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POSNA AM20 Virtual Mtg Pgm

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Program Committee............................................2
President’s Welcome ...........................................3
Board of Directors .............................................6
Acknowledgments .............................................7
General Meeting Information.....................................8
CME Credit...................................................8
Disclosure and FDA Statement ...................................8
Annual Meeting Policies.........................................9
Connect with POSNA...........................................9
LOE Levels of Evidence ........................................10
Meeting at a Glance...........................................12
Program Chair’s Welcome ......................................13
Live Session ............................................. 14 - 16
POSNA Pre-Course ....................................... 18 - 21
Young Member Forum .........................................23
Speakers & Award Recipients................................ 24 - 26
Scientic Program......................................... 28 - 62
Symposia Program ........................................ 37 - 41
Subspecialty Day ......................................... 43 - 58
ePoster Program.......................................... 64 - 80
Video Abstracts Program ................................... 81 - 82
POSNA Antitrust Policy .................................... 83 - 84
2020 Research Grant & Award Winners ........................ 85 - 86
1
PRE-COURSE COMMITTEE
Chair
A. Noelle Larson, MD
Committee
Lindsay Andras, MD Julie Balch Samora, MD, PhD Brian P. Scannell, MD
PROGRAM COMMITTEE
Chair
Jeffrey Martus, MD
Committee
Michelle Caird, MD Wudbhav (Woody) Sankar, MD Matthew Oetgen, MD
ABOUT POSNA
The Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) is a group of
professionals comprised mostly of pediatric orthopaedic surgeons.
We are board certied in orthopaedic surgery and have participated
in additional training to become specialized in the care of children’s
musculoskeletal health and our practice reects this dedication.
We, as a group, strive to become the authoritative source on such care through
appropriate research that will lead to the best evidence-based patient care.
POSNA MISSION STATEMENT
To improve the care of children with musculoskeletal disorders
through education, research, and advocacy.
CONNECT WITH POSNA DURING THE MEETING
AND SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCES
#POSNA2020
@POSNA_org Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA)
linkedin.com/company/posna posna_ortho
Websites: POSNA.org, orthokids.org and posnacademy.org
OrthopaedicTraumaAssociation
orthopaedic-trauma-association
@otatrauma
@otatrauma
OrthopaedicTraumaAssociation
orthopaedic-trauma-association
@otatrauma
@otatrauma
Dear Colleagues,
Consistent with the guidance provided by public health ofcials, POSNA is committed to
reducing the spread of the COVID-19 virus and therefore made the disappointing decision
to cancel the 2020 Annual Meeting in San Diego. Many options were explored, including
rescheduling at a later time. Unfortunately, we were unable to identify a satisfactory date.
The annual meeting is the highlight of the POSNA year. The program committee of Jeff
Martus (Chair), Woody Sankar, Michelle Caird and Matt Oetgen had organized an outstand-
ing program for San Diego. Some of the highlights in the initial schedule are listed below:
The pre-course “Transition to Adulthood: Orthopedics for the Adolescent,” organized
by Noelle Larson. The course was designed to address many unique features of this
age group and guide participants in the development of appropriate management
strategies.
Recognition of award winners Behrooz Akbarnia (Distinguished Achievement),
Charles Johnston (Humanitarian) and Donald Bae (Special Effort and Excellence).
Recognition of grant winners and industry partners.
A scientic program including 170 podium presentations, 40 paper posters, 80
ePosters, multiple symposia and a subspecialty day.
Presidential guest speaker Lori Karol addressing adapting to change in the new decade.
Presidential transfer to incoming president Michael Vitale.
Closing reception at the San Diego Air and Space Museum, located in historic Balboa
Park. The museum is an afliate of the Smithsonian Institution and is home to a diverse
collection of aircraft.
The members of the Program Committee deserve special recognition. Since the cancellation
of the on-site event, they have worked hard to make the meeting educational materials
available to our members and meeting registrants. This reorganization required a great deal
of time, effort and originality. It would not have been possible without the cooperation of
the scientic program presenters. I appreciate the many hours Noelle Larson devoted to the
development of the pre-course. The efforts of the local hosts Hank and Jill Chambers along
with Peter and Cathy Newton also deserve recognition. Of course, all of this couldn’t have
happened without the efforts of POSNA Executive Director Teri Stech, Meetings and Educa-
tion Manager, Tara Long and the entire POSNA staff.
On behalf of POSNA, thank you for your understanding. This has been an extremely difcult
time that has resulted in signicant hardship throughout the world. I look forward to seeing
you at the 2021 Annual Meeting in Dallas.
Stephen Albanese, MD
President, POSNA
3
WELCOME
4
STEPHEN ALBANESE, MD
PRESIDENT
Stephen Albanese, MD is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at SUNY
Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, New York. He has been depart-
ment chair and residency program director at Upstate since 2000.
Dr. Albanese received his undergraduate degree in electrical engineer-
ing from Bucknell University and MD from SUNY Buffalo College of
Medicine. He completed orthopedic surgery residency at SUNY
Upstate Medical University and pediatric orthopedic surgery fellowship at the Hospital for
Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario.
Dr. Albanese’s academic interests have focused on education, accreditation and certi-
cation. He has chaired the AAOS Committee on Evaluation (1996-2001), been a mentor
in the AAOS leadership fellows program and completed two terms as a member of the
AAOS Council on Education (1996-2001, 2005-09). Dr. Albanese has been a member at
large on the AAOS Board of Directors (2002-2004). He served seven years (2005-2012) on
the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Orthopaedic Surgery
Residency Review Committee (RRC) and was chair the nal 3 years. He served a 6 year term
(2012-2018) on the ACGME Board of Directors and chaired the Program Requirements
Committee (2016-2018). He served as a member of the American Orthopaedic Association
Academic Leadership Committee (2006-2012). During his ten year term (2007-2017) on the
American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Board of Directors he chaired the Oral Examination
Committee (2010-2012), was active in the question writing task force and served as President
(2013-2014).
Dr. Albanese’s clinical interests are pediatric orthopaedics and spine deformity. He chaired
the Scoliosis Research Society Morbidity and Mortality Committee (1998-2000). He served
as a member at large on the POSNA Board of Directors (2004-06) and chaired the Education
(2000-2002) and Health Care Delivery Councils (2014-2017). In addition, he has served on
the Terminology and Nomenclature, Data Management, Education, and Practice Manage-
ment Committees for POSNA.
His sister, Dr. Margaret Albanese, is also an active member of POSNA. Dr. Albanese lives in
Upstate New York with Eileen, his wife of 34 years. They have two sons, Matt and Kevin, who
are currently Orthopedic Surgery Residents.
BIOGRAPHY
BIOGRAPHY
5
MICHAEL VITALE, MD, MPH
INCOMING PRESIDENT
Michael Vitale, MD MPH is the Ana Lucia Professor of Orthopedic and
Neurosurgery and Vice Chief, (Quality and Strategy) of the Department
of Orthopaedics at Columbia University Medical Center. He is also
Chief of Pediatric Orthopaedics for the New York Presbyterian health
system, where he has developed his clinical focus in the care of children
with spinal deformity since joining the staff of the Morgan Stanley
Childrens Hospital of New York in 2001.
Dr. Vitale received his undergraduate degree in biology and psychology from Trinity College,
and attended medical school at Columbia University’s College of Physicians & Surgeons,
where he also completed a master’s degree in public health. He remained at Columbia for
his residency training in Orthopedic Surgery at New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University
Irving Medical Center, followed by a fellowship in pediatric orthopedics at the Children’s
Hospital of Los Angeles.
Early in career, Dr Vitale was chosen as an inaugural member of the AAOS Leadership Fellow
Program as well as the POSNA Traveling Fellowship. He has served various roles in the
POSNA BOD, and has been the recipient of POSNAs Arthur Huene Memorial Award, the
Angela Kuo award, and the Award for Special Effort.
Dr Vitale has served as Chairman of the International Pediatric Orthopaedic Symposium and
President of the Childrens Spine Foundation and Pediatric Spine Study Group. He founded
the Project for Safety in Spine Surgery, which hosts the annual Summit for Safety in Spine
Surgery. He is also an active Member of the Scoliosis Research Society where he has chaired
the Committee on Safety and the Committee on Pediatric Medical Devices.
In addition to his clinical practice, Dr. Vitale has made a lifelong commitment to clinical
research with almost 200 peer-reviewed publications largely focused around pediatric spine
surgery, and numerous related chapters and books.
Dr Vitale serves on the Board of Crutches for Kids and Alexandra’s Playground, which he
co-founded with his wife, Andrea. An avid skier, marathon runner, and recreational tri-athlete,
Dr. Vitale’s biggest pleasure is spending his free time with his wife and four sons.
6
PRESIDENT
Stephen Albanese, MD
East Syracuse, NY
PRESIDENT-ELECT
Michael Vitale, MD
New York, NY
VICE PRESIDENT
Mininder Kocher, MD, MPH
Boston, MA
SECRETARY
Eric Edmonds, MD
San Diego, CA
TREASURER
Michelle Caird, MD
Ann Arbor, MI
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT
Steven Frick, MD
Palo Alto, CA
PAST PRESIDENT
Richard Schwend, MD
Kansas City, MO
JUNIOR MEMBER AT LARGE
Brian Brighton, MD
Charlotte, NC
JUNIOR MEMBER AT LARGE
Firoz Miyanji, MD
Vancouver, BC, Canada
JUNIOR MEMBER AT LARGE
Coleen Sabatini, MD
Oakland, CA
SENIOR MEMBER AT LARGE
Jonathan Schoenecker, MD, PhD
Nashville, TN
SENIOR MEMBER AT LARGE
Samantha Anne Spencer, MD
Boston, MA
SENIOR MEMBER AT LARGE
Ira Zaltz, MD
Royal Oak, MI
AAP REPRESENTATIVE, Ex-ofcio
Theodore J Ganley
Philadelphia, PA
COMMUNICATIONS COUNCIL CHAIR,
Ex-ofcio
Robert Cho, MD
Pasadena, CA
EDUCATION COUNCIL CHAIR, Ex-ofcio
Martin Herman, MD
Philadelphia, PA
HEALTH CARE DELIVERY COUNCIL CHAIR,
Ex-ofcio
Michael Hresko, MD
Boston, MA
HISTORIAN, Ex-ofcio
William Shaughnessy, MD
Rochester, MN
IPOS REPRESENTATIVE, Ex-ofcio
Donald Bae, MD
Boston, MA
QSVI COUNCIL CHAIR, Ex-ofcio
Kevin Shea, MD
Boise, ID
RESEARCH COUNCIL CHAIR, Ex-ofcio
Unni Narayanan, MD, FRCSC
Toronto, ON, Canada
EDITOR IN CHIEF, JPO, Ex-ofcio
Robert Hensinger, MD
Ann Arbor, MI
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, Ex-ofcio
Teri Stech
Oakbrook Terrace, IL
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
7
The Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America gratefully acknowledges the following
for their generous nancial support for 2020. We sincerely appreciate each of these
companies for helping POSNA fulll its goals of providing education and fostering research.
HOWARD STEEL FOUNDATION
ST. GILES FOUNDATION
ANGELA S.M. KUO MEMORIAL FUND
DOUBLE DIAMOND LEVEL
OrthoPediatrics*
DIAMOND LEVEL
DePuy Synthes*
Medtronic*
Stryker
PLATINUM LEVEL
Shriners Hospitals for Children
Zimmer Biomet*
GOLD LEVEL
BioMarin Pharmaceutical
SILVER LEVEL
Arthrex
BRONZE LEVEL
Children’s Mercy Kansas City
Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare
Globus Medical
IPSEN BioPharmaceuticals
MD Orthopaedics
NuVasive
Pega Medical
Stanford Children’s Health
*Provided Educational Grants for the 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting
GENERAL MEETING INFORMATION
8
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Objective 1: Learn about the latest advances in pediatric orthopaedic surgery
Objective 2: Obtain opinions of world-renowned thought leaders in the eld
Objective 3: Use the information obtained to make improvements in their own practices
Objective 4: Fulll the annual meeting requirements for membership in POSNA
ACCREDITATION
This Annual Meeting of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America has been
planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies
of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint
providership of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and POSNA.
The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide
continuing medical education for physicians.
CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION
The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons designates this live activity (Live Content)
for a maximum of 2.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ and On-Demand Content for a
maximum of 24.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit
commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
DISCLOSURE
Each faculty member in this meeting has been asked to disclose if he or she has received
something of value from a commercial company or institution, which relates directly or
indirectly to the subject of their presentation. An indication of the participant’s disclosure
appears after his or her name as well as the commercial company or institution that provided
the support. POSNA does not view the existence of these disclosed interests or commit-
ments as necessarily implying bias or decreasing the value of the author’s participation in the
meeting.
FDA STATEMENT
Some drugs or medical devices demonstrated at this meeting may not have been cleared
by the FDA or have been cleared by the FDA for specic purposes only. The FDA has stated
that it is the responsibility of the physician to determine the FDA clearance status of each
drug or medical device he or she wishes to use in clinical practice.
Academy policy provides that ‘off label’ uses of a drug or medical device may be described
in the Academy’s CME activities so long as the “off label” use of the drug or medical device
is also specically disclosed (ie., it must be disclosed that the FDA has not cleared the drug
or device for the described purpose). Any drug or medical device is being used “off label” if
the described use is not set forth on the product’s approval label.
4.7 hours may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
Presentations denoted with are eligible for these credits.
ANNUAL MEETING POLICIES
9
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or
medical device for the use described (ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for
an “off label” use).
DISCLAIMER
The material presented at the Annual Meeting has been made available by the Pediatric
Orthopaedic Society of North America for educational purposes only. The material is not
intended to represent the only, nor necessarily best, method or procedure appropriate for
the medical situations discussed, but rather is intended to present an approach, view, state-
ment or opinion of the faculty which may be helpful to others who face similar situations.
PRIVACY POLICY-USE OF PERSONAL INFORMATION
Annual Meeting registration lists, including the registrant’s name and postal mailing address
are provided to POSNAs sponsors as a sponsor benet.
REPRODUCTION POLICY
POSNA reserves any and all rights to materials presented at the Annual Meeting, including
Video Abstracts and ePosters. Reproductions of any kind, by any person or entity, without
prior written permission from POSNA, are strictly prohibited. Prohibited reproductions in-
clude, but are not limited to, audiotapes, videotape, and/or still photography.
ANNUAL MEETING COMING SOON TO POSNA PODCASTS
Best of POSNA 2020 on the JPO Podcast
Young Member Forum on “Interview with a Pedipod”
CONNECT WITH POSNA
The JPO Podcast
Featuring key articles from the journal each month,
including discussions with authors and other experts.
Interview with a PediPod
Conversations with leaders in the eld about their careers, philosophies, and more.
LEVELS OF EVIDENCE
10
LEVELS OF EVIDENCE FOR PRIMARY RESEARCH QUESTIONS
MEETING AT A GLANCE
12
LIVE SESSION
WEDNESDAY MAY 13, 2020, 7-9:30 PM EDT (4-6:30 PM PDT)
OPENING CEREMONY
BASIC SCIENCE AWARD SESSION
CLINICAL AWARD SESSION
PRESIDENTIAL TRANSFER
ON DEMAND CONTENT
OPEN DATE-WEDNESDAY, MAY 13
PRE-COURSE
YOUNG MEMBER FORUM
*Program subject to change
SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM
Trauma
Infections/Tumor
QSVI
Spine
Sports/Trauma
Upper and Lower Extremity
Neuromuscular
Hip
SYMPOSIA PROGRAM
Bone Health
POGO
POPS
Practice Management
Trauma
SUBSPECIALTY DAY
Hand
Foot
Hip
Neuromuscular
Lower Extremity
Spine
Sports
Trauma
13
Dear Colleagues,
On behalf of POSNA President Steven Albanese, MD and the 2020 Program Committee (Michelle
Caird, MD, Woody Sankar, MD, and Matt Oetgen, MD, and I), we invite you to attend the virtual
2020 POSNA Annual Meeting starting May 13, 2020. Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, we have
designed a virtual meeting with a combination of On Demand and Live content to facilitate
presentation of the outstanding scientic program. CME credit will be awarded to attendees
of the virtual meeting.
A record number of abstracts (1,061) were submitted and graded by volunteer readers. All 170
podium presentations, 40 posters, and 80 ePosters are outstanding. Now in its 2nd year, there
will be 17 surgical technique videos presented in the Video Theater. The virtual meeting structure
follows:
• A live session will kick off the meeting featuring the Basic Science and Clinical Award
presentations on Wednesday May 13, 2020, 7:00-9:30 pm EDT (4:00-6:30 pm PDT)
o The 2020 POSNA award winners will be announced, but will be
formally recognized at the 2021 Annual Meeting in Dallas
o A virtual presidential transfer will occur at the conclusion
On Demand content will be available via the virtual platform
o Pre-Course, chaired by Noelle Larson, MD
■ “Transition to Adulthood: Orthopedics for the Adolescent”
o Scientic Program
■ Podium presentations, Video Theater, and ePosters (posters will be
presented as ePosters)
o Subspecialty Day Program, chaired by Woody Sankar, MD
o Symposia Program
■ “The Physis: From Basic Biology to Advanced Surgical Intervention“
■ “Delivery of Pediatric Orthopaedic Global Outreach in 2020 and Beyond“
■ “Pediatric Bone Health for the Orthopaedic Surgeon”
■ “Enhancing Practice and Professional Development“
■ “Disaster Response for the Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeon”
o 6th Annual Arabella Leet Young Member Forum, chaired by Megan Johnson, MD
I would like to personally thank all that have been involved in planning and contributing to the
meeting, including our San Diego hosts (Hank Chambers, MD, and Peter Newton, MD), the volunteer
abstract reviewers, the meeting presenters and chairs, the program committee, and in particular,
Tara Long, Theodora Heihn, Teri Stech and the rest of the POSNA team.
This is a challenging time and we hope that you and your family remain safe and healthy. On behalf
of POSNA, we appreciate your participation in the Virtual 2020 Annual Meeting.
Sincerely,
Jeff Martus, MD
Program Chair
WELCOME
14
LIVE SESSION
LIVE SESSION
WEDNESDAY MAY 13, 2020, 7-9:30 PM EDT (4-6:30 PM PDT)
7:00 PM–7:10 PM OPENING CEREMONY
Stephen Albanese, MD
BASIC SCIENCE AWARD
45 minutes
Moderator: Michelle Caird, MD eModerator: Nancy Miller, MD
7:11 PM–7:15 PM PAPER 66
Timing is Everything: Optimizing a Novel Pharmacologic Therapy for Contracture Prevention in
Neonatal Brachial Plexus Injury
Qingnian Goh, PhD; Athanasia Nikolaou, PhD;
Kritton Shay-Winkler; Roger Cornwall, MD
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
7:16 PM–7:20 PM PAPER 67
Collagen X Biomarker (CXM) is Predictive of Growth Cessation in Idiopathic Scoliosis
Michelle Welborn, MD; Ryan Coghlan; Susan Sienko, PhD; William Horton, MD
Shriners Hospital for Children, Portland, OR
7:21 PM–7:25 PM PAPER 68
Can Bisphosphonates Prevent Osteotomy Repair?
