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POSNA AM19 Abbrev Final Program : simplebooklet.com

PROGRAM CHAIR
MICHELLE CAIRD, MD
PRE-COURSE CHAIR
BRIAN SCANNELL, MD
SUBSPECIALTY DAY CHAIR
JEFFREY MARTUS, MD
LOCAL HOSTS
BRIAN BRIGHTON, MD
VIRGINIA CASEY, MD
POSNA
2019
ANNUAL MEETING
CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA
MAY 15 – 18, 2019
Fearless leadership
Congratulations to Stanford Children’s Steven Frick, MD,
on a successful POSNA presidency. That’s just one example
of our faculty’s leadership in pediatric orthopedics:
New scoliosis treatments. A Stanford preliminary study
found that 3-D printed scoliosis braces were as eective
as traditional braces and patients said they were more
comfortable and easier to take on and o. We are one
of the few hospitals in the country testing this approach.
Our surgeons also use innovative MAGEC spine-
lengthening rods.
More research. Our faculty are engaged in more than
80 ongoing research projects on topics including VR
use in the clinic, shoulder pain in swimmers, and activity
levels and bracing compliance in clubfoot patients, and
have published almost 50 papers in 2019.
Better imaging. Our EOS low-dose imaging system
helps reduce radiation exposure. And we use custom
technology to obtain high-resolution 4D MRI of knees
and ankles, which takes only 10 minutes but yields
detailed thinner slices that enable viewing anatomic
structures in any orientation.
Smarter return-to-sport decisions. Our Motion
Analysis Laboratory captures the body’s motion and
force and translates it into actionable data and
custom recovery plans.
Learn more at ortho.stanfordchildrens.org
or by calling (844) 41-ORTHO.
1
Program Committee.........................................2
President’s Welcome ........................................3
Board of Directors ..........................................5
Acknowledgments ..........................................6
Local Hosts’ Welcome .......................................7
General Meeting Information.............................. 8 - 10
CME Credit................................................8
Disclosure and FDA Statement ................................9
Annual Meeting Policies.....................................11
LOE Levels of Evidence .....................................12
Program at a Glance.................................... 14 - 15
POSNA Pre-Course .................................... 17 - 19
Opening Ceremony Program .................................20
Speakers & Award Recipients............................. 21 - 23
Scientic Program...................................... 25 - 74
Symposia Program ..................................... 35 - 41
Young Member Forum ......................................42
Subspecialty Day ...................................... 47 - 69
Video Abstracts Program ................................ 75 - 76
Paper Poster Program .................................. 77 - 79
ePoster Program....................................... 80 - 90
Explore Charlotte ...................................... 91 - 93
Exhibitor Listing ...................................... 94 - 100
POSNA Antitrust Policy ............................... 102 - 103
2019 Research Grant & Award Winners ................... 104 - 105
POSNA extends sincere appreciation to
NuVasive
for their support of the production of the Final Program Book
TABLE OF CONTENTS

PRE-COURSE COMMITTEE
Chair
Brian Scannell, MD
Committee
Lindsay Andras, MD A. Noelle Larson, MD Wudbhav (Woody) Sankar, MD
PROGRAM COMMITTEE
Chair
Michelle Caird, MD
Committee
Jeffrey Martus, MD Wudbhav (Woody) Sankar, MD Jeffrey Sawyer, MD
ABOUT POSNA
The Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) is a group of
professionals comprised mostly of pediatric orthopaedic surgeons.
We are board certied in orthopaedic surgery and have participated
in additional training to become specialized in the care of children’s
musculoskeletal health and our practice reects this dedication.
We, as a group, strive to become the authoritative source on such care through
appropriate research that will lead to the best evidence-based patient care.
POSNA MISSION STATEMENT
To improve the care of children with musculoskeletal disorders
through education, research, and advocacy.
CONNECT WITH POSNA DURING THE MEETING
AND SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCES
#POSNA2019
@POSNA_org Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA)
Websites: POSNA.org and orthokids.org
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WELCOME
3
Dear Colleagues,
Gear up and get ready for the 2019 POSNA Annual Meeting and Pre-Course! On behalf of our local
co-hosts Brian Brighton and his wife, Erin Brighton, and Virginia Casey and her husband, Kevin
Casey, our Program Chair Michelle Caird and the Program Committee Jeffrey Martus, Wudbhav
(Woody) Sankar, and Jeffrey Sawyer, our Executive Director Teri Stech and her staff, as well as the
numerous POSNA volunteers who have worked to make this meeting a success, we welcome you.
The meeting will be at the Charlotte Convention Center, from May 15 to 18, 2019, with the primary
meeting hotel The Westin across the street.
Take a spin around the POSNA Annual Meeting track and check out all the meeting has to offer this year:
The meeting kicks off with the Pre-Course entitled “Improving Patient Care through Well-
ness, Teamwork, and Organizational Changes”, developed and chaired by Brian Scannell.
Wayne Sotile, a physician with decades of experience assisting physicians with work-life
issues, Surgeon Master Jeffrey Smith, and some our own POSNA experts share knowledge
that will help you take better care of yourself so you can take better care of your patients.
The Opening Ceremony will take place on Wednesday evening, highlighted with the
Howard Steel Lecture presented by Aric Almirola, nicknamed The Cuban Missile”, an American
NASCAR professional race car driver. It also allows us to recognize our industry partners and
honor Dick Gross for the Humanitarian Award and Wudbhav (Woody) Sankar for the Special
Effort and Excellence Award. A cocktail welcome reception will follow the Opening Ceremony.
A diverse Symposia Program will cover many topics: Refugee Health (COUR), Strategies for
Pediatric Orthopedic Education in the Modern Era (Educate the Educator), Innovation and
Technology, Coding and Documentation Guidelines (POPS), QSVI and Industry debates
(Research Symposium) and nally meeting the guidelines of the ACS Committee on Trauma
in your practice (Trauma).
The Fifth Annual Arabella Leet, MD Young Member Forum will be held Thursday over
lunchtime, developed and chaired by Jennifer Weiss.
Friday morning will begin with the Basic Science and Clinical Awards Papers followed by the
presentation of the Distinguished Achievement Award. The awards committee has selected
Perry Schoenecker for the Distinguished Achievement Award. Peter Waters will be the
Presidential Speaker and will be sharing his perspective from a lifetime of experience as a
leader, thinker and mentor in pediatric orthopaedics. Friday morning will also be the
presidential transfer, to incoming POSNA President, Steve Albanese.
Friday’s Subspecialty Day led by experts and leaders in pediatric orthopaedics will highlight
sessions in Foot & Ankle/Hand, Hip, Lower Extremity/Neuromuscular, Sports, Spine, and
Trauma.
The closing night celebration will be at NASCAR Hall of Fame, just a short walk from the
Westin. Food, Drink and entertainment will be provided. Remember to dress for a day at the
NASCAR track! You will not want to miss out on this memorable evening with your friends
and family.
Be sure to make a pit stop at the Video Abstracts, which are new to POSNA this year, along
with the returning Posters and ePosters.
As part of POSNA’S Physician Wellness initiative, Thursday afternoon will be free for attendees to
refuel and explore Charlotte. Check the POSNA website for a long list of activity options. Thursday
evening, as always, is reserved for family, friends and fellowship reunions, with a wide variety of
outstanding restaurants to experience in Charlotte.
The educational and social program for this 2019 POSNA Annual Meeting is outstanding. Ladies
and Gentlemen, Start Your Engines. Welcome to the POSNA Annual Meeting!
Steve Frick, MD
POSNA President
STEVEN FRICK, MD
PRESIDENT
Dr. Frick is Professor of Orthopaaedic Surgery and Pediatric Endocrinology (Courtesy)
and Vice Chairman – Education at Stanford University School of Medicine Depart-
ment of Orthopaedic Surgery, and Chief of Pediatric Orthopaedics at Stanford
Children’s Health. A native of Greenville, South Carolina, he graduated from The
George Washington University and the Medical University of South Carolina. He
completed orthopaedic surgery residency and a basic science research fellowship
at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte NC, and a fellowship in pediatric orthopaedic surgery at
Children’s Hospital San Diego. He served from 1998-2012 on the faculty and as Residency Program
Director in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Carolinas Medical Center. He was the founding
Chairman of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Nemours Children’s Hospital in Orlando, FL
from 2012-2016, and also served as Surgeon-in-Chief and Chairman of the Department of Surgery. His
academic interests include clubfoot and foot/ankle disorders, trauma, hip dysplasia, growth, leader-
ship, professionalism, and graduate medical education. He is a member of the Eastside High School
and The George Washington University Athletic Halls of Fame, and has been honored by the AOA as a
North American Traveling Fellow (2001) and an American-British-Canadian Traveling Fellow (2007), and
as an AAOS Leadership Fellow (2002-3). He is active in organized medicine, currently serving as the
President of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America. He has previously chaired different
committees for both the American Orthopaedic Association and the American Academy of Orthopae-
dic Surgeons as well as Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America.
He lives in Redwood City, CA with his wife of 32 years, Lisa. Their son Eric is an attorney in Charlotte,
NC, and daughter Rachel is an occupational therapist in Philadelphia, PA. Current favorite interests
outside orthopaedics include reading, cycling, golf, and hiking/exploring Northern California with Lisa
and their Vizsla, Reese.
STEPHEN ALBANESE, MD
INCOMING PRESIDENT
Stephen Albanese, MD is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at SUNY Upstate Medi-
cal University in Syracuse, New York. He has been department chair and residency
program director at Upstate since 2000. Dr. Albanese received his undergradu-
ate degree in electrical engineering from Bucknell University and MD from SUNY
Buffalo College of Medicine. He completed orthopedic surgery residency at SUNY
Upstate Medical University and pediatric orthopedic surgery fellowship at the
Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario.
Dr. Albanese’s academic interests have focused on education, accreditation and certication. He has
chaired the AAOS Committee on Evaluation (1996-2001), been a mentor in the AAOS leadership fel-
lows program and completed two terms as a member of the AAOS Council on Education (1996-2001,
2005-09). Dr. Albanese has been a member at large on the AAOS Board of Directors (2002-2004). He
served seven years (2005-2012) on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)
Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Review Committee (RRC) and was chair the nal 3 years. He served
a 6 year term (2012-2018) on the ACGME Board of Directors and chaired the Program Requirements
Committee (2016-2018). He served as a member of the American Orthopaedic Association Academic
Leadership Committee (2006-2012). During his ten year term (2007-2017) on the American Board of
Orthopaedic Surgery Board of Directors he chaired the Oral Examination Committee (2010-2012), was
active in the question writing task force and served as President (2013-2014).
Dr. Albanese’s clinical interests are pediatric orthopaedics and spine deformity. He chaired the Scoliosis
Research Society Morbidity and Mortality Committee (1998-2000). He served as a member at large
on the POSNA Board of Directors (2004-06) and chaired the Education (2000-2002) and Health Care
Delivery Councils (2014-2017). In addition, he has served on the Terminology and Nomenclature, Data
Management, Education, and Practice Management Committees for POSNA.
His sister, Dr. Margaret Albanese, is also an active member of POSNA. Dr. Albanese lives in Upstate
New York with Eileen, his wife of 33 years. They have two sons, Matt and Kevin, who are currently
Orthopedic Surgery Residents.
4
PRESIDENT
Steven Frick, MD
Palo Alto, CA
PRESIDENT-ELECT
Stephen Albanese, MD
East Syracuse, NY
VICE PRESIDENT
Michael Vitale, MD
New York, NY
SECRETARY
Todd Milbrandt, MD
Rochester, MN
TREASURER
Mark Erickson, MD
Aurora, CO
TREASURER-ELECT
Michelle Caird, MD
Ann Arbor, MI
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT
Richard Schwend, MD
Kansas City, MO
PAST PRESIDENT
James McCarthy, MD, MHCM
Cincinnati, OH
JUNIOR MEMBER AT LARGE
Brian Brighton, MD
Charlotte, NC
JUNIOR MEMBER AT LARGE
Firoz Miyanji, MD
Vancouver, BC, Canada
JUNIOR MEMBER AT LARGE
Matthew Oetgen, MD
Washington, DC
SENIOR MEMBER AT LARGE
Daniel Sucato, MD
Dallas, TX
SENIOR MEMBER AT LARGE
Vishwas Talwalker, MD
Lexington, KY
SENIOR MEMBER AT LARGE
Ira Zaltz, MD
Royal Oak, MI
AAP REPRESENTATIVE, Ex-ofcio
Brian Shaw, MD
Colorado Springs, CO
COMMUNICATIONS COUNCIL CHAIR,
Ex-ofcio
Robert Cho, MD
Pasadena, CA
EDUCATION COUNCIL CHAIR, Ex-ofcio
Martin Herman, MD
Philadelphia, PA
HEALTH CARE DELIVERY COUNCIL CHAIR,
Ex-ofcio
Michael Hresko, MD
Boston, MA
HISTORIAN, Ex-ofcio
William Shaughnessy, MD
Rochester, MN
IPOS REPRESENTATIVE, Ex-ofcio
Donald Bae, MD
Boston, MA
QSVI COUNCIL CHAIR, Ex-ofcio
Kevin Shea, MD
Boise, ID
RESEARCH COUNCIL CHAIR, Ex-ofcio
Paul Sponseller
Baltimore, MD
EDITOR IN CHIEF, JPO, Ex-ofcio
Robert Hensinger, MD
Ann Arbor, MI
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
5
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America gratefully acknowledges the following
for their generous nancial support for 2019. We sincerely appreciate each of these
companies for helping POSNA fulll its goals of providing education and fostering research.
HOWARD STEEL FOUNDATION
ST. GILES FOUNDATION
ANGELA S.M. KUO MEMORIAL FUND
DOUBLE DIAMOND LEVEL
DIAMOND LEVEL
PLATINUM LEVEL
Zimmer Biomet
GOLD LEVEL
Arthrex BioMarin Pharmaceutical
Globus Medical Pega Medical
SILVER LEVEL
Children’s Mercy Kansas City Nemours/Alfred duPont Hospital for Children
Stanford Children’s Health Wright Medical
BRONZE LEVEL
7D Surgical Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare Medicrea, USA
Merete Technologies, Inc.
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WELCOME
Dear friends and fellow pediatric orthopedic surgeons,
We are looking forward to having you visit Charlotte, North Carolina for the Annual POSNA
meeting from May 15-18, 2019. This year’s scientic program under the direction of our
president, Steve Frick and program chair, Michelle Caird promises to be nothing less than
outstanding. We also will have a fantastic Pre-Course coordinated by Brian Scannell.
Charlotte is located in the Piedmont of North Carolina and is known as the “Queen City” after
King George III’s wife, Queen Charlotte. Charlotte is the most populous city in North Carolina
and is known for being second largest banking center in the United States.
Charlotte is also home to the US National Whitewater Center which boasts a wide variety of
adventure sports and outdoor activities including rafting, kayaking, rock climbing, zip lining,
mountain biking and hiking trails as well as food and entertainment. You can look forward to
reconnecting with your fellow pediatric orthopedic surgeons from across the country/world
while enjoying the activities of the Whitewater Center or a number of recreational activities
offered in Charlotte including cycling, tennis, golf, and soccer on Thursday afternoon.
The NASCAR Hall of Fame is a short walk from the hotels and convention center located in
“Uptown” Charlotte which is what Charlotteans call the central business district usually known
as downtown. Assemble your best pit crew and compete for the top spot while visiting the
simulated speedway experience at the NASCAR Hall of Fame for the Friday night reception.
We welcome our POSNA friends to come to Charlotte and enjoy our abundant outdoor
activities, delicious local barbeque, and a lively local brewery scene, while visiting with
colleagues, and sharing new ideas and experiences.
Virginia Casey, Local Host
Brian Brighton, Local Host
Romare Bearden Park
Courtesy of charlottesgotalot.com
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GENERAL MEETING INFORMATION
8
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
OBJECTIVE 1: Learn about the latest advances in pediatric orthopaedic surgery
OBJECTIVE 2: Obtain opinions of world-renowned thought leaders in the eld
OBJECTIVE 3: Use the information obtained to make improvements in their own practices
OBJECTIVE 4: Fulll the annual meeting requirements for membership in POSNA
ACCREDITATION
This Annual Meeting of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America has been planned and
implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation
Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the American
Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and POSNA.
The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing
medical education for physicians.
CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION
The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons designates this live activity for a maximum of
19 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the
extent of their participation in the activity.
Scientic Program 12.75
Subspecialty Day 3.00
Symposia Program 2.00
Young Member Forum 1.25
ONSITE REGISTRATION
POSNA MEETING REGISTRATION
POSNA Member: ............. $ 775
Non-member: ............... $ 1025
Resident/Fellow**: ............ $ 550
RN/PA/Allied Health: .......... $ 550
Delegates from Reduced Rate Countries:
Low Income: ............. $ 475
Low-Middle Income: ....... $ 550
Accompanying Person***: ...... $ 325
Senior Members: ............. $ 375
Children 13-17, per child: ...... $ 100
Children 6-12, per child: ....... $ 10
* Friday Subspecialty Day registration is Friday only, and includes breakfast, the morning scientic
paper sessions, afternoon sessions, and the Closing Reception in the evening.
** Residents/Fellows must have the phone number and signature of their Chief of Service on their
registration form to qualify for the reduced fee. Without a signature and phone number, you
will be charged the non-member fee.
*** Accompanying Persons must be registered in order to attend any function,
including optional events.
PRE-COURSE REGISTRATION
Member: ................... $ 150
Non-member: ............... $ 200
RN/PA/Allied Health: .......... $ 100
Resident/Fellow**: ............ $ 100
FRIDAY SUBSPECIALTY DAY REGISTRATION*
Friday ONLY – Member: ....... $ 250
Friday ONLY – Non-member: ... $ 300
Friday ONLY – Allied Health: .... $ 200
Friday ONLY – Resident/Fellow: . $ 200
8.4 hours may be used for
external trauma-related CMEs.
Presentations denoted with
are eligible for these credits.
GENERAL MEETING INFORMATION
9
BADGES
Badges are required for entrance to all POSNA functions and events, including scientic sessions and
the Exhibit Hall. Lost badges may be replaced at the POSNA registration desk, located outside
Richardson Ballroom AB. White Annual Meeting Registration Blue Pre-Course Registration
Green Friday Only
EVENT CANCELLATION
Due to circumstances beyond our control, the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America may
elect to cancel the Annual Meeting. These circumstances may include but are not limited to disaster,
severe weather, civil commotion or government laws or regulations. In the event of such cancellation,
all Annual Meeting registrants will be notied by email at the address noted in the POSNA database;
and registration fees will be refunded in full. Other costs incurred by the registrant, such as airline or
hotel penalties, are the responsibility of the registrant.
DISCLOSURE
Each faculty member in this meeting has been asked to disclose if he or she has received something
of value from a commercial company or institution, which relates directly or indirectly to the subject of
their presentation.
An indication of the participant’s disclosure appears after his or her name as well as the commercial
company or institution that provided the support. POSNA does not view the existence of these dis-
closed interests or commitments as necessarily implying bias or decreasing the value of the author’s
participation in the meeting.
FDA STATEMENT
Some drugs or medical devices demonstrated at this meeting may not have been cleared by the FDA
or have been cleared by the FDA for specic purposes only. The FDA has stated that it is the responsi-
bility of the physician to determine the FDA clearance status of each drug or medical device he or she
wishes to use in clinical practice.
Academy policy provides that ‘off label’ uses of a drug or medical device may be described in the
Academy’s CME activities so long as the “off label” use of the drug or medical device is also specical-
ly disclosed (ie., it must be disclosed that the FDA has not cleared the drug or device for the described
purpose). Any drug or medical device is being used “off label” if the described use is not set forth on
the product’s approval label.
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical
device for the use described (ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
SPEAKER READY ROOM INFORMATION
POSNA REQUIRES ALL ELECTRONIC PRESENTATIONS TO BE MADE USING THE CENTRAL
COMPUTER SYSTEM. No Laptop computers will be allowed.
Note: All presentations (including concurrent sessions) MUST be uploaded in the Speaker Ready Room
located in the General Session room, Richardson Ballroom CD.
HOURS OF OPERATION:
Wednesday, May 15 6:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Thursday, May 16 6:30 AM – 1:00 PM
Friday, May 17 6:30 AM – 5:00 PM
Saturday, May 18 7:00 AM – 12:00 PM
GENERAL MEETING INFORMATION
VIDEO ABSTRACTS, PAPER POSTERS AND EPOSTERS
Video Abstracts, Paper Posters, and ePosters will be located in the hall outside Richardson Ballroom CD.
LANGUAGE
English will be the ofcial language at POSNA.
LOST AND FOUND
Lost and found inquiries may contact security at (704) 339-6096.
NURSING ROOM
The nursing room is located in the women’s restroom near Ballroom B.
SAFETY INFORMATION
EMERGENCY NUMBERS
City Police Emergency: 911
City Police Non-Emergency: 311 (if outside Charlotte dial 704-336-7600)
Poison Control: (800)222-1222 (Nationwide)
NEAREST HOSPITAL AND URGENT CARE
Nearest Hospital and Urgent Care
Novant Health Presbyterian Medical Center
200 Hawthorne Ln, Charlotte, NC 28204
(704) 384-4000
2.0 miles
Atrium Health Urgent Care Morehead
1426 E Morehead St, Charlotte, NC 28204
(704) 446-6090
8 miles
CVS Pharmacy
210 E Trade St, Charlotte, NC 28202
(704) 971-1254
Operation Hours: M-F 8:00 AM-8:00 PM,
Saturday 10:00 AM-6:00 PM,
Sunday 12:00 PM-4:00 PM
.4 miles
Walgreens
101 S Tryon St Ste 22, Charlotte, NC 28280
(704) 334-6262
Operation Hours: 7:00 AM-10:00 PM
.4 miles
10
ANNUAL MEETING POLICIES
DISCLAIMER
The material presented at the Annual Meeting has been made available by the Pediatric Orthopaedic
Society of North America for educational purposes only. The material is not intended to represent the
only, nor necessarily best, method or procedure appropriate for the medical situations discussed, but
rather is intended to present an approach, view, statement or opinion of the faculty which may be
helpful to others who face similar situations.
POSNA disclaims any and all liability for injury or other damages resulting to any individual attending
the Annual Meeting and for all claims which may arise out of the use of the techniques demonstrated
therein by such individuals, whether these claims shall be asserted by physician or any other person.
INSURANCE/LIABILITIES
POSNA will not be held liable for personal injuries or for loss or damage to property incurred by partic-
ipants or guests at the Pre-Course or Meeting, including those participating in tours and social events.
Participants and guests are encouraged to take out insurance to cover losses incurred in the event of
cancellation, medical expenses, or damage to or loss of personal effects when traveling outside their
own country.
POSNA cannot be held liable for any hindrance or disruption of the Meeting arising from natural,
political, social or economic events or other unforeseen incidents beyond its control. Registration of a
participant implies acceptance of this condition.
PRIVACY POLICY - USE OF PERSONAL INFORMATION
Annual Meeting registration lists, including the registrant’s name and postal mailing address are
provided to POSNAs sponsors as a sponsor benet.
REPRODUCTION POLICY
POSNA reserves any and all rights to materials presented at the Annual Meeting, including Video
Abstracts, Paper Posters, and ePosters. Reproductions of any kind, by any person or entity, without
prior written permission from POSNA, are strictly prohibited. Prohibited reproductions include, but are
not limited to, audiotapes, videotape, and/or still photography. Cameras or video cameras may not
be used in any portion of the scientic sessions. Persons violating this policy may have their badge
conscated and be escorted from the meeting. No unapproved surveys, handouts, or literature may be
distributed at the meeting.
