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The Competitive Equestrian Mag Sept/Oct Issue - Equestrian Magazine

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2020 ISSUE 29
EVENT GALLERY
SONOMA HORSE PARK
THE
COMPETITIVE EQUESTRIAN
VIENNA
@ GIANA TERRANOVA
LENS ENVY
GIANA TERRANOVA
ARTICLES
IT TAKES A VILLAGE:
HOW THE FEMALE-
LED TEAM AT BEACON
HILL SHOW STABLES
PREPARES STUDENTS FOR
SUCCESS
THE STORYBOOK LIFE OF
LAFITTE DE MUZE
Learn more online
www.dechra-us.com
www.osphos.com
The intramuscular
bisphosphonate injection
for control of clinical signs
associated with Navicular Syndrome
in horses 4 years of age and older
F
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* Freedom of Information Summary, Original New Animal Drug Application, approved by FDA under NADA # 141-427, for OSPHOS. April 28, 2014.
Dechra Veterinary Products US and the Dechra D logo are registered trademarks of Dechra Pharmaceuticals PLC. © 2019 Dechra Ltd.
CAUTION: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of licensed veterinarian.
As with all drugs, side effects may occur. In field studies and post-approval experience the most common side effects reported were signs of discomfort, nervousness,
and colic. Other signs reported were: renal insufficiency/failure, anorexia, lethargy, hypercalcemia, behavioral disorders, hyperkalemia, hyperactivity, recumbency,
hyperthermia, injection site reactions, muscle tremor, urticaria, hyperglycemia, and fracture. In some cases, death has been reported as an outcome of these
adverse events. The safe use of OSPHOS has not been evaluated in horses less than 4 years of age or breeding horses. OSPHOS should not be used in pregnant or
lactating mares, or mares intended for breeding. NSAIDs should not be used concurrently with OSPHOS. Concurrent use of NSAIDs with OSPHOS may increase
the risk of renal toxicity and acute renal failure. Use of OSPHOS in patients with conditions affecting renal function or mineral or electrolyte homeostasis is not
recommended. Refer to the prescribing information for complete details or visit www.dechra-us.com.
OSPHOS
®
(clodronate injection)
Manufactured for: Dechra Veterinary Products
7015 College Blvd., Suite 525, Overland Park, KS 66211
866-933-2472
© 2019 Dechra Ltd. OSPHOS is a registered trademark of Dechra Ltd.
All rights reserved. Approved by FDA under NADA # 141-427
Bisphosphonate.
For use in horses only.
Brief Summary (For Full Prescribing Information, see package insert)
CAUTION: Federal (USA) law restricts this drug to use by or on the order
of a licensed veterinarian.
DESCRIPTION: Clodronate disodium is a non-amino, chloro-
containing bisphosphonate. Chemically, clodronate disodium is (dichloro-
methylene) diphosphonic acid disodium salt and is manufactured from
the tetrahydrate form.
INDICATION: For the control of clinical signs associated with navicular
syndrome in horses.
CONTRAINDICATIONS: Horses with hypersensitivity to clodronate disodi
-
um should not receive OSPHOS. Do not use in horses with impaired renal
function or with a history of renal disease.
WARNINGS: Do not use in horses intended for human consumption.
HUMAN WARNINGS: Not for human use. Keep this and all drugs out of
the reach of children. Consult a physician in case of accidental human
exposure.
PRECAUTIONS: OSPHOS has been associated with renal toxicity.
Concurrent administration of other potentially nephrotoxic drugs should
be approached with caution and renal function should be monitored.
Use of bisphosphonates in patients with conditions or diseases affecting
renal function is not recommended. Horses should be well-hydrated
prior to and after the administration of OSPHOS due to the potential for
adverse renal events. Water intake and urine output should be monitored
for 3-5 days post-treatment and any changes from baseline should elicit
further evaluation. As a class, bisphosphonates may be associated with
gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. Sensitivity to drug associated adverse
reactions varies with the individual patient. Renal and gastrointestinal
adverse reactions may be associated with plasma concentrations of the
drug. Bisphosphonates are excreted by the kidney; therefore, conditions
causing renal impairment may increase plasma bisphosphonate
concentrations resulting in an increased risk for adverse reactions.
Concurrent administration of other potentially nephrotoxic drugs should
be approached with caution and renal function should be monitored. Use
of bisphosphonates in patients with conditions or diseases affecting renal
function is not recommended. Administration of bisphosphonates has
been associated with abdominal pain (colic), discomfort, and agitation
in horses. Clinical signs usually occur shortly after drug administration
and may be associated with alterations in intestinal motility. In horses
treated with OSPHOS these clinical signs usually began within 2 hours
of treatment. Horses should be monitored for at least 2 hours following
administration of OSPHOS.
Bisphosphonates affect plasma concentrations of some minerals and
electrolytes such as calcium, magnesium and potassium, immediately
post-treatment, with effects lasting up to several hours. Caution should
be used when administering bisphosphonates to horses with conditions
affecting mineral or electrolyte homeostasis (e.g. hyperkalemic periodic
paralysis, hypocalcemia, etc.). The safe use of OSPHOS has not been
evaluated in horses less than 4 years of age. The effect of bisphospho
-
nates on the skeleton of growing horses has not been studied; however,
bisphosphonates inhibit osteoclast activity which impacts bone turnover
and may affect bone growth.
Bisphosphonates should not be used in pregnant or lactating mares,
or mares intended for breeding. The safe use of OSPHOS has not
been evaluated in breeding horses or pregnant or lactating mares.
Bisphosphonates are incorporated into the bone matrix, from where they
are gradually released over periods of months to years. The extent of
bisphosphonate incorporation into adult bone, and hence, the amount
available for release back into the systemic circulation, is directly related
to the total dose and duration of bisphosphonate use. Bisphospho-
nates have been shown to cause fetal developmental abnormalities in
laboratory animals. The uptake of bisphosphonates into fetal bone may
be greater than into maternal bone creating a possible risk for skeletal or
other abnormalities in the fetus. Many drugs, including bisphosphonates,
may be excreted in milk and may be absorbed by nursing animals.