Jonathan Schoenecker, MD, PhD; Stephanie Moore; Samuel Posey, MD; Masanori Saito, MD
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
7:25 PM–7:33 PM Discussion
7:34 PM–7:38 PM PAPER 69
Sirt6 in Osteoblast/Osteocyte is Vital to Prevent Bone Deformity Induced by Ischemia Through
Targeting VDR-RANKL Signaling
Young-Jae Moon; Sung Il Wang, MD; Jung-Ryul Kim, MD
Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea
7:39 PM–7:43 PM PAPER 70
Intraosseous BMP2-Hydrogel Injection
Using Multi-needles Improves Homogenous Bone Formation
While Avoiding Heterotopic
Ossication in a Piglet Model of Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease (LCPD)
Minsung Park, PhD; Yinshi Ren, PhD; Chi Ma, PhD; Felipe Monte, MD; Vishal Gokani, BS;
Xiaohua Liu, PhD; Harry Kim, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
7:44 PM–7:48 PM PAPER 71
Reverse Dynamizaton Accelerates Bone Healing in a Large Animal Osteotomy Model
Christopher Iobst, MD; Mikhail Samchukov, MD; Alexander Cherkashin, MD; Vaida Glatt;
Satbir Singh, BS
Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH
7:48 PM–7:56 PM Discussion
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device
for the use described (ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
LIVE SESSION, CONTINUED
CLINICAL AWARDS
83 minutes
Moderator: Michael Vitale, MD, MPH eModerator: Coleen Sabatini, MD, MPH
7:57 PM–8:02 PM PAPER 56
Long-Term Outcomes of Closed Reduction and Open Reduction with Innominate
Osteotomy for Developmental Dislocation of the Hip: 45 Years at Two Institutions
Elizabeth Scott, MD; Stuart Weinstein, MD; Lori Dolan, PhD
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
8:03 PM–8:08 PM PAPER 57
A Postoperative Protocol Reduces Opioids Prescribed after Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery
Kirsten Ross, MD; Joseph Gibian, BS; Jeffrey Martus, MD; David Johnson, MD; Megan Johnson, MD
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
8:09 PM–8:14 PM PAPER 58
Probability Analysis of Sequential SCFE (PASS Score)
Baruch Danino, MD; Satbir Singh, BS;
Junxin Shi, MD, PhD; Jingzhen Yang, MD, PhD;
Kevin Klingele, MD
Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH
8:14 PM–8:22 PM Discussion
8:23 PM–8:28 PM PAPER 59
Marijuana Use Results in Increased Time to Union in Surgically Treated Pediatric Fracture Patients
David Heath, MD; James Miller; Caleb Davis, BS; Lynda Lee, BS; Rose Ann Huynh; Kush Shah, PhD;
Grant Hogue, MD
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX
8:29 PM–8:34 PM PAPER 60
A Multicenter Study of Intramedullary Rodding in Osteogenesis Imperfecta
Peter Smith, MD; Mercedes Rodriguez Celin, MD; Karen Kruger, PhD; Angela Caudill, MPT;
Gerald Harris, PhD
Shriners Hospital for Children, Chicago, IL
8:35 PM–8:40 PM PAPER 61
Ultrasonic Bone Scalpel (USBS) Does Not Reduce Blood Loss in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS):
Randomized Clinical Trial
Sumeet Garg, MD; James Thomas, MD; Hannah Quick, BA; Patrick Carry, MS; Eun Kim, BA;
Mark Erickson, MD
Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO
8:40 PM–8:48 PM Discussion
LIVE SESSION
15
16
LIVE SESSION
8:49 PM–8:54 PM PAPER 62
Hunger Games: Impact of Fasting Guidelines for Orthopaedic Procedural Sedation in the Pediatric
Emergency Department (PED)
Jeffrey Sawyer, MD; Robert Stewart, MD; Carson Strickland, MD; Rudy Kink, MD; Padam Kumar, BS;
Busra Gungor, BA; Derek Kelly, MD
Campbell Clinic Orthopaedics, Memphis, TN
8:55 PM–9:00 PM PAPER 63
Do Routine Nutrition Consults for Neuromuscular Scoliosis Help the Patient or Just the Rankings?
Kavish Gupta, BA; David Skaggs, MD, MMM; Stephen Stephan, MD; Kenneth Illingworth, MD;
Lindsay Andras, MD
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
9:01 PM–9:06 PM PAPER 64
Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial of Implant Density in AIS: Results of the Minimize Implants
Maximize Outcomes Study
A. Noelle Larson, MD; David Polly; Paul Sponseller, MD, FAAOS
; B. Stephens Richards, MD;
Sumeet Garg, MD;
Hubert Labelle, MD; Stuart Weinstein, MD; Suken Shah, MD;
Charles Crawford, MD;
Matthew Oetgen, MD;
James Sanders, MD; Nicholas Fletcher, MD; Laurel Blakemore, MD;
Michael Kelly, MD; Ann Brearley, PhD; Mark Erickson, MD; Stefan Parent, MD; Carl-Eric Aubin, PhD;
Daniel Sucato, MD, MS
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
9:07 PM–9:12 PM PAPER 65
Effect of Reducing Urban Speed Limit on Pedestrian Collisions: A Controlled Study
Andrew Howard, MD; Liraz Fridman, PhD; Linda Rothman, PhD; Brent Hagel, PhD;
Marie Soleil Cloutier, PhD; Colin Macarthur, MBBS
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
9:12 PM–9:20 PM Discussion
9:20 PM–9:30 PM PRESIDENTIAL TRANSFER
Stephen Albanese, MD
POSNA 2020 PRE-COURSE
18
TRANSITION TO ADULTHOOD: ORTHOPEDICS
FOR THE ADOLESCENT
Chair: A. Noelle Larson, MD
DESCRIPTION
Pediatric orthopedic surgeons care for children from infancy to adulthood, and the
adolescent years present special challenges both in surgical decision-making and patient
and parent communication. In this precourse, we will discuss when to introduce adult
treatment strategies in the adolescent years and how to achieve age-appropriate orthopedic
care. Further, at every visit with adolescents and young adults, there is an opportunity
to intervene and change the trajectory of young people’s health by promoting informed
shared decision making and guided autonomy. This partnership is critical in the treatment
of adolescents. This course will discuss evidence-based communication skills to improve
patient/parent/surgeon conversations and discuss longterm implications of pediatric
orthopedic treatment.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of this program, participants should be able to:
Objective 1: Differentiate orthopedic conditions which are best treated with adult treatment
strategies rather than a pediatric orthopedic approach
Objective 2: Assess treatment approaches in adolescents that may result in future harm
or altered health related quality of life and identify how to mitigate
potential deleterious effects
Objective 3: Develop evidence-based communication skills to address unique needs and
considerations specic to adolescents
ACCREDITATION
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation
requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education
(ACCME) through the joint providership of the American Academy of Orthopaedic
Surgeons and the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America. The American Academy
of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical
education for physicians
POSNA 2020 PRE-COURSE
, CONTINUED
19
PROGRAM – 162 minutes
Welcome and Overview
A. Noelle Larson, MD
Upper Extremity Trauma
Fracture in Girls 11-14 and Boys 13-15 –
What Alignment is Acceptable at What Age? Pinning vs. Plates
Mauricio Silva, MD
Distal Radial Physeal Bar and Ulnar Overgrowth, Indications for Treatment,
Epiphyseodesis vs. Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy in Adolescents
Julie Samora, MD
Both Bone Forearm Fractures – What Alignment is Acceptable at What Age?
Nails vs. Plates?
Christine Ho, MD
Proximal Humerus Fractures – What Alignment is Acceptable in Children 10 and up?
Pooya Hosseinzadeh, MD
Lower Extremity
Has the Threshold for Epiphyseodesis vs. Lengthening Changed in the Era of Magnetically
Controlled Rods?
L. Reid Boyce Nichols MD, FAAOS
Internal Fixation vs. Casting: Tibial Shaft Fractures in Adolescents
Jeffrey Martus, MD
A Foot to Last a Lifetime – Is Hindfoot Fusion Ever Appropriate for Pediatric Orthopedic
Conditions?
Derek Kelly, MD
End-Stage Arthritis in the Teenage Hip: How to Reconstruct
Eduardo Novais, MD
Total Hip Arthroplasty for Teenagers and What Peds Ortho Surgeons Can Do to Optimize
the Result
Richard Santore, MD
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
POSNA 2020 PRE-COURSE
, CONTINUED
20
Spine
Neuromuscular Minimally Ambulatory Patient – Fuse to the Pelvis
Rachel Thompson, MD
Neuromuscular Minimally Ambulatory Patient – Stop Short of the Pelvis
Sumeet Garg, MD, FAAOS
45 Degree Skeletally Mature Athlete with Lumbar Curve with Oblique Takeoff + Leg Length
Discrepancy – Observe
Nicholas Fletcher, MD
45 Degree Skeletally Mature Athlete with Lumbar Curve with Oblique Takeoff + Leg
Length Discrepancy – Fuse
Ying Li, MD
Surviving Adolescence
Preoperative Considerations for Teenagers: DVT Prevention, Vaping, OCPs, SI, Drug
Addiction: What
Questions Can You Not Afford to Miss?
Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC
How to Practice Kind, Careful Medicine: Shared Decision-Making
Juan Brito Campana, MD
What is Happening in the Teenage Brain and How Best to Communicate?
Ken Taylor, MD
Long-Term Impact of Pediatric Orthopedic Treatment
Radiation Safety. . . How to Minimize Pediatric Exposure
Jeffrey Sawyer, MD
Anesthesia Safety. . . Are We Causing ADHD?
Lindsay Andras, MD
Retained Implants? Can They Stay or Can They Go?
Is There Systemic Harm from Metallosis?
Michelle Caird, MD
Screw Malposition. . . Are there Long-term Repercussions to Malpositioned
Pedicle Screws?
Terry Amaral, MD
21
Transition to Adulthood
I Discharge My Patients at Age 18, This is Appropriate
Purnendu Gupta, MD
I Keep Seeing My Patients Long into Adulthood
Steven Koop, MD
What Happens to our Neuromuscular Patients in Adulthood:
Pathway to Independence and Maximal Function
Wade Schrader, MD
POSNA 2020 PRE-COURSE
, CONTINUED
YOUNG MEMBER FORUM
2020 ARABELLA LEET MEMORIAL
YOUNG MEMBER FORUM
Chair: Megan Johnson, MD
DESCRIPTION
The POSNA Young Member Forum is held in honor of Dr. Arabella Leet,
who passed away in 2013 after a sudden illness. Dr. Leet was a highly accomplished Pediatric
Orthopaedic Surgeon with a special interest in children with Cerebral Palsy. At the end of
her career, she served as Chief of the Shriner’s Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii.
This year the Young Member Forum will focus on a variety of topics relevant to pediatric
orthopaedic surgeons in the rst 5 years of their practice, as well as residents and fellows
pursuing careers in pediatric orthopaedic surgery. Members of POSNA will share their own
personal experience and wisdom on the topics selected.
PROGRAM 86 minutes
Welcome
Megan Johnson, MD
Arabella Leet Memorial
Margaret Siobhan Murphy-Zane, MD
Developing a Career Action Plan: Academic and Professional Advancement
Stephen Albanese, MD
Getting to Yes: Negotiation with your Practice and Administration
David Skaggs, MD, MMM
Mentors, Networking, and POSNA
Michelle Caird, MD
Success at Home and Work: How to be a Great Mom/Dad/Surgeon
Amy McIntosh, MD
Lessons Learned: Mistakes from My First 10 Years
John (Jack) Flynn, MD
Concluding Remarks
Megan Johnson, MD
23
SPEAKERS & AWARD RECIPIENTS
24
BEHROOZ AKBARNIA, MD
DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
Behrooz Akbarnia, M.D. graduated from Tehran University and continued his
Orthopaedic Surgery residency at Albany Medical Center including a year of
Pediatric Orthopaedics under Dr. Howard Steel in Philadelphia. He then com-
pleted a Scoliosis Fellowship at Twin Cities Scoliosis Center with Dr. John Moe
and colleagues. Dr. Akbarnia was Professor/Vice Chairman of the Department of
Orthopaedic Surgery at St. Louis University and Chief of Pediatric Orthopaedics at
Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital for 10 years before relocating to San Diego
in 1990. There, he established his academic practice, created the San Diego Spine Fellowship Program
and founded the San Diego Spine Foundation to support educational and research programs.
Dr. Akbarnia’s interest has been focused on spinal deformity, especially Early Onset Scoliosis which
started with POSNA Growing Rod Tutorials at Children’s Hospital, San Diego. He then worked with
other colleagues to establish the Growing Spine Study Group. GSSG recently merged with CSSG to
become Pediatric Spine Study Group (PSSG), creating the largest database of young children with
spine deformity. In 2007, he established International Congress on Early Onset Scoliosis (ICEOS), which
just held its 13th Annual Meeting. He has published several books including 2 editions of The Growing
Spine Textbook (3rd Ed. in progress). His efforts have signicantly affected the lives of young children
with spinal deformity around the world.
He has helped many children globally with his innovations, developing new means for treating young
children with EOS. His efforts comprise over 200 peer-reviewed publications, many book chapters, and
presentations nationally and internationally. He has received the AAP Distinguished Service Award,
SRS’s Blount Humanitarian and Lifetime Achievement Awards. He is past president of Scoliosis
Research Society and currently a Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at University of California;
San Diego.
He and Nasrin married in 1968 and now reside in La Jolla, California. He is both proud father of three
children and grandfather of ve.
LORI KAROL, MD
2020 PRESIDENTIAL GUEST SPEAKER
Dr. Lori Karol is currently the Assistant Chief of Staff and Chief Quality Ofcer at
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, and professor of orthopaedic surgery at
the University of Texas-Southwestern in Dallas. She is the medical director of the
movement science laboratory. She earned her undergraduate and medical degrees
at the University of Michigan, and served her orthopaedic residency at Wayne State
University in Detroit. Dr. Karol completed a fellowship in pediatric orthopaedics
and scoliosis at the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital in Dallas. She served as the
president of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America in 2015-2016. Her clinical areas of
interest include scoliosis, clubfoot, and the orthopaedic management of cerebral palsy. She has au-
thored 93 peer reviewed manuscripts on topics ranging from early onset scoliosis, the orthotic man-
agement of scoliosis, the application of gait analysis in clubfoot. She has lectured widely both national-
ly and internationally. She credits her success to the team at Scottish Rite, especially Tony Herring, who
has served as a mentor throughout her career. Lori has been married to Bob Karol for 35 years, and has
three lovely and successful daughters, Molly, Leah, and Abby.
SPEAKERS & AWARD RECIPIENTS
, CONTINUED
25
DONALD BAE, MD
SPECIAL EFFORT AND EXCELLENCE AWARD
Donald S. Bae, MD is a Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Harvard Medical
School and Attending Surgeon at Boston Children’s Hospital. He also serves as
co-director of the Harvard Hand and Upper Extremity Fellowship, Associate Clini-
cal Director of the SimPeds Program at Boston Children’s Hospital, and Associate
Program Director of the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Surgery Residency.
After completing his undergraduate and medical school degrees at Harvard,
Dr. Bae completed orthopaedic surgery residency in the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Residency
Program. He joined the faculty at Boston Children’s Hospital after fellowship training in both pediatric
orthopaedics and hand surgery. Clinically, Dr. Bae specializes in congenital, traumatic, neuromuscular,
and sports-related conditions of the hand and upper limb.
In addition to patient care, his clinical research focuses on pediatric upper limb conditions, including
congenital differences of the hand. Dr. Bae currently serves as PI of a multicenter prospective longi-
tudinal cohort study of children and adolescents with distal radius fractures, supported by a POSNA
Quality-Safety-Value grant. He is co-PI of a multicenter prospective registry of congenital hand dif-
ferences, with currently over 2,500 patients enrolled across seven institutions in North America. Most
recently, he has helped form a multicenter effort studying osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow.
A devoted member of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America, Dr. Bae has previously
served on the POSNA Board of Directors as the junior member-at-large, as chair of the Educational
Courses Committee, and most recently Director of the International Pediatric Orthopaedic Symposium.
SPEAKERS & AWARD RECIPIENTS
, CONTINUED
26
CHARLES E JOHNSTON, MD
HUMANITARIAN AWARD
After growing up in the 50’s&60’s in Southern California, Charlie Johnston left
the Beach Boys/Jan&Dean for the right coast attending Yale, Columbia P&S, and
U.Va. before coming full circle back to Texas where family ancestors rst immigrated
to south Texas in the 1870’s. After fellowship at TSRH with Tony Herring and
Dennis Wenger and a brief stint at LSU NOLa, he has had but one job, secured
only with a handshake, since 1985, and attributes his medical “attitude” directly
to the TSRH philosophy that provides the most expert care available anywhere to
any child with an orthopedic condition, without regard to the cost – actually, there
was no billing dept.at TSRH - or amount of time to complete the task.
Having known and been mentored by many giants – the aforementioned Herring and Wenger, Luque,
Dubousset, Coleman, Hall, Goldner, Gillespie, Dimeglio, to name a few - it didn’t take much to
transport all that knowledge and expertise to patients unable , through geographic or political iso-
lation, to access care and escape the debilitation and impairment of neglected treatable conditions.
The goal however was not to simply swoop in, operate, and be back in the ofce by Monday, but to
identify, train and mentor local orthopods who could then effectively treat their own population while
minimizing the effects of neglect and incompetence. He was rst challenged to venture to the Moski-
to Coast, Honduras to treat children who could only be reached by air or water – no roads existed to
connect to the usual “mission” sites in San Pedro Sula or inland. Then an opportunity to build a spine
deformity program in the West Bank, Palestinian Territory arose through the auspices of Hugh Watts
and The Palestine Childrens Relief Fund(PCRF). There were no local physicians in Moskito environs,
so those patients had to be brought to Dallas for surgery and rehab….but once we penetrated the
physical and political isolation of Palestine, it was just a matter of enlisting other US mentors and an
Israeli colleague to develop now three well-trained and competent “residents” who engage as COUR
scholars and who have become our junior colleagues locally.
The message: there are probably an innite number of patients and places needing POSNA expertise,
and many are covered by regularly-visiting brigades. But imagine the efciency and the benet
when you can teach, train and turn over care to someone who lives locally and becomes the pediatric
orthopedist for their community, region, even nation. The value of having local pediatric orthopedic
colleagues with real “skin in the game” is a worthy goal for POSNA colleagues who can commit more
to the patients who are otherwise reliant only on the visiting brigades and Mercy ships or have the
means to travel to come to us.
Stanford Excellence
in Action
Our Presentations:
Using Data-Driven, Principled Negotiation with a
Clinician-Integrated Approach to Achieve Best Values
on Spinal Implants | Kevin Shea, MD
Does Navigation Make Spinal Fusion for Adolescent
IdiopathicScoliosis Safer? Insights from 17,400 Cases
in a National Database | John Vorhies, MD
Our Posters and Abstracts:
Opioid Re-Prescription Following ACL Reconstruction
isAssociated with Subsequent Opiate Use Disorders
John Vorhies, MD
Cast Univalve Location Matters: Determines Pressure
at theThree-Point Mold | Stephen Frick, MD
A Quality Improvement Project to Reduce the Use
of Combination Acetaminophen-Opioid Medications
within a Large Health System | Kevin Shea, MD
No Correlation between Healthcare System Device
Volumeand Price Paid for Spinal Implants in a National
Database | Kevin Shea, MD
Technique for Elongation, Derotation, Flexion Casting
Using a Modified Jackson Table | John Vorhies, MD
Learn more at ortho.stanfordchildrens.org
or by calling (844) 41-ORTHO.
038033_Update POSNA ad 2020_2020-03-31_D1.indd 1 3/31/20 12:04 PM
28
PRESENTATIONS
TRAUMA
24 minutes
PAPER 1
22 Years of Pediatric Musculoskeletal Firearm Injuries: The Carnage Continues
Richard Schwend, MD; Emily Boschert, BA; Connor Stubbleeld, BS; Kimberly Reid, MS
Children’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO
PAPER 2
Optimizing Triage of Orthopedic Transfers to a Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center:
Is there a Role for Telemedicine?
Rameez Qudsi, MD; Kathryn Leyden, BA; Nancy Moontasri, MD; Alfred Atanda, MD
Nemours / A.I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
PAPER 3
Age-Based Screening for Non-Accidental Trauma in Children Less than 3 Years Old with Femur
Fracture
Raheel Ali, MD; Varun Bora; Lorenzo Deveza, MD; Angela Bachim, MD; Binita Patel, MD;
Scott Rosenfeld, MD
Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
PAPER 4
Fracture Characteristics Predict Suboptimal Alignment in Pre-School Femur Fractures Treated
in a Spica Cast
Amirhossein Misaghi, MD; Mahmoud Mahmoud, MD; Alexandre Arkader, MD; Keith Baldwin, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
PAPER 5
Sagittal Plane Residual Deformity in Pediatric Type II Supracondylar Humerus Fractures
Mauricio Silva, MD; Matthew Day, BS; Bianka Aceves-Martin, BS; Edward Ebramzadeh, PhD
Orthopaedic Institute for Children, Los Angeles, CA
PAPER 6
Operative Versus Non-Operative Management of Acute Pediatric Monteggia Injuries with
Complete Ulna Fractures
Mauricio Silva, MD; Christopher Hart, MD; Joshua Bram, BS; Alexandre Arkader, MD
UCLA/Orthopaedic Institute for Children, Los Angeles, CA
INFECTIONS AND TUMOR
24 minutes
PAPER 7
Abbreviated Non-contrast Imaging Protocol Decreases Costs and Improves Value in Treatment of
Pediatric Musculoskeletal Infection
Todd Blumberg, MD; Shing Varakitsomboon, BS; Viviana Bompadre, PhD; Mahesh Thapa, MD;
Sarah Menashe
Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
29
PRESENTATIONS
, CONTINUED
INFECTIONS AND TUMOR, CONTINUED
PAPER 8
Surgical Management of Children with Osteomyelitis Results in Signicantly Greater Identication of
the Causative Organism: Results from the CORTICES Multicenter Database
Vidyadhar Upasani, MD; Brian Brighton, MD;
Rachel Goldstein, MD; Benton Heyworth, MD; Mark Miller;
Julia Sanders, MD; Jonathan Schoenecker, MD, PhD; Walter Truong; Cortices Study Group
Rady Children’s Hospital San Diego, San Diego, CA
PAPER 9
Can CRP Predict the Need to Escalate Care After Initial Debridement for Musculoskeletal Infection?