PHOTOGRAPHY
Registration and attendance at, or participation in, POSNA activities constitutes an agreement by the
registrant to allow POSNA to capture, retain, and utilize (both now and in the future) the attendees’
image, likeness, voice, and actions, whether captured live or recorded and in any format, during the
Annual Meeting, for display, exhibition, publication, or reproduction in any medium or context for any
purpose, including but not limited to, POSNA member communications, commercial or promotional
purposes.
NO SMOKING POLICY
Smoking is not permitted during any meeting or event.
11
12
LEVELS OF EVIDENCE
FOR PRIMARY RESEARCH QUESTIONS
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FULL PROGRAM CAN BE FOUND IN THE 2019 MEETING APP
Access the meeting app by downloading My POSNA
from the Apple App or Google Play store.
MEETING AT A GLANCE
14
TUESDAY, MAY 14
Board of Directors Meeting 7:00 AM–3:00 PM Westin, Providence Ballroom 1
Registration 4:00 PM–6:00 PM CC Richardson Ballroom Foyer
POPS Meeting 8:00 AM–5:00 PM Westin, Grand Ballroom AB
WEDNESDAY, MAY 15
Fellowship Directors Meeting 6:30 AM–7:30 AM Westin, Uptown III
Registration 6:30 AM–5:00 PM CC Richardson Ballroom Foyer
Pre-Course Breakfast/Exhibits 7:00 AM–8:00 AM CC Richardson Ballroom AB
Pre-Course 8:00 AM–12:00 PM CC Richardson Ballroom CD
Coffee Break/Exhibits 9:35 AM–9:55 AM CC Richardson Ballroom AB
Scientic Program 1:00 PM–3:05 PM CC Richardson Ballroom CD
Coffee Break/Exhibits 3:05 PM–3:30 PM CC Richardson Ballroom AB
Concurrent Session 1 3:30 PM–5:05 PM CC Richardson Ballroom CD
Concurrent Session 2 3:30 PM–5:05 PM CC Rm 217 ABCD
EVENING
Opening Ceremony 6:30 PM–8:00 PM CC Richardson Ballroom CD
Welcome Reception 8:00 PM–9:30 PM CC Ballroom Terrace
THURSDAY, MAY 16
Registration 6:30 AM–12:00 PM CC Richardson Ballroom Foyer
Breakfast/Exhibits 6:30 AM–7:30 AM CC Richardson Ballroom AB
Scientic Program 7:30 AM - 9:33 AM CC Richardson Ballroom CD
Coffee Break/Exhibits 9:33 AM–10:00 AM CC Richardson Ballroom AB
SYMPOSIA PROGRAM
COUR 10:00 AM–12:00 PM CC Room 207ABCD
Educate the Educator 10:00 AM–12:00 PM CC Richardson Ballroom CD
Innovation and Technology 10:00 AM–12:00 PM CC Room 213ABCD
POPS 10:00 AM–2:00 PM CC Room 211AB/212AB
Research 10:00 AM–12:00 PM CC Room 218AB/219AB
Trauma 10:00 AM–12:00 PM CC Room 217ABCD
Young Member Forum 12:15 PM–1:30 PM CC Room 217ABCD
FRIDAY, MAY 17
Registration 6:00 AM–3:30 PM CC Richardson Ballroom Foyer
Breakfast/Exhibits 6:00 AM–7:00 AM CC Richardson Ballroom AB
Scientic Program Award Papers 7:00 AM–10:00 AM CC Richardson Ballroom CD
Coffee Break/Exhibits 9:05 AM–9:25 AM CC Richardson Ballroom AB
Distinguished Achievement Award 10:15 AM–10:30 AM CC Richardson Ballroom CD
*Lunch will be served at the Member Business Meeting
ANNUAL BUSINESS MEETING
All POSNA members are urged to attend the Annual Business Meeting held at the Charlotte Convention
Center in Room 217ABCD. The meeting will be held Friday, May 17th from 11:30 AM-1:00 PM. Lunch will be
provided.
2019 NOMINATING COMMITTEE
In May 2018, the membership elected ve members by ballot to serve on the 2019 Nominating Committee.
President, Steven Frick, MD appointed the Chair of Nominating Committee.
The members of the 2019 Nominating Committee are: Richard Schwend, MD, Chair, Howard Epps, MD,
Lori Karol, MD, James Beaty, MD, Jennifer Weiss, MD, and Peter Waters, MD (alternate).
The 2019 Nominating Committee will present its slate of nominees for each vacancy during the business
meeting, Friday, May 17th.
2020 NOMINATING COMMITTEE
Nominations for the 2020 Nominating Committee will be accepted from the oor during the business
meeting. All members will receive an electronic ballot after the 2019 Annual Meeting, with an
opportunity to cast their votes for nominees to ll the elected positions on the 2020 Nominating
Committee.
15
FRIDAY, MAY 17 (CONTINUED)
2020 Meeting Announcements 10:31 AM–10:38 AM CC Richardson Ballroom CD
Presidential Speaker 10:39 AM–10:59 AM CC Richardson Ballroom CD
Presidential Transfer 11:00 AM–11:10 AM CC Richardson Ballroom CD
Member Business Meeting 11:30 AM–1:00 PM CC Room 217ABCD
SUBSPECIALTY DAY
Hand/Foot 1:30 PM–5:00 PM CC Room 211AB/212AB
Hip 1:30 PM–5:00 PM CC Richardson Ballroom CD
LE/Neuromuscular 1:30 PM–5:00 PM CC Room 213ABCD
Spine 1:30 PM–5:00 PM CC Room 217ABCD
Sports 1:30 PM–5:00 PM CC Room 207ABCD
Trauma 1:30 PM–5:00 PM CC Room 218AB/219AB
Coffee Break/Exhibits 3:05 PM–3:25 PM CC Richardson Ballroom AB
EVENING
Closing Reception 7:30 PM–11:00 PM NASCAR Hall of Fame
SATURDAY, MAY 18
Registration 7:00 AM–12:00 PM CC Richardson Ballroom Foyer
Breakfast 7:00 AM–8:00 AM CC Richardson Ballroom AB
POSNA Board Meeting 8:00 AM–10:00 AM Westin, Providence Ballroom III
Scientic Program 8:00 AM–12:04 PM CC Richardson Ballroom CD
Coffee Break 10:06 AM–10:26 AM CC Richardson Ballroom Foyer
*CC denotes Convention Center
MEETING AT A GLANCE
IMPROVING PATIENT CARE THROUGH WELLNESS,
TEAMWORK, AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES
Chair: Brian Scannell, MD
WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 2019
8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
DESCRIPTION
As pediatric orthopaedic surgeons, we are constantly trying to improve care for our patients.
Often, we overlook important areas that can improve the care of our patients: our own
wellness, our team environment and practice efciency, and our organizational culture.
The purpose of this Pre-Course is to discuss and offer practical improvement strategies for
our own personal resilience, efciency of practice, and organization cultural changes. This
will inform our membership and provide a springboard for discussion on wellness within
POSNA.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of this program, participants should be able to:
OBJECTIVE 1: Appreciate issues surrounding physician burnout and discuss practical tools
for improved physician wellness and resiliency
OBJECTIVE 2: Develop improved strategies to enhance team performance, patient safety
through teamwork, and efciency of practice
OBJECTIVE 3: Understand how to build a culture of wellness/change within your organization
ACCREDITATION
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation
requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education
(ACCME) through the joint providership of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
and the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America. The American Academy of
Orthopaedic Surgeons is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education
for physicians.
CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION
The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons designates this live activity for a maximum
of 3.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Physicians should claim only the credit
commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
PRE-COURSE
17
PRE-COURSE
18
IMPROVING PATIENT CARE THROUGH WELLNESS,
TEAMWORK, AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES
Convention Center Richardson Ballroom CD
WEDNESDAY, MAY 15
8:00 AM–8:05 AM WELCOME AND OVERVIEW
Brian Scannell, MD
INTRODUCTION
Moderator: Brian Scannell, MD
8:05 AM–8:11 AM What is Wellness, Why Talk About Burnout
Vishwas Talwalkar, MD
8:11 AM–8:17 AM Drivers of Burnout
Jennifer Weiss, MD
8:17 AM–8:25 AM Compassionate Care: Making It a Priority and the Science Behind It
Michael Goldberg, MD
PART I: PERSONAL RESILIENCE AND WELLBEING
Moderator: Henry (Hank) Chambers, MD
8:25 AM–8:45 AM Physician Resiliency and Tools for Improved Wellness
Wayne Sotile, PhD
8:45 AM–9:05 AM Surgeon Coaching: Why and How
Jeffrey Smith, MD, FACS, CPC
9:05 AM–9:20 AM Self-Compassion
Wayne Sotile, PhD
9:20 AM–9:35 AM Panel Q&A with
Jeffrey Smith, MD, FACS, CPC;
Wayne Sotile, PhD
9:35 AM–9:55 AM Break
PART II: PERSONAL RESILIENCE AND WELLBEING
Moderator: Cordelia Carter, MD
9:55 AM–10:05 AM Mistakes Made and Lessons Learned: A Mid-Career Pediatric
Orthopaedic Surgeon’s Journey to Sustain Energy and Avoid Burnout
John (Jack) Flynn, MD
10:05 AM–10:15 AM Second Victim Phenomenon: Managing Surgical Complications
John (Tony) Herring, MD
10:15 AM–10:25 AM Panel Q&A with
John (Jack) Flynn, MD;
John (Tony) Herring, MD
TEAM COMPASSION, COLLABORATION, AND
EFFICIENCY OF PRACTICE
Moderator: Wudbhav (Woody) Sankar, MD
10:25 AM–10:35 AM Strategies and Tools to Enhance Team Performance
Daniel Sucato, MD, MS
10:35 AM–10:45 AM Strategies and Tools to Enhance Patient Safety
Kevin Shea, MD
10:45 AM–10:55 AM Improving Efciency of Practice through Deliberate Incremental
Adjustments
Jeffrey Smith, MD, FACS, CPC
10:55 AM–11:10 AM Panel Q&A with
Kevin Shea, MD;
Daniel Sucato, MD, MS;
Jeffrey Smith, MD, FACS, CPC
ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE
Moderator: Michael Goldberg, MD
11:10 AM–11:30 AM Building a Culture of Wellness Within your Organization and
Managing Systems that Don’t Allow Collaborative Care
Harris Baden, MD
11:30 AM–11:40 AM Building a Culture of Wellness in an Orthopaedic Department/Group
Virginia Casey, MD
11:40 AM–11:50 AM Panel Q&A with
Harris Baden, MD;
Virginia Casey, MD
11:50 AM–12:00 PM POSNA’S PLAN WHAT POSNA IS DOING –
Wellness Committee
Vishwas Talwalkar, MD
Jennifer Weiss, MD
12:00 PM CLOSING
Brian Scannell, MD
19
POSNA extends sincere appreciation to
NuVasive
for their support of the Pre-Course program.
OPENING CEREMONY
WEDNESDAY, MAY 15
6:30 PM–6:35 PM WELCOME
POSNA President: Steven Frick, MD
Local Hosts: Brian Brighton, MD and Virginia Casey, MD
6:35 PM–6:45 PM INTRODUCTIONS OF DISTINGUISHED GUESTS
International Presidents
Members of POSI
New Members (2018 and 2019)
Distinguished Achievement Award Recipient
Presidential Guest Speaker
EPOS Traveling Fellows
POSNA Traveling Fellows
COUR Visiting Scholars
6:45 PM–6:50 PM INTRODUCTION OF INAUGURAL POSNA HALL OF FAME
INDUCTEES
6:50 PM–7:15 PM PRESENTATION POSNA AWARDS
St. Giles Young Investigator AwardDonald Huene, MD
Arthur H. Huene AwardDonald Huene, MD
Angela S.M. Kuo Memorial AwardKen Kuo, MD and Christina Kuo, MD
POSNA Humanitarian AwardSteven Frick, MD
POSNA Special Effort and Excellence AwardSteven Frick, MD
7:15 PM–7:30 PM RECOGNITION OF INDUSTRY SPONSORS
Steven Frick, MD
7:30 PM INTRODUCTION STEEL LECTURER
Brian Brighton, MD
7:35 PM–8:00 PM 2019 STEEL LECTURE
“Congrats! We’ve Made It, Now What?”
Aric Almirola, NASCAR Race-Car Driver
8:00 PM–9:30 PM WELCOME RECEPTION
Convention Center Richardson Ballroom CD
20
SPEAKERS and AWARD RECIPIENTS
21
PERRY SCHOENECKER, MD
DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
Perry Schoenecker, MD is a professor of orthopedic surgery at Wash U School of
Med and practices at St. Louis Shriners, St. Louis Children’s and Barnes Jewish
Hospitals. He is a past chairman of the division of pediatric orthopedic surgery
at Washington U, Chief of staff at the St. Louis Shriners Hospital and orthopedic
surgeon in chief at St. Louis Children’s Hospital.
Dr. Schoenecker’s practice focus on pediatric orthopedics in the care of infants on
up to young adults. He has a special interest includes congenital and developmental deformities of
the lower extremity, hip, knee, foot and ankle as well as adolescent and young adult hip problems. He
also cares for patients with traumatic, neuromuscular, arthrogrypotic and syndromic associated muscu-
loskeletal deformities.
He is the author of 190 peer reviewed manuscripts, a reviewer for JPO, JCO, CORE and JBJS. He is
a regular participant in the annual meetings of POSNA, AAOS and EPOS. He is a frequent visiting
professor in North America and a very active participant in out of country symposiums/workshops
particularly in South America and Asia. He is a POSNA past president (2006-07). He received the AAP
Distinguished Service Award in 2014. He has been the recipient of the Washington University Depart-
ment of Surgery Distinguished Palma Chironis Award as Clinical Teacher of the Year on 4 occasions, the
Distinguished Clinician Award in 2012, and also the Jerome Gilden Distinguished Clinical Surgeon of
the year on 3 occasions.
He and Sally were married while in med school in 1963. They have two children, Chris (and his wife
Lisa) with three grandchildren living in St. Louis and Jon (and his wife Susan) with two grandchildren
living in Nashville.
Credentials: Medical Degree, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Internship, Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas
General Surgery Residency, Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester
Orthopedic Residency, Barnes Hospital, St. Louis
Barnes, Children’s & Shriners Staff 1975-present
PETER WATERS, MD
2019 PRESIDENTIAL GUEST SPEAKER
Dr. Peter Waters was raised in Syracuse, NY and graduated college and medical
school from Tufts University in Boston, MA. Post-graduate residency training includ-
ed general pediatric training at the Massachusetts General Hospital and orthopedic
surgery residency in the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Residency Program. He
completed his fellowship training in both pediatric orthopedic surgery and sports
medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital; and, hand surgery in the Harvard Hand
Surgery program. He believes education is transformative and has gained post-graduate certicates
and degrees from programs in leadership, management, and education from Harvard’s Business, Public
Health, and Medical Schools along with Middlebury Breadloaf Writers Conference.
Peter is presently Director of the Hand Surgery Program and Orthopaedic Surgeon-in-Chief at Boston
Children’s Hospital as well as the John E. Hall Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at the Harvard Medical
School. He was the president of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America from 2011-2012.
He is the author of over 225 publications and book chapters, co-author of Surgery of the Pediatric Hand
and Upper Limb and co-editor of Fractures in Children. Dr. Waters is known for his expertise in pediatric
hand and upper extremity surgery and in particular, care of children with brachial plexus birth palsies.
Outside of orthopaedics, Peter has deep passion and commitment for coaching and has led diverse
youth athletic programs in Boston/Brookline as well as Curry College. On a personal note, he has two
wonderful kids - Rebecca and James who were foolish enough to engage him in all activities;
along with two Charlotte based grandchildren Izzy and Elle. And most importantly, his great
wife, Janet, who keeps everything and everyone together.
WUDHAV (WOODY) SANKAR, MD
SPECIAL EFFORTS AND EXCELLENCE AWARD
Wudbhav (Woody) N. Sankar, MD is an Associate Professor at the Perelman School
of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and an attending surgeon at the
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.
He is director of the hip disorders program and the young adult hip preservation
program at CHOP and the University of Pennsylvania. He also serves as
co-director of the pediatric orthopaedic fellowship at CHOP. Dr. Sankar is a
graduate of Cornell University’s college of engineering and the University of Pennsylvania School of
Medicine. He completed his orthopaedic surgical training at the University of Pennsylvania, followed by
two pediatric orthopaedic fellowships at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and the Shriners Hospitals for
Children in Los Angeles. He then pursued advanced training in the area of adolescent and young adult
hip preservation at Boston Children’s Hospital.
He has been on staff at CHOP since 2009, where he specializes in the area of hip and spinal deformity.
Dr. Sankar is active in a number of professional societies, including the American Academy of Ortho-
paedic Surgeons (AAOS), American Orthopaedic Association (AOA), Scoliosis Research Society (SRS),
and the Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America (POSNA) where he has previously served on
the board of directors as a junior member-at-large and currently chairs the fellowship training/quali-
cations for practice committee. He is co-medical director of the International Hip Dysplasia Institute
(IHDI) and is an active member of several other multi-center research groups, including the Internation-
al Perthes Study Group (IPSG) and the Academic Network of Conservational Hip Outcomes Research
(ANCHOR). He also serves on the board of directors for the Legg-Calvé-Perthes Foundation. He has
published over 120 peer-reviewed articles and chapters, and has written and edited two textbooks.
RICHARD GROSS, MD
HUMANITARIAN AWARD
The son of a theologian/minister and schoolteacher, Richard Gross grew up in
western New York and Pennsylvania. In 1961, he graduated from Alfred University,
where he was a forgettable Division III athlete(football, wrestling), but compensated
for that with an undistinguished academic record. He then went south to Duke for
his MD degree, exposing him to the “son, if you can’t get your work done in 24
hours, you better work nights too” culture of that time. Having been commissioned
on graduation from Alfred’s ROTC program and deferred to attend medical school, he went on active
duty in 1965 for his postgraduate training, including a rotating internship at Ft Lewis(Tacoma,Wa),
then what he considers a most valuable PG2 year of general surgery at Ft Knox(Kentucky), and adult
orthopaedics at Ft Bliss(El Paso,Tx). Those years involved care of an overwhelming number of Viet-
nam casualties, and the respite from that during his last year of residency at Carrie Tingley Hospital for
Crippled Children in Truth or Consequences, NM, convinced him that pediatric orthopaedics was his
future. Followlng residency, he was stationed at Ft Jackson, SC, until 1973, when he returned to Carrie
Tingley as a staff surgeon. He used his leave during his last year of active duty to visit the Scottish Rite
in Atlanta, DuPont institute in Delaware, and Duke as he had no fellowship training. Subsequently, he
went to Oklahoma where he was the rst pediatric orthopaedist in the state, and had a great partner in
Andy Sullivan. Paul Grifn lured him back east to Boston, where he and Jim Kasser started work at the
same time. In 1986, he started at the Medical University on Charleston, where his partners included the
Stanikskis, Jim Mooney; and for a magical few years, Paul Grifn rejoined him in Charleston.
He spent a lot of time away from work, with 16 “working” trips overseas, including 3 to Vietnam. As
the rst graduating resident in his residency not to be immediately assigned to Vietnam, that fullled
something missing. He coached soccer in some form for 25 years, the last 15 as goalkeeper coach at
his community’s high school; where he learned more about educational principles from a remarkable
22
head coach than in any hospital. During those 15 years, 3 of his goalkeepers were All State. He took
a month off from work to write the rst POSNA study guide, moderated debates on the local public ra-
dio station for 4 years, was an AMA delegate for 5 years, and a mentor in the AAOS Leadership Train-
ing program for 2 years. For the past 6 years, he has served on the board of Pattison’s Academy, a
charter school for children with multiple disabilities, including 3 as board chair. He considers his major
academic accomplishment as being (what he thinks) the only orthopaedic surgeon to publish editorials
in the NEJM, Lancet, and Small Wars Journal. He’s also served on a number of AAOS, POSNA, and
SRS committees. He was shocked, but immensely gratied, to learn he would be receiving this award.
ARIC ALMIROLA
STEEL LECTURE
Aric Almirola is a Cuban American race-car driver at the elite level of NASCAR.
He was born on Eglin Air Force base in Fort Walton Beach, Florida and grew up in
Tampa, Florida. Aric’s father came to America from Cuba with his family in 1966.
Aric, at the age of 8 years old, began his racing career with go-karts. After many
years of winning local, state, and national championships in karting he moved up
to stock car racing at age 15. In 2004 while studying mechanical engineering at
the University of Central Florida, Almirola got a call from Joe Gibbs to start his
professional career as a racer. Since 2004 Almirola has been on a journey through the NASCAR ranks
nally landing his rst full time season in 2012 at NASCAR’s elite level of the Cup Series driving for the
legendary Richard Petty. Almirola drove for the “King” Richard Petty from 2012-2017 being the rst
driver in 20 years to bring the famed number 43 back to Victory Lane at Daytona International Speed-
way. 2018 saw Almirola move to Stewart-Haas racing where he achieved the best year of his career.
He won a NASCAR Cup series race at Talladega Superspeedway propelling him into the penultimate
round of the championships. Almirola nished the year 5th in the standings and had a career best in
every NASCAR measurable statistics.
23
Courtesy of charlottesgotalot.com
WEDNESDAY, MAY 15
1:00 PM–1:05 PM Introduction and Opening Remarks
Trauma General Session
Moderator: Susan Scherl, MD
eModerator: Jeffrey Sawyer, MD
Presider: Simon Kelley, MBChB, FRCS
1
1:06 PM-1:10 PM Registry of Orthopaedic Trauma in Children (ROTC): A Pilot Study
Brian Brighton, MD; Kelly Vanderhave, MD; Rachel Seymour, PhD;
Jeffrey Cassidy, MD; Jeffrey Martus, MD; Brian Scannell, MD; Susan Scherl, MD;
Mauricio Silva, MD; Mark Sinclair, MD; Christine Churchill, BA;
Meghan Wally, MSPH; Edward Hardison, BA
Atrium Health, Charlotte, NC
2
1:11 PM-1:15 PM Do Patient- or Fracture-Specic Factors Predict the Development of
Acute Compartment Syndrome after Pediatric Tibial Shaft Fractures?
Benjamin Sheffer, MD; Eric Villarreal, MD; Jesse Wrenn, PhD;
Jeffrey Sawyer, MD; David Spence, MD; Derek Kelly, MD
Campbell Clinic, Germantown, TN
3
1:16 PM-1:20 PM Delayed Unions and Functional Outcomes of
Pediatric Lateral Condyle Humerus Fractures:
A Prospective Study
Alexander Nazareth, MS; Curtis VandenBerg, MD; Rachel Goldstein, MD MPH;
Natalya Sarkisova, BS; Lindsay Andras, MD; Nina Lightdale-Miric, MD;
J. Lee Pace, MD; Paul Choi, MD; David Skaggs, MD, MMM
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
1:21 PM-1:29 PM Discussion
4
1:30 PM-1:34 PM Nonoperative Versus Operative Treament for Displaced Midshaft
Clavicle Fractures in Adolescents: A Comparative Study
Mi Hyun Song, MD; Yeo-Hon Yun, MD; Jungwook Lim; Hae Ryong Song, MD
Korea Medical Center Guro Hospital, Seoul, Korea, Republic of
5
1:35 PM-1:39 PM The Song Classication is Reliable and Guides Prognosis and Treatment
for Pediatric Lateral Condyle Fractures:
An Independent Validation Study with Treatment Algorithm
Brandon Ramo, MD; Shawn Funk, MD; Marilyn Elliott, BS; Chan-Hee Jo, PhD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
PODIUM PRESENTATIONS
25
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
Wednesday, May 15, 2019, continued
26
6
1:40 PM-1:44 PM Displaced Fractures of the Proximal Humerus In Children Cause
Long-Term Sequelae
Luis Cuadrado Rubio, MD; Joaquín Núñez de Armas, MD;
Israel Rubio Sáez, MD; Alfonso Vaquero Picado, MD; Luis Moraleda, MD
Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Madrid, Spain
1:45 PM-1:53 PM Discussion
7
1:54 PM-1:58 PM Does Time to Treatment of Pediatric Femoral Shaft Fractures Impact
Clinical Outcomes?