Increased bone fragility has been observed in animals treated with bis-
phosphonates at high doses or for long periods of time. Bisphosphonates
inhibit bone resorption and decrease bone turnover which may lead to
an inability to repair micro damage within the bone. In humans, atypical
femur fractures have been reported in patients on long term bisphospho-
nate therapy; however, a causal relationship has not been established.
ADVERSE REACTIONS: The most common adverse reactions reported
in the field study were clinical signs of discomfort or nervousness, colic
and/or pawing. Other signs reported were lip licking, yawning, head
shaking, injection site swelling, and hives/pruritus.
POST-APPROVAL EXPERIENCE (December 2018): The following adverse
events are based on post-approval adverse drug experience reporting.
Not all adverse events are reported to FDA/CVM. It is not always possible
to reliably estimate the adverse event frequency or establish a causal
relationship to product exposure using these data.
The following adverse events are listed in decreasing order of reporting
frequency: renal failure, polyuria, polydipsia, abdominal pain, anorexia,
lethargy, hypercalcemia, behavioral disorder, discomfort, hyperkalemia,
hyperactivity, recumbency, hyperthermia, injection site reactions, muscle
tremor, urticaria, hyperglycemia, and fracture. In some cases, death has
been reported as an outcome of the adverse events listed above.
INFORMATION FOR HORSE OWNERS: Owners should be advised to:
• NOT administer NSAIDs.
• Ensure horses have access to adequate water before and
after administration of OSPHOS.
• Observe their horse for at least 2 hours post-treatment for
signs of colic, agitation, and/or abnormal behavior.
• If a horse appears uncomfortable, nervous, or experiences
cramping post-treatment, hand walk the horse for 15 minutes.
If signs do not resolve contact the veterinarian.
• Monitor water intake and urine output for 3-5 days post-
treatment.
• Contact their veterinarian if the horse displays abnormal
clinical signs such as changes in drinking and urination,
appetite, and attitude.
Osphos_CompEQ_10.19.indd 1 10/2/19 6:57 PM
4 TCE SEptEmbEr / OctObEr 2020
________________
ThECompETiTivEEquEsTrian
2020 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER
The
Competitive
Equestrian
© 2020 by Equestrian Communications USA LLC, all rights reserved.
This publication may not be reproduced or quoted in whole or in part by any means,
printed or electronic, without the written consent of the publisher.
Submissions:
Magazines will gladly consider all articles, news, letters, and photographs
for publication, but assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. Submissions may be
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should meet our ad deadline to facilitate inclusion in next issue.
Creative Director
LORNA LOWRIE
Publisher & Executive Editor
LORNA LOWRIE
The Competitive Equestrian
Equestrian Communications USA LLC
editor@TheCompetitiveEquestrian.com
6 It Takes A Village:
How the Female-Led Team at Beacon Hill Show Stables Prepares Students for Success
By Allyson Lagiovane
22 The Storybook Life of Latte De Muze
By Elaine Wessel
36 LENS ENVY
Giana Terranova
70 Sonoma Horse Park
Gallery by Grand Prix Photography
128 A New Normal:
FEI Competition Resumes at Split Rock Jumping Tour Lexington
By Callie Clement
Content
On the Cover
Vienna Photo ©
Giana Terranova
@ Giana Terranova
Contributing Writers
ALLYSON LAGIOVANE
ELAINE WESSEL
CALLIE CLEMENT
Contributing Photographers
GRAND PIX PHOTOGRAPHY
GIANA TERRANOVA
ALLYSON LAGIOVANE
TAYLOR RAINS
LENORE PHILLIPS
GEORGIE HAMMOND
SYDNEY LOW
CALLIE CLEMENT
SPORTFOT
SHAWN MCMILLAN PHOTOGRAPHY
@ Giana Terranova
TIME FOR
photo alden corrigan media
Taylor, Harris insurances services
Wor ldWid e equine insu ranc e sp ecia lis ts
Founded in 1987
THis
Hor sein sura nce.com
800.291.4774
It Takes A
Village:
How the
Female-
Led Team
at Beacon
Hill Show
Stables
Prepares
Students for
Success
By Allyson Lagiovane
Phelps Media Group
Photo ©Allyson Lagiovane for Phelps Media Group
Photo ©Allyson Lagiovane for Phelps Media Group
8
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TheCompetitiveEquestrian
september / october /2020
Bella Kay aboard SWS Questionnaire with Stacia Klein Madden
Photo ©Allyson Lagiovane for Phelps Media Group
9
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TheCompetitiveEquestrian
september / october /2020
T
he common phrase ‘it takes a village’
echoes in the ears of equestrians across the
globe. A capable and passionate leadership
team is key to the longevity of a high-performance
training business. For Beacon Hill Show Stables,
the nine women working together to run the
renowned operation leverage their expertise,
communication style, and relationship building
skills as their formula for success.
Based out of Colts Neck, New Jersey and
Wellington, Florida, Beacon Hill Show Stables
offers training programs for equitation, hunter,
and show jumping riders of all ages. Most known
for bringing up junior riders in the sport, the team
has coached 16 students to major equitation
nal titles in the last 18 years. As a powerhouse
in the equitation ring, Beacon Hill Show Stables
has etched their name in the history books.
Though the team understands what it takes to
win, owner and head trainer Stacia Klein Madden
prioritizes coaching effective riding and building
fundamentals for a lifetime in the sport rather than
solely coaching students to the winner’s circle.
Madden explained, “I believe I’ve really tried to
emphasize the fact that equitation is a stepping
stone for our students to continue on and achieve
their riding goals. I stop and think when people
say ‘You are an equitation trainer.’ I can take that
two ways. I can take that as we are only teaching
riders to jump 3’6’’ fences and those riders are
being subjectively judged, so it’s an easy job.
However, I choose to take it as we are building
the foundation of our students for the rest of their
equestrian life. That is my vision - developing
horsemen.”