Jonathan Schoenecker, MD, PhD; Joshua Daryoush, BS; Joseph Gibian, BS; Colby Wollenman, BS;
Megan Johnson, MD; Isaac Thomsen, MD; Stephanie Moore
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
PAPER 10
Pediatric Chondroblastoma and the Need for Chest Staging
Alexandre Arkader, MD; Amy Williams, MD; Odion Binitie, MD; Mihir Thacker, MD; German Farfalli, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
PAPER 11
Synthetic Bone Graft Substitute for Treatment of Unicameral Bone Cysts: Preliminary Results
John Williams, MD; Carl Nunziato, MD; Ronald Williams, MD
Dell Children’s Medical Center, Austin, TX
PAPER 12
Low Rate of Healing and High Incidence of Complications in Benign Pediatric Bone Tumors Treated
with Synthetic Calcium Sulfate-Calcium Phosphate Bone Graft
Kenneth Illingworth, MD; Ali Siddiqui, BS; Lindsay Andras, MD; Bensen Fan, MD; James Bennett, MD;
Vernon Tolo, MD; David Skaggs, MD, MMM
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
QSVI
52 minutes
PAPER 13
Improving Patient-Family Experience in Pediatric Ambulatory Orthopaedics
James McCarthy, MD; Andrea Shaffer Ellis, RN; Carie Norris, RN; Sandy Singleton, MBA;
Jennifer Anadio, MA
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati, OH
PAPER 14
Improving Access to Care by Implementing LEAN Methodology in a Pediatric Orthopaedic Clinic
Ron El-Hawary, MD; Karl Logan, MBBS; Benjamin Orlik, MD; Luke Gauthier, MD; Michael Drake, MBA;
Kristyn Reid, MSc; Lucas Paraanowicz, MSc; Elizabeth Schurman, MS; Shelley Saunders, MA;
LeeAnn Larocque, MSPH; Kristin Taylor, PT
IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
PRESENTATIONS
, CONTINUED
QSVI, CONTINUED
PAPER 15
Rational Electronic Medical Record Template Design and Implementation Improves
Documentation Quality
Sasha Carsen, MD, MBA, FRCSC; Christopher Mattice, PhD; Andrew Tice, MD; Holly Livock, MSc;
Kevin Smit, MD
CHEO, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
PAPER 16
Implementation of a Venous Thromboembolic in a Pediatric Orthopaedics:
High Rates of High Risk Patients
Henry Ellis, MD; Meagan Sabatino, BA; Kerry Wilder, RN, MBA; Charu Sharma, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
PAPER 17
Use of Virtual Reality Distraction to Manage Anxiety During Cast Removal in Children:
A Prospective, Randomized Trial
Mark Sinclair, MD; Paige Chase, MS; Julia Leamon, RN; Ashley Sherman, MA
Children’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO
PAPER 18
Virtual Reality (VR) to Reduce Pain and Anxiety in the Pediatric Orthopaedic Outpatient Setting:
A Randomized Controlled Trial
Bejaan Jivraj, MBBS; Emily Schaeffer, PhD; Jeffrey Bone, MSc; Chelsea Stunden, MPH; Eva Habib, BS;
John Jacob, MSc; Kishore Mulpuri, FRCSC
BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada
PAPER 19
A Negative Workplace Culture is Associated with Burnout in Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeons
Cordelia Carter, MD; Vishwas Talwalkar, MD; Jennifer Weiss, MD; Richard Schwend, MD;
Michael Goldberg, MD
NYU-Langone Medical Center, New York, NY
PAPER 20
Infection Prevention Pathway for Scoliosis: What is Necessary for Success?
William Randall; Benjamin Martin, MD; Shannon Kelly, MD; Matthew Oetgen, MD
Children’s National Hospital, Washington, DC
PAPER 21
Using Data-Driven, Principled Negotiation with a Clinician-Integrated Approach to Achieve Best
Values on Spinal Implants
Eli Cahan, BA; Amanda Chawla, MA; Ly Nguyen, MS; James Lee, BS; Serena Hu, MD; John Ratliff;
Meghan Imrie, MD; John Vorhies, MD; Steven Frick, MD; Kevin Shea, MD
Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
30
PRESENTATIONS
, CONTINUED
QSVI, CONTINUED
PAPER 22
Relling Opioid Prescriptions after Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery: Who is at Risk for Opioid-Seeking
Behavior?
Blake Meza, BS; Ishaan Swarup, MD; Thaddeus Woodard, BS; Alejandro Cazzulino, BA; Apurva Shah
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA
PAPER 23
Pills at Home: Teenagers Report Pain and Opioid Usage Following Posterior Spinal Fusion in AIS
Using Text Messaging
Nishank Mehta, BA; John (Jack) Flynn, MD; Daniel Miller, MD; Wudbhav (Woody) Sankar, MD;
Patrick Cahill, MD; Faris Fazal, BS; Apurva Shah, MD, MBA
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
PAPER 24
Decreasing Overall Narcotic Load in a Pediatric Population Using Standardized Home Going
Postoperative Pain Management Standardization
Kerwyn Jones, MD; Laurie Engler
Akron Children’s Hospital, Akron, Ohio
PAPER 25
Safely Reducing Unnecessary Radiographs in Suspected Pediatric Musculoskeletal Injuries Through a
Multidisciplinary Developed Algorithm
Sarah Lander MD; Julie Michels; Anne Brayer MD; Sarah Obudzinski; Taylor D’Amore BA;
Mitchell Chess MD; Derek Wakeman MD; P. Cook MD; James Sanders MD
University of Rochester, Rochester, New York
SPINE
60 minutes
PAPER 26
Surgical Complications of Anterior Vertebral Body Growth Modulation for Skeletally Immature
Patients with Idiopathic Scoliosis
Stefan Parent, MD; Abdulmajeed Alzakri, MD; Marjolaine Roy-Beaudry, MSc; Isabelle Turgeon, BS;
Marie Beausejour, PhD; Olivier Turcot, MD
CHU Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
PAPER 27
Anterior Vertebral Body Tethering vs. Posterior Spinal Fusion for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis:
Results of a Surgeon-Sponsored FDA IDE Study
Todd Milbrandt, MD; Smitha Mathew, MBBS;
A. Noelle Larson, MD; Donald Potter, MD
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
PAPER 28
Anterior Vertebral Body Tethering Shows Mixed Results at 2-Year Follow Up
Kevin Neal, MD; Courtney Baker, MD; Gary Kiebzak, PhD
Nemours, Jacksonville, FL
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device
for the use described (ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
31
PRESENTATIONS
, CONTINUED
SPINE, CONTINUED
PAPER 29
Comparison of Traditional Growth Friendly Surgeries and Magnetically Controlled Growing Rods for
the Treatment of Early Onset Scoliosis in Patients with Cerebral Palsy
Margaret Man Ger Sun, PhD; Nicholas Buckler, BS; Mason Al Nouri, MD;
Majella Vaughan, MPH;
Tricia St. Hilaire, MPH;
Paul Sponseller, MD, FAAOS; John Smith, MD;
George Thompson, MD;
Jason Howard, MD;
Ron El-Hawary, MD
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
PAPER 30
Five Year Radiographic Outcomes Following Discontinuation of Growth Friendly Surgery for Early
Onset Scoliosis
Robert Murphy, MD; William Bareld, PhD; John Emans, MD; Behrooz Akbarnia, MD;
Paul Sponseller, MD, FAAOS; George Thompson, MD; David Skaggs, MD, MMM; David Marks, FRCS;
Charles Johnston, MD; John (Jack) Flynn, MD; Tricia St. Hilaire, MPH; Jeffrey Sawyer, MD; John Smith, MD
Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC
PAPER 31
What’s It Worth? Growth-Friendly Surgery Results in More Growth but a Higher Complication Rate
and Unplanned Returns to the Operating Room Compared to Single Fusion in Juvenile
Neuromuscular Scoliosis
Ying Li, MD; Jennylee Swallow, MS; Joel Gagnier, PhD; Patrick Cahill, MD; Paul Sponseller, MD, FAAOS;
Sumeet Garg, MD; George Thompson, MD; Brandon Ramo, MD; Pediatric Spine Study Group
C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI
PAPER 32
Validation of the Early Onset Scoliosis Questionnaire (EOSQ) as Applied to the Classication of Early
Onset Scoliosis (C-EOS) Etiology Designation Before Scoliosis Treatment
Brandon Ramo, MD; Anna McClung, RN; Chan-Hee Jo, PhD; Burt Yaszay, MD; Lindsay Andras, MD;
Matthew Oetgen, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital, Dallas TX
PAPER 33
Is Growth-Friendly Surgery Effective for the Treatment of Spinal Deformity in Patients with
Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita?
Bram Verhofste, MD; John Emans, MD; Patricia Miller, MS; George Thompson, MD; Amer Samdani, MD;
Francisco Perez-Grueso, MD; Anna McClung, RN; Pediatric Spine Study Group; Michael Glotzbecker;
Craig Birch, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
PAPER 34
Age Stratied Outcomes of Mehta Casting in a Large Multi-Center Cohort of Idiopathic Early-Onset
Scoliosis Patients
Graham Fedorak, MD; Bruce MacWilliams; Michal Szczodry, MD; Peter Stasikelis, MD; Joel Lerman, MD;
Joshua Pahys; Kim Hammerberg, MD
Shriners Hospitals for Children-Salt Lake City,
Salt Lake City, Utah
32
PRESENTATIONS
, CONTINUED
SPINE, CONTINUED
PAPER 35
Serious Perioperative Adverse Events After Pediatric Cervical Spine Fusions
Bram Verhofste, MD; Nora O’Neill, BA; Michael Hresko, MD; John Emans, MD; Daniel Hedequist, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
PAPER 36
Modied Proximal Humerus Physeal Classication System for Growth Prediction in Children
Brian Smith, MD; Eric Li; Elsayed Attia, MD; Ashley Startzman, DO; Don Li; Joseph Kahan;
Alana Munger, MD; Ahmed Elabd, MD; Siddharth Jadhav, MD; Jonathan Cui, MD; Erin Cravez, MD;
Logan Petit, MD; Daniel Cooperman, MD; Ronan Talty, BS
Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
PAPER 37
The Relationship of Olecranon Apophyseal Ossication and Sanders Hand Scores to the Timing of
Peak Height Velocity in Adolescents
Janelle Greene, MD; Don Li; Kristin Yu, BA; Raymond Liu, MD; Daniel Cooperman, MD
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
PAPER 38
Deformity Angular Ratio is Associated with Neuromonitoring Changes without a Vertebral Column
Resection: Spinal Deformity is More Inuential than Type of Surgery
Kenneth Illingworth, MD; Ali Siddiqui, BS; David Skaggs, MD, MMM; Lindsay Andras, MD
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
PAPER 39
The Axial Spinal Cord Classication Is Associated with Intraoperative Neurologic Alerts for Pediatric
Scoliosis Patients
Smitha Mathew, MBBS; Todd Milbrandt, MD;
William Shaughnessy, MD; Anthony Stans, MD;
A. Noelle Larson, MD
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
PAPER 40
Preoperative Halo-Gravity Traction for Severe Pediatric Spinal Deformity: Can It Replace a Vertebral
Column Resection?
Scott Lavalva, BA; Joshua Pahys; Sumeet Garg, MD; David Bumpass, MD; Daniel Sucato, MD, MS;
Amer Samdani, MD; John Emans, MD; Mark Erickson, MD; Michael Kelly, MD; Lawrence Lenke, MD;
Munish Gupta; Oheneba Boachie-Adjei, MD;
Paul Sponseller, MD, FAAOS; Peter Newton, MD;
Richard McCarthy, MD; Suken Shah, MD; Harry Shufebarger, MD; Burt Yaszay, MD; Patrick Cahill, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
SPORTS/TRAUMA
60 minutes
PAPER 41
Use Caution When Assessing Pre-Operative
Leg Length Discrepancy in Pediatric Patients with
Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries
Lindsay Schlichte, MS; Peter Fabricant, MD; Christine Goodbody, MD; Frank Cordasco; Daniel Green, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
33
PRESENTATIONS
, CONTINUED
SPORTS/TRAUMA, CONTINUED
PAPER 42
Comparing the Relative Utility of Wrist and Tibial Tubercle Apophysis X-Rays in Determining Skeletal
Age in Pediatric Patients Undergoing ACL Reconstruction
Mihir Dekhne, MS; Isabelle Kocher, BA; Kathryn Williams, MS; Saritha Sankarankutty;
Benton Heyworth, MD; Matthew Milewski, MD; Mininder Kocher, MD, MPH
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
PAPER 43
Quadriceps Tendon Autograft for Pediatric Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Results in Less
Graft Failure and Meniscus Re-injury
Tyler Hall, BA; Carly Strohbach, BA; Kiana King; Luciano Lazzaretto; Craig Finlayson; Neeraj Patel, MD
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL
PAPER 44
Association Between Psychological Readiness, Patient Reported Outcomes and Return-to-Sport
Following Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Readiness Outcomes Affecting
Return-to-Sport (ROAR)
Matthew Milewski, MD; Jessica Traver; Melissa Christino, MD; Ryan Coene; Kathryn Williams, MS;
Dai Sugimoto; Dennis Kramer, MD; Yi-Meng Yen;
Mininder Kocher, MD, MPH; Lyle Micheli, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
PAPER 45
Comparison of 6-Month Return to Sports
Assessments Following ACL Reconstruction
in Male vs.
Female Adolescents: A Matched, Sex-Based Cohort Analysis of 543 Patients
Kathleen Maguire, MD; Dai Sugimoto; Lyle Micheli, MD; Mininder Kocher, MD, MPH; Benton Heyworth, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
PAPER 46
Cost-Effectiveness for Return-To-Play (RTP) Programs after Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Reconstruction
Christopher Defrancesco, MD; Drake Lebrun, MD; Joseph Molony, PT; Madison Heath, BS;
Peter Fabricant, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
PAPER 47
POSNA Surgeons Warning: Multicenter Study Reveals Arthrobrosis Incidence After Operative
Management of Tibial Spine Fractures Higher than Previously Reported
Joshua Bram, BS; Julien Aoyama, BA; R. Justin Mistovich, MD; Yi-Meng Yen; Henry Ellis, MD;
Rushyuan Lee, MD; Peter Fabricant, MD; Daniel Green, MD; Aristides Cruz; Scott McKay, MD;
Gregory Schmale, MD; Theodore Ganley, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
PAPER 48
Do Not Discount Non-Operative Treatment: Factors Associated with a Successful Closed
Reduction of a Tibial Eminence Fracture
Henry Ellis, MD; Morgan Adkins, BS; Marilyn Elliot, BS; Sharon Huang, BA; Charles Wyatt, NP;
Philip Wilson, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
34
PRESENTATIONS
, CONTINUED
SPORTS/TRAUMA, CONTINUED
PAPER 49
A Comparison of Non-Operative and Operative Treatment of Type II Tibial Spine Fractures
Niyathi Prasad, BS; Theodore Ganley, MD; Henry Ellis, MD; Julien Aoyama, BA;
R. Justin Mistovich, MD; Yi-Meng Yen; Peter Fabricant, MD; Daniel Green, MD; Aristides Cruz;
Scott McKay, MD; Gregory Schmale, MD; Jason Rhodes, MD; Jason Jagodzinski, MD; Indranil Kushare;
Brant Sachleben, MD; M. Sargent, MD; Rushyuan Lee, MD
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
PAPER 50
Outcomes of Pediatric Acetabular Fractures
Managed Operatively: Results of a Large,
Consecutive Series of Patients from 2 Large Academic Medical Centers
Evan Sheppard, MD; Kyle Cichos, BS; Alice Hughes, MD; Taylor Swansen, MD; Jessica Heyer, MD;
Gerald McGwin, MS; Elie Ghanem; Shawn Gilbert, MD; Shannon Kelly, MD; James DeBritz, MD;
Clay Spitler, MD
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
PAPER 51
Expert Consensus for a Principle-Based Classication in Treatment of Diaphyseal Pediatric
Femur Fractures
Daniel Weltsch, MD; Keith Baldwin, MD; Divya Talwar, MPH; John (Jack) Flynn, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
PAPER 52
Dorsal-Entry Flexible Radial Nails and Extensor Pollicis Longus Injury: “Entry-Point of the
Devil?” or “The Devil’s in the Details?”
Junichi Tamai, MD; Derek Hayden, DO; Charles Mehlman, DO; Roger Cornwall, MD
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
PAPER 53
Incidence of Compartment Syndrome and Fasciotomy and Associated Risk Factors in Children
with Supracondylar Fractures of the Elbow
Douglas Armstrong, MD; Rhett Macneille, MD; Erik Lehman, MS; William Hennrikus, MD
PennState Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA
PAPER 54
Prospective, Randomized, Blinded Trial Demonstrates Decreased Pain During Supracondylar Pin
Removal with Noninvasive Electrotherapy Stimulation Compared to Placebo
Natalya Sarkisova; Rachel Goldstein; Erin Meisel, MD; Nina Lightdale-Miric, MD;
David Skaggs, MD, MMM; Lindsay Andras, MD
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
PAPER 55
Is the Pendulum Swinging in the Right Direction? Displaced and Non-Displaced Supracondylar
Humerus Fractures Have Similar Functional Outcomes with Casting
Rushyuan Lee, MD; Alexandra Dunham; Walter Klyce, MD; Ranjit Varghese, MD; Alvaro Ibaseta, MS;
Caleb Gottlich, BS; Francisco Eguia, BA
Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
35
Expert Spine
Care from Simple
to Complex
“Our overall volume lends us a
degree of clinical expertise that
isn’t seen in other institutions in
the region or the state.”
Tenner Guillaume, MD,
spine surgeon at Gillette
Gillette Children’s Specialty
Healthcare is internationally
recognized for treating pediatric
spine conditions. From innovative
procedures to pioneering
research—Gillette has the
expertise to help kids.
Learn more: gillettechildrens.org/spineortho
To make an appointment: 651-290-8707
37
2020 SYMPOSIA PROGRAM
PEDIATRIC BONE HEALTH FOR THE ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEON
90 minutes
Co-Chairs: Barbara Minkowitz, MD, Jenn Beck, MD, and Laura Tosi, MD
This year’s Pediatric Bone Health for the Orthopedic Surgeon Symposium will focus on the following
topics: Bone health quality versus quantity including determinants of bone strength and toughness;
Current bone health screening addressing work-up with consideration of labs and imaging (DEXA and
QCT); Bone acquisition during childhood and adolescence including factors that affect bone mass that
are nonmodiable and modiable and populations at risk for reduced bone mass; Treatment of children
with fragility fractures using bone health in children with disabilities as a model for reducing fracture
rates and improving quality of life in children with a primary bone disorder; Options for diagnosing,
treating, and managing children at high risk for recurrent fracture; Bone health in trauma including
delayed/nonunion risk fractures in fracture patients and non-weight bearing effects on bone healing;
Bone health in the young athlete and update on NSAIDS and healing; Metabolic considerations for
deformity correction, regenerate consolidation/osteotomy healing. We will conclude with a review of
evidence-based protocols for supplementation
.
Welcome
Barbara Minkowitz, MD
Bone Health: Quality vs. Quantity
Alessandra Carriero, PhD
Bone Acquisition During Childhood & Adolescence
L. Reid Boyce Nichols, MD
Treating Children with Fragility Fractures
Laura Tosi, MD
Bone Health in Trauma
Christen Russo, MD
Bone Health in the Young Athlete
Jenn Beck, MD
Metabolic Considerations for Deformity Correction
Christopher Iobst, MD
Protocols for Supplementation
Julie Samora, MD
SYMPOSIA PROGRAM
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
SYMPOSIA PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
38
PEDIATRIC ORTHOPEDIC GLOBAL OUTREACH (POGO)
DELIVERY OF OUTREACH CARE IN 2020 AND BEYOND
130 minutes
Co-Chairs: Eric Fornari, MD and Michael Heffernan, MD
Pediatric orthopedists have been at the forefront in global health for the last half century and have
helped our profession and society in meaningful and impactful ways. In 2001, the Children’s Orthopedics
in Underserved Regions (COUR) committee was formed to help POSNA members carry out this work
in resource-limited environments. The COUR committee recently changed its the name to the Pediatric
Orthopedic Global Outreach (POGO) committee in order to better reect the evolved role the
committee has for our membership and the Society. The mission of POGO will be carried out through
a combination of Education, Coordination, and Research. This year’s symposium will focus on how to
develop a sustainable global outreach program. We will cover the ethics of getting involved with such
work as well as ideas for how to track outcomes to ensure all goals are being met. Finally, we will give
our members a chance to present some of the programs they have developed with the goal of
stimulating discussion, collaboration, and engagement. This is an opportunity to build on the work of
the visionary leaders who laid the foundation for us to shape the future.