Anthony Stans, MD; Jennifer Grauberger, BA; Todd Milbrandt, MD;
William Shaughnessy, MD; A. Noelle Larson, MD
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
8
1:59 PM-2:03 PM Observation Versus Cast Treatment of Toddler’s Fractures
Joseph Fox, MD; Brianna Enriquez, MD; Viviana Bompadre, PhD;
Kristen Carlin, MPH; Mark Dales, MD
Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA
9
2:04 PM-2:08 PM Metaphyseal Fracture Displacement is Predictive of Intra-Articular
Diastasis in Adolescent Triplane Ankle Fractures
Jose Romero, MD; Surya Mundluru, MD; Dustin Greenhill, MD; Marilyn Elliott;
Robert Wimberly, MD; Anthony Riccio, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
2:09 PM-2:17 PM Discussion
Infection/Tumors General Session
Moderator: Alexandre Arkader, MD
eModerator: Ying Li, MD
Presider: Howard Epps, MD
10
2:18 PM-2:22 PM C-reactive Protein Level at Time of Discharge is not Predictive of Risk of
Reoperation or Readmission in Children with Septic Arthritis
Maryse Bouchard, MD; Lara Shefelbine, BA; Viviana Bompadre, PhD
Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA
11
2:23 PM-2:27 PM The Use of Cytokines and Biomarkers in the Work-Up of Septic Arthritis:
A Pilot Study
Scott Luhmann, MD; Alexis Elward, MD; Kirsten Brouillet, BA;
Dominic Thompson, MA; Farshid Guilak, PhD
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
12
2:28 PM-2:32 PM A Clinical Care Algorithm Resulted in Improved Care for Children with
Hematogenous Osteomyelitis
Eric Robinette, MD; Laura Brower, MD; Samir Shah, MD; Patrick Whitlock, MD;
Joshua Schaffzin, PhD
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
2:33 PM-2:41 PM Discussion
13
2:42 PM-2:46 PM Vertebra Plana in Children: Other Etiologies than Just Eosinophilic
Granuloma?
Matthew Houdek, MD; Fady Baky; Todd Milbrandt, MD; A. Noelle Larson, MD
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
14
2:47 PM-2:51 PM Survival in Allograft Reconstruction for Children and Teenagers After
Resectio Due to Bone Sarcoma in Femur and Humerus
Fernando Escámez Fernández, MD; Joaquín Núñez de Armas, MD;
Alfonso Vaquero Picado, MD; Irene Barrientos Ruiz, MD
Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Madrid, Spain
15
2:52 PM-2:56 PM Treatment of Symptomatic Extremity Venous Malformations with
Single-Stage Combined Glue Embolization and Surgical Excision
Antoinette Lindberg, MD;
Eric Monroe, MD; Kevin Koo, MD;
Giridhar Shivaram, MD
Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA
2:57 PM-3:05 PM Discussion
3:05 PM-3:30 PM Break
Concurrent Session: Spine
Moderator: Laurel Blakemore, MD
eModerator: Christina Hardesty, MD
Presider: Nicholas Fletcher, MD
16
3:30 PM-3:34 PM Restoration of Thoracic Kyphosis in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis over a
Twenty Year Period: Are We Getting Better?
Blake Bodendorfer, MD; Suken Shah, MD; Tracey Bastrom, MA;
Baron Lonner, MD; Burt Yaszay, MD; Amer Samdani, MD; Firoz Miyanji, MD;
Patrick Cahill, MD; Paul Sponseller, MD; Randal Betz, MD; David Clements, MD;
Lawrence Lenke, MD; Harry Shufebarger, MD; Peter Newton, MD
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
27
Wednesday, May 15, 2019, continued
Wednesday, May 15, 2019, continued
28
17
3:35 PM-3:39 PM A Matched Cohort of Large AIS Curves: Do Ponte Osteotomies Improve
Coronal Plane and Sagittal Plane Correction?
Lorena Floccari, MD; Dustin Greenhill, MD; Kiley Poppino, BS;
Daniel Sucato, MD, MS
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
18
3:40 PM-3:44 PM 10-Year Natural History of the Uninstrumented Compensatory Curve in
Selectively Fused AIS
Craig Louer, MD; Burt Yaszay, MD; Madeline Cross, MPH;
Carrie Bartley, MA; Tracey Bastrom, MA; Suken Shah, MD;
Baron Lonner, MD; Patrick Cahill, MD; Amer Samdani, MD;
Vidyadhar Upasani, MD; Peter Newton, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital - San Diego, San Diego, California
3:45 PM-3:53 PM Discussion
19
3:54 PM-3:58 PM T1 Tilt and Clavicle Angle are the Best Predictors of Postoperative
Shoulder Balance
Vishal Sarwahi, MBBS; Jesse Galina, BS; Saankritya Ayan, MBBS;
Beverly Thornhill, MD; Abhijit Pawar, MD; Yungtai Lo, PhD; Terry Amaral, MD
Cohen Children’s Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY
20
3:59 PM-4:03 PM Do Intraoperative Lateral Radiographs During Scheuermann Kyphosis
Correction Predict the Standing Radiographic Outcome?
Dustin Greenhill, MD; Kiley Poppino, BS; Chan-Hee Jo, PhD;
Daniel Sucato, MD, MS
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, Texas
21
4:04 PM-4:08 PM Do Patients with “Less than Ideal” Outcomes at 2 Years Continue to Have
Suboptimal Outcomes in the Long-Term Following Surgery of Adolescent
Idiopathic Scoliosis?
Jessica Hughes, MD; Burt Yaszay, MD; Tracey Bastrom MA; Carrie Bartley MA;
Stefan Parent, MD; Patrick Cahill, MD; Baron Lonner, MD; Suken Shah, MD;
Amer Samdani, MD; Peter Newton, MD; Harms Study Group
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA
4:09 PM-4:17 PM Discussion
22
4:18 PM-4:22 PM Prophylactic Application of Local (Intra-wound) Antibiotic Does not
Decrease Acute Surgical Site Infections (SSI) in AIS Patients
Amy McIntosh, MD; Kiley Poppino, BS
Texas Scottish Rite, Dallas, TX
29
Wednesday, May 15, 2019, continued
23
4:23 PM-4:27 PM Development and Validation of a Risk Severity Score Identifying Patients with
Cerebral Palsy at High-Risk for Developing Surgical Site Infection After Spinal
Surgery
Hiroko Matsumoto, MA; Megan Campbell, BA; Benjamin Roye, MD;
David Roye, MD; Lawrence Lenke, MD; Paul Sponseller, MD;
John (Jack) Flynn, MD; David Skaggs, MD, MMM; Michael Glotzbecker, MD;
Michael Vitale, MD, MPH
Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY
24
4:28 PM-4:32 PM Liposomal Bupivacaine is Both Safe and Effective in Controlling
Post-Operative Pain Following Spinal Surgery in Children:
A Controlled Cohort Study
Morad Chughtai, MD; Assem Sultan, MD; Brittany Patterson, BS;
Ryan Goodwin, MD; John Seif, MD; Anton Khlopas, MD; Anton Khlopas, MD;
Nipun Sodhi, BA; James Bena, MS; Yuxuan Jin;
David Gurd, MD; Thomas Kuivila, MD; Robert Ballock, MD
The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
4:33 PM-4:41 PM Discussion
25
4:42 PM-4:46 PM Two Year Follow up of Vertebral Body Tethering for Adolescent Idiopathic
Scoliosis - Which Curve Types are Responding to Growth Modulation?
Daniel Hoernschemeyer, MD; John Worley, MD; Christopher Loftis, MD;
Madeline Robertson, BS; Nicole Tweedy, NP; Sumit Gupta, MD
University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO
26
4:47 PM-4:51 PM A Prospective, Multicenter Analysis of the Efcacy of Anterior Vertebral
Body Tethering in the Treatment of Idiopathic Scoliosis
Firoz Miyanji, MD; Jeff Pawelek; Luigi Nasto, MD; Stefan Parent, MD
BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada
27
4:52 PM-4:56 PM Correlation Between Spine and Chest Wall Deformities and Pulmonary
Function in Marfan’s Syndrome
Hila Otremski, MD; Dror Ovadia, MD; Mary Dimaio, MD; Roger Widmann, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
4:57 PM-5:05 PM Discussion
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device for the use described
(ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
Concurrent Session: Sports
Moderator: Jennifer Weiss, MD
eModerator: Kevin Dale, MD
Presider: Eric Edmonds, MD
28
3:30 PM-3:34 PM Long-term Follow-up of Skeletally Immature Patients with Physeal-Sparing
Combined Extra-/Intra-articular Iliotibial Band ACL Reconstruction:
3-D Motion Analysis
Dai Sugimoto; Amy Whited, MS; Jeff Brodeur, BS; Elizabeth Liotta;
Kathryn Williams, MS; Mininder Kocher, MD, MPH; Lyle Micheli, MD;
Benton Heyworth, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
29
3:35 PM-3:39 PM Can Combined Trans-physeal and Lateral Extra-Articular Pediatric ACL
Reconstruction Techniques Be Employed to Reduce ACL Re-Injury While
Allowing for Growth?
Henry Ellis, MD; Nathan Boes, MD;
Parker Mitchell, BS; Charles Wyatt, NP; Philip Wilson, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
30
3:40 PM-3:44 PM Quadriceps Tendon Autografts Have a Lower Early Graft Failure Rate than
Hamstring Tendon Autografts when Performing Transphyseal ACL
Reconstructions
Andrew Pennock, MD; Kristina Johnson, ATC; Henry (Hank) Chambers, MD;
Tracey Bastrom, MA; Raghav Badrinath, MD; Robby Turk; M. Morgan Dennis,
BS; Eric Edmonds, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA
3:45 PM-3:53 PM Discussion
31
3:54 PM-3:58 PM The Physeal-Sparing Combined Extra-/Intra-Articular Iliotibial Band ACL
Reconstruction in Children: A Long-Term Strength, Balance, and Functional
Analysis
Lyle Micheli, MD; Benton Heyworth, MD; Elizabeth Liotta; Dai Sugimoto;
Kathryn Williams, MS; Nicole Goldhaber, MA; Mininder Kocher, MD, MPH
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
32
3:59 PM-4:03 PM Outcomes of Revision ACL Reconstructions
Henry (Hank) Chambers, MD; Ryan Ouillette, BA; Eric Edmonds, MD;
Tracey Bastrom, MA; Andrew Pennock, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA
33
4:04 PM-4:08 PM Which Children are at Risk for Contralateral Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury
After Ipsilateral Reconstruction?
Neeraj Patel, MD; Nakul Talathi, BS; Joshua Bram, BS;
Christopher Defrancesco, MD; J. Todd Lawrence, MD, PhD;
Theodore Ganley, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Wednesday, May 15, 2019, continued
30
4:09 PM-4:17 PM Discussion
34
4:18 PM-4:22 PM Suture Versus Screw Fixation of Tibial Spine Fractures:
A Comparative Study
Mininder Kocher, MD; Judd Allen, MD; Mark Callanan, MD;
Frances Tepolt, MD; Brett Flutie
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
35
4:23 PM-4:27 PM Which Psychological Measure Should Be Used to Identify Athletes at Risk for
Prolonged Recovery Following ACL Reconstruction?
Henry Ellis, MD; K. John Wagner, BS; Aaron Zynda, BS; Meagan Sabatino, BA;
Philip Wilson, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
36
4:28 PM-4:32 PM Prospectively Calculated Utility Values in Children with Osteochondritis
Dissecans of the Knee
Joshua Adjei, BA; Benedict Nwachukwu; Yi Zhang, MS; Daniel Green, MD;
Emily Dodwell, MD; Peter Fabricant, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
4:33 PM-4:41 PM Discussion
37
4:42 PM-4:46 PM Youth Marathon Training: Injury Epidemiology and Risk Factors
Joshua Goldman; Emily Miller, MD; Summer Runestad, ATC; Rebecka Serpa;
Jennifer Beck, MD
Orthopaedic Institute for Children, Los Angeles, CA
38
4:47 PM-4:51 PM Youth Ice Hockey Concussions Reported at US Emergency
Departments from 2002-2016: A Peak in 2011 and the Impact of
Rule Modications
Patrick Morrissey, BA; Neil Shah, MD; Andrew Hayden, MD; Jack Zhou, BS;
Lee Bloom, MD; Alexandr Aylyarov, MD; Dipal Chatterjee, MD;
Jared Newman, MD; Matthew McCarthy; Khalid Hesham, MD;
William Urban, MD
SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
39
4:52 PM-4:56 PM Delivery of Patient-Reported Outcome Instruments by Automated Mobile
Phone Text Messaging in Pediatric Sports Medicine
J. Todd Lawrence, MD, PhD; Xochitl Mellor, BS; Matthew Buczek, BS;
Theodore Ganley, MD; Alexander Adams, BS; Apurva Shah, MD, MBA
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
4:57 PM-5:05 PM Discussion
31
Wednesday, May 15, 2019, continued
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
32
THURSDAY, MAY 16
7:30 AM–7:34 AM Welcome Remarks
QSVI General Session
Moderator: Brian Brighton, MD, MPH
eModerator: Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC
Presider: Julie Samora, MD, PhD
40
7:34 AM-7:38 AM Deciding Without Data: Clinical Decision Making in Pediatric Orthopaedic
Surgery
Steven Frick, MD; Karthik Nathan BS; Jacinta Leyden, BS;
Onyemaechi Uzosike, BA; Alexander Karius; Uriel Sanchez, BS;
Nicole Segovia, BS; Sara Eppler, MPH; Robin Kamal, MD
Stanford University, Stanford, CA
41
7:39 AM-7:43 AM What is the Evidence Behind the US News & World Report Rating, and
Does It Make Us Better Surgeons?
Smitha Mathew, MBBS; A. Noelle Larson, MD; Todd Milbrandt, MD
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
42
7:44 AM-7:48 AM Pediatric Orthopaedists are not Immune: Characterizing Self-reported
Burnout Rates Amongst POSNA Members
Cordelia Carter, MD; Vishwas Talwalkar, MD; Jennifer Weiss, MD;
Richard Schwend, MD; Michael Goldberg, MD
POSNA Wellness Committee,
Rosemont, IL
7:49 AM-7:57 AM Discussion
43
7:58 AM-8:02 AM Implementation of Standardized Discharge Regimen and Education
Reduces Narcotic Prescribing Following Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS)
Surgery: A Quality Value Safety Initiative (QVSI)
Craig Birch, MD; Kerry Wilder; Charu Sharma; Stacie Bukowsky, MSPH;
Sandi Greenberg; Brandon Ramo, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
44
8:03 AM-8:07 AM Intraoperative Red Blood Cell Salvage in Posterior Spinal Fusions for
Idiopathic Scoliosis: Guidelines for Selective Use
Scott Luhmann, MD; Garrett Wahl, BS
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
45
8:08 AM-8:12 AM Surgical Site Infections in Pediatric Spinal Surgery over a Decade of Serial
and Iterative Efforts to Eradicate Infection: Timing Matters
Bradley Hammoor, BS; Hiroko Matsumoto, BA; Gerard Marciano;
Kevin Wang, BA; Lucas Dziesinski, BS; Michael Vitale, MD, MPH
Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device for the use described
(ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
33
Thursday, May 16, 2019, continued
8:13 AM-8:21 AM Discussion
46
8:22 AM-8:26 AM Appropriate Use Criteria for Treatment of Pediatric Supracondylar
Humerus Fractures with Vascular Injury: Do Recommendations Follow
Current Clinical Practice?
Aaron Brandt, MD; Meghan Wally, MSPH; Virginia Casey, MD; Christian Clark, MD;
Michael Paloski, DO; Brian Scannell, MD; Brian Brighton, MD
Levine Children’s Hospital, Charlotte, NC
47
8:27 AM-8:31 AM Perioperative Ketorolac for Supracondylar Humerus Fracture in Children
Decreases Postoperative Pain, Opioid Usage, Hospitalization Cost, and
Length of Stay
Alexander Adams, BS; Matthew Buczek, BS; John (Jack) Flynn, MD;
Apurva Shah, MD, MBA
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
48
8:32 AM-8:36 AM Safe Transport of Spica Casted Children in Passenger Vehicles is
Possible: A Frontal Crash Test Analysis of Child Restraint Systems Using
Spica Casted Crash Test Dummies
Jeffrey Peck, MD; Angela Collins, MD; Sean Caskey, DO;
Theresa Atkinson, PhD; Norman Walter, MD; Patrick Atkinson, PhD
McLaren-Flint, Flint, MI
8:37 AM-8:45 AM Discussion
49
8:46 AM-8:50 AM Can Real Time Monitoring with a Controlled Advancement Drill Decrease
Plunge Depth?
Stephen Wallace, MD; Alexander Cherkashin, MD; Mikhail Samchukov, MD;
Robert Wimberly, MD; Anthony Riccio, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
50
8:51 AM-8:55 AM Getting the Message: The Declining Trend in Opioid Prescribing for
Minor Orthopaedic Injuries in Children and Adolescents over the Past
14 Years
Jigar Gandhi; Divya Talwar, MPH; John (Jack) Flynn, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia PA
51
8:56 AM-9:00 AM Are We Overprescribing Opioids for Adolescents with Lower Extremity
Fractures? Preliminary Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial at a
Level I Pediatric Trauma Facility
Arianna Trionfo, MD; Matthew Buczek, BS; Keith Baldwin, MD;
Apurva Shah, MD, MBA
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
9:01 AM-9:09 AM Discussion
52
9:10 AM-9:14 AM Expanding Practice Boundaries: Delivery of Fracture Care Using
Telemedicine in Pediatric Orthopaedics
Neha Sinha, MD; Max Cornell; Benjamin Wheatley, BS; Mark Seeley, MD
Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA
53
9:15 AM-9:19 AM Pacic Ocean’s Eleven: The Cost-Effectiveness of Pediatricians
Splinting Injuries in Their Ofce
Byron Izuka, MD
University of Hawaii Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Honolulu, HI
54
9:20 AM-9:24 AM Where are the Women Leaders? A Look at POSNA Committee and
Leadership Positions
Sharul Saxena; Jennifer Weiss, MD; Joshua Abzug, MD; Michelle Caird, MD;
Marilan Luong, MPH; Selina Poon, MD
Shriners for Children Medical Center, Pasadena, CA
9:25 AM-9:33 AM Discussion
9:33 AM-10:00 AM Break
34
Thursday, May 16, 2019, continued
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
35
Thursday, May 16, 2019, continued
Symposia Program
Children’s Orthopaedics in
Under-Resourced Environments (COUR)
10:00 AM-12:00 PM
Co-Chairs: Eric Fornari, MD & Coleen Sabatini, MD, MPH
Caring for Refugee Communities as an Orthopaedic Surgeon
This year’s COUR Symposium is focused on the health and musculoskeletal needs of refugee com-
munities throughout the world. We will review the current status of the refugee crisis and learn from
orthopaedic surgeons who have been caring for displaced communities in a variety of settings in the
Middle East and Africa. Real-life experiences will be shared and the musculoskeletal issues seen in
these populations discussed. Resources for those interested in becoming involved will be addressed
as well as time for an open discussion about the role that orthopaedic surgeons can play in caring for
refugee communities.
10:00 AM-10:05 AM: Welcome
Eric Fornari, MD
10:05 AM-10:10 AM: Introduction of COUR Scholars
Eric Fornari, MD;
Coleen Sabatini, MD, MPH
10:10 AM-10:15 AM: Introduction to the Symposium
Coleen Sabatini, MD, MPH
10:15 AM-10:35 AM: Understanding the World’s Refugee Crisis
Fatima Karaki, MD
10:35 AM-11:00 AM: Overview of the Palestine Refugee Populations and an Integrated Approach
to Addressing their Ongoing Pediatric Musculoskeletal Needs
Anna Vergun, MD
11:00 AM-11:30 AM: Principles of War Surgery: The Syrian Field Hospital Experience
Samer Attar, MD
11:30 AM-11:40 AM: Resources for Orthopaedic Surgeons Interested in Helping
Eric Fornari, MD; Coleen Sabatini, MD, MPH
11:40 AM-12:00 PM: Discussion
36
Thursday, May 16, 2019, continued
Teach the Teacher – Strategies for Pediatric
Orthopedic Education in the Modern Era
10:00 AM-12:00 PM
Co-Chairs: Craig Eberson, MD & Todd Milbrandt, MD
Education of residents and fellows in Pediatric Orthopedics remains an evolving science. Today’s learners
continue to require new strategies to impart the knowledge required for success in our eld. In the era
of reduced work hours, today’s educators must be able to efciently transfer their experience and skill
to their students, while at the same time coping with the increasing administrative burden of modern
practice. This symposium brings to bear the expertise of a collection of seasoned educators, program
directors, and academicians who will share their tips for efcient teaching, providing and receiving
meaningful feedback, and for allowing graduated autonomy in the clinics and the operating room.
10:00 AM-10:10 AM: Introduction
Craig Eberson, MD; Todd Milbrandt, MD
SETTING UP YOUR PEDS ORTHO ROTATION FOR EDUCATION-PRACTICAL TIPS
10:10 AM-10:17 AM: Teaching the Curriculum-Techniques for Modern Learners
Todd Milbrandt, MD
10:18 AM-10:25 AM: How to Encourage Learning in the Clinic, Yet Still Go Home on Time
Steven Frick, MD
10:26 AM-10:33 AM: Surgical Teaching: Pre-Op Planning to Handing Over the Knife
Anthony Riccio, MD
10:34 AM-10:44 AM: Panel Discussion
Moderator: Craig Eberson, MD
Panel: Steven Frick, MD; Todd Milbrandt, MD; Anthony Riccio, MD
EVALUATION
10:45 AM-10:52 AM: Usable Feedback for Residents-How to Give It
Ryan Muchow, MD
10:53 AM-11:00 AM: Remediation of the Struggling Learner-Head, Heart, and Hands
Craig Eberson, MD
11:01 AM-11:08 AM: Are YOU the Problem? Understanding and Changing Bad Evaluations
Michelle Caird, MD
11:09 AM-11:14 AM: Panel Discussion
Moderator: Todd Milbrandt, MD
Panel: Michelle Caird, MD; Craig Eberson, MD; Ryan Muchow, MD
LESSONS FROM THE EDUCATION PROFESSIONAL OUTSIDE OUR FIELD
11:15 AM-11:45 AM Special POSNA Invited Guest Lecturer
What Should You Know About Learning Theories to be Great Teachers?
Sandra Jarvis-Selinger, PhD
11:45 AM-11:55 AM Discussion
11:55 AM-12:00 PM Wrap Up and Final Comments
Craig Eberson, MD; Todd Milbrandt, MD
Innovation and Technology
10:00 AM-12:00 PM
Co-Chairs: Jonathan Schoenecker, MD, PhD;
Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC;
& Bryan Tompkins, MD
This session will explore technology and innovation in the OR, teaching methods, and practice man-
agement. We will touch on imaging in virtual reality, 3D modeling, advances in stimulation, using social
media in practice, and telehealth. There will also be a demo on the OSSO Virtual Reality SCFE model.