After winning the ASPCA Maclay National
Championship in 1987 as a student with Beacon
Hill Show Stables, Madden turned professional
and took on a full-time role as a rider and
trainer at Beacon Hill in 1988. As Madden’s
responsibilities in the business grew, so did the
team alongside her. Though it wasn’t intentional,
the impressive team of trainers and managers
behind Beacon Hill Show Stables became an all-
female force to be reckoned with over time.
Madden said, “Over the years, Beacon Hill has
had different male partners and assistant trainers.
Our leadership team ended up evolving into all
females over time. Everyone that comes on board
plays a very integral part in running Beacon Hill,
but the female aspect of it was not necessarily
by design. However, it leads to a very passionate
and compassionate group of people with an
extraordinary work ethic that really understand
and respect one another.”
As Madden started taking on more responsibility
in the operations of Beacon Hill Show Stables
full-time, Krista Freundlich graduated from a junior
rider and was hired full-time at 18 years old in
2002. Heather Senia-Williams followed suit after
a successful junior campaign, joining the team
in 2006. Freundlich and Senia-Williams stepped
up as assistant trainers and instantly became
Madden’s right-hand women. Mary Anne Minor,
who has a 25-year history with the farm, now
handles Beacon Hill’s immigration paperwork and
payroll. With 14 years as a member of the Beacon
Hill team, Gail Mohr brings her experience as
a parent to Beacon Hill students to her current
role as bookkeeper. Early on, it was clear that
the strong women in the leadership team were
instrumental as the business continued to thrive.
Minor commented, “The fact that the team is
female-led is not as important to me as who the
female is. Stacia Madden is extremely organized,
dedicated and treats her clients and staff with
integrity. Being a close-knit team and being able
to utilize all our individual strengths is essential
to success. The trust we have for one another is
second to none.”
10
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TheCompetitiveEquestrian
september / october /2020
Freundlich added, “For me, after 21 years, Beacon
Hill is my family. I love and appreciate the whole
team and cannot imagine being anywhere else.
I am so proud of our successes. Stacia is a super
strong woman, a wonderful boss and a great role
model for not only the staff but also all of the
young people we teach!”
As Beacon Hill’s reputation was established as a
premier training center and the clientele grew, the
need to expand the team of trainers was essential.
Katie Kanner was hired in 2015 and quickly took to
the task of managing the grooms’ schedules and
assisting with riding the horses. Three years later,
Abby Jorgensen made the trek from California
all the way to the East Coast to accept a full-time
role with Beacon Hill and join the team. After
graduating from Beacon Hill Show Stables as
a student to then working for John and Beezie
Madden for a few summers, Lydia Ulrich was hired
full-time in 2019. The newest member of the team,
Katie Bremen, was hired just this year as Barn
Manager.
Jorgensen commented, “I was welcomed to
Beacon Hill with open arms coming all the way
from California. I knew maybe a total of ve people
on the East Coast, and immediately I felt like I had
a tribe of really good people. They have my back
and that is something very rare in this sport.”
All nine women have worked closely over the years
to develop Beacon Hill into a well-oiled machine.
On any given day, the staff manages over 40
horses, 25 students, and 14 grooms, with everyone
embracing an all-hands-on-deck mentality. Beacon
Hill Show also has a working relationship with
the neighboring operation Stonehenge Stables,
spearheaded by Freundlich’s husband Max
Amaya. Though the days can be long, the job is
a rewarding one that brings joy and a sense of
fulllment to the staff as they watch each of their
students grow into well-rounded horsemen.
11
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TheCompetitiveEquestrian
september / october /2020
Left to Right - Jennifer Alessi, Krista Freundlich, Katie Kanner, Stacia Klein Madden,
Eleanor Bright, Abigail Jorgensen, Heather Senia Williams
Photo ©Allyson Lagiovane for Phelps Media Group
12
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september / october /2020
Catalina Peralta aboard Alligator with Krista Freundlich. Photo ©Allyson Lagiovane for Phelps Media Group
Mohr reected on her time working at Beacon Hill
saying, “Excellence starts at the top and Stacia
[Madden] exhibits it. She inspires the team and
her leadership ows right down to the students.
From the expert grooms to the training staff,
everyone works toward elevating expectations in
everything they undertake. That is the product
Beacon Hill produces.”
Kanner added, “My favorite part about working
with these women is how we work so well
together as a unied team. A lot of people ask
how we handle having so many horses and
students, but to be honest, while it takes a lot
of work, the team runs like a well-oiled machine
even on the craziest show days.”
Bremen echoed Kanner saying, “My favorite
part about working on the Beacon Hill team is
that everyone is hands-on in the barn each day
working together, no matter the task! You can see
strong relationships at work not only at a horse
show but in our everyday activities at the barn
which creates a positive and fun environment for
everyone to work in.”
With a typically busy show schedule throughout
the entire year, the COVID-19 outbreak has
13
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TheCompetitiveEquestrian
september / october /2020
forced everyone to become even more exible,
and adjusting plans has become a new way of
life. With the most anticipated competitions of
the year approaching, including the Platinum
Performance/USEF Show Jumping Talent Search,
the Dover Saddlery/USEF Hunter Seat Medal
Final, the Washington International Horse Show
Equitation Final, and the ASPCA Maclay National
Championship, the team will certainly have to
tackle new challenges as they face the uncertainty
of the coming months.
Ulrich explained, “I think we always have to learn
to be exible in this industry, but this year has
denitely presented new challenges. In terms of
getting ready for equitation nals, it is difcult to
really know how to prepare the horses because
we want them to peak at the right time and make
sure we are not overusing them, which is really
difcult to do when the timeline continues to
change. It has for sure been difcult, but at the
end of the day we are still making decisions with
horses’ and riders’ best interests in mind.”