Welcome and Introduction to Symposium
Eric Fornari, MD (POGO Chair)
Resources for Orthopaedic Surgeons Interested in Getting Involved.
How POGO Can Help You!
Michael Heffernan, MD (POGO Vice-Chair)
An Orthopedic Journey in a Low Income Country and the Way Forward
for Long Term Sustainable Change: The Haitian Experience
Pierre Marie Woolley, MD
Development of “Care Pathways”
Kevin Shea, MD
Development of Registry/Multicenter Research?
How to Help Start a Research Program in Resource Limited Environments
Kishore Mulpuri, MD
Current Pediatric Orthopedic Programs. This is How We Run our Program…
Matthew Schmitz, MD – Ecuador
Collin May, MD – Colombia
Maryse Bouchard – Vietnam
Josh Murphy – El Salvador
Mark Barry – Tanzania
Gerald Harris – Colombia, Mumbai, Manila and Mexico City
SYMPOSIA PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
39
POPS
THE PHYSIS: FROM BASIC BIOLOGY TO
ADVANCED SURGICAL INTERVENTION
90 minutes
Co-Chairs: Jessica Staschak, CPNP and Ray Kleposki, CPNP
POPS is pleased to offer a symposium on “the physis”. The symposium will start with a discussion of
the basic biology of the physis and fracture repair. The second talk will focus on genetic and traumatic
diagnoses that impact the physis. The nal talk will discuss surgical interventions to address a multitude
of physeal issues and injuries.
Physeal Biology and Fracture Repair
Jonathan Schoenecker, MD, PhD
Genetic and Traumatic Diagnoses that Impact the Physis
Jorge Fabregas, MD
Surgical Intervention to Address Physeal Pathology
David Podeszwa, MD
SYMPOSIA PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
40
PRACTICE MANAGEMENT
ENHANCING PRACTICE AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
90 minutes
Co-Chairs: Wade Shrader, MD and Pooya Hosseinzadeh, MD
This year’s Practice Management Symposium will address the common challenges in the busy practice
of a pediatric orthopedic surgeon. The rst part of the symposium will provide attendees with an
update on coding and billing for 2020 and the second half is dedicated to professional and practice
development across the career span. The novel and broad topics covered in this symposium will be
of interest to pediatric orthopedic surgeons in a variety of practice settings. Experts will share their
knowledge and personal experience on the topics.
CODING AND BILLING UPDATE
Welcome
Wade Shrader, MD
Proposed E&M Coding Changes
Dale Blasier, MD
Brien Rabenhorst, MD
Fracture Billing
Kevin Neal, MD
Shared Billing with PA/NP
Kevin Neal, MD
PROFESSIONAL AND PRACTICE DEVELOPMENT
Balancing Academic Advancement and Productivity
John (Jack) Flynn, MD
Value of MPH/MBA
Mininder Kocher, MD, MPH
How to Foster/Integrate Junior Partners
John Lubicky, MD
Daniel Grant, MD
Negotiations – How to be Your Own Advocate
Mike Jofe, MD
SYMPOSIA PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
TRAUMA
DISASTER RESPONSE FOR THE PEDIATRIC ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEON
109 minutes
Co-Chairs: Chris Souder, MD, Stephanie Holmes, MD and Mark Sinclair, MD
This year’s Trauma Symposium is focused on aspects of disaster response and mass casualty care that
impact pediatric orthopaedic surgeons. We will review what care will need to be provided to pediatric
patients in these circumstances and what government regulatory agencies expect from trauma centers.
We will review past disasters in the United States, discuss what went well and what did not, and
discuss how to use simulation in preparation for disasters that are most likely to affect your hospital
and community. We will discuss international disaster response using knowledge gained from the
Haitian earthquake of 2010. We will then conclude by reviewing how course participants can prepare
themselves, their departments and hospitals, and their community in providing a well-organized and
effective disaster response.
Pediatric Mass Casualty Care Considerations
Mark Sinclair, MD
Joint Commission and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services:
Why They Care About This Topic and What Are the Rules in 2020
Susan Scherl, MD
Standards of Care in a Crisis-What You Need to Know and Do
Robert Wineld, MD
Boston Marathon Bombing: What Worked and What Didn’t
Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC
Hurricane Katrina: What Worked and What Didn’t
Raoul Rodriguez, MD
School Shootings: Columbine, Sandy Hook, and Parkland: What Have We Learned?
Stephanie Holmes, MD
Mass Casualty Simulations: Best Ways to Prepare for Disaster
Robert Wineld, MD
2010 Haiti Earthquake: Disaster Response Goes International
Scott Nelson, MD
2020 COVID-10 Pandemic: How to Respond with Resource Limitations
Eric Fornari, MD
Preparing Yourself, Your Department, and Your Hospital to
Provide a Well-Organized Disaster Response
Chris Souder, MD
Community and Regional Considerations in Disaster Response Preparedness
Robert Wineld, MD
41
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
Future IPOS Meetings
December 1- 5, 2020 December 7-11, 2021
Orlando, FL Orlando, FL
Are you a POSNA Member?
1,400
+
50
POSNA Members from Countries
POSNA Membership Benets
With over 20% of our membership comprised of women, we offer
unparalleled access FOR ALL to the following range of benets:
Reduced registration fees for POSNA Annual Meeting and
International Pediatric Orthopaedic Symposia (IPOS).
Opportunity to serve as faculty and present at POSNA
Annual Meeting, Pre-Course, and IPOS.
Access to the POSNA Job Board
Ability to participate in the POSNA Traveling Fellowship in
conjunction with the European Paediatric Orthopaedic Society (EPOS), the
Asia Pacic Pediatric
Orthopaedic Society (APPOS), and the Sociedad Latin America Ortopedia y Traumatologia
Infantil
(SLAOTI)). For more information, please visit posna.org/Resources/Traveling-Fellowship.
Access to the POSNA member directory
Leadership opportunities: Have a voice in over 30 POSNA committees including Education, Advocacy,
Quality, Safety and Value Initiative, and more. Additionally, members are eligible to be elected to
serve on the POSNA Board of Directors.
Complimentary online access to all current and past issues of the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics
(JPO), the source for the best research and up-to-date treatments of musculoskeletal problems in
children.
POSNA Education and Resources
POSNA Annual Meeting
IPOS (International Pediatric Orthopaedic Symposium)
POSNA Mentorship Program
Webinars
Tutorials
POSNAcademy.org: Pediatric Orthopaedic Online
Learning Portal
OrthoKids.org: POSNAs website for parents and
patients
Opportunity for Global Outreach
POSNA Research
POSNA funded Research Grants
Industry funded Research Grants
Foundation funded Awards
POSNA Mission
To improve the care of children with
musculoskeletal disorders through
education, research, and advocacy.
POSNA Vision
A world with fewer pediatric
musculoskeletal disabilities.
Apply today to join over 1,400 of your friends
and colleagues in one of the most diverse
orthopaedic subspecialty societies.
2020 SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
HAND SUBSPECIALTY DAY
59 minutes
Co-Chairs: Claire Manske, MD and Lindley Wall, MD
Conditions of the pediatric upper limb span from congenital to traumatic presentations, and creates
challenging, and at times, controversial treatment approaches. This session will include presentation
of 6 chosen abstracts, followed by discussion. Subsequently, four case presentations of interesting
pediatric upper extremity cases will be presented – ranging from the shoulder to the ngers – followed
by lively discussion of treatment approaches by the expert panel. Pre-operative assessment, surgical
technique, and pure opinion (somewhat literature based) will be discussed and debated.
PAPER 72
Trapezius Muscle Activity in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Obstetrical Brachial Plexus
Birth Palsy
Jasmine Lin; Alex Lin; Brittany Ward;
Gromit Yeuk-Yin Chan, BS; Claudio Silva, PhD;
Luis Gustavo Nonato, PhD; Preeti Raghavan, MD; Aleksandra McGrath, MD; Alice Chu, MD
Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ
PAPER 73
Contractures in Brachial Plexus Birth Injury Are a Problem of Muscle Length, not Muscle Strength:
Translating Findings from an Animal Model to Humans
Athanasia Nikolaou, PhD; Jason Long, PhD; Kendra Eckstein, BS; Roger Cornwall, MD
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
PAPER 74
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type II [Hunter Syndrome] and the Effect of
Enzyme Replacement Therapy
Benan Dala-Ali, FRCS (Ortho); Shivan Jassim, MBBS; Alexios Iliadis, MBBS; Vasiliki Tsiokou, MBBS;
Deborah Eastwood, FRCS
Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, United Kingdom
PAPER 75
A Comparative Analysis of 150 Thumb Polydactyly Cases Using the Wassel-Flatt, Rotterdam, and
Chung Classications
Charles Goldfarb, MD; Eliza Thompson, BS; Deborah Bohn, MD; Julie Agel, ATC; Andrea Bauer, MD;
Caroline Hu, MD; Amy Moeller, MD; Susan Novotny, MA; Ann Van Heest, MD
Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare, Minneapolis, MN
PAPER 76
Association of Radial Longitudinal Deciency and Thumb Hypoplasia:
An Update Using the Congenital Upper Limb Differences (CoULD) Registry
Michelle James, MD; Malka Forman, BS; Maria Canizares, MD; Deborah Bohn, MD; Julie Samora, MD;
Suzanne Steinman; Lindley Wall, MD; Andrea Bauer, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
PAPER 77
Functional Workspace of Reconstructed Hypoplastic Thumbs
Patrick Curran, MD; Madeleine Ball, BS; Anita Bagley, PhD; Mary Manske, MD; Laura Lewallen, MD;
Mitell Sison-Williamson, MS; Michelle James, MD
Shriners Hospitals for Children Northern California, Sacramento, CA
43
POSNA Research
POSNA funded Research Grants
Industry funded Research Grants
Foundation funded Awards
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
HAND SUBSPECIALTY DAY, CONTINUED
CASES/DIDACTICS
Panel: Kevin Little, MD and Apurva Shah, MD
Moderators: Claire Manske, MD and Lindley Wall, MD
Case 1 and discussion
6 year-old child with bilateral radial longitudinal deciency, with a type 2 hypoplastic thumb and a
unclassiable thumb. Discussion of surgical approach and favored techniques.
Case 2 and discussion
3 year-old with birth brachial plexus palsy glenohumeral dysplasia and limited function. Discuss surgical
considerations, functional implications, and expected long term outcome.
Case 3 and discussion
7 year-old with spastic hemiplegia. Address approach to assessment, clinic set-up, and surgical options
to improve function and cosmesis.
Case 4 and discussion
14 year-old with medial epicondyle non-union. Work through treatment options and subsequent com-
plications; discuss approach to optimizing motion and function through surgical decision making.
FOOT/ANKLE SUBSPECIALTY DAY
44 minutes
Co-Chairs: Derek Kelly, MD and Jennifer Laine, MD
To Fuse or Not To Fuse?
As pediatric orthopaedic surgeons, our treatment goals often involve maximizing long-term function
and minimizing pain. Arthrodesis in the pediatric or adolescent foot and ankle has the risk of stiffness,
early degeneration of neighboring joints, and pain. Unfortunately, in some cases, joint sparing proce-
dures either do not give adequate correction or allow for early recurrence. In this year’s Foot and Ankle
symposium, “To Fuse or Not to Fuse?,” we will focus on the complexity of this decision-making process
Our foot and ankle specialists, through a case-based approach, will illustrate when joint-sparing surgery
should be employed, and when it is time to proceed with arthrodesis. Our experts will highlight their
indications, treatment algorithms and surgical techniques for fusions in the foot.
At the end of this session:
1. The attendee will gain a better understanding of the appropriate indications for hindfoot
and forefoot fusions
2. The participant will learn arthrodesis surgical technique pearls and potential pitfalls
3. The attendee will be able to explain the potential risks associated foot arthrodesis, especially
when poorly indicated
PAPER 78
The Development of a Clubfoot Outcome Score for Ponseti Treated Idiopathic Clubfeet:
Results of a Pilot Study with 40 Unilateral Clubfeet
Christine Douglas, CPS; Roisin Delaney; Neil Segaren, FRCS (Ortho); Matt Thornton; Sally Tennant, MD
Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, UK, United Kingdom
44
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
FOOT/ANKLE SUBSPECIALTY DAY, CONTINUED
PAPER 79
Pedobarographic and Ankle Kinematic Analyses of Idiopathic Clubfoot after a Soft Tissue
Release Procedure
Noppachart Limpaphayom, MD
Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
PAPER 80
Functional Implications of the Flat-Topped Talus Following Treatment of Idiopathic
Clubfoot Deformity
Matthew Siebert, BS; Jacob Zide, MD; Claire Shivers, BS; Kirsten Tulchin-Francis, PhD;
Wilshaw Stevens, BS; Justine Borchard, BS; Anthony Riccio, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
PAPER 81
Do We Really Need to Worry About Calcaneocuboid Subluxation During Lateral Column Lengthening
for Planovalgus Foot Deformity?
Brittany Hedrick, MD; Jacob Zide, MD; Danielle Thomas, MD; Claire Shivers, BS; Matthew Siebert, BS;
William Pierce; Mitchell Harris, MD; Anthony Riccio, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
PAPER 82
Redening the Juvenile Bunion
Caitlin Hardin, DO; Jacob Zide, MD;
Claire Shivers, BS; Kirsten Tulchin-Francis, PhD;
Chan-Hee Jo, PhD;
Anthony Riccio, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
PAPER 83
Proximal Fifth Metatarsal Fracture Review and Healing Outcomes
Hannah Lee; Matthew Buczek, BS; Divya Talwar, MPH; Bernard Horn, MD; Richard Davidson, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
To Fuse or Not to Fuse?
The Limits of Joint Sparing in Hindfoot Deformities
Maryse Bouchard, MD
To Fuse or Not to Fuse?
The Forefoot
Michael Conklin, MD
45
46
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
HIP SUBSPECIALTY DAY
61 minutes
Co-Chairs: Travis Matheney, MD and Rachel Goldstein, MD
This session will have two aims. The rst will be to provide a comprehensive overview of how we assess
hip cartilage and arthrosis in preservation surgery. We will be discussing the latest updates in imaging,
bio markers, and biologics. Experts in the eld will review the latest developments and discuss their
applicability to difcult to manage hip preservation cases. The second aim will be to address the use
of ultrasound imaging in the infant hip, both in and out of the operating room. We will focus on how
ultrasound may improve our ability to assess hip reductions and perfusion in the operating room, as
well as how to include it in your clinical practice.
PAPER 84
Development and External Validation of a Novel Clinical Score to Quantify the Presence of Instability
Characteristics in Patients with Borderline Acetabular Dysplasia
Maria Schwabe, BS; Elizabeth Graesser, MD; Lee Rhea, PhD; Cecilia Pascual-Garrido, MD;
ANCHOR Study Group; John Clohisy, MD; Jeffrey Nepple, MD
Washington University Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Saint Louis, MO
PAPER 85
Modied Dunn Procedure for Stable Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) –
100 Cases with a Minimum of 1-Year Follow-up
Oliver Birke, FRACS; Justine St George, MBBS;
Paul Gibbons, MBBS; David Little, MBBS, FRACS, PhD
The Childrens Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, NSW, Australia
PAPER 86
Borderline Acetabular Dysplasia: Three-Dimensional Deformity Predictors of the Diagnosis of
Symptomatic Instability Treated with Periacetabular Osteotomy
John Clohisy, MD; Elizabeth Graesser, MD; Maria Schwabe, BS; Cecilia Pascual-Garrido, MD;
Jeffrey Nepple, MD
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
PAPER 87
FAI Surgery in the Adolescent Patient Population: Mild Deformities and Lack of Sports Participation
are Associated with an Increased Risk of Treatment Failure
Yi-Meng Yen, MD; Jeffrey Nepple, MD; Ira Zaltz, MD; David Podeszwa, MD; Ernest Sink, MD;
Young Jo Kim, MD; Daniel Sucato, MD, MS; ANCHOR Study Group; John Clohisy, MD
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
PAPER 88
Increased Biomarker Levels of
Cartilage Breakdown and Inammation
are Present in Patients with
Stable Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis
Devon Nixon, MD; Perry Schoenecker,MD;
Craig Smith, MD; Meghan Merklein, MD;
John Clohisy, MD;
Jeffrey Nepple, MD
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
PAPER 89
Do Weight-Bearing and Activity Restriction Treatments Affect Health-Related Quality of Life
Measures in Patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease (LCPD)?
Dang-Huy Do, BA; Molly McGuire; Chan-Hee Jo, PhD; Harry Kim, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
47
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
HIP SUBSPECIALTY DAY, CONTINUED
The Future of Arthrosis in Hip Preservation Surgery
Introduction
Rachel Goldstein, MD
What’s New in Imaging
Stephanie Pun, MD
What’s New in Biomarkers
Jeffrey Nepple, MD
What’s New in Biologics
Jonathan Schoenecker, MD, PhD
PAPER 90
MRI Assessment of Inverted Labrum Following Closed Reduction of DDH After Femoral
Head “Docking”
Zhe Fu, MD; Jianping Yang, MD; Zhongli Zhang
Department of Pediatric Orthopedics, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin City, People’s Republic of China
PAPER 91
MRI Hip Morphology is Abnormal in Unilateral DDH and Increased Asymmetric Lateral Cartilage
Thickness is Associated with Residual DDH at Minimum 10-Year Followup: A Proof of Concept Study
Florian Schmaranzer, MD; Mariana Ferrer, MD; Young Jo Kim, MD; Patricia Miller, MS; Jennifer Kallini;
Pedro Justo, MD; Eduardo Novais, MD
Boston Childrens Hospital, Boston MA
PAPER 92
Verication of Hip Reduction Using Medial Ultrasound in Spica Cast Treatment for Developmental
Dysplasia of Hip
Gang Fu, MD
Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
PAPER 93
Investigating the Radiation Risk from Repeated Pelvic Imaging in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip
Alexander Aarvold, FRCS (Ortho); Elizabeth Vogel; Tom Leaver, MBBS; James Lampard, BS;
Ben Johnson, BS; Mike Uglow, FRCS (Ortho)
Southampton Children’s Hospital, Southampton, United Kingdom
PAPER 94
Comparative Evaluation of Perioperative Continuous Epidural Versus Continuous Lumbar Plexus
Block for Complex Hip Surgeries in Children: A Retrospective Review
Mihir Thacker, MD; Dinesh K. Choudhry, MD; Karen Sacks; Bruce R. Brenn, MD
Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
PAPER 95
Single-Incision Triple Innominate Osteotomy: Outcomes of an Updated Technique
Wudbhav (Woody) Sankar, MD; Ira Zaltz, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
48
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
HIP SUBSPECIALTY DAY, CONTINUED
Infant Hip Imaging Introduction
Travis Matheney, MD
Potential Uses and Efcacy of In Clinic Ultrasound
Pablo Casteñeda, MD
Assessing Infant Hips After Operative Reduction
Suzanne de Vos-Jakobs, MD
How Do We Assess Hip Perfusion After Infant Hip Reduction
Travis Matheney, MD
Why Do We Bother to Assess Hip Perfusion? Don’t Most Cases Do Okay In the Long Run
Vidyadhar Upasani, MD
LOWER EXTREMITY SUBSPECIALTY DAY
45 minutes
Co-Chairs: Christopher Iobst, MD and Phil McClure, MD
This session will be a mixture of scientic papers, debates and panel discussion regarding lower
extremity deformity issues. The debate will attempt to answer the question of whether excision of a
physeal bar should be attempted or not. A panel of experienced limb deformity surgeons will provide
an update on the current techniques for surgical management tibial deformity using plates, nails, and
external xators.
PAPER 96
Explanted PRECICE Magnetic Limb Lengthening Nails: Can They Be Reactivated?
Hady Eltayeby, MBChB; Hamza Alrabai, MD; John Herzenberg, MD
Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, MD
PAPER 97
Metallosis in PRECICE Nail Implants: An Endoscopic, Histologic, and Explanted Nail Analysis
Kyle Miller, MD; Melih Eriten, PhD; Lejie Liu, PhD; Ahmet Deniz Usta, PhD; Shixuan Chen;
Darya Buehler, MD; Ken Noonan, MD, FAAOS
The University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
PAPER 98
Does Plate Position Affect Sagittal Alignment of Distal Femur During Growth Tethering Surgery?