PERIOD 1
TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION IN THE OR
10:00 AM-10:15 AM: Imaging in Virtual Reality
Bryan Tompkins, MD
10:15 AM-10:30 AM: 3D Modeling
Brian Haus, MD
PERIOD 2
TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION IN TEACHING
10:30 AM-10:45 AM: Changing How We Teach
Jonathan Schoenecker, MD, PhD
10:45 AM-11:00 AM: Advances in Simulation
Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC
11:00 AM-11:30 AM: OSSO VR SCFE Demo
Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC; Bryan Tompkins, MD
PERIOD 3
TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION IN PRACTICE
MANAGEMENT
11:30 AM-11:45 AM: Social Media in Practice
Bryan Tompkins, MD
11:45 AM-12:00 PM: NextGen Telehealth
Robert Cho, MD
37
Thursday, May 16, 2019, continued
Thursday, May 16, 2019, continued
**Attendance to this symposium requires the purchase of
a $40 workbook that is NOT part of the registration fee.
POPS
10:00 AM-2:00 PM
Co-Chairs: Amanda Fletcher & Tracy Warhoover MSN, RN, CPNP
Coding and Documentation for Pediatric Orthopaedic Practitioners
This four-hour symposium will provide advanced practice providers with the knowledge of coding and
documentation guidelines in addition to how to navigate between coding specics, process issues,
and payor policies. Margaret Maley with Karen Zupko and Associates will lead the discussion on prop-
erly selecting an evaluation and management code and correctly supporting it with documentation,
coding accurately and ethically, appropriate documentation of level of service, recognizing the correct
use of ICD 10 codes and CPT codes, and the proper use of EM levels of service.
Learning Objectives
1. Use E/M modiers accurately
2. List what is included in global fracture care
3. Dene “incident to” reporting to Medicare and how this translates to other payors
10:00 AM-10:30 AM E/M Categories of Service and When to Use Them
New vs. Established Patient
What is a consultation?
Can a PA request one? Perform one?
What do you use when you go to the ER?
10:30 AM-10:45 AM Medical Necessity
Just because it is in the note, doesn’t mean it was necessary to make a
diagnosis or treat a problem! How does the diagnosis code impact medical
necessity?
10:45 AM-11:45 AM E/M Levels of Service and How to Document Them
History-What’s NEW in 2019?
Physical Examination, Medical Decision Making
11:45 AM-12:15 PM Physician Assistant/APP Billing in Orthopaedics
Direct, Incident-to, Split/Shared
12:15 PM-1:00 PM Global Surgical Package
Pre-operative H&P - can this be billed if the PA does it?
E&M modiers
Modier 24- unrelated E&M service
Modier 57- E/M resulting in urgent decision to operate.
When is it needed? When isn’t it needed?
Modier 25-signicant separate E/M service
1:00 PM-1:30 PM Fracture Care
What’s included and what is separately reportable
Does your state have restrictions on global care by a PA?
1:30 PM-1:45 PM Assisting in Surgery- Modier AS
What needs to be documented
1:45 PM-2:00 PM Are You Tracking Your Production?
Do you know your value- the basics of RVUs
38
Research
10:00 AM-12:00 PM
Co-Chairs: A. Noelle Larson, MD &
Jonathan Schoenecker, MD, PhD
In this symposium, we will debate the role of QSVI studies and industry involvement in furthering
pediatric orthopedic research, followed by short presentations from POSNA-funded researchers.
Finally, pediatric orthopedic thought leaders will provide succinct snapshots regarding how they
approached a major personal or professional achievement, i.e. bringing a device to market, reserving
protected time, or obtaining NIH funding for a clinical study.
PERIOD 1
DEBATES: QSVI & INDUSTRY
Debate: Is QSVI Bringing Up the Quality of Pediatric Orthopaedic Research or Dragging It Down?
We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the recent trend in pediatric orthopedics to
perform quality studies testing multiple variables simultaneously, rather than traditional research.
10:00 AM-10:05 AM: Pro QSVI
Kevin Shea, MD
10:05 AM-10:10 AM: Con QSVI
Matthew Halanski, MD
10:10 AM-10:15 AM: Rebuttals
10:15 AM-10:20 AM: Discussion
Debate: Does Working with Industry Help or Hurt the Scientic Process?
We will discuss the role of industry involvement in pediatric orthopedic research.
10:20 AM-10:25 AM: Pro Industry
Suken Shah, MD
10:25 AM-10:30 AM: Con Industry
Matthew Oetgen, MD
10:30 AM-10:35 AM: Rebuttals
10:35 AM-10:40 AM: Discussion
PERIOD 2
POSNA SUPPORTED RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS
10:40 AM-10:45 AM: A Prospective, Multi-centered Comparative Study of Non-operative and
Operative Containment Treatments in Children Presenting with Late-stage
Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease
Benjamin Martin, MD, 2015 POSNA Research Grant
Thursday, May 16, 2019, continued
39
10:45 AM-10:50 AM Uncoupling Cell Signaling and Mineralization Defects in Neurobromin
Decient Tibial Pseudoarthrosis
Jonathan Rios, PhD, 2015 POSNA Research Grant
10:50 AM-10:55 AM: Spinal and Vertebral Dimension Charts: Precise and Accurate
Characterization for Decision Support
Stefan Parent, MD, 2015 Biomet Spine Research Grant
10:55 AM-11:00 AM: Discussion
11:00 AM-11:05 AM: Effects of Standing on Non-Ambulatory Children with Neuromuscular
Conditions
Walter Truong, MD, 2015 St. Giles Young Investigator Award
11:05 AM-11:10 AM: Assessing the Burden of Childhood Musculoskeletal Conditions
Kevin Shea, MD, 2015 POSNA Directed Research Grants
11:10 AM-11:15 AM: PLUTO (Pediatric ACL: Understanding Treatment Operations):
A Multi-Center Prospective Cohort Study
Mininder S. Kocher, MD, MPH, 2015 Arthur H. Huene Award
11:15 AM-11:20 AM Discussion
PERIOD 3
HOW I MADE THE WORLD/MY LIFE BETTER
11:20 AM-11:26 AM: How I Brought a Medical Device to Clinical Practice
Peter Stevens, MD
11:26 AM-11:32 AM: How I Secured Development Funding for Our Orthopedic Research Program
David Roye, MD
11:32 AM-11:38 AM: How to Do Research with Nationalized Healthcare
Firoz Miyanji, MD
11:38 AM-11:44 AM: How I Negotiated Protected Research Time with my Department
Michelle Caird, MD
11:44 AM-11:50 AM: How I Obtained NIH Funding for an RCT
Lori Dolan, PhD
11:50 AM-12:00 PM: Discussion
Thursday, May 16, 2019, continued
40
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device for the use described
(ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
Trauma –
The Optimal Care of the Injured Pediatric
Orthopaedic Patient
10:00 AM-12:00 PM
Co-Chairs: Stephanie Holmes, MD & Mark Sinclair, MD
“The Optimal Care of the Injured Pediatric Orthopaedic Patient”:
A session focused on providing great care of the pediatric orthopaedic trauma patient and meeting
American College of Surgeons-Committee on Trauma (ACS-COT) guidelines while doing it!
10:00 AM-10:10 AM: Overview of ACS-COT and Why It Matters to Your Pediatric
Orthopaedic Trauma Patient
Allan Beebe, MD
10:10 AM-10:20 AM: Best Practice Guidelines for Supracondylar Humerus Fractures
Heather Kowalski, MD
10:20 AM-10:30 AM: Best Practice Guidelines for Open Fracture Management in Children
and Adolescents
Scott Yang, MD
10:30 AM-10:40 AM: Questions and Discussion
10:40 AM-10:50 AM: Pelvis Fractures and Massive Transfusion Protocols and the Pediatric
Orthopaedic Trauma Patient
Keith Bachmann, MD
10:50 AM-11:00 AM: Comprehensive Pain Management in the Pediatric Orthopaedic
Trauma Patient
Claire Shannon, MD
11:00 AM-11:10 AM: DVT Prophylaxis in the Pediatric Orthopaedic Trauma Patient
Grant Hogue, MD
11:10 AM-11:20 AM: Questions and Discussion
11:20 AM-11:30 AM: Compartment Syndrome Evaluation and Management in the Pediatric
Orthopaedic Trauma Patient
Matthew Halsey, MD
11:30 AM-11:40 AM: Damage Control Surgery and the Mangled Extremity: What Does That
Mean in the Management of Pediatric Orthopaedic Trauma Patients
Christopher Souder, MD
11:40 AM-11:50 AM: Extremity Injuries with Coexistent Vascular Trauma in the Pediatric
Orthopaedic Trauma Patient
Shawn (Skip) Gilbert, MD
11:50 AM-12:00 PM: Questions and Discussion
Thursday, May 16, 2019, continued
41
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
YOUNG MEMBER FORUM
FIFTH ANNUAL ARABELLA LEET, MD
YOUNG MEMBER FORUM
12:15 PM-1:30 PM
Moderator: Jennifer Weiss, MD
12:15 PM-12:20 PM Welcome
Jennifer Weiss, MD
12:21 PM-12:25 PM Memorial to Arabella Leet
Margaret Murphy-Zane, MD
12:26 PM-12:34 PM What Can POSNA Do For You?
Robert Cho, MD
12:35 PM-12:44 PM What Can You Do For POSNA?
Todd Milbrandt, MD
12:45 PM-1:30 PM Panel Q&A
Moderator: Jennifer Weiss, MD
Panel: Donald Bae, MD;
Robert Cho, MD;
Steven Frick, MD;
A. Noelle Larson, MD;
Todd Milbrandt, MD;
Coleen Sabatini, MD, MPH;
Margaret Murphy-Zane, MD
Thursday, May 16, 2019, continued
42
FRIDAY, MAY 17
7:00 AM–7:04 AM Welcome Remarks
Clinical Awards Session
Moderator: Stephen Albanese, MD
eModerator: Amy McIntosh, MD
Presider: Matthew Oetgen, MD
55
7:05 AM-7:10 AM The Effect of Intravenous Tranexamic Acid on Blood Loss and Transfusion
After Periacetabular Osteotomy: A Double-Blinded, Randomized Controlled
Trial
Ashley Levack, MD; Alexander McLawhorn, MD; Emily Dodwell, MD;
Kathryn Delpizzo, MD; Joseph Nguyen, MPH; Ernest Sink, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
7:11 AM-7:16 AM Discussion
56
7:17 AM-7:22 AM Two-Year Functional Outcomes of Operative vs. Non-Operative
Treatment of Completely Displaced Clavicle Fractures in Adolescents:
Results from the Prospective, Multicenter, Level 2 ‘Facts’ Study
Benton Heyworth, MD; Andrew Pennock, MD; Ying Li, MD; Leslie Kalish;
Brittany Dragonetti, BA; Henry Ellis, MD; Jeffrey Nepple, MD;
Samuel Willimon, MD; David Spence, MD; Nirav Pandya, MD;
Mininder Kocher, MD, MPH; Eric Edmonds, MD; Philip Wilson, MD;
Michael Busch, MD; Coleen Sabatini, MD, MPH; Donald Bae, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
7:23 AM-7:28 AM Discussion
57
7:29 AM-7:34 AM The Mobility Sparing Benets of Selective Thoracic Fusions in Adolescent
Idiopathic Scoliosis are Evident at 10 Years Post-operatively
Peter Newton, MD; Masayuki Ohashi; Tracey Bastrom, MA; Michelle Marks, PT;
Carrie Bartley, MA; Harms Study Group
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA
7:35 AM-7:40 AM Discussion
58
7:41 AM-7:46 AM The Rate of Mediastinal and Vascular Injury Following Acute Posterior
Sternoclavicular Dislocation
Matthew Fournier, MD; Mark Sinclair, MD; Evan Zheng, BA; David Spiegel, MD;
Anna Johnson, MD; Apurva Shah, MD, MBA; Anthony Riccio, MD;
Marilyn Elliott; Donald Bae, MD; Jeffrey Sawyer, MD
University of Tennessee - Campbell Clinic, Memphis, TN
7:47 AM-7:52 AM Discussion
43
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device for the use described
(ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
59
7:53 AM-7:58 AM Intraoperative Neurologic Monitoring in Limb Surgery for Patients with
Mucopolysaccharidoses
Andrew Georgiadis, MD; Kevin Walker, MD; Susan Novotny;
Breana Siljander, MD
Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare, St. Paul, MN
7:59 AM-8:04 AM Discussion
60
8:05 AM-8:10 AM A Randomized Controlled Trial of Zoledronic Acid in Perthes Disease (ZAP)
David Little, MD, MBBS, FRACS, PhD; Kamal Jamil, MD; Craig Munns, MBBS;
Christopher Cowell, MBBS; Bruce Foster, MD; Michael Johnson, MD;
Geoff Donald, MBChB; Colin Whitewood, MBBS
The Childrens Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, NSW, Australia
8:11 AM-8:16 AM Discussion
61
8:17 AM-8:22 AM Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis: Diagnosis and Treatment
Pathways for a Large Patient Cohort
Nathan Donaldson, DO; Nathan Rogers, MPH; Ryan Mooney, PA-C;
Shelley Dell’Orfano; Jennifer Soep, MD
Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO
8:23 AM-8:28 AM Discussion
62
8:29 AM-8:34 AM Is it Growth or Natural History? Increasing Spinal Deformity after Sanders
Stage 7 in Females with AIS
Ryan Muchow, MD; Olivia Grothaus, BA; Cale Jacobs, PhD;
Vishwas Talwalkar, MD; Henry Iwinski, MD
Lexington Shriners Hospital for Children, Lexington, KY
8:35 AM-8:40 AM Discussion
63
8:41 AM-8:46 AM The Addition of Continuous Nerve Blockade to General Anesthesia:
An Effective Tool to Reduce Pain and Length of Stay in Pediatric Patients
Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery
Anas Minkara, MD; Reid Chambers, DO; Turan Alparslan, MD; John Seif, MD;
Ryan Goodwin, MD
Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH
8:47 AM-8:52 AM Discussion
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
44
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device for the use described
(ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
64
8:53 AM-8:58 AM Major Perioperative Complications After Spinal Fusion Do Not Inuence
Health-Related Quality of Life Outcomes in Children with Cerebral Palsy
Francisco Eguia, BA; Derek Nhan, BS; Suken Shah, MD; Amit Jain, MD;
Amer Samdani, MD; Burt Yaszay, MD; Joshua Pahys, MD; Michelle Marks, PT;
Paul Sponseller, MD
Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD
8:59 AM-9:04 AM Discussion
9:05 AM-9:25 AM Break
Basic Science Awards Session
Moderator: Matthew Halanski, MD
eModerator: Michelle Welborn, MD
Presider: Roger Cornwall, MD
65
9:26 AM-9:30 AM Identifying and Pharmacologically Correcting the Molecular
Pathophysiology of Contractures in Neonatal Brachial Plexus Injury
Athanasia Nikolaou, PhD; Liangjun Hu, MS; Roger Cornwall, MD
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati, OH
66
9:31 AM-9:35 AM Early Osteoarthritis Observed after Recovery from Neonatal Brachial Plexus
Injury in a Mouse Model
Lynn Ann Forrester, MD; Benjamin Roye, MD; Stavros Thomopoulos, PhD
Columbia University Medical Center Department of Orthopedic Surgery,
New York, NY
67
9:36 AM-9:40 AM Local Delivery of Anti-VEGF Following Physeal Injury Decreases Bony
Bar Formation
Christopher Erickson, BS; Jake Newsom, BS; Nathan Fletcher, PhD;
Gavriel Feuer, BS; Yangyi Yu, MD; Francisco Rodriguez-Fontan, MD;
Nancy Miller, MD; Melissa Krebs, PhD; Karin Payne, PhD
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO
9:41 AM-9:49 AM Discussion
68
9:50 AM-9:54 AM Identication of Plasma MicroRNA Signature to Predict Curve Progression
in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) – A 6 Years Longitudinal Follow Up
Study
Jiajun Zhang, PhD; Ka-Yee Cheuk; Yujia Wang; Tsz Ping Lam, MBBS;
Alec Lik Hang Hung; Bobby Ng, MD; Jack Cheng, MD; Wayne Lee, PhD
Department of ORT, SH Ho Scoliosis Research Laboratory, The Chinese
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device for the use described
(ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
45
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
69
9:55 AM-9:59 AM Paraspinal Muscle Tissue Morphological Differences at the Curve Apex in
Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis
Peter Newton, MD; Andrew Yoo, MD; Bahar Shahidi, DPT; Mary Esparza, BS;
Seth Johnson, BS; Jennifer Padwal, MS; Christine Farnsworth, MS;
Richard Lieber, PhD; Samuel Ward, PhD
Rady Children’s Hospital - San Diego,
San Diego, CA
70
10:00 AM-10:04 AM Targeting Cholesterol Biosynthesis in Enchondromas
Benjamin Alman, MD
Duke University, Durham, NC
10:05 AM-10:13 AM Discussion
10:15 AM-10:30 AM DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
Perry Schoenecker, MD
10:31 AM-10:38 AM 2020 MEETING ANNOUNCEMENTS
Peter Newton, MD
10:39 AM-10:59 AM PRESIDENTIAL SPEAKER
Peter Waters, MD
11:00 AM-11:10 AM Presidential Transfer
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
46
Subspecialty Day
Foot & Ankle Subspecialty Day
1:30 PM-3:05 PM
Co-Chairs: Jennifer Laine, MD & Anthony Riccio, MD
MANAGEMENT OF COMMON AND COMPLEX ADOLESCENT FOOT DEFORMITY…
NO SMALL “FEET”
As transitional medicine becomes increasingly important in both pediatric and adult orthopaedic
practices, this year’s Foot and Ankle open time will consist of a symposium entitled “Management
of Common and Complex Adolescent Foot Deformity…No Small ‘Feet’” during which four highly
regarded adult and pediatric foot and ankle specialists will provide their insights into both common
and complex adolescent foot deformities. Particular attention will be given by the adult specialists to
sharing their perspective on the adult sequela of pediatric congenital foot deformities and the surgical
treatment of those deformities. The attendee will better understand the controversies and variability
surrounding foot and ankle deformity management in the adolescent patient.
1. The attendee will better understand that presumed standard of care practices may differ
among pediatric and adult foot and ankle surgeons.
2. The attendee will learn treatment strategies and operative techniques for management of
adolescent foot deformities.
3. The attendee will learn about the problems associated with the natural history and treatment
of pediatric congenital foot deformities and the management of these sequela in the adult
patient.
In this case based symposium, the approach to common and complex adolescent foot deformities will
be discussed by adult and pediatric orthopaedic foot and ankle specialists to compare, contrast, and
debate differing management strategies.
PERIOD 1A
1:30 PM-1:40 PM What We See That You Don’t:
What Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeons Should Know About Their Patients
in Adulthood
James Brodsky, MD
1:40 PM-1:50 PM Commentary/Rebuttal
Vincent Mosca, MD
1:50 PM-2:15 PM Case Presentations
Moderators: Jennifer Laine, MD
Anthony Riccio, MD
Panel: James Brodsky, MD
Jaime Denning, MD
Vincent Mosca, MD;
Jacob Zide, MD
The moderators will present three or four cases highlighting the complexities and controversies
surrounding various foot and ankle deformities with discussion of treatment techniques and
management options by both the pediatric and adult foot and ankle “factions.” Audience
participation will be highly encouraged during these discussions.
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
47
PERIOD 1B
FREE PAPERS
Moderators: Jennifer Laine, MD & Anthony Riccio, MD
71
2:16 PM-2:20 PM Assessment of Quality Metrics in Clubfoot Clinics in an LMIC (Low-Middle
Income Countries) Setting
Christie Pettitt-Schieber, MPH; Jennifer Everhart, PT;
Francesca Colloredo-Mansfeld, MPH; Alaric Aroojis, MD
Bai Jerbai Wadia Hospital for Children, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
72
2:21 PM-2:25 PM Anterior Hemi-Epiphysiodesis of the Distal Tibia for Residual Equinus
Deformity in Children with Clubfeet
Pamela Lang, MD; Kenneth Noonan, MD; Benjamin Giertych, BS;
Sara Heintzman, MD
University of Wisconsin & American Family Children’s Hospital, Madison, WI
73
2:26 PM-2:30 PM How Many Clubfoot Patients Undergo Foot or Ankle Surgery as Adults?
Steven Frick, MD; Thompson Zhuang BA
Stanford University, Stanford, CA
2:31 PM-2:40 PM Discussion
74
2:41 PM-2:45 PM Posterior Ankle Impingement – Why is there a Delay in Diagnosis in
Pediatric and Adolescent Patients?
Indranil (Neel) Kushare, MD; Matthew Ditzler, MD; Kristen Kastan;
Siddharth Jadhav, MD
Texas Children’s Hospital Houston, TX
75
2:46 PM-2:50 PM A Randomized, Controlled Trial Comparing Stockinette Cast Padding and
Webril Cast Padding for Treatment of Clubfoot by the Ponseti Method
Kevin Smit, MD; Meaghan Marien, MD; Marcel Abouassaly, MD;
Ken Kontio, MD; James Jarvis, MD
Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
76
2:51 PM-2:55 PM Algorithm in the Treatment of Ankle Valgus in MHE Patients
David Feldman, MD; Melih Civan, MD; Troy Rand, PhD;
Dror Paley, MD, FRCSC; Aaron Huser, DO
The Paley Institute, West Palm Beach, FL
2:56 PM-3:05 PM Discussion
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
48
Hand Subspecialty Day
3:25 PM-5:00 PM
Co-Chairs: Apurva Shah, MD, MBA & Christopher Stutz, MD
Challenging cases in pediatric upper extremity surgery including brachial plexus, complex elbow and
wrist, and congenital limb differences will be presented to a panel of experts. Pre-operative evaluation,
surgical techniques, and treatment algorithms will be explored, highlighting controversies in decision
making for a variety of pediatric upper extremity conditions.
PERIOD 2A
3:25 PM-3:30 PM Challenging Cases in the Pediatric Upper Extremity Case Presentation #1
Apurva Shah, MD, MBA
3:31 PM-3:47 PM Discussion
Panel: Donald Bae, MD
Robert Carrigan, MD
Charles Goldfarb, MD
3:48 PM-3:53 PM Challenging Cases in the Pediatric Upper Extremity Case Presentation #2
Christopher Stutz, MD
3:54 PM-4:10 PM Discussion
Panel: Robert Carrigan, MD
Charles Goldfarb, MD
Allan Peljovich, MD MPH
PERIOD 2B
Free Papers
Moderators: Apurva Shah, MD, MBA & Christopher Stutz, MD
77
4:11 PM-4:15 PM Treatment Variation in Brachial Plexus Birth Injury Across Academic Medical
Centers in North America
Carley Vuillermin, MBBS; Amina Kunnummal, BS; Andrea Bauer, MD;
Roger Cornwall, MD; Ashley Tartarilla, MA; Patricia Miller, MS;
Peter Waters, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
78
4:16 PM-4:20 PM Are Nerve Transfers Supplanting Nerve Grafting as the Primary Treatment
Strategy for Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy?
Jigar Gandhi; Divya Talwar, MPH; Rikesh Gandhi, MD; Joshua Abzug, MD;
Apurva Shah, MD, MBA
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
79
4:21 PM-4:25 PM The Incidence and Epidemiology of BPBI in California: 1997-2016
Mary Manske, MD; Lauren Agatstein BA; Michelle James, MD
Shriners Hospital for Children Northern California, Sacramento, CA
49
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
4:26 PM-4:35 PM Discussion
80
4:36 PM-4:40 PM Seymour Fractures a Review of Treatment and Outcomes
Dawn Goral, MD; Bryant Elrick, MS; Christopher Chen, MD;
Andy Lalka, MPH; Sarah Sibbel, MD; Jessica Wingeld, MD; Frank Scott
Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO
81
4:41 PM-4:45 PM Exploring Demographics, Treatment, and Outcomes for Pediatric
Bony Ulnar Collateral Ligament (UCL) Injuries
Julie Samora, MD; Nina Livermore, BS
Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH
82
4:46 PM-4:50 PM Outcomes of Syndactyly Reconstruction using Hyalomatrix®
Charles Goldfarb, MD; Lindley Wall, MD; Katherine Velicki, BA;
Summer Roberts, MA
Shriner’s Hospital for Children, Saint Louis, MO
4:51 PM-5:00 PM Discussion
Hip Subspecialty Day
1:30 PM-5:00 PM
Co-Chairs: Travis Matheney, MD & Vidyadhar Upasani, MD
The Hip Subspecialty Day sessions will be a combination of scientic papers and debates centered
around case presentations. We sought to include cases that we feel are some of the more challenging
hip problems in children and adolescents. In session one we will discuss how to manage symptomatic
whole-head involvement avascular necrosis. In the second session, we will dive into a debate of when
to treat infant hip dislocations that have failed bracing- operate early versus wait until patient is old
enough to undergo open reduction and osteotomy.