Abby Jorgensen and Stacia Klein Madden with Dominic Gibbs aboard Cent 15. Photo ©Allyson Lagiovane for Phelps Media Group
14
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TheCompetitiveEquestrian
september / october /2020
Madison Goetzmann wins 2017 ASPCA Maclay National Championship aboard San Remo VDL
Photo ©Taylor Rains for Phelps Media Group
15
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TheCompetitiveEquestrian
september / october /2020
Madison Goetzmann wins 2017 ASPCA Maclay National Championship aboard San Remo VDL
Photo ©Taylor Rains for Phelps Media Group
16
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TheCompetitiveEquestrian
september / october /2020
Dominic Gibbs wins 2018 Hamel Foundation National Horse Show 3’3” Equitation Championship at the National Horse Show aboard Limitless
Photo ©Lenore Phillips for Phelps Media Group
Alexandra Worthington rides to the reserve championship in the 2018 Dover Saddlery USEF Hunter Seat Medal Final
Photo ©Allyson Lagiovane for Phelps Media Group
Dominic Gibbs wins 2018 Hamel Foundation National Horse Show 3’3” Equitation Championship at the National Horse Show aboard Limitless
Photo ©Lenore Phillips for Phelps Media Group
Krista Freundlich, Katie Kanner, Mimi Gochman and Stacia Klein Madden,
Photo ©Allyson Lagiovane for Phelps Media Group
18
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TheCompetitiveEquestrian
september / october /2020
Sixteen of Beacon Hill’s students are currently
slated to compete in at least one major equitation
nal this year, and though the future is unknown,
the team is determined to end 2020 on a high
note. Beacon Hill Show Stables proves necessity
breeds invention, no matter the climate of the
outside world.
Senia-Williams added, “Throughout the years one
fundamental has always remained the same - take
control over the things you have control of. This
includes being on time, checking your equipment
and polishing your boots. No matter where we
are, that makes all the difference.”
While Madden is at the helm of the operation, it
is clear that the success, and the future, of Beacon
Hill is attributed to the entire team. Madden said,
“When I am making business decisions, I am
always thinking about the future of the business.
My motivation is always to create a platform for
the business to be able to be passed on to the
current staff without any interruption, to go on if
the people that are working for me choose that
when I decide to retire. I don’t want it to be all
about me because the team is a big part of who I am.”
It is evident that Beacon Hill’s leadership team, staff
and students share the same sentiment - the idea
that they are all working toward a goal that is bigger
than themselves. Dedicating much of their lives to the
sport, the riders and trainers at Beacon Hill have built
relationships that will last a lifetime, always welcoming
new members to their family with open arms.
Madden added, “I love the fact that even when our
students age out, they always talk about coming home
to ride over break. The parents laugh because when
they refer to home, they are talking about Beacon
Hill.”
Stacia Klein Madden coaches students at the Kentucky Horse Park. Photo ©Georgie Hammond for Phelps Media Group
Stacia Klein Madden coaches students at the Kentucky Horse Park. Photo ©Georgie Hammond for Phelps Media Group
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OMPETITIVE
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JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020 ISSUE 25
INDOOR FINALS HIGHLIGHTS
FROM COAST TO COAST
DOUBLE H FARM’S ONGOING MISSION
TO PRESERVE THE PAST AND FORGE THE FUTURE
ELEMENTA MASTERS PREMIERE FIERACAVALLI VERONA:
THE SPOTLIGHT IS ON REINING
LENS ENVY
MATTHEW SEED
TCE LIFE
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THE
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MARCH / APRIL 2020 ISSUE 26
THE SPECIALISTS
JOHN FRENCH FINDS HIS NICHE
ALONGSIDE KENT FARRINGTON
BETTER TOGETHER
HOW REBECCA BRUCE AND NED GLYNN
NAVIGATE LOVE AND HORSES
LENS ENVY
ELEGANT EQUUS - LINDSAY BROWN
TCE LIFE
PASO ROBLES
PALM BEACH MASTERS SERIES HIGHLIGHTS
LONGINES FEI JUMPING :
WORLD CUP™ WELLINGTON
NATIONS CUP™ OF USA
WINTER EQUESTRIAN FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS
$50,000 MARS EVENTING SHOWCASE
FEI CSI5* $401,000 FIDELITY
INVESTMENTS GRAND PRIX
MAY/JUNE 2020 ISSUE 27
JENNIFER BURGER'S JOURNEY
FROM RIDING AND OWNING HORSES TO HORSE SHOW PRESIDENT
LENS ENVY
MATTHEW DONAHUE PHOTOGRAPHY
TCE LIFE
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PALM BEACH MASTERS SERIES HIGHLIGHTS
$300,000 CSI5* CP PALM BEACH MASTERS FINAL
WINTER EQUESTRIAN FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS
ADEQUAN GLOBAL DRESSAGE FESTIVAL CDIO3*
THE
C
OMPETITIVE
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QUESTRIAN
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November / December 2019 Issue 24
Washington International Horse Show
Hampton Classic Horse Show
The Run For A Million
The Kids Are Alright
The American Gold Cup
Lens Envy
Taylor Pence
Balancing Act
Andrew and Alex Welles
Talk Marriage, Business and Parenting
COMPETITIVE
E
QUESTRIAN
September / October 2019 Issue 24
THE
Business With Your Best Friend:
Why It Works for Darragh Kenny and
Hardin Towell at Oakland Stables
USEF Junior Hunter
National Championship West
Franktown Meadows Hunter Derby
Lens Envy
Dana Goedewaagen
Farmhouse Inn & Spa
Congratulates
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on their 2020 Adequan®/USEF Junior Hunter National Championship success
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COMPETITIVE EQUESTRIAN SEPTEMBER OCTOBER 2020 ISSUE 29  THE  LENS ENVY GIANA TERRANOVA  ARTICLES IT TAKES A VILLAGE  HOW T...
The Storybook Life
of Lae De Muze
By Elaine Wessel, Phelps Media Group
Steege praises Lafitte De Muze following the Hunter Spectacular in Wellington
Photo ©Allyson Lagiovane for Phelps Media Group
Olsten’s new book drew inspiration from Lafitte De Muze
Image courtesy of Cheryl Olsten
25
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september / october /2020
W
hile many horses
are immortalized
in photos,
shadow boxes and even
gurines, few can claim to
be storybook characters.
