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Whether you or your EA/VA is managing your own LinkedIn presence, read this ebook to avoid obvious mistakes you might not even know exist. Be prepared so you present in the best way possible.

My Awesome Heading

BONUSES 

 in:dispensable podcast interview  

with Erin Dore Miller + Colleen McKenna

Plus a recorded webinar on the Top 5 LinkedIn Mistakes


Ensure your LinkedIn profile and network are working for you. 
The Ultimate Guide 
to Managing a CEO's LinkedIn Presence  
Ensure your LinkedIn profile and network are working for you. 
The Ultimate Guide 
to Managing a CEO's 
LinkedIn Presence

PART ONE | CEO 

BONUSES 

Our in:dispensable podcast interview  

with Erin Dore Miller + Colleen McKenna


Webinar recording

5 LinkedIn Mistakes, Must-do's + Tips

with Colleen McKenna

Ensure you're LinkedIn presence is complete, optimized and well-positioned to extend your brand and business.

PART ONE

Intero Advisory

Thanks for taking the time to read this eBook. It means you realize three things. 

One, you know there are benefits to being on LinkedIn for your brand, recruiting and business development/sales.

Second, you don't want to manage your own LinkedIn profile and presence.  

Third, you're okay with delegating your profile to someone else.

Before you do, read on and learn how to ensure you've covered all your bases.

If you prefer the podcast version, just click here.



















 

Let's be honest - You’re feeling like you don't want to spend any time on LinkedIn for whatever the reason (time, energy, lack of proficiency). So, you've decided to hand it off to someone on your team or a Virtual Assistant or an outsourced resource. 


But not so fast; think this through before you hand over what amounts to your online presence to someone that may not yet be qualified. 


Assuming that others know how to maximize LinkedIn is foolish. It's mistake number one. If you know a lot about LinkedIn and have been using it effectively, you probably know the questions to ask to evaluate someone’s LinkedIn aptitude. If you're not sure, read on.


If you don’t know much about LinkedIn, asking someone else how much they know is ridiculous. It's a path to getting nowhere fast. 


How can I make such a bold statement? For more than eight years I’ve heard, seen and experienced the crazy that comes with people who are not LinkedIn proficient managing the profiles for people who also know little about LinkedIn, thinking they know a lot and expecting it to produce results with little effort, like magic. 


Among the people you talk to about managing your LinkedIn account, they will most likely fall into three categories.

  • They don't know it well, but take a "How hard can it be?" attitude.

  • They've been on LinkedIn for years; they use it and think, “I'll figure it out for you, for sure.”

  • They know nothing about LinkedIn, but are a fast learner.

Just because someone claims they know something doesn't mean they do, and just because they claim they're a fast learner doesn't mean they are. Asking the right questions, setting clear parameters and expectations, and knowing what you're paying for is critical.


If you're a CEO, Entrepreneur, or small business owner and want to hand off your LinkedIn presence and network to someone else, please ask the following questions and make sure the answers you receive make sense, are not filled with fluff and buzzwords and have examples that substantiate results.

9 QUESTIONS TO ASK SOMEONE BEFORE 

THEY TAKE OVER YOUR LINKEDIN PRESENCE



#1 - How do you currently use LinkedIn for your own personal/professional branding and business development?

If they don't use LinkedIn personally and don't look good on LinkedIn, how do you think they can make you look good?


#2 - How do you manage your LinkedIn network?

If they don't have a business network of their own, how will they know how to connect you with the right kinds of people?


#3 - What kind of network do you have?

If they don't know most of the people that they’re connected to, or haven't thought about connecting strategically, how will they know how to hand-select good connections for you?


#4 - How have you set up your Settings & Privacy?

If they haven't done this in a while, don't know where this area is or haven't ever paid attention to it, they are certainly not strategic about using LinkedIn.


#5 - How do you engage on LinkedIn?

If they don't engage for themselves or do so with no strategy, how will they do that for you?


#6 - Do you automate any of your LinkedIn activities? If so, what tools do you use?

If they are automating some or most of the process, what are you paying them for? Automated tools may dilute your brand. Tread carefully. 