ADOLESCENT HIP
PERIOD 1A:
FREE PAPERS
Moderator: Vidyadhar Upasani, MD
83
1:30 PM-1:34 PM Outcomes of Periacetabular Osteotomy for Mild Acetabular Dysplasia in
Adolescent Patients
Ishaan Swarup, MD; Ira Zaltz, MD; Stacy Robustelli, BS; Bryan Kelly, MD;
Ernest Sink, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
50
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
84
1:35 PM-1:39 PM The Effect of Screw Position in Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis
Jillian Lee, MBChB; Tegan Cheng; David Little, MD, MBBS, FRACS, PhD
The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
85
1:40 PM-1:44 PM Predictors of Failure After Surgical Treatment of Femoroacetabular
Impingement: Results of a Multicenter Prospective Cohort of 621 Hips
Jeffrey Nepple, MD; Asheesh Bedi, MD; Ira Zaltz, MD; Christopher Larson, MD;
Daniel Sucato, MD, MS; Paul Beaule, MD; Young-Jo Kim, MD, PhD;
ANCHOR Study Group; John Clohisy, MD
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
1:45 PM-1:54 PM Discussion
86
1:55 PM-1:59 PM Does a Fascia Iliaca Pain Block Protocol Facilitate Earlier Mobilization
and Shorter Hospital Stay than Epidural Anesthesia After Periacetabular
Osteotomy
Patrick Whitlock, MD; Vidya Chidambaran; Megan Albertz, MD; Lili Ding, PhD;
James McCarthy, MD, MHCM
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
87
2:00 PM-2:04 PM Naproxen Provides Safe and Effective Heterotopic Ossication Prophylaxis
for Periacetabular Osteotomies
John Clohisy, MD; Adam Sassoon, MD; Gail Pashos; Sean Akers;
Karla Crook, BSW; Michael Hellman, MD
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
88
2:05 PM-2:09 PM Does Early Proximal Femoral Varus Osteotomy Shorten the Length of
Fragmentation In LCPD? Lessons from a Prospective Multi-Center Cohort
Wudbhav (Woody) Sankar MD; Scott Lavalva, BA; Molly McGuire;
Chan-Hee Jo, PhD; Harry Kim, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
2:10 PM-2:19 PM Discussion
PERIOD 1B
2:20 PM-2:22 PM Case 1: Management of Focal Femoral Head Avascular Necrosis
Vidyadhar Upasani, MD
2:23 PM-2:27 PM Allograft / Biologics
Patrick Whitlock, MD
2:28 PM-2:32 PM Osteotomy
Courtney O’Donnell, MD
51
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
2:32 PM-2:42 PM Discussion
2:43 PM-2:45 PM Case 2: Management of Whole Head Avascular Necrosis
Vidyadhar Upasani, MD
2:46 PM-2:50 PM THA
John Masonis, MD
2:51 PM-2:55 PM Non-Arthroplasty Options
David Podeszwa, MD
2:55 PM-3:05 PM Discussion
3:05 PM-3:25 PM Break
DEVELOPMENTAL DYSPLASIA OF THE HIP
PERIOD 2A
FREE PAPERS
Moderator: Travis Matheney, MD
89
3:25 PM-3:29 PM Comparison Between the Pavlik Harness and the Tübingen Splint for the
Treatment of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip in Infants
Xuemin Lyu, MD
Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing, China, People’s Republic of
90
3:30 PM-3:34 PM The Fate of the Stubborn Hip in Bilateral Cases Where One Hip Reduces on
Initial Treatment: How Many and What To Do?
Jose Herrera-Soto, MD; Emily Schaeffer, PhD; Kishore Mulpuri, MBBS;
Wudbhav (Woody) Sankar, MD; Nicole Williams, FRACS; Travis Matheney, MD;
Vidyadhar Upasani MD
BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada
91
3:35 PM-3:39 PM Perfusion MRI after Closed and Open Reduction may not Predict Proximal
Femoral Growth Disturbance at Long-term Followup in Developmental
Dysplasia of the Hip
Florian Schmaranzer, MD; Young-Jo Kim, MD, PhD; Mariana Ferrer, MD;
David Williams, PhD; Sarah Bixby, MD; Eduardo Novais, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
3:40 PM-3:49 PM Discussion
92
3:50 PM-3:54 PM Anterior Open Reduction of the Hip in Walking Age Children.
What is the Role of Bony Surgery?
Alpesh Kothari, MD; Angela Tatay, MD; Sarah Lancaster, MD; Tim Theologis
Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Oxford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
52
93
3:55 PM-3:59 PM Hip Morphology Differs on Post-reduction MRI Between Hips with and
without Residual Dysplasia at Long-term: A Pilot Study with a Minimum
10 year Followup
Florian Schmaranzer, MD; Mariana Ferrer, MD; Young-Jo Kim, MD, PhD;
David Williams, PhD; Sarah Bixby, MD; Eduardo Novais, MD
Boston Childrens Hospital, Boston, MA
94
4:00 PM-4:04 PM Predictors of Total Hip Arthroplasty Following Surgical Treatment of Pediatric
Developmental Hip Dysplasia
Ernest Young, MD; Paul Sousa, MD; William Shaughnessy, MD;
Anthony Stans, MD; Todd Milbrandt, MD; A. Noelle Larson, MD
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
4:05 PM-4:15 PM Discussion
PERIOD 2B
4:15 PM-4:17 PM Case 1: Persistent Dislocation, Failed Bracing
Travis Matheney, MD
4:18 PM-4:22 PM Attempt Closed Reduction/Open Reduction Early (Early Treatment)
Andreas Roposch, MD, MSc, FRCS
4:23 PM-4:27 PM Wait for Open Reduction/Osteotomies
Charles Price, MD
4:27 PM-4:37 PM Discussion
4:38 PM-4:40 PM Case 2: Residual Dysplasia with Open Triradiate Cartilage
Travis Matheney, MD
4:41 PM-4:45 PM Intervene Now
Scott Rosenfeld, MD
4:46 PM-4:50 PM Wait and See/PAO is Best
Eduardo Novais, MD
4:50 PM-5:00 PM Discussion
53
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
54
Lower Extremity Subspecialty Day
1:30 PM-3:05 PM
Co-Chairs: Christopher Iobst, MD & Raymond Liu, MD
This session will be a mixture of scientic papers, debates and panel discussion regarding lower
extremity deformity issues. The debate will attempt to answer the question of whether isolated femoral
anteversion should be corrected or not. With the recent paradigm shift away from pediatric external
xation in limb deformity correction, a panel will discuss techniques to correct distal femoral deformity
that do not require an external xator post-operatively.
PERIOD 1A
FREE PAPERS
Moderator: Christopher Iobst, MD
95
1:30 PM-1:34 PM Vitamin D Level of Toddlers with “Physiologic” Genu Varum is Lower than
That of Control Toddlers: 1:2 Case-Control Study
Yuko Sakamoto, MD
Juntendo University Nerima Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
96
1:35 PM-1:39 PM Recurrence of Varus Following Guided Growth for Infantile Tibia Vara
Allison Scott, MD
Shriners Hospital for Children, Houston, Houston, TX
97
1:40 PM-1:44 PM Distal Tibial Osteotomy to Address Internal Tibial Torsion –
Should the Fibula be Cut?
Emily Cidambi, MD; Megan Jeffords, MS; Christine Farnsworth, MS;
Jessica Hughes, MD; Kevin Parvaresh, MD; Thomas Sullivan, MD;
Burt Yaszay, MD; Eric Edmonds, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital - San Diego, San Diego, CA
1:45 PM-1:54 PM Discussion
Moderator: Raymond Liu, MD
98
1:55 PM-1:59 PM Posterior Neurovascular Bundle Location Is Variable in Fibular Hemimelia
David Feldman, MD; Aaron Huser, DO; Troy Rand, PhD;
Dror Paley, MD, FRCSC
The Paley Institute, West Palm Beach, FL
99
2:00 PM-2:04 PM Extramedullary Motorized Lengthening of the Femur in Pediatric Patients
Andrew Georgiadis, MD; Jennifer Laine, MD; Susan Novotny; Mark Dahl, MD
Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare, St. Paul, MN
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device for the use described
(ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
55
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
100
2:05 PM-2:09 PM Results of Physeal Bar Resection at a Single Pediatric Institution
John Birch, FRCSC; Kshitij Manchanda, MD; David Podeszwa, MD;
Yassine Kanaan, MD; Chan-Hee Jo, PhD; Jennifer Rogers, MA
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
2:10 PM-2:19 PM Discussion
PERIOD 1B
DEBATE: Should Isolated Femoral Anteversion Be Corrected?
Moderator: Christopher Iobst, MD
2:20 PM-2:25 PM Pro
J. Eric Gordon, MD
2:25 PM -2:30 PM Con
Richard Davidson, MD
2:30 PM-2:40 PM Discussion
CASE DISCUSSION: Surgical Approach for Distal Femoral
Valgus with Shortening
Moderator: Raymond Liu, MD
2:40 PM -2:45 PM Fixator Assisted Nailing
Christopher Iobst, MD
2:45 PM -2:50 PM Fixator Assisted Plating and
Proximal Lengthening
John Herzenberg, MD
2:50 PM -2:55 PM Reverse Planning Method
Mark Dahl, MD
2:55 PM-3:05 PM: Discussion
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
56
Neuromuscular Subspecialty Day
3:25 PM-5:00 PM
Co-Chairs: Emily Dodwell, MD & Vineeta Swaroop, MD
This session will be a mixture of scientic papers, debates and discussion regarding neuromuscular
issues. The debate will focus on cerebral palsy surgery- percutaneous vs. open lengthenings. Presen-
tations on different publications that may change your practice, operating on older teens with cerebral
palsy, and a master technique on the early results of the trochanteric sparing proximal femoral resec-
tion for arthritic neuromuscular hip will also be presented.
PERIOD 2A
FREE PAPERS
Moderators: Emily Dodwell, MD & Vineeta Swaroop, MD
101
3:25 PM-3:29 PM Impact of Hip Displacement on Health Related Quality of Life in Children
with Cerebral Palsy
Unni Narayanan, FRCSC; Menal Huroy, BS; Clarissa Encisa, MPH;
Ashley Ferkul, BA; Herbert Graham, MD; Kishore Mulpuri, MBBS;
Michael Fehlings, MD
The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
102
3:30 PM-3:34 PM Hip Reconstruction in Children with Cerebral Palsy: What Predicts Failure?
Pooya Hosseinzadeh, MD; Arya Minaie, BA; Jaclyn Schipper, BA;
Elizabeth Forsen, ST
Saint Louis Children’s Hospital, Saint Louis, MO
103
3:35 PM-3:39 PM Additional Therapeutic Effects of Guided Growth In Spastic Hip
Displacement
Chia-Hsieh Chang, MD; Huan Sheu, MD; Wen-E Yang, MD; Hsuan Kai Kao, MD
Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan City, Taiwan
3:40 PM-3:49 PM Discussion
104
3:50 PM-3:54 PM Anterior Guided Growth of the Distal Femur for Knee Flexion Contracture:
Clinical, Radiographic, and Motion Analysis Results
Kemble Wang MD; Adam Rozumalski, PhD; Thomas Novacheck, MD;
Andrew Georgiadis, MD
Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare, St. Paul, MN
105
3:55 PM-3:59 PM A Thirteen-Year Longitudinal Outcome Study: Is Adolescent Mobility
Function Preserved in Adults with Cerebral Palsy?
Freeman Miller, MD; Chris Church, PT; Nancy Lennon, PT; Faithe Kalisperis, DPT;
Kristen Nicholson, PhD; Jose Salazar-Torres, PhD; John Henley, PhD;
Daveda Taylor, DPT; Timothy Niiler, PhD; Julieanne Sees, DO;
Michael Shrader, MD
Nemours duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
57
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
106
4:00 PM-4:04 PM Femoral Head Avascular Necrosis After Reconstructive Hip Surgery in
Children with Cerebral Palsy
Pooya Hosseinzadeh, MD; Arya Minaie, BA;
Jaclyn Schipper, BA;
Elizabeth Forsen, ST
Saint Louis Children’s Hospital, Saint Louis, MO
4:05 PM-4:15 PM Discussion
PERIOD 2B
Moderators: Emily Dodwell, MD & Vineeta Swaroop, MD
DEBATE: Surgery in Cerebral Palsy- Percutaneous vs. Open Lengthenings
4:15 PM-4:20 PM Percutaneous
David Yngve, MD
4:21 PM-4:26 PM: Open
Jon Davids, MD
4:27 PM-4:34 PM: Discussion
4:35 PM-4:40 PM: Publications This Year That Might Change Your Practice
Jill Larson, MD
4:41 PM-4:50 PM: How/When to Operate on Older Teens/Young Adults with Cerebral Palsy
Henry (Hank) Chambers, MD
4:51 PM-5:00 PM: Master Technique: Early Results of the Trochanteric Sparing Proximal
Femoral Resection for Arthritic Neuromuscular Hip
Jonathan Schoenecker, MD, PhD
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device for the use described
(ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
58
Spine Subspecialty Day
1:30 PM-5:00 PM
Co-Chairs: Lindsay Andras, MD & Ron El-Hawary, MD
OPTIMIZING SPINAL DEFORMITY CARE:
A DEEPER DIVE INTO BUILDING A SUCCESSFUL TEAM
As the importance of a collaborative effort in and out of the operating room has become apparent for
patient safety and improving outcomes, we will look at ways to build a successful spine team. Partici-
pants can expect to gain pearls from some of the nation’s top centers that will encourage dialogue with
their own team members.
PERIOD 1A
Moderators: Lindsay Andras, MD & Ron El-Hawary, MD
1:30 PM-1:34 PM How to Create a Positive Culture: From CEO to Circulators
David Skaggs, MD, MMM
1:34 PM-1:38 PM Secrets to Successful Anesthesia for Complex Spinal Deformity
John (Jack) Flynn, MD
1:38 PM-1:42 PM What Makes My Neuromonitoring Team Great
Suken Shah, MD
1:42 PM-1:46 PM Tips from My Star Scrub Technician
Brandon Ramo, MD
1:46 PM-1:50 PM Reining in the Radiation: How to Protect Your Patients and Staff with or
without an O-arm
A. Noelle Larson, MD
1:50 PM-1:55 PM Discussion
1:55 PM-1:59 PM Safely Improving Speed: The 5 Biggest Factors That Have Made My
Team Faster
Peter Newton, MD
1:59 PM- 2:03 PM Managing Pain and Expectations for an Accelerated Discharge-The Team
Approach
Nicholas Fletcher, MD
2:03 PM-2:07 PM Why My PA is Critical to Patient Pre-and
Postop Care
Michael Glotzbecker, MD
2:07 PM-2:11 PM Cutting Costs Not Corners: How to Lower
Expenses without Sacricing Care
Laurel Blakemore, MD
2:11 PM-2:15 PM Discussion
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device for the use described
(ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
59
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
PERIOD 1B
FREE PAPERS
Moderators: Patrick Cahill, MD & Amy McIntosh, MD
107
2:16 PM-2:20 PM Accelerated Discharge Pathway Resulted in 50% Decrease in Length of Stay,
Lower Pain at Discharge, and Earlier Return to School than a Traditional
Discharge Pathway Following Posterior Spinal Fusion for Adolescent
Idiopathic Scoliosis: A Prospective Study
Nicholas Fletcher, MD; Joshua Murphy, MD; Hilary Harris, BS;
Jack Goldberg, BS; Thomas Austin, MD; Austin Yu, BS; Robert Bruce, MD;
Michael Schmitz, MD; Dennis Devito, MD; Jorge Fabregas, MD;
Firoz Miyanji, MD
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA
108
2:21 PM-2:25 PM The Impact of Posterior Spinal Fusion (PSF) on Coronal Balance in Adolescent
Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS): A New Classication and Trends in the
Post-Operative Period
Jason Anari, MD; Aaron Tatad, MPH; Patrick Cahill, MD;
John (Jack) Flynn, MD; Harms Study Group
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
109
2:26 PM-2:30 PM It’s Not Just About the Frontal Plane: Sagittal Parameters Impact Curve
Progression in AIS Patients Undergoing Brace Treatment
Hiroko Matsumoto MA; Shay Warren MD; Megan Campbell BA; John Tunney;
Nicole Bainton NP; Joshua Hyman MD; Benjamin Roye MD; David Roye MD;
Michael Vitale, MD, MPH
Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY
2:31 PM-2:40 PM Discussion
110
2:41 PM-2:45 PM Curve Flexibility is a Signicant Predictor of Surgical Morbidity for Patients
with Cerebral Palsy and Severe Scoliosis
Jessica Hughes, MD; Burt Yaszay, MD; Tracey Bastrom, MA; Carrie Bartley, MA;
Paul Sponseller, MD; Patrick Cahill, MD; Mark Abel, MD; Suken Shah, MD;
Firoz Miyanji, MD; Amer Samdani, MD; Peter Newton, MD;
Harms Study Group
Alfred I Dupont Hosp for Children, Wilmington, DE
111
2:46 PM-2:50 PM Of Cerebral Palsy Patients Fused Short of the Pelvis, What Predicts Good
Radiographic Results?
Francisco Eguia, BA; Brian Sullivan, MD; Patrick Cahill, MD; David Spiegel, MD;
Keith Baldwin, MD; Suken Shah, MD; Burt Yaszay, MD; Peter Newton, MD;
Paul Sponseller, MD
Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
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112
2:51 PM-2:55 PM Implanted Reservoir for Intrathecal Administration of Nusinersen
(Spinraza™) in Patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Posterior Spinal
Fusions
Burt Yaszay, MD; Chamindra Konersman, MD; Emily Ewing, MA;
Andrew Skalsky, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA
2:56 PM-3:05 PM Discussion
3:05 PM-3:25 PM Break
EARLY ONSET SCOLIOSIS:
TWEENERS (8-10 YEAR OLDS WITH EOS)
There is equipoise as to the ideal treatment for older patients with early onset scoliosis.
PERIOD 2A
Moderators: Firoz Miyanji, MD & Jeffrey Sawyer, MD
3:25 PM-3:30 PM Setting the Stage
Jeffrey Sawyer, MD
3:30 PM-3:35 PM Non-Surgical Treatment
Lori Karol, MD
3:35 PM-3:40 PM Growth Friendly Treatment
Michael Vitale, MD, MPH
3:40 PM-3:45 PM Vertebral Body Stapling
Patrick Cahill, MD
3:45 PM-3:50 PM Vertebral Body Tethering
Stefan Parent, MD
3:50 PM-3:55 PM Spinal Fusion
Jaime Gómez, MD
3:55 PM-4:10PM Discussion
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device for the use described
(ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
PERIOD 2B
FREE PAPERS
Moderators: Amer Samdani, MD & John Smith, MD
113
4:11 PM-4:15 PM What is the Cost of a “Cast Holiday” in Treating Children with Early Onset
Scoliosis (EOS) with Elongation Derotation Flexion (EDF, “Mehta”) Casting?
Graham Fedorak, MD; Hannah Dreksler, BS; Alexandra Nielson, BS;
John Hein, MD; Bruce MacWilliams; Jacques D’Astous, MD
Shriners Hospitals for Children - Salt Lake City, Salt Lake City, UT
114
4:16 PM-4:20 PM Relationship Between Body Mass, Rod Diameter and Rod Fracture in
Magnetically Controlled Growing Rods
Benjamin Roye, MD; Gerard Marciano; Megan Campbell, BA;
Hiroko Matsumoto, MA; Klane White, MD; Jeffrey Sawyer, MD; John Smith, MD;
Scott Luhmann, MD; Peter Sturm, MD; Paul Sponseller, MD;
Michael Vitale, MD, MPH; Children’s Spine Study Group;
Growing Spine Study Group
Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY
115
4:21 PM-4:25 PM Correlation Between Surgical Site Infection and Classication of Early Onset
Scoliosis (C-EOS) in Patients Managed by Rib-based Distraction
Instrumentation (VEPTR)
John (Jack) Flynn, MD; Mahmoud Mahmoud, MD; Patrick Cahill, MD;
Aaron Tatad, MPH
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
4:26 PM-4:35 PM Discussion
116
4:36 PM-4:40 PM Limited Sequence MRI’s for Early Onset Scoliosis Patients Detected 100% of
Neural Axis Abnormalities While Reducing MRI Time by 68%
Rajan Murgai, BS; Benita Tamrazi, MD; Kenneth Illingworth, MD;
David Skaggs, MD, MMM; Lindsay Andras, MD
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
117
4:41 PM-4:45 PM Intraspinal MRI Abnormalities in Early-Onset Scoliosis – Rates Across a
Global Cohort
Brendan Williams, MD; Anna McClung, RN; Suken Shah, MD;
Laurel Blakemore, MD; Jeff Pawelek; Paul Sponseller, MD;
Stefan Parent, MD; John Emans, MD; Peter Sturm, MD; Burt Yaszay, MD;
Behrooz Akbarnia, MD; Growing Spine Study Group
University of Florida at Gainesville, Gainesville, FL
118
4:46 PM-4:50 PM One and Done Surgical Fusion for Juvenile Scoliosis: Leads to Equivalent
PROs at Five Years Despite High Rates of Adding-On
Brandon Ramo, MD; Nathan Boes, MD; Dong-Phuong Tran, MS;
David Thornberg
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
4:51 PM-5:00 PM Discussion
61
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
Sports Subspecialty Day
1:30 PM-5:00 PM
Co-Chairs: Cordelia Carter, MD & Benton Heyworth, MD
PERIOD 1A
LOWER EXTREMITY SPORTS INJURIES/CONDITIONS
FREE PAPERS
Moderator: Benton Heyworth, MD
119
1:30 PM-1:34 PM Four-in-One Extensor Realignment Procedure for the Treatment of
Obligatory or Fixed, Lateral Patellar Instability
David Deliberato, DO; Oussama Abousamra, MD; Satbir Singh, BS;
Kevin Klingele, MD
Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH
120
1:35 PM-1:39 PM Predicting Recurrent Patellar Instability with Novel MRI Measurements of
Extensor Mechanism Containment
Daniel Weltsch, MD; Calvin Chan; John Urwin, BS; R. Justin Mistovich, MD;
Christopher Gajewski, BA; Peter Fabricant, MD;
J. Todd Lawrence, MD, PhD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
121
1:40 PM-1:44 PM The Utility of Stability and Tear Location in a Classication System for Discoid
Meniscus Surgical Planning
Brian Yang, BA; Catherine Logan, MD; Kathryn Williams, MS;
Frances Tepolt, MD; Nikolaos Paschos, MD; Mininder Kocher, MD, MPH
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
1:45 PM-1:54 PM Discussion
122
1:55 PM-1:59 PM Race Independently Predicts Unsuccessful Healing of Osteochondritis
Dissecans in the Pediatric Knee
Neeraj Patel, MD; Jigar Gandhi; Andrew Helber, BA; Kevin Shea, MD;
Theodore Ganley, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
123
2:00 PM-2:04 PM Meniscus Root Tears in Children and Adolescents
Samuel Willimon, MD; Michael Busch, MD; Melissa Christino, MD;
Crystal Perkins, MD
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
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may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
124
2:05 PM-2:09 PM The Use of the Y-Balance Test for Return to Play Assessment Following
Adolescent ACL Reconstruction: Exposing the Contralateral Limb
Henry Ellis, MD; K. John Wagner, BS; Meagan Sabatino, BA; Aaron Zynda, BS;
Lorenzo Vite, PT; Jessica Dabis, DPT; Laura Saleem, PT; Daniel Stokes, DPT;
Philip Wilson, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
2:10 PM-2:19 PM Discussion
PERIOD 1B
LE (HIP/KNEE/ANKLE) – CASE-BASED CONTROVERSIES
The invited speakers will debate different positions on some of the most controversial and common
upper extremity conditions in pediatric sports medicine. Specically, debates will include when to
pursue non-operative treatment versus joint preservation technique in femoroacetabular impingement
(FAI), what the best surgical treatment for unstable OCD of the patella, and what techniques offer the
most successful outcomes for talar OCD.