For Latte De Muze, his
effortless way of going
and scopey jump have
catapulted him to stardom as
one of the winningest hunter
and derby horses in recent
years with rider Amanda
Steege aboard, but it is his
special bond with his owner,
Cheryl Olsten, that has
prompted his newest literary
endeavors. Equipped with
a background in publishing
behind her, Olsten drew
from her relationship with
“Latte” to write a whimsical
children’s book, called “Big
Wishes for Little Feat,” that
is sure to inspire horse lovers
both young and old. Bearing
markings that resemble the
real-life horse behind the
pages, the main equine
character of Little Feat
parallels his inspiration in
that he can jump the moon,
shares his loving penchant to
spend time with his favorite
people and is living a life t
for a fairytale.
“Everything came together
at the right time,” said
Olsten. “A one-page Q&A
for the EQUUS Foundation
back in early 2018 about
Latte prompted me to really
think about why I thought
he was such a unique horse.
My answer; Every once in
a while, something special
crosses your path, and with
that, an opportunity presents
itself. And so it is with Latte
De Muze. Latte, by his very
nature, is an inspiration.”
Similar to Olsten, Steege has formed a unique bond with Lafitte De Muze
Photo ©Sydney Lowe for Phelps Media Group
Set to be widely released in October 2020, Olsten’s
book is a magical tale about facing the challenges life
throws your way. In a year that has been fraught with
strife for so many, it could not come at a more tting
time. A horse named Latte De Muze, nicknamed
Little Feat, and a young girl named Ella, who live on
opposite sides of the world, are eventually brought
together by a bit of fate, Ella’s quirky aunt and a
shooting star. It is a story about true friendship, facing
and overcoming obstacles and, most importantly,
always believing. With exquisitely beautiful illustrations
by talented artist Paolo d’Altan on every page,
the book is as much a piece of art as it is a
children’s read.
“When I rst saw Latte, I thought ‘He’s a little
guy!’ He’s really not, but all the horses I have
owned, for the most part, stand taller than
Latte. Hence the title of the story, ‘Big Wishes
for Little Feat,’ remarked Olsten. “In the story,
one of the messages is that it doesn’t matter
what your stature or what others think, but
what matters is what’s inside. In this case, that’s
the determination Little Feat has to do what
he loves most.”
Similar to the characters in Olsten’s picture
book, the stars aligned for the team of Olsten,
Steege and Latte De Muze. Impressed
enough by video footage of Latte jumping in
Europe, Steege and Olsten worked together
to send Steege on her rst European horse
shopping trip, a tribute to the young horse’s
uniqueness that pulled the decorated hunter
competitor and trainer to visit him for herself.
Martin Sylvestre rode Lafitte De Muze at the 2016 World Breeding
Jumping Championships for Young Horses in Lanaken
Photo ©Sportfot
“It was denitely love at rst sight, and rst
ride! I had seen a few videos of him, which
prompted me to ask Cheryl to send me to
Germany so that I could ride him and see
him in person. That was my rst visit to
Europe to try horses,” remembered Steege.
“It was the fall of 2017 and it was cold and
rainy in Germany that day. I already loved his
look, his eyes and his personality, but once
I got on it was his impressive jumping style
that won me over. We felt like an instant
match.”
Prior to his hunter transition, Latte was
campaigned in jumper contests in Europe
by the two Frenchmen Martin Sylvestre
and David Frédéric. The 2011 bay Belgian
Warmblood successfully competed over
courses up to the 1.25m height during his
time across the pond, and even participated
in the FEI World Breeding Jumping
Championships for Young Horses in Lanaken
as a 5-year-old. Bred by Joris De Brabander
and the Bruggeman family, Latte is by
Darco out of Everlychin de la Pomme. With
his sire a World Cup Qualier winner and a
World Equestrian Games nalist with Ludo
Phillipaerts, and dam a successful contender
up to 1.60m at the CSI5* level with riders
that included Shane Sweetnam, Latte’s
pedigree has surely aided with his natural-
born talent.
“I was very excited for him to come to
the United States and to start his hunter
career, but I don’t think anyone could have
predicted how successful he would be and
how quickly he would nd success in the
hunter ring,” commented Steege. “Ever
since he stepped off the plane, he has been
impressing us. We are lucky to be the ones
that snatched him up!”
Though she could not have known just
how suited her horse was to the hunter
ring, Olsten clearly had an inkling that he
would be earning some prize money in his
competitive career. Less than one year after
purchasing Latte, his owner pledged to
donate the majority of her horse’s winnings
to EQUUS Foundation, which is currently
the only national animal welfare in the
United States totally dedicated to protecting
America’s horses and strengthening the bond
between horses and people, a cause close to
Olsten’s own heart.
“After my initial call with Lynn Coakley, the
founder of EQUUS Foundation, my very next
communication was from Saugerties to say,
‘Our boy just won the big hunter class. I’ll be
sending you a check for $100,000.’ That was
two years ago, and he’s been winning and
adding to that number ever since. A win for
Latte is a win for horses in need,” expressed
Olsten.
At only seven years old and one year
removed from his transatlantic ight to
America, Latte carried Steege to the top of
the leaderboard in the $500,000 Diamond
Mills Hunter Prix at HITS Saugerties in
September 2018, besting an impressive eld
of veteran challengers. The victory marked
Steege’s rst win in the class after placing
second and third in previous years.
The tricolor honors have continued to
accumulate, with notable 2018 triumphs
coming in the $50,000 WCHR Professional
Challenge at the Capital Challenge Horse
Show, as well as blue ribbons in every
one of his Green 3’6” Hunter classes that
propelled him to the division championship
and the Grand Green Champion title at
the same show. In 2019, the pair won the
$50,000 National Horse Show Hunter Classic,
placed second in the $100,000 WCHR Peter
Wetherill Palm Beach Hunter Spectacular
and earned third in the 3’6″/3’9″ Platinum
Performance/USHJA Green Hunter Incentive
Championship. During World Championship
Hunter Rider Week in Wellington in 2020,
Latte was honored as the 2019 WCHR
Hunter of the Year, only the ninth horse to be
awarded the distinction.
