. This course provides ongoing clinical instruction and an evaluation method for students to demonstrate clinical competency for routine and advanced EEG procedures. Students will work on expanding their pattern recognition skills. Students are required to spend a minimum of 15 clock hours a week (for 12 weeks) in the clinical setting. 4th Quarter Neurological Disorders II (IOM) END 401 45 lecture clock hours This course is a continuation of END 301 Neurological Disorders II. Topics included in this course include cerebrovascular diseases, metabolic/toxic disorders, coma and impairment of consciousness, tumors, developmental disorders, headaches, dizziness and vertigo. In addition, students, will have learn about the various types of intra-operative monitoring (IOM) being done throughout Neurodiagnostic centers nationwide. IOM is now becoming standard practice for many neurosurgical procedures and students learn the indications for surgical monitoring, the expected changes that can occur and outcomes seen with these procedures. Electroneurodiagnostic IV END 402 45 lecture clock hours This course is a continuation of Electroneurodiagnostic III. Students will continue to build on their pattern recognition skill and advanced END recording procedures. In addition, students, will learn the basics of Polysomnography to meet the graduate competencies including recognition of sleep stages, montages used in Polysomnography, basic understanding of common sleep disorders, and the requirements for performing a technically adequate PSG recording.

Page 78

I N S T I T U T E O F H E A L T H S C I E N C E S 78 Clinical Practicum IV END 403 180 Internship clock hours This course provides ongoing instruction and an evaluation method for students to demonstrate clinical competency for EEG procedures. This course is a continuation of EEG Clinical Practicum III and will allow you to expand the technical skills and knowledge you have previously gained. This course will afford students the opportunity to integrate what is being learned in other course areas into the clinical spectrum. Students will also be exposed to other END procedures performed in the END laboratory. Students are required to spend a minimum of 15 clock hours a week (for 12 weeks) in the clinical setting. END Technology Course Descriptions 1080 Total Clock Hours

Page 79

77

Page 80

77 School Faculty & Staff Director, Institute of Health Sciences Richard L. Trader Sr. MMSc. RRT PA-C FCCM Received his Master’s degree in Medical Science from the International University of Health Sciences, School of Medicine with research in Mass Spectrometry at Brown University. He is a Registered Physician Assistant with a Board Certification in Primary Care & Surgery. He is an elected Member of the Society of Critical Medicine. Assistant Director Institute of Health Sciences Adjunct Faculty Registrar Lynn Kuser-Trader, BS RN CCRN She is a Registered Critical Care Nurse Received her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing from Towson University. Director Neurodiagnostic Technology Programs

Page 81

78 KelleeTrice, BS R.EEG/EP. T RPSGT She is an ABRET Board-Certified EEG, EP Technologist and Board-Certified Polysomnography Technologist. Received her Bachelor degree in Health Science from Widener University. CO-Medical Director END Technology Program Richard L. Taylor, M.D., F.A.A.N., Medical Director Clinical Neurophysiology Greater Baltimore Medical Center Doctor Taylor attended the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland, where he received his Medical Doctor Degree. He is a Board-Certified Neurologist. CO-Medical Director END Technology Peter Kaplan, MBBS F.A.A.N Professor of Neurology John Hopkins Director of the EEG/Epilepsy Program @ Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center Dr. Peter Kaplan received his Doctor in Medicine degree from St. Bartholomew's Medical School, University of London. He is a Board-Certified Neurologist. Financial Aid Officer – Adjunct Faculty Denise L. Bates, R. EP T./C.N.I.M/MBA She received her Master’s in Health Administration from the University of Phoenix Shs is a Registered Electroneurodiagnostic Technologist and Evoked Potential Technolog Adjunct Faculty END Technology Margaret Tucker MS REEG.T

Page 82

79 She received her BA Degree in Management from Ashworth College. She is a Registered Electroneurodiagnostic Technologist and Registered in Evoked Potentials. Adjunct Faculty END Technology Glenna Carroll REEG.T She is a Registered EEG.T Technologist and Registered Polysomnography Technician. Adjunct Faculty END Technology Tashina Clancy AA REEG.T She received her AA degree and Certificate in Neurodiagnostic Technology from Corinthian College. She is a Registered EEG.T technologist

Page 83

80 TextBook List2020-2021 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology Below you will find a list of books/materials that are a requirement of the course. Since textbooks are updated periodically we recommend that your order only the current course list. At the start of each quarter a current list will be provided. We encourage students to search for other sources to purchase textbooks/materials. These can be used or rented just be sure that you order the correct edition. 1st Quarter: ACNS 2006 Guidelines. Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology. Volume 23/Number 2/2006. LWW (Available to download at no charge from: www.acns.org) Instructions on which guidelines need to be downloaded will be available in the course. A Review of the International Ten-Twenty System of Electrode Placement. Astro-med Grass. Included in your course—students do not need to purchase Mannequin Heads – (Bald & Samuel) Purchase from Pivot Point International. 1-800-886-4247 (Beatrice Cano is our representative) Note: mannequin heads are also available at discounted pricing on Amazon.com. Though we typically have students order the "Sammy" mannequin any Cosmetology Mannequin Head with 100% Human Hair will work, male or female--I would order the least expensive. You can also look at a local beauty supply though these may be more expensive. Holders are optional but you may find it worth your while to purchase. Yamada, T. Meng, E. 2010 Practical Guide for Clinical Neurophysiologic Testing: EEG 2nd Edition ISBN 13: 978-1496383020 (see note below about LWW text)

Page 84

81 ASET – The Neurodiagnostic Society student membership. Each student is required to become a member of the American Society of Electroneurodiagnostic Technologists (ASET) and qualifies for the discounted student membership fee. ASET provides a variety of benefits to its members and will serve as a valuable resource throughout your training. You can obtain a registration form from the ASET website at www.aset.org. Students should purchase a membership based on their program start date and information on how to become a member will be listed in your course. 2nd Quarter: Suggested Marieb: Essentials of Human Anatomy & Physiology. ISBN 13: 9780134395326 Edition: 12 Marieb: Anatomy and Physiology Coloring Workbook: A Complete Study Guide ISBN 13: 9780134459363 Edition: 12 Required Tatum: Handbook of EEG Interpretation, Second Edition ISBN 13: 9781620700167 Edition: 2 3rd Quarter: Tyner, F. Knott, J. Fundamentals of EEG Technology, Volume 2: Clinical Correlates. ISBN 0-89004-909-2 Oklahoma Notes: Neurology and Clinical Neurosciences. Springer. ISBN 0- 387-94635-7

Page 85

82 Yamada, T. Meng, E. 2011. Practical Guide for Clinical Neurophysiologic Testing: EP, LTM, IOM, PSG, and NCV. ISBN 13: 9781609137144 4th Quarter ABRET ASAP (Student fee for online access) Fee and application will be posted in your 4th quarter course along with the discount code.

Page 86

83