FAI
6 months hip pain in adolescent soccer player with mild cam lesion w/ ‘possible small labrum tear’ on
MR arthrogram
2:20 PM-2:25 PM Nonop/Injection/PT
Andrew Pennock, MD
2:25 PM-2:30 PM Arthroscopic Osteoplasty and Labrum Repair
Yi-Meng Yen, MD
2:30 PM-2:35 PM Discussion
Patellar OCD
6 weeks of knee pain in skeletally mature baseball player, worse with squatting, with 12x10x8mm
unstable OCD with multiple chondral ssures
2:35 PM-2:40 PM Drilling and Fixation
Jennifer Beck, MD
2:40 PM-2:45 PM Chondroplasty/Debridement and Drilling/Microfracture/Marrow Stimulation
Gregory Schmale, MD
2:45 PM-2:50 PM Discussion
63
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
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Talar OCD
Pre-adolescent female gymnast with non-healing 1x1cm posteromedial talar dome stable OCD despite
3 months crutches and boot
2:50 PM-2:55 PM Trans-Articular Drilling
Jeremy Frank, MD
2:55 PM-3:00 PM Retro-Articular Drilling and Bone Grafting
Shital Parikh, MD
3:00 PM-3:05 PM Discussion
3:05 PM-3:25 PM Break
PERIOD 2A
UPPER EXTREMITY SPORTS INJURIES/CONDITIONS
FREE PAPERS
Moderator: Cordelia Carter, MD
125
3:25 PM-3:29 PM Sports Specialization and Incidence of Shoulder Pain in American Youth
Peter Fabricant, MD; Madison Heath, BS; Jonathan Schachne, MD;
Shevaun Doyle, MD; Roger Widmann, MD; Daniel Green, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
126
3:30 PM-3:34 PM Normal Glenoid Ossication in Pediatric and Adolescent Shoulders Mimics
Bankart Lesions: An MRI-Based Study
Peter Fabricant, MD; Harry Greditzer, MD; Joash Suryavanshi, BA;
Sreetha Sidharthan, BS; Madison Heath, BS; Daniel Green, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
127
3:35 PM-3:39 PM Risk Factors for Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Instability after Arthroscopic
Stabilization in Adolescent Athletes
Timothy Cheng, MD; Eric Edmonds, MD; Tracey Bastrom, MA;
Andrew Pennock, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA
3:40 PM-3:49 PM Discussion
128
3:50 PM-3:54 PM Posterior Shoulder Instability: Surgical Outcomes and Risk of Failure in
Adolescence
Alicia Asturias, BA; Tracey Bastrom, MA; Andrew Pennock, MD;
Eric Edmonds, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
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129
3:55 PM-3:59 PM Progressive Elbow MRI Abnormalities in Little League Baseball Players are
Common: A 3-Year Longitudinal Evaluation
Joshua Holt, MD; Philip Henry Stearns NP; Tracey Bastrom MA;
M. Morgan Dennis; Jerry Dwek, BS; Andrew Pennock, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA
130
4:00 PM-4:04 PM Early Functional Outcomes and Radiographic Healing after Autologous
Osteochondral Grafting for Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Elbow:
Results from a Prospective Registry
Kemble Wang, MD; Kathryn Williams, MS; Katherine Eisenberg, BS;
Donald Bae, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
4:05 PM-4:15 PM Discussion
PERIOD 2B
UE (SHOULDER) – CASE-BASED CONTROVERSIES
Experts in shoulder surgery will provide their recommended approaches to two of the most frequent
presentations in adolescent sports medicine: rst time shoulder dislocation for a contact athlete and
multidirectional instability with recurrent subluxations affecting activities of daily life. Debate will be
focused on surgical indications and the techniques that minimize recurrence while allowing full return
to activities, including competitive sports.
Traumatic Unidirectional Shoulder Instability: 1
st
time traumatic anterior GH dislocation in
adolescent male football player
4:15 PM-4:20 PM Nonop/PT/Bracing
Matthew Schmitz, MD
4:20 PM-4:25 PM Op – Arthroscopic Bankart Repair
Paul Saluan, MD
4:25 PM-4:30 PM Op – Open Bankart Repair
Henry Ellis, MD
4:30 PM-4:40 PM Discussion
Multidirectional Instability: multiple subluxations, pain despite 6mo PT in adolescent female
recreational athlete with ligamentous laxity
4:40 PM-4:45 PM Nonop/PT
Donald Bae, MD
4:45 PM-4:50 PM Op – Arthroscopic Capsulorrhaphy
Michael Busch, MD
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
66
4:50 PM-4:55 PM Op – Open Inferior Capsular Shift
Mininder Kocher, MD, MPH
4:55 PM-5:00 PM Discussion
Trauma Subspecialty Day
1:30 PM-5:00 PM
Co-Chairs: Andrew Howard, MD & Mark Sinclair, MD
This session will be a mixture of scientic papers, debates and case discussions regarding upper and
lower extremity trauma. The debates and case discussions will specically address distal radius, femoral
and tibial shaft fractures where the patient, either due to age, size, or injury pattern, is in between
pediatric and adult fracture treatment techniques. Through our (lively) discussion, we will attempt to
decide the best course of treatment for these “tweener” cases. Audience participation will be
encouraged.
UPPER EXTREMITY TRAUMA
PERIOD 1A
FREE PAPERS
Moderator: Andrew Howard, MD
131
1:30 PM-1:34 PM Improving Quality in the Treatment of Pediatric Forearm Fractures:
Minimizing the Need for Repeat Intervention
Todd Osterbur, PA-C; Kevin Neal, MD; Gary Kiebzak, PhD
Nemours, Jacksonville, FL
132
1:35 PM-1:39 PM Post Traumatic Growth Arrests of the Distal Radius in Children and
Adolescents
Patrick Tohmé, MD; Eric Desautels; Marie-Lyne Nault, MD;
Nathalie Jourdain, MA; Marie Beausejour, PhD; Raphaelle Blondin-Gravel, MSc;
Constantin Stanciu; Mathilde Hupin, MD
CHU Ste-Justine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
133
1:40 PM-1:44 PM Vitamin D Status in Children with Forearm Fractures: Is Deciency
Associated with Fracture Severity?
Pooya Hosseinzadeh, MD; Gary Kiebzak, PhD; Charles Goldfarb, MD
Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, Florida
1:45 PM-1:54 PM Discussion
134
1:55 PM-1:59 PM Prospective Comparison of Operative versus Non-operative Treatment
of Type IIA Supracondylar Humerus Fractures
Julia Sanders, MD; Andrew Pennock, MD; Eric Edmonds, MD;
Olivia Hughes, BS; M. Morgan Dennis, BS; Christina Paik, PA-C;
Philip Stearns, NP; Vidyadhar Upasani, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
135
2:00 PM-2:04 PM Minimally Displaced Humeral Lateral Condyle Fractures: Is Prophylactic
Stabilization Superior To Surgery After Displacement?
Dustin Greenhill, MD; Shawn Funk, MD;
Marilyn Elliott; Chan-Hee Jo, PhD; Brandon Ramo, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
136
2:05 PM-2:09 PM Pediatric Type II Supracondylar Humerus Fractures: Factors Associated
with Successful Closed Reduction and Immobilization
Patrick Ojeaga; Christine Ho, MD; Charles Wyatt, NP; Philip Wilson, MD;
Henry Ellis, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
2:10 PM-2:19 PM Discussion
PERIOD 1B
2:20 PM-2:35 PM Medial Epicondyle Factors: ORIF or Treat Closed?
Colin May, MD
2:35 PM-2:50 PM Open Forearm/Wrist Fractures: Emergency Department Irrigation vs.
Formal Operative Debridement
Joseph (Jay) Janicki, MD
2:50 PM-3:05 PM Displaced Distal Radius Fractures: Reduce or Not Reduce? Pin or Not Pin?
Walter Truong, MD
3:05 PM-3:25 PM Break
LOWER EXTREMITY TRAUMA
PERIOD 2A
FREE PAPERS
Moderator: Mark Sinclair, MD
137
3:25 PM-3:29 PM Open Reduction of Closed Pediatric Tibia Fractures Treated with
Intramedullary Stabilization Does Not Increase Risk of Post-Operative
Complications
Todd Blumberg, MD; Erik Magnusson, MD; Daniel Weltsch, MD;
Keith Baldwin, MD
Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA
138
3:30 PM-3:34 PM Treatment Outcomes of Displaced Adolescent Distal Third Tibia
Fractures: Can We Do Better?
Wendy Ramalingam MD; Patrick Carry, MS; Christopher Brazell, BA;
Ryan Calkins, BS; Sara Linza-Moscati; Jason Stoneback, MD;
Nancy Miller, MD
Children’s Hospital of Colorado, Aurora, CO
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
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may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
139
3:35 PM-3:39 PM Secondary Surgeries Following Major Lower Extremity Amputations in
the Pediatric Population
Christopher Joyce, MD; Jane Gralla, PhD; Ryan Calkins, BS;
Anastasiya Trizno, BS; Colin Reisenauer, BS; Jason Stoneback, MD
University of Colorado, Aurora, CO
3:40 PM-3:49 PM Discussion
140
3:50 PM-3:54 PM Duration of Spica Cast Treatment for Childhood Femur Fracture
R. Dale Blasier, MD; Stacy Calloway, MD; Laura Meyer, RN;
John Cale, BS; Katherine Travis, NP
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR
141
3:55 PM-3:59 PM Does Obesity Increase the Complication Rate in Spica Casting for
Pediatric Femur Fractures?
Robin Wolschendorf; Daniel Havlichek; Meghan Hill, BS; Amil Jayasuriya;
Gerald Lilly, BS; Philip Nowicki, MD
Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital, Grand Rapids, MI
142
4:00 PM-4:04 PM Achieving Consensus on the Treatment of Pediatric Femoral
Shaft Fractures
Matthew Oetgen, MD; Benjamin Martin, MD; Nicholas Fletcher, MD;
Jeffrey Sawyer, MD
Children’s National Health System, Washington, DC
4:05 PM-4:15 PM Discussion
PERIOD 2B
4:15 PM-4:17 PM Pediatric Patients with Adult Trauma: Treating the “Tweener” Cases:
Introduction and Presentation of the Femoral Tweener Case
Mark Sinclair, MD
4:17 PM-4:22 PM Treatment of Femoral Tweener Case with IM Fixation
Eric Eisner, MD
4:23 PM-4:28 PM Treatment of Femoral Tweener Case with Submuscular Plating
Paul Sponseller, MD
4:28 PM-4:30 PM Audience Vote/Discussion
4:30 PM-4:39 PM Case Follow Up
Mark Sinclair, MD
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
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may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
4:40 PM-4:42 PM Introduction and Presentation of the Tibial Tweener Case
Mark Sinclair, MD
4:43 PM-4:48 PM Treatment of Tibial Tweener Case with Rigid IM Nail
Brian Brighton, MD
4:49 PM-4:54 PM Treatment of Tibial Tweener Case with Physeal Sparring Technique
Mark Lee, MD
4:54 PM-4:56 PM Audience Vote/Discussion
4:56 PM-5:00 PM Case Follow Up
Mark Sinclair, MD
Friday, May 17, 2019, continued
69
CLOSING RECEPTION AT NASCAR HALL OF FAME
LOCATION: 400 E. MLK Jr. Blvd.
Charlotte
DATE: May 17, 2019
TIME: 7:30 PM – 11:00 PM
7:30 PM Doors Open
7:30 PM-8:00 PM Cocktails
8:00 PM-9:30 PM Dinner
9:30 PM-11:00 PM DJ and Karaoke
The Friday Closing Reception will be held at the NASCAR Hall of Fame, which is conveniently
located in Uptown Charlotte, across the street from the Convention Center. The NASCAR
Hall of Fame is an interactive entertainment attraction honoring the history and heritage of
NASCAR. The high-tech venue, designed to educate and entertain race fans and non-fans
alike through its artifacts, hands-on exhibits, state-of-the-art theater, and the Hall of Honor.
The goal of the facility is to honor NASCAR icons and create an enduring tribute to the
drivers, crew members, team owners and others that have impacted the sport in the past,
present and future.
Attire: Dress for a day at the NASCAR track! Casual attire including casual collared shirts,
tops, jeans, cotton dresses, and baseball hats are encouraged.
*Included with attendee registration
Accompanying Persons must be registered to attend.
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
70
SATURDAY, MAY 18
8:00 AM–8:05 AM Welcome Remarks
Upper/Lower Extremity General Session
Moderator: John (Jack) Flynn, MD
eModerator: Samantha Spencer, MD
Presider: Christine Ho, MD
143
8:06 AM-8:10 AM Prediction and Classication of Radial Head Subluxation and Forearm
Deformity in MHE
David Feldman, MD; Jaroslaw Deszczynski; Troy Rand, PhD;
Dror Paley, MD, FRCSC; Tomasz Albrewczynski, MD
The Paley Institute, West Palm Beach, FL
144
8:11 AM-8:15 AM Patient-reported Outcomes in Congenital Radioulnar Synostosis:
Does Forearm Position Matter?
Donald Bae, MD; Jennifer Kallini, BS; David Williams, PhD; Lindley Wall, MD;
Julie Samora, MD; Mary Manske, MD; Suzanne Steinman, MD;
Deborah Bohn, MD; Douglas Hutchinson, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
145
8:16 AM-8:20 AM Predicting Radial Head Subluxation in Multiple Hereditary Exostoses (MHE):
The Impact of Ulnar Variance
Blake Meza, BS; Nakul Talathi, BS; Apurva Shah, MD, MBA;
Alexandre Arkader, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
8:21 AM-8:29 AM Discussion
146
8:30 AM-8:34 AM Cross Union for Congenital Pseudarthrosis of the Tibia: 100% Union;
No Refractures
Dror Paley, MD, FRCSC; Anna Hell, MD; David Feldman, MD
Paley Orthopedic and Spine Institute, West Palm Beach, FL
147
8:35 AM-8:39 AM Ankle Deformity in Children with Congenital Pseudoarthrosis of the Fibula
Carley Vuillermin, MBBS; Katherine Eisenberg, BS; Collin May, MD;
James Kasser, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
148
8:40 AM-8:44 AM Gait Analysis in Children with Proximal Femoral Focal Deciency
Lorena Floccari, MD; Kelly Jeans, MSc; John (Tony) Herring, MD;
Charles Johnston, MD; Lori Karol, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital, Dallas, TX
8:45 AM-8:53 AM Discussion
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device for the use described
(ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
Saturday, May 18, 2019, continued
71
149
8:54 AM-8:58 AM Systematic Isolation of Key Parameters for Estimating Skeletal Maturity on
Knee Radiographs
Alex Benedick, MD; Derrick Knapik, MD; Dana Duren, PhD;
James Sanders, MD; Daniel Cooperman, MD; Raymond Liu, MD
Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital/Case Western Reserve University,
Cleveland, OH
150
8:59 AM-9:03 AM Cumulative Radiation Exposure for Low Dose Slot-Scanning Imaging (EOS)
Versus Scanogram and Hip-to-Ankle Radiograph
Anthony Stans, MD; Fady Baky; Todd Milbrandt, MD;
William Shaughnessy, MD; Beth Schueler; A. Noelle Larson, MD
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
151
9:04 AM-9:08 AM How Accurate Is the Multiplier Method in Predicting the Timing of Angular
Correction after Hemiepiphysiodesis?
John Herzenberg, MD; Hady Eltayeby, MBChB; Chukwuweike Gwam, MD
International Center for Limb Lengthening,
Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, MD
9:09 AM-9:17 AM Discussion
Congenital/Syndromes General Session
Moderator: Lori Karol, MD
eModerator: Philip Nowicki, MD
Presider: Klane White, MD
152
9:18 AM-9:22 AM Radiographic Progression of Hip Disease in Morquio Syndrome Type A:
A Natural History Study
Klane White, MD; Yi-Ju Li, MD; Eveline Langereis, MD; I Jung Feng
Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA
153
9:23 AM-9:27 AM Extremity Surgery in Achondroplasia: A Multicenter Study
Nickolas Nahm, MD; Michael Bober; William Mackenzie, MD;
Adekemi Alade, MBBS, MPH; Syed Hashmi, MD; Jacqueline Hecht, PhD;
Janet Legare, MD; Mary Little; Peggy Modaff, MD; Richard Pauli;
David Rodriguez- Buritica, MD; Elena Serna, MD; Cory Smid, MD;
Julie Hoover Fong, MD
Nemours - Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
154
9:28 AM-9:32 AM Ultrasound Guided Percutenous Bipolar Release of Sternocleidomastoid for
Congenital Muscular Torticollis – A Retrospective Study of 22 Cases
Bibi Dhanan; Taral Nagda, MD
Institute of Paediatric Orthopaedic Disorders, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
9:33 AM-9:41 AM Discussion
72
Saturday, May 18, 2019, continued
155
9:42 AM-9:46 AM Characteristics of Olecranon Fractures in Osteogenesis Imperfecta
Samantha Tayne, MD; Peter Smith, MD
Shriners Hospitals for Children - Chicago, Chicago, IL
156
9:47 AM-9:51 AM Femoral Fassier-Duval Rodding in Osteogenesis Imperfecta:
Long Term Results in 27 Patients with a Minimum 10 Year Follow Up
Francois Fassier, MD; Abdullah Addar, MBBS; Fan Jiang; Yousef Marwan, MD;
Nizar Algarni, MD; Kathleen Montpetit, OT; Reggie Hamdy, MD
Shriners Hospitals for Children - Canada, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
157
9:52 AM-9:56 AM Bone Density and Hardware Failure in Pediatrics
Althea Perez; Mallory Rowan; Amanda Whitaker, MD
Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH
9:57 AM-10:05 AM Discussion
10:06 AM-10:26 AM Break
Hip General Session
Moderator: Ernest Sink, MD
eModerator: Rachel Goldstein, MD
Presider: Kishore Mulpuri, MD
158
10:27 AM-10:31 AM Should I Plan to Open? Predicting the Need for Open vs. Closed Reduction
in the Surgical Treatment of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip
Nakul Talathi, BS; Arianna Trionfo, MD; Neeraj Patel, MD;
Vidyadhar Upasani, MD; Travis Matheney, MD; Kishore Mulpuri, MBBS;
Wudbhav (Woody) Sankar, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
159
10:32 AM-10:36 AM Predictors of Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head Following Closed or
Open Reduction in the Treatment of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip
Emily Schaeffer, PhD; Jeffrey Bone, MSc; Wudbhav (Woody) Sankar, MD;
Travis Matheney, MD; Kishore Mulpuri, MBBS
BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada
160
10:37 AM-10:41 AM Evolution of Concentric Reduction after Closed Reduction in Developmental
Dysplasia of the Hip: A Prospective Series of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Studies
Weizheng Zhou, MD; Lianyong Li
Shenjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province,
China, People’s Republic of
may be used for external trauma-related CMEs.
Saturday, May 18, 2019, continued
73
10:42 AM-10:50 AM Discussion
161
10:51 AM-10:55 AM The Natural History of Unilateral Versus Bilateral Immature Hips – What are
the Factors that Lead to Persistently
Abnormal Exams?
Katherine Schroeder, MD;
Ashley Startzman, DO; Kolby Buckner, PA; Hayley Peoples, MPH; Jaclyn Hill, MD
Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
162
10:56 AM-11:00 AM Signicance of Asymmetry of Groin/Thigh Creases in Developmental
Dysplasia of the Hip Revisited: A Myth or a Fact ?
Hakan Omeroglu, MD; Suleyman Tatlici, MD; Nusret Kose
TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Sogutozu, Ankara, Turkey
163
11:01 AM-11:05 AM The Duration of Pavlik Harness Wear Following Successful Reduction of
Dislocated Hips Does Not Seem to Play a Role in Determining Radiographic
Dysplasia at Two Years
Daniel Sucato, MD, MS; Hannah Worrall, MPH; Chan-Hee Jo, PhD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital, Dallas, TX
11:06 AM-11:14 AM Discussion
164
11:15 AM-11:19 AM Comparison of Staged Vs. Single Event Timing of Bilateral Hip Surgery in
Children with Spastic Quadriplegic Cerebral Palsy
Craig Louer, MD; Jason Nunez, BA; James Bomar;
Henry (Hank) Chambers, MD; Vidyadhar Upasani, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, San Diego, CA
165
11:20 AM-11:24 AM Prolonged Non-Weightbearing Treatment Decreases Femoral Head
Deformity in Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease
Jeffrey Peck, MD; Dustin Greenhill, MD; Molly McGuire; Harry Kim, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
166
11:25 AM-11:29 AM Does Surgical Containment of Hips in Patients with Epiphyseal Dysplasia
Impact Clinical Outcomes?