Wang Chun-Chieh, MD; Kuan-Wen Wu, MD; Ting-Ming Wang, MD; Ken Kuo, MD
National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
PAPER 99
Medial Metaphyseal Beak Angle as a Predictor for Langenskiold Stage II of Blount’s Disease
Jidapa Wongcharoenwatana, MD; Thanase Ariyawatkul, MD
Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device
for the use described (ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
49
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
LOWER EXTREMITY SUBSPECIALTY DAY, CONTINUED
PAPER 100
Depression of the Medial Tibial Plateau in Infantile Blount Disease: Can Pathologic Bony Changes be
Reversed with Guided Growth Treatment?
Regina Hanstein, PhD; Christopher Schneble, MD; Jacob Schulz; Adrienne Socci, MD;
Melinda Sharkey, MD
Monteore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
PAPER 101
Correction of Mild/Moderate Arthrogrypotic Knee Flexion Contractures with Guided Growth
Harold Van Bosse, MD
Shriners Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA
Debate: Physeal Bar Excision: Is it Necessary?
PRO: William Shaughnessey, MD, Mayo Clinic
CON: John Birch, MD, FRCSC, Texas Scottish Rite
Case Discussion: Surgical Approach for Tibial Deformity
Osteotomy and Plating
Mark Dahl, MD, Gillette Children’s Hospital
Osteotomy and Nailing
Christopher Iobst, MD, Nationwide Children’s Hospital
Osteotomy and External Fixation
Simon Kelley, MBChB, FRCS, Sick Kids, Toronto, ON Canada
NEUROMUSCULAR SUBSPECIALTY DAY
61 minutes
Co-Chairs:
Vineeta T. Swaroop, MD and Andrew Georgiadis, MD
This session will be a mixture of scientic papers, debates and discussion regarding neuromuscular
orthopaedics, with a focus on treatment of patients with greater motor disability. The debate will focus
on unilateral versus bilateral proximal femoral surgery for hip subluxation in non-ambulatory patients
with cerebral palsy. Other presentations will focus on difcult complications of proximal femoral sur-
gery, a review of publications that may change your practice, discussion of patient reported outcomes,
and pre-operative optimization of high-risk patients.
PAPER 102
Long Term Outcomes of Ambulatory Function in Adults with Cerebral Palsy:
Evaluating Change from Adolescence
Michael Shrader, MD; Nancy Lennon, PT; Chris Church, PT; William Robinson; Jose Salazar-Torres, PhD;
John Henley, PhD; Timothy Niiler, PhD; Jason Howard, MD; Freeman Miller, MD
Nemours duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device
for the use described (ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
NEUROMUSCULAR SUBSPECIALTY DAY, CONTINUED
PAPER 103
Single Event Multilevel Surgery in Cerebral Palsy: Value Added by a Co-Surgeon
Nickolas Nahm, MD; Meryl Ludwig, MD; Freeman Miller, MD; Rachel Thompson, MD;
Kenneth Rogers, PhD; Julieanne Sees, DO
Nemours/AI duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
PAPER 104
Remodeling of Femoral Head Deformity After Hip Reconstructive Surgery In Patients with
Cerebral Palsy
Jae Jung Min, MD; Soonsun Kwon, PhD; Ki Hyuk Sung, MD; Kyoung Min Lee, MD;
Chin Youb Chung, MD; Moon Seok Park, MD
Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam, Republic of Korea
PAPER 105
Clinical Outcomes of the Triple C Osteotomy for the Treatment of Pediatric Neuromuscular Foot
Deformity: A Single Center, Retrospective Study
Ian Hollyer; Derek Hesse, BS; Jill Larson, MD
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, Northwestern University Feinberg School of
Medicine, Chicago, IL
PAPER 106
Botulinum Toxin and Casting may Delay or Prevent Surgery in Spastic Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy
Robert Wimberly,MD; Anthony Riccio, MD; Stephen Gates, MD; Jonathan Van Pelt, BA;
Mauricio Delgado, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital, Dallas, TX
PAPER 107
Survivorship of Gastrocnemius Soleus Fascial Lengthening (GSFL) for Equinus in Ambulatory Cerebral
Palsy (CP): Factors Affecting Success in Long Term Follow-up
Kristen Carroll, MD; Emma Naatz; Alan Stotts, MD; Bruce MacWilliams; Sierra Pond, BS
Shriners Hospital for Children- Salt Lake City, Salt Lake City, UT
Debate: Spastic Hip Subluxation (in GMFCS IV and V): Unilateral vs Bilateral VDRO?
Unilateral – Lori Karol, MD
Bilateral – Robert Kay, MD
Removal of Proximal Femoral Implants -
Should This Be Routine and How to Manage Peri-implant Fracture
Walter Truong, MD
Publications This Year that Might Change your Practice
Pooya Hosseinzadeh, MD
How and Which Patient Reported Outcomes to Collect in Neuromuscular Patients
Unni Narayanan, MSc, MBBS, FAAOS, FRCSC
Pre-operative Optimization for Neuromuscular Surgical Patients
Wade Shrader, MD
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device
for the use described (ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
50
51
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
SPINE SUBSPECIALTY DAY
114 minutes
Co-Chairs: Ron El-Hawary, MD and Sumeet Garg, MD
Do you feel overwhelmed by the all the new technologies offered for pediatric spinal deformity?
How do you decide who will progress, who can be braced, and who should get non-fusion surgery?
Your colleagues will challenge and debate dogma on natural history, non-fusion treatment, and
navigation technologies.
PAPER 108
Safety of Pedicle Screw Placement in a Large Series of AIS Patients: Is Navigation Necessary?
Daniel Sucato,MD, MS; Kiley Poppino, BS
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
PAPER 109
Does Navigation Make Spinal Fusion for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Safer? Insights from 17,400
Cases in a National Database
Japsimran Kaur, BS; Jayme Koltsov, PhD; Ivan Cheng; John Vorhies, MD
Stanford, Stanford, CA
PAPER 110
Power Pedicle Tract Preparation and Screw Placement: A Multicenter Study of Early Adopters
Edward Compton, BS; Lindsay Andras, MD;
Michael Vitale, MD, MPH; Sumeet Garg, MD;
Joseph Stone, MD; Nicholas Fletcher, MD; Kenneth Illingworth, MD; Roxana Martinez, BA; Eun Kim, BA;
Lukas Keil, MD; Hilary Harris, BS; David Skaggs, MD, MMM
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
PAPER 111
Bracing Decreases Back Pain in Adolescents with Idiopathic Scoliosis
Lori Dolan, PhD; Kelsey Sheets; Stuart Weinstein, MD
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
PAPER 112
Pregnancy Outcomes in Operative vs. Nonoperative Scoliosis Patients at Mean 30-Year Follow-Up
A. Noelle Larson, MD; Lauren Swany; Pawel Grabala, MD; Suken Shah, MD; Todd Milbrandt, MD;
Michael Yaszemski
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
PAPER 113
Surgeon Volume Affects Short- and Long-term Surgical Outcomes in Idiopathic Scoliosis
Alexander Satin, MD; Vishal Sarwahi, MD; Aaron Atlas, MS; Sayyida Hasan, BS; Jesse Galina, BS;
Dean Perfetti, MD; Terry Amaral, MD
Cohen Children’s Medical Center, Queens, NY
Challenging the Dogma of Idiopathic Scoliosis
Natural History of 35-50 Degree Curves in Idiopathic Scoliosis
Stefan Parent, MD, PhD
Predicting Brace Success versus Failure in Idiopathic Scoliosis
Ron El-Hawary, MD, FRCSC
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
SPINE SUBSPECIALTY DAY, CONTINUED
Radiographic vs Biologic Markers for Growth Prediction in Idiopathic Scoliosis
Michelle Welborn, MD
Vertebral Body Tethering -- How to and Early Results
Kevin Smit, MD
Posterior Dynamic Deformity Correction – How to and Early Results
Jeffrey Sawyer, MD
PAPER 114
Using the Sanders Maturity Scale (SMS) to Predict Progression of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis
(AIS) in Girls: What Final Curve Size is Important?
Kevin Neal, MD; Gary Kiebzak, PhD
Nemours, Jacksonville, FL
PAPER 115
Do Patients with Anterior Vertebral Body Growth Modulation have a better Quality of Life than
Patients with a Posterior Spinal Fusion?
Marjolaine Roy-Beaudry, MSc; Julie Joncas, BSN; Isabelle Turgeon, BS; Abdulmajeed Alzakri, MD;
Stefan Parent, MD
CHU Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
PAPER 116
Vertebral Body Tethering: Truly Motion Preserving or Rather Motion Limiting?
Firoz Miyanji, FRCSC; Paul Rushton, MBBS; Maty Petcharaporn, BS; Michelle Marks, PT
British Columbia Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada
PAPER 117
T1 Tilt and Clavicle Angle are the Best Predictors of Postoperative Shoulder Balance in AIS Patients:
A Review of 347 Cases
Vishal Sarwahi, MD; Aaron Atlas, MS; Jesse Galina, BS; Sayyida Hasan, BS; Yungtai Lo, PhD;
Spencer Stein, MD; Terry Amaral, MD
Cohen Children’s Medical Center, Queens, NY
PAPER 118
Bigger is Better: Larger Thoracic Height is Associated with Increased Health Related Quality of Life at
Skeletal Maturity
Matthew Simhon, BS; Hiroko Matsumoto, MA;
Sumeet Garg, MD; Gregory Redding, MD;
Amer Samdani, MD; John Smith, MD; Paul Sponseller, MD, FAAOS
; Michael Vitale, MD, MPH;
Benjamin Roye, MD; Pediatric Spine Study Group
Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY
PAPER 119
Single Rod Constructs in Severe EOS Produce Similar Cobb Correction and Spinal Growth as Dual
MCGR Constructs
Scott Luhmann, MD; David Skaggs, MD, MMM; Charles Johnston, MD; Joshua Pahys; John Smith, MD;
Amer Samdani, MD; Ron El-Hawary, MD; Pediatric Spine Study Group
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device
for the use described (ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
52
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
SPINE SUBSPECIALTY DAY, CONTINUED
Pediatric Scoliosis Debates
Navigation Improves Quality and Safety: Point
Jason Anari, MD
Navigation Improves Quality and Safety: Counterpoint
Jennifer Bauer, MD, MS
Navigation Improves Teaching: Point
A. Noelle Larson, MD
Navigation Improves Teaching: Counterpoint
Dominick Tuason, MD
Bracing is as Effective as Casting for EOS: Point
John Thometz , MD
Bracing is as Effective as Casting for EOS: Counterpoint
Graham Fedorak, MD
SPORTS SUBSPECIALTY DAY
102 minutes
Co-Chairs: Cordelia Carter MD and Peter Fabricant MD, MPH
This session aims to provide a comprehensive approach to the management of re-tears of the ACL
graft following primary ACL reconstructive surgery – one of the most difcult problems to treat in
young athletes. From the epidemiology of these injuries
to the preoperative assessment and
intraoperative decision-making
algorithms, experts in the eld will review in detail their own evidence-
based approaches to the problem. Participants will leave this session with a “toolkit” of practical
recommendations for incorporation into their own pediatric sports medicine practices.
PAPER 120
Athlete Burnout Is Associated with Perceived Likelihood of Future Injury Among Healthy Adolescent
Athletes
Aaron Provance, MD; Morgan Potter, BA; Gregory Walker, MD; Katherine Dahab, MD; David Howell, ATC
University of Colorado Department of Orthopedics, Aurora, CO
PAPER 121
Pediatric Shoulder Instability and Arthroscopic Shoulder Instability Surgery Across the United States:
A PHIS Database Study
Ryan Coene; Kelly McFarlane, BS; Kathryn Williams, MS; Lanna Feldman, MS; Matthew Milewski, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
PAPER 122
Arthroscopic Shoulder Stabilization in High School Football Players: Recurrent Instability with Return
to Contact Sport
Jessica Stambaugh, MD; Eric Edmonds, MD; Andrew Pennock, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, San Diego, CA
53
54
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
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CONTINUED
SPORTS SUBSPECIALTY DAY, CONTINUED
PAPER 123
Pediatric Meniscus Ramp Lesions: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
Sensitivity
Margaret Wright, MD; Joshua Bram, BS; Jie Nguyen, MD; Tomasina Leska, BS; Julien Aoyama, BA;
Theodore Ganley, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
PAPER 124
Open Osteochondral Autograft Transfer Results in More Frequent Reoperation than Open Allograft
Transfer in the Pediatric Knee
Tyler Hall, BA; Max Hyman; Neeraj Patel, MD
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL
PAPER 125
Increased Tibiofemoral Rotation with Increasing Severity of Pediatric Patellar Instability
Daniel Green, MD; Kenneth Lin, MD; Evan James, MD; Alexandra Aitchison, BS; Lindsay Schlichte, MS;
Grace Wang, BA
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
Instructional Course Lecture: Pediatric Revision ACL
What Do We Know About Revision ACLs in Kids?
Andrew Pennock, MD
Preoperative Evaluation: From Diagnostic Imaging to Biomechanical Assessment
John Todd Lawrence, MD, PhD
Psychological Assessment and Cognitive Skills Training: Practical Applications for You and
Your Patients
Melissa Christino, MD
My Approach to Tunnel Management in Revision ACL Reconstruction
Eric Edmonds, MD
Operative Decision-making: Graft Choice and the Role for Associated Stabilization Procedures
Philip Wilson, MD
PAPER 126
Discoid Meniscus Repairs in Children and Adolescents: Minimum 2 Year Outcomes
Crystal Perkins, MD; Michael Busch, MD; Samuel Willimon, MD
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA
PAPER 127
Long Term Follow Up After Discoid Lateral Meniscus Preservation Surgery
Mininder Kocher, MD, MPH; Laura Lins, MPH; Brian Yang, MD; Kathryn Williams, MS;
Saritha Sankarankutty
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
55
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
SPORTS SUBSPECIALTY DAY, CONTINUED
PAPER 128
Does Discoid Morphology Affect Performance on Return to Sport Testing After Meniscus Repair?
Megan Kuba, MD; Jordan Snetselaar, DPT;
Andrew Gupta, MD; Viviana Bompadre, PhD;
Gregory Schmale, MD; Michael Saper, DO
Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA
PAPER 129
Concomitant Meniscectomy Results in Delayed Return To Sport Compared to Meniscus Repair in
Primary Pediatric ACL Reconstruction
Brendan Williams, MD; Margaret Wright, MD; Joshua Bram, BS; Neeraj Patel, MD; Theodore Ganley, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
PAPER 130
Quadricep Strength in Adolescent Patients Undergoing Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Reconstruction After a Femoral Nerve Versus Adductor Canal Block
Paul Fleissner, MD
Crystal Clinic Orthopaedic Center, Akron, OH
PAPER 131
Comparison of 6-Month Return to Sports Testing Following ACL Reconstruction in Adolescents with
Quadriceps Tendon Autograft versus Hamstring Autograft
Elizabeth Liotta; Dai Sugimoto; Kathleen Maguire, MD; Mininder Kocher, MD, MPH; Lyle Micheli, MD;
Benton Heyworth, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
Masters Techniques for Patellofemoral Instability: Beyond the MPFL
This Masters Techniques session will feature a wide variety of state-of-the-art approaches to the
management of patellar instability in children and adolescents by leaders in the eld of pediatric sports
medicine. Participants will leave this session armed with the tools to evaluate and manage patellar
instability in children regardless of its etiology and the physeal status.
Nonoperative Treatment (with an Emphasis on ‘Treatment’)… The Keys to Maximizing Success of
Rehabilitation, Bracing, and Return to Play in First Time Dislocators
Joseph T. Molony Jr, PT, MA, SCS, CSCS
Treating Our Youngest Patients: How Studying Pediatric Knee Anatomy Has Changed My Approach
to Patellofemoral Instability In Children Under 10 Years Old
Kevin Shea MD
Management of Coronal and Axial Bony Deformity: When and How to Treat
Corinna Franklin MD
Managing Chondral Injuries In the Setting of Patellofemoral Instability
Aristides Cruz MD
An Algorithmic Approach To Treating Our Most Challenging Patients: Syndromic Patellar Instability
and Instability in Flexion
Daniel Green MD
56
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
TRAUMA SUBSPECIALTY DAY
118 minutes
Co-Chairs: Mauricio Silva, MD and Mark Sinclair, MD
The Trauma Subspecialty session will consist of three different components, all of which should be of
interest to pediatric orthopaedic surgeons involved in trauma care. There will be scientic paper
presentations, with our two experienced discussants leading a lively question and answer segment
about the latest controversies in trauma care.
There will also be two didactic sessions. The rst will discuss turning your trauma M&M into trauma QI
(Quality Improvement). This is an area that is highly stressed in ACS verication. Three specic types
of complications seen in trauma care will be discussed, and applicable techniques of turning complica-
tions into improvement opportunities will be stressed.
The second will discuss variations of common fracture care, highlighting three injuries seen almost
daily in a pediatric orthopaedic practice. Is this just benign practice variation or should there be more
specic treatment protocols for these common injuries?
PAPER 132
Lowering the Default Dose Quantity Decreases the Number of Opioids Prescribed in the
Pediatric ED
Wee-Jhong Chua, MD; Cornelius Groenewald, MBChB; Shing Varakitsomboon, BS; Jacob Harris, BS;
Anna Faino, MS; Linda Quan, MD; Gary Walco, PhD; Ted Sousa, MD
Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA
PAPER 133
Demographic Changes in US Trampoline Related Injuries 1998 through 2017: Cause for Alarm
Ryan Fitzgerald, MD; Serena Freiman, BS; Robert Kulwin, MD; Randall Loder, MD
Riley Children’s Hospital, Indianapolis, IN
PAPER 134
Predictive Factors of Reconstructive Surgery for Chronic Monteggia Fracture in Children
Kyung Rae Ko, MD; Jong Sup Shim, MD; Minkyu Seo, MD
Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea
PAPER 135
Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Intramedullary Kirschner-Wires to Titanium Elastic Nails for
Pediatric Femur Fractures in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: A Preliminary Analysis
Edmund Eliezer, MD; Msami Evarist, MD;
Bryson Mcharo, MD; Revocatus Bernard, MD;
John Ibrahim, MD; David Shearer, MD; Saam Morshed, MD; Patrick Curran, MD
Muhimbili Orthopaedic Institute, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
PAPER 136
Flexible Versus Rigid Nailing of Femur Fractures in 8 to 12-Year Olds: Where are We Now?
Katherine Schroeder, MD; Ramesh Ghanta, BS; Barkha Chhabra, MD; Nicole Montgomery, MD
Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
57
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
TRAUMA SUBSPECIALTY DAY, CONTINUED
PAPER 137
“Length Unstable” Pediatric Femoral Shaft Fractures Treated with Flexible Elastic Nails Have
Few Complications
Philip Fontenot, MD; Omar Atassi, MD; Gennadiy Busel, MD; Guadalupe De La Fuente, MD;
Anjan Shah, MD; David Watson, MD; Katheryne Downes, PhD; Roy Sanders, MD; Hassan Mir, MD
University of South Florida, Tampa, FL
Session 1: Turning Punitive M&M Conference into Trauma
Quality Improvement Conference: It’s Easy If You Know How
The Orthopaedic Surgeon’s Guide to Quality Improvement
Caroline Tougas, MD
The “One-Off” Complication: Case Presentation
Caroline Tougas, MD
Tracking and Trending the One-Off Complication To Ensure It Doesn’t Happen Again
John Kemppainen, MD
The Provider-Caused Complication: Case Presentation
Caroline Tougas, MD
Rogue Agent or Flawed Policy/Procedure: Appropriate Management of the Provider-Caused
Complication
Brad Olney, MD
The Systems Issue Complication: Case Presentation
Caroline Tougas, MD
How to Solve a Complication That Wasn’t Your Fault: Bringing the Systems Related Complication
Around to Full Loop Closure
Stephanie Holmes, MD
PAPER 138
Spica Casting Results in More Unplanned Reoperations than Elastic Intramedullary Nailing:
A National Analysis of Femur Fractures in the Preschool Population
David Lyons, DO; Konstantin Brnjoš, BS; Max Hyman; Neeraj Patel, MD
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL
PAPER 139
Early Failure of Proximal Femoral Locking Compression Plates in Pediatric Proximal Femur
Fractures
Benjamin Sheffer, MD; Derek Kelly, MD; Seth Cope, MD; Matthew Wideman; James Beaty, MD;
William Warner, MD; David Spence, MD; Jeffrey Sawyer, MD
Campbell Clinic Orthopaedics, Memphis, TN
PAPER 140
Functional Outcomes of Tillaux and Triplane Fractures with 2-5mm of Intra-Articular Gap
Vidyadhar Upasani, MD; Benjamin Lurie, BA;
Noelle Van Rysselberghe, BA; Andrew Pennock, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, San Diego, CA
58
SUBSPECIALTY DAY PROGRAM
,
CONTINUED
TRAUMA SUBSPECIALTY DAY, CONTINUED
PAPER 141
Titanium Elastic Nails System (TENS) in Adolescent Forearm Fractures : Using Bone Age as an
Objective Guide to Its Limits
Chin Chuen Tan; Kenneth Wong, FRCS; John Allen, PhD; Arjandas Mahadev, FRCS
KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore, Singapore
PAPER 142
Outcomes of Displaced Lateral Condyle Humerus Fractures Treated with Closed Versus
Open Reduction
Adam Thiessen, MD; Marilyn Elliott; Shawn Funk, MD; Brandon Ramo, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital, Dallas, TX
PAPER 143
Treatment of Forearm Fractures in Children: Is Single Bone Fixation Adequate?