“The turning point for me was his WCHR
win at Capital Challenge. I wasn’t there to
feel and share the excitement with Amanda
and her team, but I was home watching the
livestream. While he’s had great wins and
accolades since, for me, that’s when I knew
he was that special horse,” recalled Olsten.
Steege and Lafitte De Muze won the $50,000 WCHR
Professional Challenge at the Capital Challenge Horse Show
Photo by ©Shawn McMillan Photography
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Though their impressive list of accolades together
has certainly been a bright spot in Steege’s
career, some of her most cherished memories
with Latte are the ones out of the saddle.
“Some of my favorite moments with Latte are
the times we are alone in the morning preparing
to show, or just hanging out with him in his
stall. He has this sparkle in his eye and way of
communicating with me and all of his people.
That is so special,” reected Steege. “Latte’s
success is denitely a huge team effort that is
managed by myself, Cheryl, my boyfriend and
barn manager Tim Delovich, and all of the vets,
farriers, and bodywork therapists that work on
Latte. He seems to know each one of us, and
everyone loves him for it. There’s nobody that
doesn’t like Latte.”
Olsten agrees that Latte’s personality is one of
his greatest qualities, a testament to the horse’s
character considering his exceptional movement
and jumping efforts that turn heads in the show
ring. While many talented horses can often
get away with a sour attitude or a particular
vice because of their winning ways, no such
compromises are necessary with Latte, who is
naturally curious and a crowd-pleaser.
“Latte has these wide expressive eyes, and it’s
as though he wants very much to talk. I always
bring carrots and honey oat bars to the barn, so
when he spies me from a good distance away, he
zeroes in. Let’s say, I’ve spoiled him,” said Olsten.
“A few times I tried to hide around corners so
I could see him without his demands for treats,
but he always sees me peeking around a corner. I
guess I’m not very good at hiding!”
Based on Latte’s personality, he is the ideal
horse to transform into a storybook character.
Already a crowd favorite, he is sure to pose for
even more photos with fans as his popularity
grows, but his rider and owner do not seem to
think he will mind.
“We have had young girls that come to meet
him and get their picture taken with him in
Wellington. At the Devon Horse Show I’ve spent
a lot of time walking him around and letting
spectators come up and pet him and get to know
him. You can’t do that with every horse, but he
really loves people and all of the attention,”
noted Steege.
Lafitte De Muze was champion in his division before winning the $50,000 Hunter Classic at the National Horse Show
Photo ©Georgie Hammond for Phelps Media Group
Lafitte De Muze was champion in his division before winning the $50,000 Hunter Classic at the National Horse Show
Photo ©Georgie Hammond for Phelps Media Group
Still only a 9-year-old, Latte has already
accomplished more in a short span than most
competitive horses do in a lifetime. Adding to
his noteworthiness is the fact he has managed
to do so with a steadfast character, just one of
the many traits that keep him at the top of the
favorites list and helped to inspire his ctitious
self. There’s more to come from this special
horse.
Steege and Lafitte De Muze rode to blue-ribbon
success at the 2019 Devon Horse Show in the
Green 3’9” Hunters
Photo ©Callie Clement for Phelps Media Group
TERRANOVA
LENS ENVY
GIANA
TERRANOVA
LENS ENVY
“Please Don’t Tell”
Photographed at Caves Farm (Maryland)
“Q The Music” Photographed in Wellington, FL
Giana Terranova is a 26 year old
photographer and horse enthusiast
originally from Southern California. She
graduated from Savannah College of
Art and Design (SCAD) in 2016 with an
Equestrian Studies Degree, working
in the horse industry as a rider and
groom before she took the plunge into
becoming a full-time photographer.
Having and riding horses throughout
her life since childhood, combining
the creative side of things with the
horse industry was a way to have both
her interests as part of her career. She
travels all over the United States from
coast to coast, photographing horses
and their owners through horse shows
and creative portrait sessions.
Her main focus is to capture the bond
and relationship between horse and
rider, no matter the context. Whether
it’s a photo shoot at a private farm
or a client competing at the Winter
Equestrian Festival, she aims to use
her imagery as a way to convey every
equestrian’s connection to their partner,
as well as the emotions involved. Her
biggest goal is to change what the
typical and traditional themes of horse
photography used to be, and make it
more of an experience than an image.
Contact:
Giana Terranova
info@gianaterranovaphotography.com
www.gianaterranovaphotography.com
Amber, Daisy & Tip Jar Photographed in Wellington, FL
Chris Ewanouski & Vagabon De La Vallee, WEF 2020
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september / october 2020
“Queen Vienna” Photographed at Foggy Meadow Farm
45
TCE
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september / october 2020
Alise Oken’s Semilly F
WEF 2020
“Mexicali Blue”, Photographed at Caves Farm
Layla Kurbanov & The Flying Ham, WEF 2020
Wanda & Mel, Photographed at Hunter Ridge Stables
Chloe Reid & Crystal, WEF 2020
Anne Gardner & Retiro, WEF 2020
“Abbey” Photographed at Aliboo Farm
Ana & Dayro, Photographed in Wellington, FL
Chloe Reid’s Crossover 4, WEF 2020
“Pistol” Photographed at Tally Ho Equestrian
Amber & Red Diamond, WEF 2020
Chloe Reid & Crossover 4, WEF 2020
Bella & Q, Photographed at Beacon Hill Show Stables
Chloe Reid & Crystal, WEF 2020
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HIDDEN CANYON FARM
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PHOTOGRAPH by Matthew Seed - The Horse Photographer| DESIGN by The Competitive Equestrian
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Patrick Seaton and Skipio K
Winners of the $30,000 Hygain Grand Prix, HMI Equestrian Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Three Weeks of
Wonderful...