Vidyadhar Upasani, MD; Amelia Lindgren, MD; Dennis Wenger, MD;
James Bomar, MPH
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, San Diego, CA
11:30 AM-11:38 AM Discussion
74
Saturday, May 18, 2019, continued
167
11:39 AM-11:43 AM Relative Contribution of Epiphyseal Tubercle and Peripheral Cupping to
Capital Femoral Epiphysis Stability: New Insights to the Pathogenesis of
SCFE and Cam-FAI Morphology
Eduardo Novais, MD; Daniel Maranho; Ata Kiapour, PhD; Ali Kiapour, PhD;
Young-Jo Kim, MD, PhD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
168
11:44 AM-11:48 AM Comparison of Prophylactic In-situ Screw Fixation Versus Observation of the
Asymptomatic Contralateral Hip in Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE)
Brian Haus, MD; Lauren Agatstein, MA; Akash Patel, BS; Alton Skaggs BS;
Jennette Boakes, MD
Shriners Hospitals for Children Northern California, Sacramento, CA
169
11:49 AM-11:53 AM Capital Femoral Epiphyseal Cupping and Extension May Be Protective in
Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis: A Multicenter Matching Cohort Study
William Morris, MD; Raymond Liu, MD; Danielle Marshall, BA; Daniel Maranho;
Roya Dastjerdi; Eduardo Novais, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
11:54 AM-12:04 PM Discussion
75
VIDEO ABSTRACTS
Video Abstract 1
Thumb Duplication: Reconstruction of a Wassel IV Deformity
David Westberry, MD; Ashley Carpenter, BS
Shriners Hospital for Children: Greenville, Greenville, SC
Video Abstract 2
Magnetic, Motorized Femoral Lengthening Nail: Antegrade Piriformis Insertion
John Herzenberg, MD
Sinai Hospital of Baltimore, Baltimore, MD
Video Abstract 3
Posterior Iliac Osteotomy for Bladder Exstrophy
Dana Weiss, MD; Douglas Canning, MD; Erin Steffe; Bernard David Horn, MD
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia PA
Video Abstract 4
Pediatric ACL Reconstruction Using 7-Stranded Autologous Hamstring
Benjamin Forst, PA-C; Anju Thomas, PA; Dennis Hiller; Julien Aoyama, BA; Theodore Ganley, MD
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Video Abstract 5
Application of Mehta Cast Technique
Joseph Khoury, MD; Jacob Cox, MD; Rafael Serrano, MD
Shriner’s Hospital for Children, Tampa, FL
Video Abstract 6
Accessory Navicular: Evaluation and Operative Management
Philip Nowicki, MD; Grant Mathison, MD
Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital Pediatric Orthopaedics, Grand Rapids, MI
Video Abstract 7
Percutaneous Calcaneal Displacement Osteotomy in the Pediatric Population
Indranil (Neel) Kushare, MD; Jeffrey Shilt, MD
Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
Video Abstract 8
Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction with Quadriceps Tendon Autograft &
Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction in a Pediatric Patient
Julian Sonnenfeld, MD; David Trofa, MD; Joseph Lombardi, MD; Forrest Anderson, MD;
Christopher Ahmad, MD
NYP/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY
Video Abstract 9
Bracket Epiphysis Excision of the First Metatarsal
Anthony Riccio, MD; Alexander Carduff, BA; Christopher Stutz, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
NEW
for 2019
76
Video Abstracts, continued
Video Abstract 10
Two Surgeon Approach to Posterior Spinal Fusion the
Correction of Neuromuscular Scoliosis
Taylor Webb, MS; Hamdi Sukkarieh, MD; Patrick Wright, MD; Jaysson Brooks, MD
Children’s of Missisippi / University of Mississippi
Medical Center, Jackson, MS
77
PAPER POSTERS
Paper Poster 1
National Epidemiological Trends for Multiple Hereditary Exostosis Condition Among 44
Children’s Hospital
Divya Talwar, MPH; Mahmoud Abo Elmagd; Alay Shah, BS; Alexandre Arkader, MD
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Paper Poster 2
Coronal Remodeling Potential of Pediatric Distal Radius Fractures
Teresa Cappello, MD; Kyle Lynch, BS
Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL
Paper Poster 3
Comparative Effectiveness of Nonoperative Versus Operative Treatment for Completely Displaced
Clavicle Shaft Fractures in Children
Charles Mehlman, DO; Shital Parikh, MD; Tyler Ames, MD; Robert Toy, BA
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
Paper Poster 4
Complications and Revision Surgeries in Limb Salvage Reconstructions for Pediatric Lower
Extremity Sarcoma
Colin Anderson, MD; Kristina Barber, BA; Patrick Carry, MS; Nathan Donaldson, DO
Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO
Paper Poster 5
Gross Motor Function Classication System Specic Growth Charts – Utility as a Risk Stratication
Tool for Surgical Site Infection Following Spine Surgery in Children with Cerebral Palsy
Eric Baranek, MD; Stephen Maier, BA; Hiroko Matsumoto, MA; Joshua Hyman, MD; Michael Vitale, MD,
MPH; David Roye, MD; Benjamin Roye, MD
Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY
Paper Poster 6
Effect of Intravenous ε-Aminocaproic Acid on Blood Loss and Transfusion Requirements after Bilateral
Varus Rotational Osteotomy: A Prospective, Double-blinded, Randomized Controlled Trial
Ishaan Swarup, MD; Joseph Nguyen, MPH; Emily Dodwell, MD; David Scher, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
Paper Poster 7
Are Precontoured Spinal Rods Mechanically Superior to Manually Contoured Rods?
Joshua Murphy, MD; Kenneth Shaw, DO; David Daniels; Dennis Devito, MD
Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Fort Gordon, GA
Paper Poster 8
Casting for Early Onset Scoliosis: Comparison of Three Different Materials
Muayad Kadhim, MD; Perry Merillat, DO; William Accousti, MD; Bryant Song; Andrew King, MD;
Michael Heffernan, MD
Children’s Hospital of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA
78
Paper Posters, continued
Paper Poster 9
18% of Patients with MCGR Experience Minimal Lengthening Episodes and the Majority Successfully
Lengthen on Subsequent Attempts
Ali Siddiqui, BS; Alexander Nazareth, MS; Lindsay Andras, MD; Kenneth Illingworth, MD;
Purnendu Gupta, MD; Michael Vitale, MD, MPH; John Smith, MD; Growing Spine Study Group;
Children’s Spine Study Group; David Skaggs, MD, MMM
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
Paper Poster 10
Distal Radius Fracture Treatment: A Survey of POSNA Membership
Andrew Georgiadis, MD; Jamie Burgess, PhD; Walter Truong, MD; Joseph (Jay) Janicki, MD
Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare, St. Paul, MN
Paper Poster 11
Skeletal Maturity of Various Skeletal Regions and Staging Systems and their Relationship to Peak
Growth, Chronological Age, and Growth in Height, Spine and Lower Extremities
James Sanders, MD; Xueya Cai, PhD; Shan Gao, MS; Raymond Liu, MD; Jonathan Cui, MD;
Dana Duren, PhD; Mekka Garcia, BS; Alec Lik Hang Hung; Lauren Karbach, MD; Derrick Knapik, MD;
Don Li; Allen Nicholson, MD; Brian Smith, MD; David Weber; Daniel Cooperman, MD
University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
Paper Poster 12
Does Repetitive Torque Result in Morphological Changes of the Lateral Elbow of the Skeletally
Immature Baseball Player? A Prospective MRI Study
William Harkin, BA; Andrew Pennock, MD; Tracey Bastrom, MA; Eric Edmonds, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA
Paper Poster 13
The Modied Kocher Criteria is Good Predictor of Both Septic Hip and Knee
Casey Smith, MD; Jessica Burns, MD; Mohan Belthur, MD
Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Phoenix, AZ
Paper Poster 14
Epiphyseal-Entry Cannulated Screws for Temporary Guided Growth of the Knees
Kevin Neal, MD; Gary Kiebzak, PhD; Cody Sanderson, MD
Nemours, Jacksonville, FL
Paper Poster 15
Factors Affecting Femoral Remodeling after Proximal Femoral Varus Osteotomy in Children with
Cerebral Palsy
Pooya Hosseinzadeh, MD; Arya Minaie, BA; Jaclyn Schipper, BA; Elizabeth Forsen, ST
Saint Louis Children’s Hospital, Saint Louis, MO
79
Paper Poster 16
Risk Factors for Venous Thromboembolism in Children Undergoing Orthopaedic Surgery
Elbert Mets, BA; Neil Pathak, BS; Anoop Galivanche, BS; Ryan Mclynn, MD; David Frumberg, MD;
Jonathan Grauer, MD
Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
Paper Poster 17
Utility of Preoperative Labs in Posterior Spinal Fusions for Idiopathic Scoliosis
Scott Luhmann, MD; Kevin Clark, MPH
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
Paper Poster 18
Minimally Invasive Surgery in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis is Safer, Less Expensive
with Similar Curve Correction and SRS-30 Outcomes as Standard PSF
Vishal Sarwahi, MBBS; Jesse Galina, BS; Stephen Wendolowski, BS; Sayyida Hasan, BS;
Chhavi Katyal, MD; Yungtai Lo, PhD
Cohen Children’s Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY
Paper Poster 19
Expert Consensus for Early Onset Scoliosis Surgery 2018
Jason Anari, MD; Patrick Cahill, MD; Divya Talwar, MPH; John (Jack) Flynn, MD
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
Paper Poster 20
Retrograde Intramedullary Nailing of Pediatric Femoral Shaft Fractures does not Result in Growth
Arrest at the Distal Femoral Physis - A Retrospective Case Series
Alex Benedick, MD; Batzorig Bazar, MD; Lewis Zirkle, MD; Raymond Liu, MD
Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital/Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
Paper Posters, continued
80
ePoster 1
Correlation of Collagen X Biomarker (CXM) with Peak Height Velocity and Radiographic Measures of
Growth in Idiopathic Scoliosis
Michelle Welborn, MD; Susan Sienko, PhD; Ryan Coghlan; William Horton, MD
Shriners Hospital for Children Portland, Portland, OR
ePoster 2
Are Children Treated for ADHD at Risk for Short Stature? A Physeal Mouse Model
Todd Milbrandt, MD; Daniela Galeano-Garces, MD; Catalina Garces, BS; Jennifer Grauberger, BA;
A. Noelle Larson, MD; Andre Van Wijnen
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
ePoster 3
The Effects of Physiologic Loading on Juvenile Bone: An Analysis of Primary Osteocytes using Next
Generation Sequencing
Donna Pacicca, MD; Tammy Brown, BA; Jeff Johnston, BS; Greyson Twist, MS; M. Gibson, MB;
Emily Farrow, PhD
Children’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO
ePoster 4
Convergent Validity of PODCI and PROMIS Domains in Congenital Upper Limb Anomalies
Charles Goldfarb, MD; Carley Vuillermin, MBBS; Patricia Miller, MS; Donald Bae, MD; Lindley Wall, MD
Washington University, Saint Louis, MO
ePoster 5
Radiologic Outcomes of Containment Surgery for Dysplastic Hips in Morquio IV-A Syndrome.
Amit Nemade, MS; William Mackenzie, MD; Mihir Thacker, MD; Kenneth Rogers, PhD
Nemours - Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
ePoster 6
Initial Dimeglio Score Predicts Treatment Difculty During Ponseti Casting for Isolated Clubfoot
Christopher Brazell, BA; Patrick Carry, MS; Alexander Jones, BA; Robin Baschal; Kaley Holmes, BA;
Nancy Miller, MD; Gaia Georgopoulos, MD
Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO
ePoster 7
Autism and Toe-walking: Are They related? Trends and Treatment Patterns from 2005-2016
Steven Frick, MD; Jacinta Leyden, BS; Lawrence Fung, MD
Stanford University, Stanford, CA
ePoster 8
Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Scores in Children with
Brachial Plexus Birth Injury
Mary Manske, MD; Ido Volk; Lauren Agatstein, BA; Nancy Abarca, MPH; Michelle James, MD
Shriners Hospital for Children Northern California, Sacramento, CA
ePOSTERS
81
ePosters, continued
ePoster 9
Analysis of Femoral Head Microstructure and Vasculature Relevant to Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease
William Morris, MD; Raymond Liu, MD; Elena Chen; Harry Kim, MD
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
ePoster 10
Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip: Care Practices of Orthopaedic Surgeons in North America
Jessica Burlile, BA; Isabel Taylor; Kishore Mulpuri, MBBS; Xue Geng, MS; Emily Schaeffer, PhD;
Eva Habib, BS; Lauren Vagelakos, MBA; Charles Price, MD; Kevin Shea, MD
Stanford University, Stanford, CA
ePoster 11
Rate of Osteotomy Healing and Factors Associated with Non-union after Periacetabular Osteotomy
for the Treatment of Symptomatic Acetabular Dysplasia
Courtney O’Donnell, MD; Michael Millis, MD; Ariel Davila-Parrilla, MD; Young-Jo Kim, MD, PhD;
Kathryn Williams, MS; Eduardo Novais, MD
Boston Childrens Hospital, Boston MA
ePoster 12
The Effect of Aminocaproic Acid on Blood Loss in Periacetabular Osteotomy
Jose Herrera-Soto, MD; Gregory Hale, MD; Denise Lopez, NP; Obinna Adigweme, MD
Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children, Orlando, FL
ePoster 13
Post-Operative Pain Control and Medication Usage in Pediatric Patients Following Operative
Treatment of Supracondylar Humerus Fractures: Are We Still Overprescribing Opioids?
Matthew Stillwagon MD; Shawn Feinstein MD; Elizabeth Byrd Nichols; Paul Andrews, MS;
Anna Vergun, MD
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
ePoster 14
Outcomes for Patients with Developmental Hip Dysplasia who Present after Six Months of Age
Ronald Roiz, MD; Liam Harris, MD; Paul Choi, MD; Rachel Goldstein, MD
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
ePoster 15
Does the Use of an Intraoperative Cell Salvage System Affect the Rate of Perioperative Allogenic
Red Blood Cell Transfusion in Patients Undergoing Periacetabular Osteotomy?
Michael Van Der Merwe, MBChB; Nicholas Lightfoot, MBChB; Jacob Munro, MD;
Matthew Boyle, FRACS
Starship Children’s Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand
ePoster 16
Does Type of Regional Anesthetic Blockade Affect Time to Mobilize and Length of Hospital Stay after
Periacetabular Osteotomy?
Isobella Henzell, MBBS; Nicholas Lightfoot, MBChB; Jacob Munro, MD; Matthew Boyle, FRACS
Starship Children’s Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand
82
ePoster 17
Corroborating the Association Between Major Comorbidities and Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis:
A Utilization of Big Data
R. Justin Mistovich, MD; Julian Gatta, MD; Lakshmanan Sivasundaram, MD; Nikunj Trivedi, MD;
Abdulhakim Tlimat, MD; David Kaelber
Case Western Reserve University Department of Orthopaedics, Cleveland, OH
ePoster 18
Reliability and Outcome Predictability of Acetabular Index and Center-edge Angle in Developmental
Dysplasia of the Hip: A Comparison of Two Different Measurement Methods
Chang Ho Shin, MD; Chaemoon Lim; Won Joon Yoo, MD; In Choi, MD; Tae-Joon Cho
Seoul National University Children’s Hospital, Seoul, Korea, Republic of
ePoster 19
Effect of Pavlik Harness Treatment on Infant Motor Milestones
Tyler Stavinoha; Onyemaechi Uzosike, BA; Damian McGlothlin, BA; Nicole Segovia, BS;
Stephanie Pun, MD; Meghan Imrie, MD
Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
ePoster 20
The Incidence of Residual Acetabular Dysplasia after Early Childhood Operative Intervention
Courtney O’Donnell, MD; Jenna Powell, BS; Patrick Carry, MS; Matthew Genelin; Ernest Sink, MD
Children’s Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO
ePoster 21
Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound of Infant Hips: A Comparison with Post-Operative MRI and
Correlation with Development of Avascular Necrosis
Travis Matheney, MD; Young-Jo Kim, MD, PhD; Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC; Harriet Paltiel, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
ePoster 22
Comparing the Pemberton Osteotomy and Modied San Diego Acetabuloplasty in Development
Dysplasia of the Hip
Raghav Badrinath, MD; James Bomar, MPH; Dennis Wenger, MD; Scott Mubarak, MD;
Vidyadhar Upasani, MD
Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, San Diego, CA
ePoster 23
The Incidence of Pin Tract Infections and Septic Arthritis in Percutaneous Distal Femur Pinning
Rajan Murgai, BS; Edward Compton, BS; Kenneth Illingworth, MD; Rachel Goldstein, MD;
Robert Kay, MD
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
ePosters, continued
Indicates those faculty presentations in which the FDA has not cleared the drug and/or medical device for the use described
(ie. the drug or medical device is being discussed for an “off label” use).
83
ePoster 24
Outcome of Surgical Excision in Patients with Fibro-Adipose Vascular Anomaly
Samantha Spencer, MD; Kemble Wang, MD; Rachel Glenn; Megan Anderson, MD; Raja Shaikh, MD;
Gulraiz Chaudry, MBChB; Steven Fishman, MD; Arin Greene, MD; Alyaa Al-Ibraheemi, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
ePoster 25
A New Method to Objectively Differentiate Paediatric Septic Arthritis of the Hips from Transient
Synovitis Using C-reactive Protein and Hip Ultrasound
Richie Olandres; Wei Ren Daniel Seng, MD; Aruni Seneviratna; Ehab Hamouda; Bryan Foong;
Elvin Lokino; Arjandas Mahadev, FRCS
KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore, Singapore
ePoster 26
Predicting Septic Arthritis of the Knee in Children: Can We Use the Septic Hip Criteria in the Knee?
Mitchel Obey, MD; Arya Minaie, BA; Jaclyn Schipper, BA; Pooya Hosseinzadeh, MD
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
ePoster 27
Pain >4 Days is Predictive of Concomitant Osteomyelitis in Children with a Septic Joint
Ali Siddiqui, BS; Lindsay Andras, MD; Kenneth Illingworth, MD; David Skaggs, MD, MMM
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
ePoster 28
Infection Trends After Open Fractures in Pediatric Patients: A Study of Data Over 11 Years
Derek Kelly, MD; Benjamin Sheffer, MD; Jeffrey Sawyer, MD; David Spence, MD; Robert Elrod;
Lauren Piana, MS; Naveen Pattisapu, MD; William Warner, MD; James Beaty, MD
Campbell Clinic, Germantown, TN
ePoster 29
The Incidence of Skip Lesions in Acute Hematogenous Osteomyelitis
Noelle Whyte, MD; Robert Bielski, MD; Kate Feinstein, MD; Olufemi Adams
University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
ePoster 30
Intravenous vs. Oral Antibiotic Therapy for Treatment of Septic Arthritis in Children
Gregory Manista, MD; Jamie Burgess, PhD; Nina Srdanovic, MS; Joseph (Jay) Janicki, MD
Ann & Robert H. Lurie Childrens Hospital, Chicago, IL
ePoster 31
Procalcitonin for Early Detection of Septic Arthritis
Brianna McMichael MPH; Amanda Nickel MPH; Jennifer Laine MD; Walter Truong MD;
Anupam Kharbanda MD
Children’s Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
ePosters, continued
84
ePoster 32
Are Patients with Musculoskeletal Infection More Likely to Present After-Hours? A Prospective,
Cross-sectional Study
Jennifer Laine, MD; Amanda Nickel, MPH; Brianna McMichael, MPH; Walter Truong, MD;
Anupam Kharbanda, MD
Children’s Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
ePoster 33
Foot Abduction Orthosis Use Greater than 3 Years Correlates with Better Promis Scores for Children
Ages 5-16 with Ponseti-Treated Idiopathic Clubfoot
Joel Lerman, MD; Ahsan Khan, BS; Nancy Abarca, MPH; Nina Cung
Shriners Hospital- Northern California, Sacramento, CA
ePoster 34
Factors Related to Outcomes after Single Event Multilevel Surgery (SEMLS) in Patients with
Cerebral Palsy
Mauro De Morais Filho, PhD; Francesco Blumetti, MD; Kamila Freitas, MD; Catia Kawamura, PT;
Marcelo Fujino; Daniella Neves; Jose Augusto Lopes, MSc
AACD, São Paulo, Brazil
ePoster 35
The Value of Tranexamic Acid in Children with Cerebral Palsy Undergoing Proximal Femoral Varus
Derotational Osteotomies
Alexander Nazareth, MS; Stephen Shymon, MD; Lydia Andras; Rachel Goldstein, MD; Robert Kay, MD
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
ePoster 36
The Use of Tranexamic Acid (TXA) in Neuromuscular Hip Reconstruction, Signicant Transfusion
Reduction or Fake News?
Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC; Laura Lins, MPH; Aneesh Samineni; Patricia Miller, MS;
Colyn Watkins, MD; Travis Matheney, MD; Brian Snyder, MD, PhD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
ePoster 37
The Effect of Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy on Hip Displacement in Children with Cerebral Palsy:
A Long Term Follow Up Study
Stacey Miller, PT; Maria Juricic, PT; Emily Schaeffer, PhD; Paul Steinbok; Jeffrey Bone, MSc;
Kishore Mulpuri, MBBS
BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada
ePoster 38
Does Acetabular Dysplasia Improve after Isolated Femoral Varus Osteotomy in Children with
Cerebral Palsy?
Pooya Hosseinzadeh, MD; Arya Minaie, BA; Jaclyn Schipper, BA; Elizabeth Forsen, ST
Saint Louis Children’s Hospital, Saint Louis, MO
ePosters, continued
85
ePoster 39
Incidence of Post-Operative Venous Thromboembolism in Children with Cerebral Palsy
Julieanne Sees, DO; Sky Prestowitz, BA; Kathleen Maguire, MD; Kenneth Rogers, PhD;
Freeman Miller, MD
Nemours - Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE
ePoster 40
Health-state Utility Values in Cerebral Palsy Patients Following Deformity Surgery: Are We Now
Ready for Cost-utility Analysis in this Patient Population?
Firoz Miyanji, MD; Luigi Nasto, MD; Michelle Marks, PT; Paul Sponseller, MD; Amer Samdani, MD;
David Clements, MD; Unni Narayanan, MBBS; Peter Newton, MD; Harms Study Group
BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada
ePoster 41
Predictors of Hospital Length of Stay Following Neuromuscular Spinal Fusion Using a Postoperative
Standardized Pathway
Laura Bellaire, MD; Laura Ward; Robert Bruce, MD; Eric Dilbone, MD; Nicholas Fletcher, MD
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA
ePoster 42
Eighty-nine Percent of Opioids Prescribed for Outpatient Pediatric Surgery Go Unused
De-An Zhang, MD; Eric McCoy, MD; Ronen Sever, MD; Cynthia Nguyen, MD; Robert Cho, MD;
Selina Poon, MD
Shriners for Children Medical Center, Pasadena, CA
ePoster 43
Does a Career in Orthopaedic Surgery Affect a Woman’s Fertility and Pregnancy Complication Rates?
Damayea Hargett, MD; Shannon Lorimer, DO; Cynthia Nguyen, MD; Samara Friedman, MD;
Shari Cui, MD; Monica Payares, MD; Kimberly Tucker, MD; Holly Pilson, MD; Selina Poon, MD
Shriners for Children Medical Center - Pasadena, Pasadena, CA
ePoster 44
Cost of Interfacility Transfer for Non-Urgent Fractures
Ryan Mayer, MD; David Zuelzer, MD; Cale Jacobs, PhD; Ryan Muchow, MD; Janet Walker, MD;
Vishwas Talwalkar, MD; Henry Iwinski, MD; Scott Riley, MD; Elizabeth Hubbard, MD
University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY
ePoster 45
Safely Reducing Radiation Exposure and Costs for Non-Operative Care of Clavicle Fractures in
Pediatric and Adolescent Patients
Brian Yang, BA; Benton Heyworth, MD; Donald Bae, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
ePosters, continued
86
ePoster 46
POSNA Practice Patterns for Pediatric Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis - Current State and
Changes Since 2011
Robert Murphy, MD; David Williams, PhD; Grant Hogue, MD; David Spence, MD;
Henry (Hank) Chambers, MD; Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC
Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC
ePoster 47
PROMIS Scores in Surgically Treated Idiopathic Scoliosis Patients: The Impact of Curve Characteristics
Scott Luhmann, MD; Ernst Etienne
Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO
ePoster 48
PROMIS Peer Relationship Domain as a Screening Tool for Socially “At Risk” Children in the Pediatric
Orthopaedic Clinic
Laura Bellaire, MD; Kristen Carroll, MD; Graham Fedorak, MD
Shriners Hospitals for Children - Salt Lake City, Salt Lake City, UT
ePoster 49
Team-Oriented, Multi-Modal Postoperative Pain Control for Idiopathic Scoliosis: Is Postoperative Day
One Discharge Feasible?