Tsung-yu Lan, MD
Far-eastern Memorial Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery,
New Taipei City, Taiwan
Session 2: Variations in Common Fracture Care:
Benign Practice Variability or Failure of Trauma Practice Protocols?
Closed Management Without Fixation
Katherine Schroeder, MD
Operative Management with Fixation
Kristin Livingston, MD
Forearm Fracture: Closed Management Without Fixation
Shawn “Skip” Gilbert, MD
Forearm Fracture: Operative Management with Fixation
Patrick Bosch, MD
Distal Tibial Physeal Fracture: Closed Management Without Fixation
Matt Ellington, MD
Distal Tibial Physeal Fracture: Operative Management with Fixation
Scott Yang, MD
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
59
UPPER/LOWER EXTREMITY
36 minutes
PAPER 144
What is the Value of Nonsurgical Interventions in the Treatment of Pediatric Ganglion Cysts?
Carolyn Shanks, BS; Tyler Schaeffer, BA; Danielle Hogarth, BS; Marilyn Elliott; Andrea Bauer, MD;
Joshua Abzug, MD; Christine Ho, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
PAPER 145
Functional Outcomes of Tendon Transfer for Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy Using the Hoffer Technique
Nina Lightdale-Miric, MD; Ram Alluri, MD; Erin Meisel, MD; Gina Kim, MA; Jesse Kaplan, MD;
Soa Bougioukli, MD; Milan Stevanovic, MD
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA), Los Angeles, CA
PAPER 146
Sprengel’s Deformity: An Analysis of Surgically and Non-surgically Treated Patients
Carley Vuillermin, MBBS; Kemble Wang, MD; Kathryn Williams, MS; Michael Hresko, MD;
Peter Waters, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
PAPER 147
Comparison of the Prediction Accuracy of Lower Extremity Segment Length at Maturity of the
Sanders Skeletal Stage/Multiplier, Paley Multiplier/Greulich and Pyle Skeletal Age, and
White/Menelaus Formulae
John Birch, FRCSC; Marina Makarov; David Podeszwa, MD; James Sanders, MD; Chan-Hee Jo, PhD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
PAPER 148
Dual Plate Epiphysiodesis for Limb Length Inequality: Followed to Maturity
Peter Stevens, MD; Matias Desperes, MD; Philip McClure, MD; Angela Presson, PhD; Jennifer Herrick, BA
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
PAPER 149
Monitoring with Tantalum Beads Demonstrates No Clinically Signicant Growth Following
Percutaneous Transphyseal Screw Epiphysiodesis
Sreetha Sidharthan; Clare Kehoe; Grace Wang, BA; Roger Widmann, MD; John Blanco; Emily Dodwell, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
PAPER 150
Growth Modulation for Fixed Flexion Contracture of the Knee: A Comparison of Two Techniques
Philip McClure, MD; Hamza Alrabai, MD; Martin Gesheff, BS; Shawn Standard, MD; John Herzenberg, MD
Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, MD
PAPER 151
Successful Ponseti-treated Clubfeet at Age Two Years: What is the Rate of Surgical Intervention
After This?
Matthew Siebert, BS; Chelsea Karacz, MS; B. Stephens Richards, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
PRESENTATIONS
, CONTINUED
UPPER/LOWER EXTREMITY, CONTINUED
PAPER 152
There Is No Benet to Hip Dysplasia Screening in Children with Idiopathic Clubfoot
Dell McLaughlin, MD;
Ruth Gremminger, MD; Marwah Sadat;
Maryse Bouchard, MD
The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
NEUROMUSCULAR
24 minutes
PAPER 153
Predicted Life Expectancy in Patients with Cerebral Palsy and Neuromuscular Scoliosis Undergoing
Spinal Fusion: An Exploratory Analysis from a Single Institution Over 15 Years
Arun Hariharan, MD; Carlos Pargas; Joseph Peteld, MD; Margaret Ann Baldwin, MD;
Julio Jauregui, MD; Kenneth Rogers, PhD; Suken Shah, MD; Freeman Miller, MD; Michael Shrader;
Julieanne Sees, DO
Nemours/A.I. duPont, Wilmington, DE
PAPER 154
In Search of a Warning Signal: Predicting Rapid Curve Progression in Neuromuscular Scoliosis
Joshua Bram, BS; Alexa Karkenny, MD; Ronit Shah; Divya Talwar, MPH; Keith Baldwin, MD;
John (Jack) Flynn, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
PAPER 155
Classications of Motor Level in Myelomeningocele: Are they Indicative of Ambulatory Function?
Melissa Bent MD; Susan Rethlefsen PT; Nicole Mueske; Tishya Wren PhD
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
PAPER 156
Impact of Hip Surveillance on Surgical Practice: What Makes a Difference?
Stacey Miller, PT; Maureen O’Donnell, MD; Kishore Mulpuri, MBBS, MS
BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada
PAPER 157
Nusinersin Does Not Mitigate Hip and Spine Pathoanatomy in Spinal Muscular Atrophy Patients
Michael Troy, BS; Patricia Miller, MS; Basil Darras, MD; Brian Snyder, MD, PhD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
PAPER 158
Gait Disturbances Following ‘Perc” Hamstring Lengthenings for Treatment of Cerebral Palsy
Allison Scott, MD; Judith Linton, PT; Christina Bickley, BOCO
Shriners Hospital for Children, Houston, Houston, TX
PRESENTATIONS
, CONTINUED
60
HIP
48 minutes
PAPER 159
Even “Experts” Can Be Fooled: The Reliability of Clinical Examination in Diagnosing Developmental
Hip Dislocations in Newborns
Alexander Aarvold, FRCS (Ortho); Nicholas Clarke, FRCS (Ortho); Wudbhav (Woody) Sankar, MD;
Philip Harper, MBBS; Jose Herrera-Soto, MD; Brijil Joseph, MMED (Ortho); Emily Schaeffer, PhD;
Kishore Mulpuri, MBBS, MS
BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada
PAPER 160
Hip Click Is Not Signicantly Associated with DDH Prevalence Among Infant Hips Referred for
Evaluation of DDH
Margaret Siobhan Murphy-Zane, MD
; Patrick Carry, MS;
Kaley Holmes, BA; Brian Kohuth, PA;
Debbie Burke, PA-C; Tyler Freeman, MD; Matthew Belton, MD; Nancy Miller, MD;
Gaia Georgopoulos, MD
Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO
PAPER 161
Ultrasonographically Reduced but Dysplastic Hip (Graf II) at 4-6 Weeks of Age: No Radiographic
Differences Between Hips Treated with a Harness and Those Observed Without Treatment
Luis Moraleda, MD; Joaquin Nuñez de Armas, MD; Mar Perez Martin-Buitrago, PhD;
Maria Salcedo, MD; Gaspar Gonzalez-Moran, MD
Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain
PAPER 162
AI-Augmented 2D Cine Ultrasound Improves the Reliability and Accuracy of Hip Dysplasia Diagnosis
Sukhdeep Dulai, FRCSC; Siyavash Nia, MSc; Abhilash Rakkunedeth, PhD; Jacob L. Jaremko, MEd
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
PAPER 163
Updated Normal Values of the Pediatric Hip Joint: A Retrospective Cohort Study
Derek Hesse, BS; Ian Hollyer; Jamie Burgess, PhD; Joseph Janicki, MD
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital, Chicago, IL
PAPER 164
Part-Time Abduction Bracing in Infants with Residual Acetabular Dysplasia: Does Compliance
Monitoring Support a Dose-Dependent Relationship?
Ishaan Swarup, MD; Divya Talwar, MPH; Wudbhav (Woody) Sankar, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
PAPER 165
Inverted Acetabular Labrum is Predictive of Pavlik Harness Treatment Failure for Children with
Developmental Hip Dysplasia
Ali Siddiqui, BS; Lillian Lai, MD; Rachel Goldstein, MD
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
PRESENTATIONS
, CONTINUED
61
HIP, CONTINUED
PAPER 166
Hip Dysplasia at 4 Years in Patients with Perinatal Risk Factors for DDH
Simon Humphry, FRCS (Ortho); Tim Hall, MBBS; Margaret Hall-Craggs, MD; Andreas Roposch, MD
Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, United Kingdom
PAPER 167
Long Term Outcomes Following Successful Closed or Open Reduction of Late Detected
Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip
William Morris, MD; Sean Hinds, BS; Hannah Worrall, MPH; Chan-Hee Jo, PhD; Harry Kim, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
PAPER 168
Intermediate Outcomes following Surgical Hip Dislocation Approach for the Treatment of Hip
Deformity in Healed Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease
Eduardo Novais, MD; Pedro Justo, MD; Young Jo Kim, MD; Michael Millis, MD; Whitney Hovater;
Daniel Maranho, MD; Mariana Ferrer, MD; Patricia Miller, MS; Roya Dastjerdi
Boston Childrens Hospital, Boston MA
PAPER 169
Reoperations Following Periacetabular Osteotomy Secondary to Impingement
Jeffrey Lamping, MD; Erika Daley, MD; Ira Zaltz, MD
Beaumont Health, Royal Oak, MI
PAPER 170
Surgical Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement: Arthroscopy vs. Surgical Hip Dislocation –
A Propensity Matched Analysis
Ira Zaltz, MD; Asheesh Bedi; Jeffrey Nepple, MD; Paul Beaule, MD; Michael Millis, MD;
Rafael Sierra, MD; Ernest Sink, MD; ANCHOR Study Group; John Clohisy, MD
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
PRESENTATIONS
, CONTINUED
62
ePOSTERS
ePoster 1
An Ovine Study of Locked Intramedullary Implants Across the Distal Femoral Growth Plate
Raymond Liu, MD; Alex Benedick, MD; Chang-Yeon Kim, MD; Kouami Amakoutou, MD;
Derrick Knapik, MD; Lewis Zirkle, MD
Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital/Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
ePoster 2
Increased Frequency of SHOX Duplications in Clubfoot
Matthew Dobbs, MD
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
ePoster 3
The Effect of Physeal Biopsy on Limb Growth in a Lamb Model
Peter Stevens, MD; Richard Epperson; Dustin Williams, PhD
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
ePoster 4
The Importance of Genetic Whole Genome-based Diagnosis in Epiphyseal Dysplasia
Amelia Lindgren, MD; Shimul Chowdhury, PhD; Lauge Farnaes; Mari Tokita; Katarzyna Ellsworth, PhD;
Meredith Wright, PhD; Stephen Kingsmore, MBChB; Vidyadhar Upasani, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, San Diego, CA
ePoster 5
A Novel Cross-Linkable, Microber-Like Collagen Scaffold Supports Chondrocyte Differentiation
and Growth
Daniel Weltsch, MD; John Todd Lawrence, MD; Mingkun Wang, ONP-C; Andrew Fok, BA;
Danielle Rux, PhD; Maurizio Pacici, PhD; Li-Hsin Han, PhD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
ePoster 6
Comparison of the Load Delivered to Scoliosis Patients Using Different Halo Gravity Traction
Systems: A Bench Study
Jonathan Poli, MSc; Tyler Morton, BS; Robert C. Aylor, BS; Christopher Howard, MBA; Walter Krengel;
Klane White, MD; Gregory Redding, MD; Jennifer M. Bauer, MD
Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA
ePoster 7
Preoperative Antibiotic For Pediatric Supracondylar Humerus Fractures: A Prospective,
Double-Blinded, Randomized Control Trial
Sumit Gupta, MD; Jayson Johnson, MD; Ennio Rizzo Esposito, MD;Daniel Hoernschemeyer, MD
Orthopedics Department at the University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO
ePoster 8
Occipito-Cervical Fusion In Morquio Syndrome
Vijay Sriram, MS; Kailash Sarathy, MS; Sriram Krishnaswamy, MD; Chidambaram Balasubramaniam, MBBS
Kanchi Kamakoti Childs Trust Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
ePOSTERS
64
ePoster 9
Use of Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein for Revision Cervical Spine Fusion in
Children with Trisomy 21: A Case Series
Lara Cohen, BS; Brian Yang, MD; Nora O’Neill, BA; Michael Glotzbecker, MD; Daniel Hedequist, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
ePoster 10
Classifying Vertebral Artery Anatomy Abnormality in Children with Skeletal Dysplasias
Jennifer Bauer, MD; Ekamjeet Dhillon, MD; Shawn Kamps, MD; Ezekiel Maloney, MD; Melody Hsu, BS;
Viviana Bompadre, PhD; Klane White, MD
Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA
ePoster 11
Intramedullary Nailing with Supplemental Plate and Screw Fixation of Long Bones of Patients with
Osteogenesis Imperfecta: Short-term Follow-up
Jeanne Franzone, MD; Kenneth Rogers, PhD; Richard Kruse
Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
ePoster 12
Intraoperative Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Cuff and Tourniquet Use: What is the Risk in the Pediatric
OI Population?
Kirsten Ross, MD; Joseph Gibian, BS; Jeffrey Martus, MD
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
ePoster 13
Peri-Operative Management of Children with SMA
Matthew Halanski, MD; Scott Hetzel, MS; Rewais Hanna, BS
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
ePoster 14
The Effect of Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy on Spinal Deformities in Children with Cerebral Palsy:
A Long Term Follow Up Study
Stacey Miller, PT; Jonathan Lau, MD; Maria Juricic, PT; Bejaan Jivraj, MBBS; Paul Steinbok;
Firoz Miyanji, MD; Kishore Mulpuri, MBBS, MS
BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada
ePoster 15
A New Radiographic Measurement for Quantitative Assessment of Forefoot Splay in Children with
Persistent Idiopathic Toe Walking
Jon Davids, MD; Donald Kephart, MD; Sean Brown, BS; Anita Bagley, PhD; Vedant Kulkarni, MD
Shriners Hospital Northern California, Sacramento, CA
ePoster 16
Treatment and Outcomes of Clubfeet Associated with Amniotic Band Syndrome
Elaine Tran, MD; Melissa Esparza ,MD; B. Stephens Richards, MD; Anthony Riccio, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital, Dallas, TX
ePOSTERS
, CONTINUED
65
66
ePoster 17
The Five Year Outcome of the Ponseti Method in Children with Idiopathic Clubfoot and
Arthrogryposis
Chris Church, PT; Abigail McGowan; John Henley, PhD; Maureen Donohoe, DPT; Timothy Niiler, PhD;
Michael Shrader, MD; Reid Nichols, MD
Nemours duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
ePoster 18
The Relationship Between Initial Treatment, Calf Circumference, Ankle Power and Single Leg Hop
Distance: A Study of 40 Ponseti Treated Unilateral Clubfeet
Neil Segaren, FRCS (Ortho); Christine Douglas, CPS; Matt Thornton; Roisin Delaney; Sally Tennant
Royal National Othopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, London, United Kingdom
ePoster 19
The Effect of Lateral Column Lengthening on Subtalar Motion: Are We Trading Deformity for Stiffness?
Brittany Hedrick, MD; Jacob Zide, MD; Danielle Thomas, MD; Claire Shivers, BS; Matthew Siebert, BS;
William Pierce; Mitchell Harris, MD; Anthony Riccio, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
ePoster 20
Surgical Outcomes and Predictive Factors in Polysyndactyly of the Fifth Toe
Kyung Rae Ko, MD; Jong Sup Shim, MD; Minkyu Seo, MD
Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea
ePoster 21
Minimal Correlation Between Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument and the Shriners
Hospital Upper Extremity Evaluation Scores in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy
Julieanne Sees, DO; Rameez Qudsi, MD; Timothy Niiler, PhD; John Kee, BA; Nancy Lennon, PT;
Jennifer Ty, MD
Nemours Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
ePoster 22
Clinically Relevant Change in the Pediatric and Adolescent Shoulder Survey (PASS)
Tracey Bastrom, MA; Andrew Pennock, MD; Kelly Boutelle, BS; Abigail Wagle, BS; Eric Edmonds, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, San Diego, CA
ePoster 23
Pediatric Proximal Phalanx Base Fractures in Fingers: Identifying the Need for Surgical Management
Nicole Look, MD; Andy Lalka, MPH; Micah Sinclair, MD; John Schutz, BS; Hannah Korrell, BA;
Jennifer Nance, DNP; Sarah Sibbel, MD
Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO
ePoster 24
Fresh Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation for Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Capitellum –
Best Fit Based on Radius of Curvature
Zachary Goldstein, BS; Austin Thompson, BS; Michael Robbins, MD
; Scott Yang, MD; Omar Nazir, MD;
Adam Mirarchi, MD
Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
ePOSTERS
, CONTINUED
67
ePoster 25
Pediatric Trigger Thumb with Metacarpophalangeal Joint Hyperextension or Instability
Sheng Jin, MD; Xu Yunlan; Wang Zhigang, MD
Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Pudong New Area,
Shanghai, People’s Republic of China
ePoster 26
Access to Occupational Therapy Services Are Limited for Pediatric Patients Regardless of
Insurnace Status
Meghan McCullough, MD; Ashley Caron, BS; Marilan Luong, MPH; Cynthia Nguyen, MD; Ruby Shin;
Katherine Au, MD; Selina Poon, MD
Shriners for Children Medical Center - Pasadena, Pasadena, CA
ePoster 27
Characterization of Pediatric Extension Trigger Thumb: An Update Insight of a Rare Phenotype from
Prospective Cohorts of 1,280 Trigger Thumb Patients
Xu Yunlan; Kaiying Shen, MD; Sheng Jin
Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China
ePoster 28
Declining Rates of Legg-Calvé-Perthes Surgery: National Trends Using the Kids’ Inpatient Database
Jaren Lagreca, MD; Amanda Nickel, MPH; Michael Finch, PhD; Benjamin Martin, MD; Jennifer Laine, MD
Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare, St. Paul, MN
ePoster 29
Epiphyseal Translation as a Risk Factor for Avascular Necrosis (AVN) in Unstable Slipped Capital
Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE)
Preetha Sinha, MD; Ahmed Khedr; Tanya Kenkre, PhD; Natalie Novak, BS; Michael McClincy, MD;
Patrick Bosch, MD
UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
ePoster 30
Are We Attaining Patient Satisfaction and Using Effective Outcome Measures? Dening the Minimal
Clinically Important Difference and Substantial Clinical Benet and Their Relationship to Satisfaction
After a Periacetabular Osteotomy
Jeffrey Peck, MD; Stacy Robustelli, BS; Joseph Nguyen, MPH; Ernest Sink, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
ePoster 31
Prospective Evaluation of In Situ Screw Fixation for Stable Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis
Samuel Baird, BS; Clarabelle Devries, MD; James Bomar;
Vidyadhar Upasani, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, San Diego, CA
ePoster 32
Seamlessly Weaving Research into Clinical Care
Brenda Matthews; Kiley Poppino, BS; Dominic Chittilappilly, BS; Brandon Ramo, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
ePOSTERS
, CONTINUED
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device
for the use described (ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
68
ePoster 33
Where Should we Aim to Penetrate the Epiphysis for Pinning a Stable SCFE? A Clinical and FE
Analysis Study of Failed SCFE Fixation Focused on the Epiphyseal Tubercle vs. the Epiphyseal Center
Eduardo Novais, MD; Young Jo Kim, MD; Ali Kiapour, PhD; Yi-Meng Yen; William Morris, MD;
Ata Kiapour, PhD
Boston Childrens Hospital, Boston, MA
ePoster 34
Treat the Image or the Infant: Ultrasonographic Abnormalities in Stable Hips
Elizabeth Hubbard, MD; Robert Lark, MD; Robert Fitch, MD
Duke University Medical Center, NC
ePoster 35
Telehealth & Teleradiology Services at a Tertiary Care Centre
Eva Habib, BS; Wendy Krishnaswamy, BSN; Emily Schaeffer, PhD; Kishore Mulpuri, FRCSC
BC Children’s Hospital Vancouver, BC Canada
ePoster 36
Descriptive Epidemiology of Upper Extremity Septic Arthritis in Children –
Review of the CORTICES Database
Ying Li, MD; Danielle Cook, BS; Allan Beebe, MD; Jaime Denning; Joseph (Jay) Janicki, MD;
Megan Johnson, MD; Antoinette Lindberg, MD; Cortices Study Group
C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI
ePoster 37
Risk Factors for Complicated Osteo-articular Infections in Children
Vinitha Shenava, MD; Elsayed Attia, MD; Ahmed Elabd, MD
Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
ePoster 38
Osteo-articular MRSA infections in Children. Does It Really Matter?