Photos by ©Grand Pix Photography
Sami Milo and Lulavani Winners of the $20,000 USHJA International
Derby presented by the Townsend Family, Giant Steps Charity Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
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september / october /2020
Leadline Class Sponsored by Redwood Tack
Photos by ©Grand Pix Photography
FUTURE SUPERSTARS
75
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september / october /2020
Alex Volpi and Absolute du Mio Winners of the
$10,000 Olympia Footing Welcome Prix, Giant Steps Charity Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Patrick Seaton and Skipio K Winners of the $30,000 Hygain Grand Prix, HMI Equestrian Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Zoe Brown and Valiant Winner of the $10,000 Estancia Farms Welcome Prix, HMI August Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Team Hope & Avery Glynn Win the SHP Equitation Transportation Team Challenge
Presented by the World Equestrian Center, HMI August Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Patrick Seaton and Skipio K Winners of the $30,000 Hygain Grand Prix, HMI Equestrian Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Team Hope & Avery Glynn Win the SHP Equitation Transportation Team Challenge
Presented by the World Equestrian Center, HMI August Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Susan Artes and Laurence Z Winners of the $30,000 Wasserman Foundation Grand Prix
Giant Steps Charity Classic, Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Sydney Shelby and Louis Vuitton win the $5,000 North
Peak Equestrian Jr/Am Hunter Derby, HMI August Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Bella Primavera Winners of the JRW Jr/Am Medal, Giant Steps Charity Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Sue Sadlier and Mattis Winners of the Peregrine Equine CH/AA Hunter Derby, Giant Steps Charity Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Olivia Brown & Inkwell Winners of the $10,000 Hygain Feeds USA Open Hunter Derby, HMI August Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Kylee Arbuckle and Nostalgic Winners of the $20,000 USHJA International Derby presented by Equine Insurance,
HMI Equestrian Classic - Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Meredith Herman and Consentida La Escondida, owned by Alexis Georgeson
Win the Burgundy Farms 1.35m Open Jumper Classic, HMI August Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Hilary Sosne & Macallan 25 Winners of the $5000 USHJA National Derby - Jr/Am
presented by Nicole Needham of Compass Napa Valley, HMI August Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Juliette Joseph and Casiro Winners of the Pickwick Junior/Amateur Medal, Giant Steps Charity Classic,
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Jenn Serek and Samurai Winners of the 1.35m Two Bits
Equestrian Open Jumper Classic, HMI Equestrian Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Elisa Broz and Cetello Winners of the Halter Project 1.35m
Open Jumper Classic, Giant Steps Charity Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Juliette Joseph and Casiro Winners of the Pickwick Junior/Amateur Medal, Giant Steps Charity Classic,
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Mandy Porter & Milano Winners of the $30,000 Amanda Teal Design Grand Prix
HMI August Classic, Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Olivia Brown & Inkwell Winners of the $10,000 Hygain Feeds USA
Open Hunter Derby, HMI August Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Nina Alario and Sonja Petri’s Drop the Mic, Winners of the $5000
USHJA National Hunter Derby, Giant Steps Charity Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Payton Potter and Khaled Winners of the $5,000 USHJA National Hunter Derby presented by AIM, HMI Equestrian Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Payton Potter and Khaled Winners of the $5,000 USHJA National Hunter Derby presented by AIM, HMI Equestrian Classic
Photo ©Grand Pix Photography
Gallery:
Showing = Winning
at Sonoma Horse Park
Photos ©TCE
Zoe Brown & Chase
Gallery:
Showing = Winning
at Sonoma Horse Park
Photos ©TCE
Watching The Competition
Beckham
Love is...
Susan Artes & California Sunshine
Patrick Seaton & Skipio K
Sarah Appel and her girls
Colin 4
Carol Wright & Conejito
Hugh Mutch & Johnnie Cash
Emma Reichow & Cocobongo CR
Carol Wright & Conejito
Alex Volpi & Foster 39
Strolling Home
Perfection
Cosmo Boy
Zoe Brown & Chase
Patrick Seaton & Skipio K
Amber Czajkowski & Vigo-R
Hugh Mutch & Johnnie Cash
Zoe Brown & Chase
Sophia Siegel & Barracuda
COMPETITIVE EQUESTRIAN SEPTEMBER OCTOBER 2020 ISSUE 29  THE  LENS ENVY GIANA TERRANOVA  ARTICLES IT TAKES A VILLAGE  HOW T...
IS  CIP  LIN  E  OSPHOS    clodronate injection   F O R E V E RY  N I U EQ  D E  The intramuscular bisphosphonate injectio...
A New Normal:
FEI Competition Resumes at
Split Rock Jumping Tour Lexington
The weekend of March 13, 2020 was a life altering one across the
globe, and the equestrian world was no exception. In Wellington,
Florida, as Week 10 of the Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF) and
the last installment of the Palm Beach Masters Series carried
on, whispers of the vast spread of COVID-19 traveled
through the horse show grounds: Will the nal two
weeks of WEF be cancelled? Will LGCT Miami
continue? Will World Cup Finals in Las Vegas
go on? Sure enough, over the course of one
weekend, all plans equestrians had made for
the foreseeable future shattered as COVID-19
nally inltrated the equestrian industry in full
force.
With horse show after horse show being
cancelled, most focused their efforts on
staying home, ne-tuning their riding
and training programs, and making sales
where possible – anything to stay aoat as
the entire world hit an unparalleled pause.
Fast forward to June 17, 2020: the return
of FEI competition worldwide. In select
locations around the globe, competition
ranging from the CSI2* to CSI4* level took
place. Many athletes, from .85m jumpers
to Olympic athletes such as Daniel Bluman
(ISR) and Shane Sweetnam (IRL), ocked
to Lexington, Kentucky, for the Split Rock
Jumping Tour’s Lexington International CSI2*.
Article and photography by Callie Clement / Four Oaks Creative
Nicki Shahinian-Simpson and Akuna Mattata
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The series, which began in 2015, was one of the rst
competitions to receive permission to carry on with the June-
scheduled show. Founder and manager of the Split Rock
competitions, Derek Braun, took to social media regularly to
update competitors as the show made progress to continue.
Beyond the normal logistics set forth of organizing a horse
show, Braun and his team worked overtime to follow new
COVID-19 guidelines. On top of the state-suggested
guidelines such as social distancing and mask usage, the Split
Rock team got creative and worked to create protocols of their
own to help the show run smoothly.