#7 - Please provide examples of how you’ve helped other clients increase their LinkedIn presence (profile), network, business development, and/or recruiting opportunities.

No examples with no articulated results, whether good, bad, or neutral suggest there may be a lack of accountability.


#8 - How would you describe your LinkedIn best practices?

If they don't have a set of best practices, how will you know your LinkedIn initiative is well crafted or is being managed correctly?


#9 - Please outline a LinkedIn strategy and set of activities that you think would work best for me.

This outline should be specific, including best practices and have specific steps in a particular order with metrics that resonate with your objective. 

#1 - How do you currently use LinkedIn for your own personal/professional branding and business development?

If they don't use LinkedIn personally and don't look good on LinkedIn, how do you think they can make you look good?


#2 - How do you manage your LinkedIn network?

If they don't have a business network of their own, how will they know how to connect you with the right kinds of people?


#3 - What kind of network do you have?

If they don't know most of the people that they’re connected to, or haven't thought about connecting strategically, how will they know how to hand-select good connections for you?


#4 - How have you set up your Settings & Privacy?

If they haven't done this in a while, don't know where this area is or haven't ever paid attention to it, they are certainly not strategic about using LinkedIn.


#5 - How do you engage on LinkedIn?

If they don't engage for themselves or do so with no strategy, how will they do that for you?



#1 - How do you currently use LinkedIn for your own personal/professional branding and business development?

If they don't use LinkedIn personally and don't look good on LinkedIn, how do you think they can make you look good?


#2 - How do you manage your LinkedIn network?

If they don't have a business network of their own, how will they know how to connect you with the right kinds of people?


#3 - What kind of network do you have?

If they don't know most of the people that they’re connected to, or haven't thought about connecting strategically, how will they know how to hand-select good connections for you?


#4 - How have you set up your Settings & Privacy?

If they haven't done this in a while, don't know where this area is or haven't ever paid attention to it, they are certainly not strategic about using LinkedIn.


#5 - How do you engage on LinkedIn?

If they don't engage for themselves or do so with no strategy, how will they do that for you?


#6 - Do you automate any of your LinkedIn activities? If so, what tools do you use?

If they are automating some or most of the process, what are you paying them for? Automated tools may dilute your brand. Tread carefully. 


#7 - Please provide examples of how you’ve helped other clients increase their LinkedIn presence (profile), network, business development, and/or recruiting opportunities.

No examples with no articulated results, whether good, bad, or neutral suggest there may be a lack of accountability.


#8 - How would you describe your LinkedIn best practices?

If they don't have a set of best practices, how will you know your LinkedIn initiative is well crafted or is being managed correctly?


#9 - Please outline a LinkedIn strategy and set of activities that you think would work best for me.

This outline should be specific, including best practices and have specific steps in a particular order with metrics that resonate with your objective. 


#7 - Please provide examples of how you’ve helped other clients increase their LinkedIn presence (profile), network, business development, and/or recruiting opportunities. 

No examples with no articulated results, whether good, bad, or neutral suggest there may be a lack of accountability.


#8 - How would you describe your LinkedIn best practices? 

If they don't have a set of best practices, how will you know your LinkedIn initiative is well crafted or is being managed correctly?


#9 - Please outline a LinkedIn strategy and set of activities that you think would work best for me. 

This outline should be specific, including best practices and have specific steps in a particular order with metrics that resonate with your objective. 


 

Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with this eBook and it's companion eBook that is specifically for whomever is managing your LinkedIn Presence.

And, if  you want to get them to actually have the insight they'll need to manager your LinkedIn presence, check out in:side, our online learning platform.


Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients* has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with our new eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Managing a CEO or Client's LinkedIn Presence. If you want to get them geared up, check out in:side, our online learning platform.

Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients* has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with our new eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Managing a CEO or Client's LinkedIn Presence. If you want to get them geared up, check out in:side, our online learning platform.


Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients* has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.




Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients* has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with our new eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Managing a CEO or Client's LinkedIn Presence. If you want to get them geared up, check out in:side, our online learning platform.



Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients* has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with our new eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Managing a CEO or Client's LinkedIn Presence. If you want to get them geared up, check out in:side, our online learning platform.


Double Tap to insert the cursor into this paragraph. Highlight text to display the toolbar and style your content. Tap the save button or outside the text box to save your changes. Double Tap to insert the cursor into this paragraph. Highlight text to display the toolbar and style your content. Tap the save button or outside the text box to save your changes.

Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients* has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with our new eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Managing a CEO or Client's LinkedIn Presence. If you want to get them geared up, check out in:side, our online learning platform.

Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients* has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with our new eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Managing a CEO or Client's LinkedIn Presence. If you want to get them geared up, check out in:side, our online learning platform.


 

Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with this eBook and it's companion eBook that is specifically for whomever is managing your LinkedIn Presence.

And, if  you want to get them to actually have the insight they'll need to manager your LinkedIn presence, check out in:side, our online learning platform.

Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients* has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with our new eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Managing a CEO or Client's LinkedIn Presence. If you want to get them geared up, check out in:side, our online learning platform.
in:side Intero Advisory


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with our new eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Managing a CEO Part One + Part Part Two. 


If you want to prepare them to manage your LinkedIn presence, check out and sign-up for  in:side, our online learning platform.


Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients* has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with our new eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Managing a CEO or Client's LinkedIn Presence. If you want to get them geared up, check out in:side, our online learning platform.


Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients* has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with our new eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Managing a CEO or Client's LinkedIn Presence. If you want to get them geared up, check out in:side, our online learning platform.



Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients* has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with our new eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Managing a CEO or Client's LinkedIn Presence. If you want to get them geared up, check out in:side, our online learning platform.


Double Tap to insert the cursor into this paragraph. Highlight text to display the toolbar and style your content. Tap the save button or outside the text box to save your changes. Double Tap to insert the cursor into this paragraph. Highlight text to display the toolbar and style your content. Tap the save button or outside the text box to save your changes.

Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients* has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with our new eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Managing a CEO or Client's LinkedIn Presence. If you want to get them geared up, check out in:side, our online learning platform.

Send this to all of the individuals you are considering working with and see what you receive in return.


I guarantee it will be an exercise worth doing. Don't be fooled by age either. Just because someone is under 40 doesn't mean they know LinkedIn. While they may be great at social media, LinkedIn is different, and as we say, “it's business, not social.” 


By way of example: One of our clients* has generated more than $250,000 in new business results from LinkedIn over the last few years recently hired a new Virtual Assistant whose LinkedIn presence was so inferior that it's embarrassing. No background image, photo, About section or Experience section, save for an odd assortment of random skills. 


Ugghhh. To make matters worse, and further display a lack of professionalism, her emails to me included spelling my name wrong, sentences with no punctuation and a lack of initiative in arranging a phone call with our mutual client. 


After asking her to use my calendar link twice, I gave up. His LinkedIn initiative has come to a grinding halt. 


I'm not sure why he hired her without vetting her. My guess is he needed someone badly, and he didn't look at her LinkedIn profile.


If there's one person on the team who should be detail-oriented and dig in, it's your VA/EA and if they are not experienced in platforms like LinkedIn, and tools such as Calendly and Grammarly, move on. You're putting your brand at stake and risk looking less than relevant. 


Dramatic? Not at all, just the facts. I get it, and I'm not saying to hand it off. I'm saying “buyer beware.” 


To ensure your LinkedIn surrogate is prepared, up-to-date, and proficient, arm them with our new eBook, The Ultimate Guide to Managing a CEO or Client's LinkedIn Presence. If you want to get them geared up, check out in:side, our online learning platform.


Prefer to talk? Email me, colleen@interoadvisory.com or arrange 
30-minute call to learn more about our in:side and services.

You may also click here to watch the recording. 


Prefer to talk? Email me, colleen@interoadvisory.com or arrange 
30-minute call to learn more about our in:side and services.

BONUS WEBCAST RECORDING 


LinkedIn Top 5: Mistakes, Must-do's + Tips

©2019 Intero Advisory | August 2019