Vinitha Shenava, MD; Elsayed Attia, MD; Ahmed Elabd, MD
Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
ePoster 39
Utility of Serum Biomarkers in Monitoring Response to Treatment for Pediatric Osteoarticular
Infections
Nicholas Gajewski, MD; Vivian Hu, BS; Sierra Pinal, BA; Paul Krogstad, MD;
Annabelle De St Maurice, MD; Mauricio Silva, MD; Rachel Thompson, MD
UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
ePoster 40
Prevalence of Intra-canal Spinal Exostoses in Pediatric MHE: Prospective Spine at Risk Program
Catphuong Vu, MD; Antoinette Lindberg, MD; Viviana Bompadre, PhD; Klane White, MD;
Jennifer M. Bauer, MD
Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA
ePOSTERS
, CONTINUED
ePoster 41
The Modied Kocher Criteria is a Good Predictor of Both Septic Hip and Knee
Roy Bisht; Jessica Burns, MD; Paul Kang; Mohan Belthur, MD; Michael Shrader, MD
Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Phoenix, AZ
ePoster 42
Poor Outcomes of Acute Compartment Syndrome in the Setting of Extracorporeal Membrane
Oxygenation: A Multicenter Case Series
Kacy Peek, MD; Viviana Bompadre, PhD; Marilyn Elliott; Christine Ho, MD; Antoinette Lindberg, MD;
Mark Miller; Gregory Schmale, MD; Suzanne Steinman
University of Washington Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA
ePoster 43
Novel Sagittal Plane Radiographic Analysis of Guided Growth for Knee Flexion Contractures:
Utilization of Blumensaat-Femoral Angle
Jacob Cohen, BS; Nicholas Casler; Gabriel Glaun, BS; Mark Birnbaum, MD; Denise Lopez, NP;
Jonathan H. Phillips, MD
Orlando Health, Orlando, FL
ePoster 44
Outcomes of Non-operative Treatment for Stable Osteochondritis Dissecans Lesions in
Adolescent Patients
Alexia Gagliardi; Victor Quach, BS; Gregory Walker, MD; Katherine Dahab, MD; David Howell;
Jay Albright, MD
Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO
ePoster 45
Prevalence of Vitamin D Deciency in Pediatric Limb Lengthening and Deformity Correction Patients
Jessica Rivera,MD; Nequesha Mohamed, MD; Iciar Davila Castrodad, MD; Noelle DiGioia, DO;
Nancy Campbell, DO; Megha Abraham; Thea Recai, BS; Jennifer Etcheson, MD; John Herzenberg, MD
Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, MD
ePoster 46
Increased Prevalence of Juvenile Osteochondritis Dissecans in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic
Arthritis
Andrew Hinkle, BS; Celeste Quitiquit Dickason, MD; Thomas Jinguji, MD; Susan Shenoi, MBBS;
Mahesh Thapa, MD; Michael Saper, DO; Viviana Bompadre, PhD; Gregory Schmale, MD
Seattle Children’s, Seattle, WA
ePoster 47
Smart Phone Accelerometers Used to Monitor Postoperative Weight-bearing Protocol
Kristine Khieu, BS; Surabhi Kalyan, BS; Alan Lunardhi, BS; Vidyadhar Upasani, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA
ePoster 48
How Much Change is Important? Calculating the Minimal Clinically Important Difference of the
GMFM, PODCI, and CPCHILD after Orthopedic Surgery in Children with Cerebral Palsy
Jodie Shea, BS; Rachel Tombeno; Patricia Miller, MS; Maria Fragala-Pinkham, DPT; Colyn Watkins, MD;
Brian Snyder; Travis Matheney, MD; Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
ePOSTERS
, CONTINUED
69
70
ePoster 49
Adding Value in Single Event Multi Level Surgery (SEMLS) for Cerebral Palsy Patients with Crouch
Gait: Value Added by a Second Surgeon
Keith Baldwin, MD; Kimberly Stevenson, MD; David Spiegel, MD; Divya Talwar, MPH;
Apurva Shah, MD, MBA
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
ePoster 50
Long Term Patient Reported Outcomes of Physical Function, Life Satisfaction, and Pain in Young
Adults with Cerebral Palsy
Michael Shrader, MD; Nancy Lennon, PT; Chris Church, PT; William Robinson; John Henley, PhD;
Timothy Niiler, PhD; Julieanne Sees, DO; Jason Howard, MD; Freeman Miller, MD
Nemours duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
ePoster 51
Treatment of Severe Knee Flexion Contractures in Patients with Arthrogryposis
Harold Van Bosse, MD
Shriners Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA
ePoster 52
Effect of Pediatric Orthopedic Intervention on Ambulatory Adults with Cerebral Palsy:
A Long-term Longitudinal Assessment
Tanyawat Saisongcroh, MD; Michael Shrader, MD; Nancy Lennon, PT; Chris Church, PT;
Julieanne Sees, DO; Freeman Miller, MD
Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
ePoster 53
Cerebral Palsy (CP) Hip Outcomes Project (CHOP): Centre Variability in Baseline Presentation
and Management
Maria Juricic, PT; Emily Schaeffer, PhD; Stacey Miller, PT; Jeffrey Bone, MSc;
Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC; Unni Narayanan, MSc, MBBS, FAAOS, FRCSC;
Kishore Mulpuri, FRCSC
BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada
ePoster 54
The Ponseti Method: What Is Happening Worldwide?
Yael Gelfer, FRCS; Katie Hughes, MBBS; Tobin Mangel, MBBS; Andreas Fontalis, MD;
Shlomo Wientroub; Deborah Eastwood, FRCS
St. George’s University Hospital NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom
ePoster 55
Evaluation of the Burden of Foot and Ankle Deformity in Fibular Hemimelia:
Is it Time to Broaden the Clinical Spectrum?
Alpesh Kothari, FRCS (Ortho); Maryse Bouchard, MD
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
ePOSTERS
, CONTINUED
71
ePoster 56
A Quality Improvement Project to Reduce the Use of Combination Acetaminophen-Opioid
Medications within a Large Health System
Sunny Trivedi, BS; Kevin Shea, MD; Whitney Chadwick, MD; Shabnam Gaskari, PhD; Ellen Wang, MD;
Thomas Caruso, MD
Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA
ePoster 57
Pediatric Venous Thromboembolism: Variable Rates of Incidence, Risk Factors, and Prophylaxis
between Orthopaedic and Non-Orthopaedic Surgical Cohorts
Aneesh Samineni, BA; Ryan Sanborn, BA; Danielle Cook, BS; Daniel Hedequist, MD; Collin May, MD;
Benton Heyworth, MD; Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
ePoster 58
Exome Sequencing of a Multiplex Family with Idiopathic Scoliosis Implicates KIF7 in IS Pathogenesis
Melissa Cuevas, MS; Maria Cattell, PhD; Elizabeth Terhune, MS; Cambria Wethey, BS; Justin Casey, MS;
Brittan Sutphin, BA; Shreyash Pradhan, BA; Robin Baschal; Anna Monley; Kenneth Jones, PhD;
Erin Baschal, PhD; Bruce Appel, PhD; Nancy H. Miller, MD
University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado
ePoster 59
Administration of Intraoperative Adjuvant Antibiotics Reveals No Change in Postoperative Surgical
Site Infection Rate: A National Analysis of Posterior Spinal Fusions for Scoliosis
Max Hyman; Jamie Burgess, PhD; Joseph (Jay) Janicki, MD
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital, Chicago, IL
ePoster 60
Postoperative Outcomes in Diabetic Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery Patients:
A Pediatric NSQIP Study
Farzam Farahani, BS; Junho Ahn, BS; Paul Nakonezny, PhD; Dane Wukich, MD; Robert Wimberly, MD;
Anthony Riccio, MD
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
ePoster 61
Does Topical Vancomycin Reduce Surgical Site Infection in Pediatric Spine Fusion Patients?
William Shaughnessy, MD; Smitha Mathew, MBBS; A. Noelle Larson, MD; Todd Milbrandt, MD;
Anthony Stans, MD
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
ePoster 62
1 to 30 Years Post-Surgical HRQoL of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) with SRS-22 -
A Study of 1315 Patients
Tsz Ping Lam; Kin-Wah Bobby Ng, FRCS (Ortho); Alec Hung, MD; Wai Wang Chau, MSc;
Jack Cheng, MD
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Chinese University of Hong Kong,
Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong
ePOSTERS
, CONTINUED
72
ePoster 63
No Correlation Between Healthcare System Device Volume and Price Paid for Spinal Implants in a
National Database
Eli Cahan, BA; Amanda Chawla, MA; Ly Nguyen, MS; James Lee, BS; Vignesh Rajagopalan, MS;
Kevin Shea, MD
Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
ePoster 64
Establishing Consensus on the Best Practice Guidelines for the Use of Bracing in Adolescent
Idiopathic Scoliosis
Matthew Simhon, BS; Benjamin Roye, MD; Hiroko Matsumoto, MS; Cynthia Almonte, PT;
Prachi Bakarania, DPT; Hagit Berdishevsky, PT; Lori Dolan, PhD; Sabrina Donzelli, MD; Kelly Grimes, DPT;
Theodoros Grivas, MD; Matthew Halsey, MD; Michael Hresko, MD; Elizabeth Janssen; Lori Karol, MD;
Andrea Lebel; Michael Mendelow, MD; Stefano Negrini, MD; Peter Newton, MD; John Tunney;
Stuart Weinstein; Grant Wood, CO; Fabio Zaina, MD; Michael Vitale, MD
Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY
ePoster 65
Is Growth-Friendly Surgery Adequate for the Treatment of Non-ambulatory Early-onset Scoliosis
Myelomeningocele Patients?
Norman Ramirez-Lluch, MD; Ryan Fitzgerald, MD; Gerardo Olivella, MD; John Smith, MD;
Peter Sturm; Paul Sponseller, MD, FAAOS; Lawrence Karlin, MD; Scott Luhmann, MD;
Tricia St. Hilaire, MPH; Pediatric Spine Study Group
Pediatric Spine Study Group, Valley Forge, PA
ePoster 66
Uncorrected Pelvic Obliquity is Associated with Lower Health Related Quality of Life in Ambulatory
but not in Non-Ambulatory Patients After Surgical Treatment in Patients with Early Onset Scoliosis
Hiroko Matsumoto, MS; Jacob Ball, BS; Benjamin Roye, MD; Sumeet Garg, MD; Mark Erickson, MD;
Amer Samdani, MD; David Skaggs, MD, MMM; David Roye; Michael Vitale, MD;
Pediatric Spine Study Group
Columbia University, New York, NY
ePoster 67
Liposomal Bupivacaine for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Does Not Effectively Decrease
Post-Operative Pain
David Macknet, MD; Richard Mcknight, MD; Susan Odum, PhD; Michael Paloski, DO
OrthoCarolina, Charlotte, NC
ePoster 68
Nationwide Ethnic/Racial Differences in the Surgical Treatment of Discoid Meniscus in Children:
A PHIS Database Study
Matthew Milewski, MD; Ryan Coene; Kathryn Williams, MS; Lanna Feldman, MS; Kelly McFarlane, BS;
Jennifer Beck, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
ePOSTERS
, CONTINUED
73
ePoster 69
A Practical Pre-Operative Predictive Model for Determining Hamstring Autograft Size for Anterior
Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Children and Adolescents
Benjamin Sherman, DO; Kevin Kwan; John Schlechter, DO
Children’s Hospital of Orange County, Orange, CA
ePoster 70
Is Percutaneous Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Relaxation During Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Reconstruction a Safe Option for Gaining Access to the Medial Knee Compartment in Children?
John Schlechter, DO; Benjamin Sherman, DO; Bryn Gornick, BS; Tanner Harrah, DO
Children’s Hospital of Orange County, Orange, CA
ePoster 71
Kids Run Differently: Preliminary Analysis of Adolescent 2D Kinematic Running Form
Yukiko Matsuzaki, DPT; Madison Heath, BS; Peter Fabricant, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
ePoster 72
Do Delays to Operative Management Affect Rates of Meniscal Injury in Pediatric and Adolescent
ACL Reconstructions?
Joshua Park, BA; Brody Dawkins, BA; Peter Fabricant, MD; Allison Gilmore, MD; Mark Seeley, MD;
R. Justin Mistovich, MD
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital,
Cleveland, OH
ePoster 73
The Other Leg: Higher Rates of Contralateral ACL Tears in Adolescent Soccer Players Following
ACL Reconstruction
Henry Ellis, MD; K. John Wagner, BS; Claire Althoff; Chan-Hee Jo, PhD; Philip Wilson
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
ePoster 74
Can MRIs Accurately Diagnose Meniscal Pathology in Pediatric Patients with ACL Tears?
Joshua Park, BA; Brody Dawkins, BA; Peter Fabricant, MD; Allison Gilmore, MD; Mark Seeley, MD;
R. Justin Mistovich, MD
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital,
Cleveland, OH
ePoster 75
Sagittal Plane Alignment Affects Stability in Supracondylar Humerus Fracture Pinning
Rushyuan Lee, MD; Alexander Bitzer, MD; Stephen Belkoff, PhD; Christa Librizzi, BS;
Chimelie Chibututu, BS
Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD
ePoster 76
Assessing Medial Epicondyle Fracture Displacement: A Comparison of Digital Tomosynthesis with
Plain Radiographs and CT Scan
Kristin Livingston, MD; Emily Edwards, MD; Michael Grifth, BA; John MacKenzie, MD; Matthew Zapala
UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital, San Francisco, CA
ePOSTERS
, CONTINUED
74
ePoster 77
A Single Education Session of Orthopaedic Residents Does Not Improve Patient Outcomes in
Pediatric Distal Radius Fractures
Edward Compton, BS; Adrian Lin; Kenneth Illingworth, MD; Melissa Bent, MD
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
ePoster 78
Checklists in Femur Fractures: High Adherence after Implementation of Computer Based Pediatric
Femur Guidelines
Kimberly Jacobsen, MD; Andrew Gupta, MD; Michael Goldberg; Ted Sousa, MD
Seattle Childrens Hospital, Seattle, WA
ePoster 79
Reducing the Reductions: An Analysis of Resource Utilization of Distal Radius Fractures in a Pediatric
Emergency Department
Keith Orland, MD; Adam Boissonneault, MBChB; Andrew Schwartz, MD; Rahul Goel, MD;
Robert Bruce, MD; Nicholas Fletcher, MD
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA
ePoster 80
Predicting Failure of Closed Reduction in Paediatric Diaphyseal Forearm Fracture Elastic Stable
Intramedullary Nailing (ESIN)
Ling Hui Tay, MBBS; Nicole Lee; Darryl Chew, MD; Arjandas Mahadev, FRCS;
Kenneth Pak Leung Wong, FRCS (Ortho)
KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore
ePoster 81
Structural Effects of Periosteal Resection on Bone
Matthew Halanski, MD
University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
ePoster 82
Are Serum Ion Levels Elevated in Pediatric Patients with Growing Spine Implants versus Controls?
Geoffrey Haft, MD; Smitha Mathew, MBBS; A. Noelle Larson, MD; Yong Xie; Bangke Zhang, MD;
Todd Milbrandt, MD; Matthew Abdel, MD; Andre Van Wijnen
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
ePoster 83
Serum-Derived Exosomes of Congenital Pseudarthrosis of Tibia in Pediatric Patients Suppresses Bone
Formation and Increases Bone Resorption via Alteration of Exosomal Bone-Related Proteins
Ge Yang, PhD; Qian Tan, MD; Hui Yu, PhD; Haibo Mei, MD
Department of Orthopedic, Hunan Children’s Hospital, Changsha, People’s Republic of China
ePoster 84
Using a Selective Epigenetic Regulator in a Mouse Model to Reversibly Slow Physeal Growth
Todd Milbrandt, MD; Daniela Galeano Garces, MD; Catalina Galeano-Garces, BS;
Jennifer Grauberger, BA; A. Noelle Larson, MD; Andre Van Wijnen
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
ePOSTERS
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75
ePoster 85
Chiari Osteotomy in Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia Including Pseudoachondroplasia with a Mean
Follow-Up of 18 Years and Survival Analysis
Aurélie Andrzejewski, MD; Georges Finidori, MD; Zagorka Péjin, MD; Alina Badina, MD;
Philippe Wicart, PhD; Christophe Glorion, PhD
Hôpital Necker Enfants Malades, Paris, France
ePoster 86
Patient Reported Outcomes Assessment of 243 Children and Adolescents with Lower Limb
Deciency: A Multi-Center Study
Joel Lerman, MD; David Westberry, MD; Janet Walker; Sarah Nossov, MD; Nina Cung; Fiona Scott
Shriners Hospitals for Children-Northern California, Sacramento, CA
ePoster 87
The Surgical Treatment of Severe Cervical Kyphosis in Diastrophic Dysplasia
John Heydemann, MD; W.G. Stuart Mackenzie, MD; Kenneth Rogers, PhD; Colleen Ditro, NP;
Jeffrey Campbell, MD; Suken Shah, MD; William Mackenzie, MD
Nemours / AI duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
ePoster 88
Introduction of Reasoned Percutaneous Achilles Tenotomy in the French Method of Idiopathic
Congenital Cubfoot: Which Indication for Which Result?
Virginie Nguyen Khac, MD; Marine De Tienda, MD; Zagorka Pejin, MD; Valérie Merzoug, MD;
Raphael Seringe, MD; Christophe Glorion, PhD; Philippe Wicart, PhD
Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malade, Paris, France
ePoster 89
Talar-Tarsal Stabilization: Rationale and Preliminary Outcomes
Peter Stevens, MD; Alex Lancaster, MD; Ansab Khwaja, MD
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
ePoster 90
Pediatric and Adolescent Lisfranc Injuries – Management and Outcomes
Indranil Kushare, MD; Nicole Wunderlich, PA-C; Ahmed Elabd, MD; Elsayed Attia, MD
Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
ePoster 91
Clinical Presentation and Epidemiology of Hand and Wrist Ganglion Cysts in Children
Joshua Bram, BS; David Falk, MD; Benjamin Chang; Jennifer Ty, MD; Ines Lin, MD; Apurva Shah, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
ePoster 92
Paediatric Elbow Fractures: Public Playground Equipment Does Not Meet The Safety Standard
Pardeep Sidhu; Jennifer Smith; Harpreet Chhina, MSc; Brittany Lim; Ian Pike, PhD;
Anthony Cooper, FRCSC
BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, Canada
ePOSTERS
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76
ePoster 93
The Effect of Social Deprivation on Pediatric PROMIS Scores in Children with Brachial Plexus
Birth Injury
Mary Claire Manske, MD; Michelle James, MD
Shriners Hospital for Children Northern California, Sacramento, CA
ePoster 94
Dening the Deformity: Utility of the 45-degree Dunn View in Assessing Deformity in Slipped Capital
Femoral Epiphysis
Craig Smith, MD; Perry Schoenecker, MD; John Clohisy, MD; Jeffrey Nepple, MD
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
ePoster 95
Effect of Surgeon Performance in Salter Innominate Osteotomy on Long-Term Outcome
Daisuke Kobayashi, MD; Shinichi Satsuma; Ryosuke Sakata; Maki Kinugasa; Izumi Komoto, MD
Kobe Children’s Hospital, Kobe, Japan
ePoster 96
Comparison of a Telescoping Screw Fixation System to Traditional In Situ Pinning for Stable Slipped
Capital Femoral Epiphysis
Cody Hansen, BS; James Bomar, MPH; Vidyadhar Upasani, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, San Diego, CA
ePoster 97
Prognostic Factors for Joint Deformity Following Pediatric Septic Arthritis
Ryosuke Yamaguchi, MD; Tomoyuki Nakamura, MD; Kazuyuki Takamura, MD; Yasuharu Nakashima, MD
Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
ePoster 98
Predicting Which Children with Osteomyelitis Require Secondary Surgery– Results from the
CORTICES Multicenter Database
Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC; Keith Baldwin, MD; Jennifer Laine, MD; David Spence, MD;
Joshua Murphy MD; Jaclyn Hill; Cortices Study Group
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
ePoster 99
Pediatric Extremity Cellulitis: When Should the Orthopedic Surgeon Become Involved?