One such protocol: family passes. All those in attendance who
were family members or who had quarantined together could
go to the horse show ofce to retrieve family passes to wear
around the showgrounds, indicating they didn’t need to be
socially distanced from each other.
“It was collectively our team’s idea to do these passes. We
were brainstorming a way that we and stewards could identify
people together and not to bother people if they were
together because I think that’s part of the frustration that a
lot of these competitors are having with the security guards
asking everybody about the protocol and trying to enforce it,”
Braun commented. “This way, there’s easy notications to say
‘we’re together’ and ‘you don’t have to bother me’.”
The family passes were just one way the Split Rock team
adapted to the new normal. Temperatures were taken each day
upon arrival to the horse show with colored wristbands given
out each day to indicate individuals had a normal temperature.
To discourage spectators in large groups, grass around the
main arena was spray painted to visualize the proper six feet
of social distancing. In addition, Braun expanded his team
by about 10 people during the event in order to have staff
specically in charge of monitoring mask usage and proper
distancing throughout the day.
Inside the show ring, however, little had changed. Competitors
returned to the arena in peak form, with both horses and riders
noticeably reenergized from forced time off. One competitor
in particular who had an exceptional week of competition
was Nicki Shahinian-Simpson (USA) and her longtime partner,
Akuna Mattata.
The 12-year-old Holsteiner mare is famous for her ercely
competitive spirit and reputation of producing a high
percentage of consistent clean rounds. Back in February,
the mare had life-threatening surgery due to damages from
guttural pouch mycosis, which left Shahinian-Simpson and her
team at Rife Hitch on the edge of their seats for the future
of the mare. With the care of barn manager and head groom
Beto Guerriez, Akuna Mattata returned to the show ring post-
surgery and COVID-19 pause in top form.
“I did have a great show, but I also think that the energy at the
show was such that you rose to the occasion. I think the Split
Rock team does an exceptional job and really have it down to
a T. As far as having to nd our new normal, I thought that it
was very well done. It really is just something we have to get
used to. I didn’t nd it to be a hardship in any way, and I don’t
have anything bad to say about it. I think it was done really
well,” Shahinian-Simpson discussed at the close of the show.
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Derek Braun during a course walk.
Andrew Welles and CW Incorporated
Akuna Mattata, or “Nahla” as she is referred to in the
barn, made a return to competition in more ways than
one and did so in style. The mare produced nothing but
clear rounds all week, winning the $37,000 Restlyane
1.45m FEI Welcome, placing second in the $10,000
Kirkpatrick & CO FEI Speed Cup, and nishing the
weekend with a fourth place nish in the $75,000 FEI
Grand Prix, presented by the Kentucky Lexington
International CSI2*.
Other winners of the week included Andrew Welles, who
attended the competition with 15 horses with his training
operation, Team Welles. Welles and a newer mount for
him, CW Incorporated, captured the win in the $20,000
Restylane National Prix out of 50 entries on top of
spending the week training his students from lower level
jumper classes all the way up to the FEI classes offered.
“It was exciting to be back at a high level horse show.
For us, we had a lot of new faces both student and horse-
wise from the last time we competed, which really felt
like a long time ago. It was fun to get all of the new
horses in such nice rings to ride in with beautiful jumps
from Dalman Jump Co. All the horses went great and
they were so happy to be showing again,” Welles
commented.
As just one of four competitions to return to FEI showing,
all eyes were on Lexington as the Split Rock Jumping
Tour stop set a precedent for the continuation of horse
showing across the country.
“People have been great. I think there have been a few
exceptions, but beyond that everybody has seemed
like they just wanted to get back to show jumping, so
everyone has been very respectful with wearing masks,
keeping their distances from everybody, and staying
within their family groups. All in all, I think it’s been a
great week,” Braun commented as the competition
wrapped up.
While many of the amenities that add excitement to
the atmosphere and generate necessary funds had to
be eliminated such as the VIP tent and the SRJT gala,
Braun still managed to make the event feel rst-class for
exhibitors. Despite being free of spectators, athletes still
provided a competitive energy that viewers could feel
while tuning in to the complimentary livestream.
“I thought that Derek spared no expense and detail even
with the restrictions. Split Rock was unable to have VIP
and other areas where he would generate money, but
you didn’t feel that in the quality of the show at all. I’m
a big fan of his shows and his team and I commend all
of them on their efforts. I give the show a 10 across the
board,” Shahinian-Simpson noted.
With 14 nations represented and 76 FEI competitors in
attendance, the show ran smoothly overall. As athletes
and their businesses continue to adapt to the resulting
effects of COVID-19, Braun and his team at the Split Rock
Jumping Tour have proven that the equestrian industry,
although often set in long-standing traditions and ways
of operation, are willing to do what it takes to return to a
new normal and life on the road of horse showing.
Brian Moggre, Michael Murphy, and Ken Smith of
Ashland Farms during the Grand Prix course walk
International competitor Karen Polle and With Wings
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Nicki Shahinian-Simpson and Akuna Mattata.
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Nicki Shahinian-Simpson and Beto Gutierrez with Akuna Mattata.
Andrew Welles and CW Incorporated
Hardin Towell and Billy Manjaro
© Callie Clement, Four Oaks Creative
G
ALLERY
By Four Oaks Creative
Split Rock Jumping Tour
Lexington International CSI2*
Teddi Pritzker and Annabella Sanchez
© Callie Clement, Four Oaks Creative
Jessica Mendoza & Dublin, winner of the Grand Prix
© Barre Dukes
Nicolette Hirt and Con Baloubet PS
© Callie Clement, Four Oaks Creative
Shane Sweetnam and Alejandro
© Barre Dukes
Brian Moggre and Nikita Jolie
© Barre Dukes
Nicolette Hirt and Chatou 7
© Callie Clement, Four Oaks Creative
Jessica Mendoza & Dublin, winner of the Grand Prix
© Callie Clement, Four Oaks Creative
Hardin Towell and Carollo
© Barre Dukes
OCTOBER 26-31, 2021
SIGN UP TO START EARNING POINTS FOR 2021! JOIN TODAY!
WIHS membership is required for points to count in the following divisions:
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