Ernest Young, MD; Tracey Bastrom, MA; Andrew Pennock, MD; Eric Edmonds, MD; Burt Yaszay, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, San Diego, CA
ePoster 100
Fassier Duval Rod Placement in the Epiphysis: Does this Relate to Rod Failure?
Kaley Holmes, BA; Jane Gralla, PhD; Christopher Brazell, BA; Patrick Carry, MS; Suhong Tong, MS;
Nancy Miller, MD; Gaia Georgopoulos, MD
Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO
ePOSTERS
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ePoster 101
Guided Growth for Ankle Valgus Deformity: The Challenges of Hardware Removal
David Westberry, MD; Ashley Carpenter; Erin Pichiotino, MD; George Graham; Jonathan Thomas, BS;
Lauren Hyer, MD
Shriners Hospital for Children: Greenville, Greenville, SC
ePoster 102
Extramedullary Implantable Limb Lengthening (EIILL) for Congenital Limb Length Discrepancy (LLD)
is Safe and Effective
Claire Shannon, MD; Craig Robbins; Dror Paley, MD, FRCSC
Paley Orthopedic and Spine Institute, West Palm Beach, FL
ePoster 103
Presence of an Anterolateral Talar Facet Evaluated on Computerized Tomography Scan in the
Pediatric Population
Megan Fischer-Colbrie; Scott Mubarak, MD; Kathleen Rickert, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA
ePoster 104
Orthopaedic Outcomes of Prenatal Versus Postnatal Repair of Myelomeningocele
Ishaan Swarup, MD; Divya Talwar, MPH; Lori Howell, DNP; Nick Adzick; Bernard Horn, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
ePoster 105
Progression of Hip Instability in Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy
Sayan De, MD; Alexis Gerk, BS; Cosmo Kwok, MD; Wade Coomer, BS; Joyce Oleszek, MD
Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO
ePoster 106
Does Patellar Tendon Advancement Improve the Outcomes Following Anterior Distal Femoral
Hemiepiphysiodesis in Children with CP?
Robert Kay, MD; Susan Rethlefsen, PT; Alison Hanson; Oussama Abousamra, MD
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
ePoster 107
The Design and Validation of a Wire Navigation Simulator for Pediatric Supracondylar Humerus
Fractures
Heather Kowalski, MD; Emily Connor, MD; Geb Thomas, PhD; Donald Anderson, PhD;
Matthew Karam; Steven Long; J. Lawrence Marsh, MD
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
ePoster 108
Determinants of Caregiver Satisfaction in Pediatric Orthopedics
Ian Singleton, BS; Rachel Garnkel, MD; Jason Malone, DO; M’Hamed Temkit; Mohan Belthur, MD
Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Phoenix, AZ
ePOSTERS
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78
ePoster 109
Addressing the Gender Gap in Academic Pediatric Orthopaedics: An Analysis on Female
Representation at the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) Annual Meetings
Judy Wu, BS; Manraj Randhawa, BS; Caitlyn Siu, BS; Hari Arneja, BS; Emily Schaeffer, PhD;
Natalya Sarkisova, BS; Kishore Mulpuri, FRCSC; Jennifer Laine; Rachel Goldstein, MD
BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada
ePoster 110
Implementation of a Multimodal Pain Protocol in Pediatric Orthopedic Surgery Decreases Inpatient
Opioid Administration
Dalibel Bravo, MD; Ryan Roach, MD; James Feng, MD; Olga Solovyova, MD; David Godfried, MD;
Mara Karamitopoulos
NYU Langone Orthopedic Hospital, New York, NY
ePoster 111
The Alarming Level of Pre- and Post-Operative Chronic Pain and Anxiety in Adolescent Idiopathic
Scoliosis Patients: A Pilot Study
Shelby Cerza, MA; Kiley Poppino, BS; Heather Richard; Teresa Collins-Jones, PhD; Brandon Ramo, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
ePoster 112
Microbiology of Spine Wounds in Paediatric Patients Undergoing Correction for Scoliosis
Haemish Crawford, MBChB; Tyler Rudolph, MBChB; Lorena Floccari, MD; Antony Field, MD;
Sally Roberts, MBChB
Starship Children’s Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand
ePoster 113
Intraoperative Hypothermia Reduction in Posterior Spinal Fusion for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis:
A Multidisciplinary Quality Value Safety Initiative (QVSI)
Christopher McLeod, DO; Charu Sharma; Kiley Poppino, BS; Daniel Sucato, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
ePoster 114
Outcomes of MPFL Reconstruction via a Quadriceps Turndown Technique in the
Adolescent/Pediatric Population
Kevin Klingele, MD; Michael Fisher, DO; Satbir Singh, BS; Leah Frischmann, BS; Cody Moore, MD;
Matthew Beran
Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH
ePoster 115
Not Just the Capitellum: Lateral Elbow Overuse Injuries in Pediatric Female Gymnasts
Philip Wilson, MD; Charles Wyatt, NP; William Searls, BS; Aaron Zynda, BS; Henry Ellis, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
ePoster 116
Opioid Re-Prescription Following ACL Reconstruction is Associated with Subsequent Opiate
Use Disorders
Eli Cahan, BA; Nicole Segovia, BS; Japsimran Kaur, BS; Charles Chan, MD; John Vorhies, MD
Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
ePOSTERS
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79
ePoster 117
Cast Univalve Location Matters: Determines Pressure at the Three-Point Mold
Blake Montgomery, MD; Kenneth Perrone, MD; Su Yang; Nicole Segovia, BS; Lawrence Rinsky, MD;
Carla Pugh, FACS; Steven Frick, MD
Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
ePoster 118
Where Is the Axillary Nerve Danger Zone with Fixation of the Pediatric Shoulder?
Tyler Stavinoha, MD; Aleksei Dingel, BS; Kevin Shea, MD
Stanford University School of Medicine Department of
Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford, CA
ePoster 119
3-D Biomechanical Analysis of Flexible Intramedullary Nailing in Length Unstable Pediatric
Femur Fractures
Emmanouil Grigoriou, MD; Ameya Harendra Deshpande; Allison Binkley, MD; Robert Galpin, MD;
Mark Ehrensberger, PhD; Jeremy Doak, MD
University at Buffalo - State University of New York, Buffalo, NY
ePoster 120
Neurological Assessments of Upper Limb in Young Children
Ignacio Sanpera-Trigueros, MD; Jean Maria Gomez-Alessandri, MD; Miguel Garcia-Cancho, MD
Hospital Universitari Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain
ePoster 121
2016 POSNA Clinical Research Grant
JUPITER (Justify Patellar Instability Treatment by Early Results
Shital N. Parikh, MD
ePoster 122
2016 POSNA Directed Research Grant
Comprehensive Coagulation Prole (including Thromboelastinograph) in Patients Receiving
Tranexamic Acid
Patrick Bosch, MD
ePoster 123
2017 Kuo Award Research Grant
A Bioinspired Approach to Large Pediatric Osteochandral Injuries
Patrick Whitlock, MD
ePoster 124
2017 POSNA/NuVasive Spine Research Grant
Recovery of Alveolar Size & Number Following Spinal Fusion for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis
Peter Sturm, MD
ePOSTERS
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80
ePOSTERS
, CONTINUED
ePoster 125
2017 POSNA Clinical Research Grant
Measuring Priorities & Goals of Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy to Develop a Meaningful
Patient Reported Outcome Measure
Unni Narayanan, MD
ePoster 126
2018 POSNA Clinical Trials Research Grant
Hip Surveillance in Children with CP: Developing POSNA Wide C
Wade Schrader, MD
ePoster 127
2018 POSNA Start Up Research Grant
Utilization of Laser Doppler Flowmetry for Dynamic Assessment of Femoral Head Perfusion to Pre-
dict the Osteonecrosis Rate Following Modied Dunn Procedure
Courtney Selberg, MD
ePoster 128
2018 POSNA Start Up Research Grant
Evaluating the Role of Patellar Realignment in Patients with CP
Joshua Hyman, MD
81
Video Abstract 1
Talo-Calcaneal Coalition Resection with Ankle Arthroscopy
Indranil Kushare, MD; Shane Ford, PA-C; Kristen Kastan;
John Shilt, PA-C
Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
Video Abstract 2
Graft Preparation Technique for All Soft Tissue Quadriceps Tendon Autograft
for ACL Reconstruction
Benjamin Forst PA-C; Lauren Peters PA-C; Dennis Hiller; Tomasina Leska BS;
Theodore Ganley, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Video Abstract 3
Pediatric Medial Epicondyle Humerus Fractures: Open Reduction and Internal Fixation
James Bomar, MPH; Andrew Pennock, MD; Eric Edmonds, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, San Diego, CA
Video Abstract 4
Surgical Management of Central Polydactyly of the Foot with Advancement Flaps
David Elbert Westberry, MD; Ashley M. Carpenter, BS; Allison Rodriguez, BS
Shriners Hospital for Children: Greenville, Greenville, SC
Video Abstract 5
Pediatric Trigger Thumb Release: Surgical Technique
Sonia Chaudhry, MD
Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, Hartford, CT
Video Abstract 6
Intra-articular Radial Head Fracture with an Entrapped Fragment in a 6-year-old Girl
Barbara Minkowitz, MD; Jennifer Rachelle Ristic, PA-C; Eytan Mendelow, BS; Camryn Myers
Atlantic Health Systems , Morristown, NJ
Video Abstract 7
Posterior Approach to the Lateral Condyle Fracture - A Pediatric Cadaver Video Simulation
Tyler Stavinoha, MD; Kevin G. Shea, MD
Stanford University Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford, CA
Video Abstract 8
Fully Waterproof One-legged Spica Cast for Femur Fractures
Barbara Minkowitz, MD; Jennifer Rachelle Ristic, PA-C; Eytan Mendelow, BS; Violet Wallerstein
Atlantic Health Systems, Morristown, NJ
Video Abstract 9
Roux-Goldthwait Procedure and MPFL Reconstruction in a Skeletally Immature Female for Recurrent
Patella Dislocation
Barbara Minkowitz, MD; Anthony James Scillia, MD; Jennifer Rachelle Ristic, PA-C;
Eytan Mendelow, BS; Camryn Myers
Atlantic Health Systems, Morristown, NJ
VIDEO ABSTRACTS
82
VIDEO ABSTRACTS
, CONTINUED
Video Abstract 10
Open Reduction and Fixation of Acute Sternoclavicular Fracture-Dislocations in Children
Ishaan Swarup, MD; Michael S. Hughes, MD; Alejandro Cazzulino, BA; David Andrew Spiegel, MD;
Apurva Shah, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Video Abstract 11
Operative Fixation of a Triphalangeal Thumb
Andrew Anthony Dobitsch, BA; Ashok Para; Daniel Coban; Yaroslav Basyuk, MD; Alice Chu, MD
Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ
Video Abstract 12
A Case of Bilateral Acrosyndactyly from Constriction Ring Syndrome
Daniel Coban; Ashok Para; Andrew Anthony Dobitsch, BA; Yaroslav Basyuk, MD; Alice Chu, MD
Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ
Video Abstract 13
Anterior Approach and Capital Realignment for Severe Slips
Sandeep Patwardhan, MS; Ashok Shyam, MS
Sancheti Institute for Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Pune Maharashtra, India
Video Abstract 14
Medial Soft Tissue Imbrication with Lateral Release for Pediatric Patellofemoral Instability
Folorunsho Edobor-Osula, MD; Zuhdi Abdo, MD
Rutgers- New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ
Video Abstract 15
Technique for Elongation, Derotation, Flexion Casting Using a Modied Jackson Table
Blake Montgomery, MD; Kali R Tileston, MD; Japsimran Kaur, BS; Nicole Alexandria Segovia, BS;
Dan Kym, BS; Meghan N. Imrie, MD; James Policy, MD; Lawrence A. Rinsky, MD; John Vorhies, MD
Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
Video Abstract 16
Osteochondral Allograft with Open Surgical Hip Dislocation
William T. Baumgartner, MD; Brian Michael Haus, MD; Trevor J. Shelton, MD
University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA
Video Abstract 17
Armboard Technique for Reduction Pinning Paediatric Supracondylar Fractures
Sandeep Patwardhan, MS; Parag Sancheti, MD; Ashok Shyam, MS
Sancheti Institute for Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Pune Maharashtra, India
83
POSNA ANTITRUST POLICY
It shall be the policy of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) to be in strict
compliance with all Federal and State Antitrust laws, rules and regulations. Therefore: These policies
and procedures apply to all membership, board, committee, and all meetings attended by representa-
tives of the POSNA.
Discussions at POSNA meetings often cover a broad range of topics pertinent to the interests or
concerns of orthopaedic surgeons. As a general rule, except as noted below, discussions at POSNA
meetings can address topics without raising antitrust concerns if the discussions are kept scrupulously
free of even the suggestion of private regulation of the profession. However, a number of topics that
might be (and have been) discussed at POSNA meetings may raise signicant complex antitrust con-
cerns. These include:
Membership admissions, rejections, restrictions, and terminations;
Method of provision and sale of POSNA products and services to non-members;
Restrictions in the selection and requirements for exhibitors at the POSNA Annual Meeting or
in CME activities;
Collecting and distributing certain orthopaedic practice information, particularly involving
practice charges and costs;
Obtaining and distributing orthopaedic industry price and cost information;
Professional certication programs;
Group buying and selling; and
Inclusions or exclusion of other medical societies in organizational activities or offerings.
When these and related topics are discussed, the convener or members of the POSNA group should
seek counsel from its General Counsel.
POSNA urges its Board, committees and other groups not to participate in discussions that may give
the appearance of or constitute an agreement that would violate the antitrust laws. Notwithstanding
this reliance, it is the responsibility of each POSNA Board or committee member to avoid raising
improper subjects for discussion. This policy has been prepared to ensure that POSNA members and
other participants in POSNA meetings are aware of this obligation.
The “Do Not’s” and “Do’s” presented below highlight only the most basic antitrust principles. POSNA
members and others participating in POSNA meetings should consult with the General Counsel in all
cases involving specic questions, interpretations or advice regarding antitrust matters.
Do Not’s
1. Do not, in fact or appearance, discuss or exchange information regarding:
a. Individual company prices, price changes, price differentials, mark-ups, discounts, allowances,
credit terms, etc. or any other data that may bear on price, such as costs, production,
capacity, inventories, sales, etc.
b. Raising, lowering or “stabilizing” orthopaedic prices or fees;
c. What constitutes a fair prot or margin level;
d. The availability of products or services; or
e. The allocation of markets, territories or patients.
2. Do not suggest or imply that POSNA members should or should not deal with certain other
persons or companies.
3. Do not foster unfair practices regarding advertising, standardization, certication or accreditation.
4. Do not discuss or exchange information regarding the above matters during social gatherings,
incidental to POSNA-sponsored meetings.
POSNA ANTITRUST POLICY
5. Do not make oral or written statements on important issues on behalf of POSNA without
appropriate authority to do so.
The Do’s
1. Do adhere to prepared agenda for all POSNA meetings. It is generally permissible for agendas to
include discussions of such varied topics as professional economic trends, advances and problems
in relevant technology or research, various aspects of the science and art of management, and
relationships with local, state or federal governments.
2. Do object whenever meeting summaries do not accurately reect the matters that occurred.
3. Do consult with General Counsel on all antitrust questions relating to discussions at POSNA meetings.
4. Do object to and do not participate in any discussions or meeting activities that you believe
violate the antitrust laws; dissociate yourself from any such discussions or activities and leave any
meeting in which they continue.
Special Guidelines for Collecting and Distributing Information
The collection and distribution of information regarding business practices is a traditional function of
associations and is well-recognized under the law as appropriate, legal and consistent with the antitrust
laws. However, if conducted improperly, such information gathering and distributing activities might
be viewed as facilitating an express or implied agreement among association members to adhere to
the same business practices. For this reason, special general guidelines have developed over time
regarding association’s reporting on information collected from and disseminated to members. Any
exceptions to these general guidelines should be made only after discussion with General Counsel.
These general guidelines include:
1. Member participation in a statistical reporting program is voluntary. A statistical reporting
program should be conducted without coercion or penalty. Non-members should be allowed to
participate in a statistical reporting program if eligible; however, if a fee is involved, non-members
may be charged a reasonably higher fee than members.
2. Information should be collected via a written instrument that clearly sets forth what is being
requested.
3. The data that is collected should be about past transactions or activities; particularly if the survey
deals with prices and price terms (including charges, costs, wages, benets, discounts, etc.), it
should be historic, i.e., more than three months old.
4. The data should be collected by either POSNA or an independent third party not connected with
any one member.
5. Data on individual orthopaedic surgeons should be kept condential.
6. There should be a sufcient number of participants to prevent specic responses or data from
being attributable to any one respondent. As a general rule, there should be at least ve
respondents reporting data upon which any statistic or item is based, and no individual’s data
should represent more than 25% on a weighted average of that statistic or item.
7.
Composite/aggregate data should be available to all participants – both members and non-members.
The data may be categorized, e.g., geographically, and ranges and averages may be used. No
member should be given access to the raw data. Disclosure of individual data could serve to
promote uniformity and reduce competition.
8. As a general rule, there should be no discussion or agreement as to how members and
non-members should adjust, plan or carry out their practices based on the results of the survey.
Each member should analyze the data and make business decisions independently.
POSNA ANTITRUST POLICY
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84
85
2020 POSNA RESEARCH GRANT WINNERS
2020 KUO MEMORIAL RESEARCH AWARD
Apurva Shah, MD
“Opioid vs. Non-opioid Analgesia in Pediatric Supracondylar Humerus Fractures”
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
2020 HUENE MEMORIAL RESEARCH AWARD
Theodore Ganley, MD
“Tibial Spine Fractures Prospective Cohort Study”
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
2020 ST. GILES YOUNG INVESTIGATOR RESEARCH AWARD
Neeraj Patel, MD
“Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction in Children: A Randomized, Controlled Trial”
Lurie Children’s Hospital
2020 POSNA/ZIMMER BIOMET SPINE RESEARCH GRANT
John Vorhies, MD
“Erector Spinae Plane Catheters and Clinical Outcomes after Spinal Fusion”
Stanford University
2020 CLINICAL TRIAL PLANNING RESEARCH GRANT
Firoz Miyanji, MD
“Effect of Mix-Metal Instrumentation on Blood Metal Ion Levels in Scoliosis”
University of British Columbia
2020 POSNA DIRECTED RESEARCH GRANTS
Peter Newton, MD
“Post-Op Flexibility & Segmental Motion in Idiopathic Scoliosis – Anterior Spinal Growth Tethering vs.
Posterior Spinal Fusion”
Rady Children’s Hospital
Michael Vitale, MD
“Evaluation of Sagittal and Axial Parameters in Braced Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Patient”
Columbia University Medical Center
2020 POSNA REGISTRY GRANT
Andrea Bauer, MD
“GUPI: Growing Up with a Plexus Injury”
Boston Children’s Hospital
2020 AWARD WINNERS
2020 POSNA RESEARCH GRANTS - BASIC RESEARCH
Jason Howard, MD
“Muscle Stiffness in Cerebral Palsy: The Effect of Botulinum Toxin”
Nemours/Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children
Yinshi Ren, PhD; Harry Kim, MD, CoPI
“Determining the Effect of Obesity on Necrotic Bone Healing in Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease”
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children
Jennifer Laine, MD
“Development of a Minimally Invasive Model of Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease”
Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare
2020 POSNA RESEARCH GRANT – CLINICAL RESEARCH
Kristen Tulchin-Francis, PhD
“Outcomes of Amputation or Limb Reconstruction in Severe Fibular Deciency”
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children
2020 POSNA START UP RESEARCH GRANTS
Stefan Parent, MD
“Lung Development & Congenital Spine Deformities: An In-vivo Ovine Model”
CHU Sainte-Justine, Montreal
Haluk Altiok, MD
“The Effect of Knee Height Asymmetry on Gait Biomechanics”
Shriners Hospital for Children, Chicago
Dec 01 05, 2020 Orlando, FL
International Pediatric
Orthopaedic Symposium
IPOS
17th Annual
Todd Milbrandt, MD
Course Director
2020 AWARD WINNERS
, CONTINUED
86
1 Tower Lane, Suite 2410
Oakbrook Terrace, IL 60181
(847) 698-1692
FAX (847) 268-9694
posna.org
FUTURE ANNUAL MEETINGS
May 11–15, 2021
Dallas, Texas
May 11–14, 2022
Vancouver, BC, Canada
April 26–29, 2023
Nashville, Tennessee
posna.org
orthokids.org
posnacademy.org
ipos.posna.org
FUTURE IPOS MEETINGS
December 1–5, 2020
Orlando, FL
December 7–11, 2021
Orlando, FL
December 6–10, 2022
Orlando, FL