Karen Myung, MD; Joseph Jacobson, MD; Jeffrey Yu, BS; Jian Ye, MD; Randall Loder, MD;
Ryan Fitzgerald, MD; Senthil Sadhasivam, MD
Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health, Indianapolis, IN
ePoster 50
Socioeconomic Factors Impact Adolescent Fracture Care Compliance
Blake Meza, BS; Dina Iacone, BS; Divya Talwar, MPH; Wudbhav (Woody) Sankar, MD;
Apurva Shah, MD, MBA
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
ePoster 51
Virtual Reality and Bedside Entertainment and Relaxation Theater Usage in Non-Invasive Pediatric
Orthopaedic Procedures
Evan Ball, BS; Alexander Karius; Katherine Hastings, MPH; Damian McGlothlin, BA;
Samuel Rodriguez, MD; Thomas Caruso, MD; Charles Chan, MD; Steven Frick, MD
Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
ePoster 52
Inuence of Cost Information on Cast vs. Splint Decision-Making for Pediatric Distal Radius Buckle
Fractures: A Randomized Controlled Trial
J. Todd Lawrence, MD, PhD; Matthew Buczek, BS; Elle Macalpine; Bernard Horn, MD;
Apurva Shah, MD, MBA
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
ePosters, continued
87
ePoster 53
Accuracy of Emergency Department and Urgent Care Center Pediatric Orthopaedic Diagnoses
Anna Schoonover, BA; Xuyang Song, MD; Alexandria Case, BS; Joshua Abzug, MD
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
ePoster 54
Economic Impact of Wait Times in a Paediatric Orthopaedic Clinic
Khristinn Leitch, MD
Canadian Centre of Orthopaedics, North York, Ontario, Canada
ePoster 55
Selective Thoracic Fusion in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Comparison of the Lower Instrumented
Vertebrae
Dale Segal, MD; Zachary Grabel, MD; Jeffrey Konopka, MD; Adam Boissonneault, MBChB; E. Yoon;
Tracey Bastrom, MA; John (Jack) Flynn, MD; Nicholas Fletcher, MD
Emory University, Atlanta, GA
ePoster 56
Preop Halo Gravity Traction (HGT) Associated with Decreased Implant Complications in MCGR
Michelle Welborn, MD; Nikolas Baksh, MD; J. Krajbich, MD
Shriners Hospital for Children Portland, Portland, OR
ePoster 57
Back Pain Increases Linearly with Age in Children and Adolescents: An Epidemiological
Cross-Sectional Study of American Youth
Roger Widmann, MD; Jonathan Schachne, BA; Madison Heath, BS; Colleen Wixted, BS;
Daniel Green, MD; Shevaun Doyle, MD; Peter Fabricant, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
ePoster 58
Comparison of Sublaminar Bands and All-Pedicle Screw Instrumentation for the Correction of Lenke 1
and 2 Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis
Sébastien Pesenti, MD; Renaud Lafage; Brice Henry, MD; Colleen Wixted, BS; Manon Bolzinger;
Han Jo Kim, MD; Tejbir Pannu, MD; Matthew Cunningham, MD; Elie Choufani; Virginie Lafage, PhD;
John Blanco, MD; Jean Luc Jouve; Roger Widmann, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY
ePoster 59
Gait Changes Induced by Idiopathic Scoliosis Mainly Occur in the Transversal Plane
Sébastien Pesenti, MD; Benjamin Blondel, MD; Jean Luc Jouve
Timone Children’s Hospital, Marseille, France
ePoster 60
Sensitivity of MRI in Detection of Pediatric Spondylolysis
Hena Joshi, MD; Joshua Murphy, MD; Dennis Devito, MD; Nicholas Fletcher, MD; Nadja Kadom, MD
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA
ePosters, continued
88
ePoster 61
Comparison of Pre-operative Halo-gravity Traction to Non-traction in Patients Undergoing Surgery
for Severe Scoliosis: A Case-control Study
Thomas Wilson, MD; Laura Bellaire, MD; John Hein, MD; Bruce MacWilliams; Graham Fedorak, MD
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
ePoster 62
Humeral Staging Straties Risk of Scoliosis Progression in Risser 0 Patients
Don Li, MS; Jonathan Cui, MD; Stephen Devries, BS; Joseph Kahan, MD; Logan Petit, MD;
Ronan Talty, BS; Daniel Cooperman, MD; Brian Smith, MD
Yale University, New Haven, CT
ePoster 63
The Safety and Efcacy of Intrathecal Morphine in Pediatric Spinal Deformity Surgery –
A 25 Year Single Center Experience
Christina Hardesty, MD; Connie Poe-Kochert, NP; Jochen Son-Hing, MD; George Thompson, MD;
Jason Ina, MD; Paul Tripi, MD
Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, Cleveland, OH
ePoster 64
Can Ultrasound be Used for Quantitative Assessment of Spinal Deformity in Adolescent Idiopathic
Scoliosis (AIS): A Detailed Analysis with Radiography for 952 Patients
Tsz Ping Lam, MBBS; Yi Shun Wong; Ka-Lee Lai; Lee Ning Wong; Yong-Ping Zheng;
Alec Lik Hang Hung; Bobby Ng, MD; Benjamin Yip; Jack Cheng, MD
Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong
ePoster 65
Comparing Risk of Unplanned Returned to the Operating Room (UPROR): Magnetically Controlled
Growing Rod (MCGR) System vs Prosthetic Rib Constructs (PRC)
Chun Wai Hung, MD; Megan Campbell, BA; Hiroko Matsumoto, MA; David Roye, MD;
Michael Vitale, MD, MPH; Benjamin Roye, MD
Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY
ePoster 66
Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Psychological Implications of Pain in Pre-Surgical Patients
Brandon Ramo, MD; Teresa Collins-Jones, PhD; Kiley Poppino, BS; Shelby Parker, MA;
Dong-Phuong Tran, MS
Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX
ePoster 67
Factors Affecting MCGR Lengthening Outcomes in Early Onset Scoliosis
Matthew Oetgen, MD; Shannon Kelly, MD; Leah Lineld
Children’s National Health System, Washington, DC
ePosters, continued
89
ePoster 68
Back to Back Scoliosis Surgeries: Is Patient Safety and Outcomes Compromised?
Vishal Sarwahi, MBBS; Jesse Galina, BS; Jon-Paul DiMauro, MD; Stephen Wendolowski, BS; Sayyida
Hasan, BS; Yungtai Lo, PhD; Terry Amaral, MD
Cohen Children’s Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY
ePoster 69
The Demographics and Epidemiology of Idiopathic Scoliosis in Children and Incidence of Scoliosis in
the U.S
Jeffrey Kessler, MD; Kevin Bondar; Annie Tram Anh Nguyen; Jasmine Vatani
Kaiser Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA
ePoster 70
Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Elbow in Adolescent Gymnasts: Early Treatment Results and
Return to Sport
Katherine Eisenberg, BS; Kathryn Williams, MS; Donald Bae, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
ePoster 71
Fluoroscopy as Denitive Post-Reduction Imaging of Pediatric Wrist and Forearm Fractures Is Safe
and Saves Time
Avi Goodman, MD; Devin Walsh, MD; Mark Zonfrillo, MD; Craig Eberson, MD; Aristides Cruz, MD
Hasbro Children’s Hospital / Brown University, Providence, RI
ePoster 72
Risk of Osteonecrosis and Complications After Delayed Treatment of Lateral Condyle Fractures
Keith Orland, MD; William Carpenter, MD; Allison Spitzer, MD; Joshua Murphy, MD; Neeta Shenvi, MS;
Nicholas Fletcher, MD
Childrens Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA
ePoster 73
Cozen’s Phenomenon of the Proximal Tibia: Does it Really Exist?
Brian Yang, BA; Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC; Emily Rademacher, BS; Collin May, MD;
Colyn Watkins, MD; Michael Glotzbecker, MD
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
ePoster 74
Practice Patterns for Management of Pediatric Femur Fractures in Low- and Middle-income Countries
Patrick Curran, MD; Patrick Albright, MS; Syed Ali; John Ibrahim, BA; David Shearer, MD;
Coleen Sabatini, MD, MPH
Institute for Global Orthopaedics and Traumatology, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery,
San Francisco, CA
ePoster 75
Driver Characteristics Involved in Child and Youth Pedestrian Motor-vehicle Collisions (PMVC) –
A Case Control Study
Andrew Howard, MD; Liraz Fridman; Linda Rothman, PhD; Brent Hagel, PhD
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
ePosters, continued
90
ePoster 76
Point of Care Ultrasound in the Emergency Department may Provide more Accurate Diagnosis of
Toddler Fractures than Radiographs: A Pilot Study
Sasha Carsen, MD, MBA, FRCSC; Meagan Doyle; Kevin Smit, MD; Alan Shefrin; Terry Varshney
Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
ePoster 77
Development and Content Validation of the Patient-Reported Outcomes of Fracture Healing
(PROOF) Questionnaires
Unni Narayanan, FRCSC; Shikha Patel, BS; Roni Propp; Mark Camp; Anne Murphy, NP;
Ashley Ferkul, BA
The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
ePoster 78
Complications Associated with Intramedullary Nailing of Femoral Shaft Fractures: Are Adolescents
Different than Adults?
Colyn Watkins, MD; Manasa Kadiyala; Ryan Sanborn, BA; Laura Lins, ATC; Collin May, MD;
Michael Glotzbecker, MD; Benjamin Shore, MD, MPH, FRCSC
Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
ePoster 79
Tibial Tuberosity Ossication Predicts Reoperation for Growth Disturbance in Distal Femoral Physeal
Fractures
Jim Kennedy, FRCS (Ortho); Daniel Westacott; Mark Camp, MD; Andrew Howard, MD
The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
ePoster 80
2016 POSNA/OREF Research Grant (Clinical Research)
A Pilot Investigation into the Genetics of Mild Bone Fragility
Sasha Carsen, MD
ePoster 81
2017 POSNA Start-Up Research Grants
Scapular Motion Across the Spectrum: Brachial Plexus and Youth Pitchers
Stephanie Russo, MD, PhD; Tyler Richardson, PhD; Matthew Topley, BS; Ross Chafetz, DPT, PhD;
James Richards, PhD; Dan Zlotolow, MD; Corinna Franklin, MD; Scott Kozin, MD
ePoster 82
2017 POSNA/Zimmer Biomet Spine Research Grant
The Impact of 3D Spine and Ribcage Parameters on the Bracing Outcomes
Saba Pasha, PhD, MSc
ePosters, continued
EXPLORE CHARLOTTE
Welcome to the Queen City, a Southern jewel whose one-of-a-kind attractions and unique
beauty shine brightly throughout the city. From thrilling adventures to moving artistic perfor-
mances to magnetic nightlife, see what the Queen City has to offer.
Cuisine: Charlotte’s rich culinary spectrum spans inventive tapas, international avors, South-
ern staples and more. There are many restaurants in the Uptown area including, but not
limited to, The Ashbury, Mert’s Heart and Soul, Roosters Uptown, and Stoke.
Outdoors: Visit Romare Bearden Park, which features two gardens, plenty of dining areas,
and several waterfalls. Or take a bike ride on the Rail Trail, which is a 4.5-mile paved track
that connects South End to Uptown. True to its name, this trail runs alongside the city’s light
rail system making it an easily accessible hot spot for bars, restaurants, and cafés.
If you plan to venture outside of the city, the National Whitewater Center is a must visit. The
NWC is an outdoor recreation facility for whitewater rafting, kayaking, canoeing, rock climb-
ing, mountain biking, and hiking.
Visit: Visit Charlotte Charlotte City Guide
101 Things to Do in Charlotte Charlotte Restaurant Map
CUISINE
AMERICAN: Roosters Uptown, Fig Tree, Stoke, The Asbury, 300 East, Mimosa Grill,
5Church Restaurant, Alexander Michael’s, Cowbell Burger & Whiskey Bar, Fitzgerald’s,
Libations Kitchen & Bar, McNinch House
ITALIAN: Angeline’s, Aria Tuscan Grill, Vapiano Charlotte, Vivace, Stagioni, Zinicola,
Ballantyne, Mama Ricotta’s, Zios
MEXICAN: Cantina 1511, La Revolucion, Que Onda Tacos & Tequila Uptown, RuRu’s Tacos,
Paco’s Tacos
SEAFOOD/STEAKHOUSE: BLT at the Ritz, Oku Sushi, Beef n Bottle, Dressler’s,
Del Frisco’s, Brio (Coastal Bar and Kitchen), Fin & Fino, Fleming’s, Sea Level NC
BARBECUE: Midwood Smokehouse, Bill Spoon’s, Mert’s Heart and Soul, Queen City Q
ETHNIC: Copper
ROOFTOP DINING: Fahrenheit, City Lights, Merchant and Trade
BREWERIES: Birdsong Brewing Co., NoDa Brewing Company, Rock Bottom Restaurant
& Brewery, Triple C Brewery, Wooden Robot (gluten-free beer), Lenny Boy (kombucha and
beer) Craft Tasting Room
Romare Bearden Park
Courtesy of charlottesgotalot.com
91
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EXPLORE CHARLOTTE, CONT’D
SHOPPING
BOA Plaza Retail Mall
SouthPark Mall
Steele Creek Outlets
NIGHTLIFE
EPICENTRE
Howl at the Moon
The Imperial
Rooftop 210
The Roxy
The Punch Room
City Lights Rooftop
GETTING AROUND TOWN
You’ll nd that many of Center City’s hotels, attractions, restaurants, and nightlife are located
within comfortable walking distance of each other. If you prefer not to walk, CATS operates
local bus routes and the Lynx light rail. Please visit www.ridetransit.org for schedules, fares,
and other services. Ubers, Lyfts, and taxis are also readily available. Most hotels within
Center City partner with limousine companies and will have town cars and other vehicles
on-call for hotel guests. Please inquire with your hotel for more information. Charlotte also
has bicycles and scooters available for rent including B-Cycle, Lime bike and scooter, and
Bird. You may visit their websites for further information.
CUISINE, continued
SOUTH PARK DINING: Comida, Flour, Midwood Smokehouse, Burton’s, Dot Dot Dot,
Upstream, Corkbuzz, Oak, Wolfgang Puck Kitchen, Amelie’s Coffee and Desserts,
Yafo Kitchen, Dogwood Southern Table, Baku, Co, Rock Salt, Paco’s Taco’s, Rooster’s,
George Brasserie
DESSERT: Amelie’s (locations in NoDa, downtown, Park Road, South Charlotte), Golden
Cow Creamery, Two Scoops Creamery, Suarez Bakery, Elizabeth Creamery, Dean & DeLuca,
Va Da Vie
COFFEE: Amelie’s, Parliament, Coco and the Director, 7th Street Public Market,
Reid’s (South Park and Uptown), Dean & DeLuca (South Park and Uptown), Earl’s Grocery
MUSEUMS
Mint Museum, New Gallery of Modern Art, Bechtler Museum, Levine Museum of the New
South, Discovery Place, NASCAR Hall of Fame
OUTDOORS
Charlotte Rail Trail
First Ward Park
The Green
Romare Bearden Park
Freedom Park
Whitewater Center
TOURS
Carolina History & Haunts
Funny Bus
Queen City Rides
FEAST Food Tours
93
charlottesgotalot.com
AvidXchange
Music Factory
W. 8th Street E. 8th Street
E. 7th Street
E. Trade Street
E. 3rd Street
E. Stonewall Street
E. 9th Street
N. Pine Street
S. Mint Street
S. Graham Street
S. Cedar Street
N. Poplar Street
N. Church Street
N. Tryon Street
N. Graham Street
N. College Street
N. Brevard Street
N. Caldwell Street
N. Davidson Street
N. McDowell Street
S. Caldwell Street
S. Tryon Street
S. College Street
S. Brevard Street
S. McDowell Street
South Boulevard
S. Church Street
W. 7th Street
W. 5th Street
W. 6th Street E. 6th Street
W. Trade Street
W. 4th Street E. 4th Street
W. 3rd Street
Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard
Levine Avenue of the Arts
W. Stonewall Street
E. Morehead Street
W. Morehead Street
W. Carson Boulevard
W. 9th Street
W. 10th Street
W. 11th Street
Frazier Park
Bank of
America
Stadium
BB&T Ballpark
The
Green
EpiCentre
Romare
Bearden
Park
Spectrum Center
Marshall
Park
Fourth Ward Park
u
t
e
s
First Ward
Park
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55
33
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AvidXchange Music Factory
15
First
Ward
Park
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Need something fun to do? We can help.
What to do.
Bechtler Museum
of Modern Art
420 S. Tryon St.
704.353.9200
Art Museum
bechtler.org
Blumenthal Performing
Arts Center
130 N. Tryon St.
704.372.1000
Performing Arts Center
blumenthalarts.org
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library
310 N. Tryon St.
704.416.0100
Library
cmlibrary.org
Discovery Place Science
301 N. Tryon St.
704.372.6261
Science Museum
discoveryplace.org
First Ward Park
301 E. 7th St.
Outdoor Park
uptowncharlotteparks.com/
rst-ward-park
Harvey B. Gantt Center
for African-American
Arts + Culture
551 S. Tryon St.
704.374.1565
Culture Center
ganttcenter.org
ImaginOn: The Joe & Joan
Martin Center
300 E. 7th St.
704.416.4600
Children’s Museum
imaginon.org
Knight Theater
430 S. Tryon St.
704.372.1000
Performing Arts Theater
blumenthalarts.org
Levine Museum
of the New South
200 E. 7th St.
704.333.1887
History Museum
museumofthenewsouth.org
Mint Museum Uptown
500 S. Tryon St.
704.337.2000
Art Museum
mintmuseum.org
NASCAR Hall of Fame
400 E. MLK Jr. Blvd.
704.654.4400
Hall of Fame
nascarhall.com
Sonia and Isaac Luski
Gallery at the Foundation
For The Carolinas
220 N. Tryon St.
704.973.4500
Art Gallery
fftc.org/luskigallery
SOZO Gallery
214 N. Tryon St.
704.578.8457
Art Gallery
sozogallery.net
Spirit Square
345 N. College St.
704.372.1000
Performing Arts Center
blumenthalarts.org
Charlotte Metro Credit Union
Ampitheatre at AvidXchange
Music Factory
1000 NC Music Factory Blvd.
704.549.5555
Performing Arts Venue
livenation.com
Wells Fargo History Museum
401 S. Tryon St.
704.715.1866
History Museum
wellsfargohistory.com
1
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3
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5
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EXPLORE CHARLOTTE, CONT’D
FIRST WARD
1 7th Street Public Market
2 Blumenthal Performing Arts
Center – Belk Theater / Booth
Playhouse / Stage Door Theater
3 Charlotte Mecklenburg Library
4 First Ward Park
5 ImaginOn: The Joe & Joan
Martin Center / Children’s
Theatre of Charlotte
6
Levine Museum of the New South
7 Sonia and Isaac Luski Gallery at
Foundation For The Carolinas
8 Spectrum Center
9 Spirit Square – McGlohon
Theater / Duke Energy Theater
10 The University of North Carolina
at Charlotte Center City
SECOND WARD
11 Charlotte Convention Center
12 EpiCentre
13 Harvey B. Gantt Center for
African-American Arts + Culture
14 Marshall Park
15 NASCAR Hall of Fame
16 The Green
17 Wells Fargo History Museum
THIRD WARD
18 Bank of America Stadium
19 BB&T Ballpark
20 Bechtler Museum of Modern Art
21 Frazier Park
22 Johnson & Wales Univ. Charlotte
23 Knight Theater at Levine Center
for the Arts
24 Latta Arcade / Brevard Court
25 Mint Museum Uptown
26 Romare Bearden Park
FOURTH WARD
27 AvidXchange Music Factory –
Charlotte Metro Credit Union Am-
phitheatre / The Fillmore Charlotte
28 Discovery Place Science /The
Charlotte Observer IMAX®
Dome Theatre
29 Elmwood Cemetery
30 Fourth Ward Park
31 McColl Center for Art +
Innovation
32 Ninth Street Park
33 Pinewood Cemetery
34 Ray’s Splash Planet
35 Settlers’ Cemetery
PUBLIC ART
A The Writer’s Desk
B Queen Charlotte Statue
C Sculptures at Independence
Square
D II Disco Grande
E Charlotte Sign on The Green
F The Firebird
G Carolina Panthers Statues
H Spiral Odyssey
94
EXHIBITOR LISTING
7D Surgical
7D Surgical is a privately-owned Toronto based company that develops advanced
optical technologies and machine vision-based registration algorithms to improve sur-
gical workow and patient care. 7D Surgical’s agship FDA 510(k)-cleared and Health
Canada approved MvIGS system delivers profound improvement to image guidance
surgical workows in spine and cranial surgery. The underlying technology provides the
promise of similar future advancements for other surgical specialties.
American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS)
Talk with an ABOS Certication Specialist about your Board Certication options,
determine your Maintenance of Certication progress, and learn how to meet those
requirements. You can also learn about the new Web-Based Longitudinal Assessment
(ABOS WLA).
AquaCast Liner
AquaCast
®
Liner manufactures a complete line of waterproof cast pad-
ding and liners used in fracture care, replacing the old WL Gore Procel
®
and PANTALOON
®
products. Our newly remodeled Hipster
®
protective
liner, used for hip and shoulder spicas, femur fractures and other body
casts, makes application quicker and easier, reduces skin excoriation, and improves patient satisfaction
– while lowering overall costs simultaneously. Stop by our table to review the new design and also see
why pediatric orthopaedic surgeons and non-operating doctors prefer our “easier-to-apply” rolls over
the Gore
®
Procel.
Biogen
Through cutting-edge science, Biogen discovers, develops and delivers
to patients worldwide therapies for the treatment of neurodegenerative
and rare diseases.
BioMarin Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
BioMarin develops and commercializes innovative biopharmaceuticals
for serious diseases and medical conditions. Approved products include
the rst and only therapies for PKU, LEMS, MPS I, MPS VI, MPS IVA, and CLN2 disease. Clinical de-
velopment programs include investigational therapies for Hemophilia A, Achondroplasia, MPS IIIB,
Friedreich’s Ataxia and other rare diseases.
BoneSupport
BONESUPPORT develops and markets CERAMENT®|BONE VOID
FILLER, a radiopaque injectable osteoconductive bone graft substitute
with a proven ability to heal defects by remodeling to host bone in
six to twelve months. CERAMENT is effective in treating patients with fractures and bone voids
caused by trauma, infection, disease or related surgery.
95
EXHIBITOR LISTING, CONTINUED
Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles
The mission of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles is to create hope and
build healthier futures. Founded in 1901, CHLA is the top-ranked children’s
hospital in California and among the top 10 in the nation, according to
the prestigious U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll of children’s hospi-
tals for 2018-19.The hospital is home to The Saban Research Institute
and is one of the few freestanding pediatric hospitals where scientic inquiry is combined with clinical
care devoted exclusively to children. Children’s Hospital Los Angeles is a premier teaching hospital and
has been afliated with the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California since 1932.
DIERS
DIERS Medical Systems is an innovative company offering a radiation-free
system for assessment of the spine and trunk. Using surface topography,
the DIERS formetric system can provide a 3-D reconstruction of the spine
as a static measurement or while the spine is in motion. The addition of lower extremity video analysis
and foot pressure measurements from the integrated treadmill turns the spine system into a fully func-
tional compact gait lab. The DIERS formetric system provides reliable outcomes data for clinicians who
treat patients with scoliosis, kyphosis, neuromuscular disorders, gait abnormalities, or sports injuries.
DePuy Synthes Companies
DePuy Synthes Companies part of the Johnson & Johnson
family of companies provides the most comprehensive ortho-
paedic and neurological solutions in the world. The company
offers an unparalleled breadth of products, services, programs and research and development capabilities.
DePuy Synthes Companies’ solutions in the specialties of joint reconstruction, trauma, neurological,
craniomaxillofacial, spinal surgery and sports medicine are designed to advance patient care while
delivering clinical and economic value to health care systems worldwide.
EOS Imaging
EOS imaging designs, develops and markets advanced imaging and image-based sol-
utions for musculoskeletal pathologies and orthopedic surgical care. The EOS platform
connects imaging to care by adding value along the entire patient care pathway from
diagnosis to follow-up. Low dose and Micro Dose EOS exams provide full body, stereo-
radiographic images in weight-bearing positions. The biplanar images are acquired simul
taneously in
less than 20 seconds without magnication. The accompanying sterEOS workstation generates
patient-
specic 3D models, calculates over 100 clinical parameters and offers customizable patient
reports. EOS
imaging also provides 3D Services and 3D surgical planning solutions for spine, hip and knee.
Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare
Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare is an independent not-for-prot
health system specializing in treating children who have complex con-
ditions, rare disorders and traumatic injuries. Our experienced clinical
staff collaborates to treat patients who have complex medical needs.
This expertise makes us a resource and partner for health systems
across Minnesota, the U.S., and throughout the world. Gillette’s skilled team of health care pro-
fessionals work proactively with families to help children achieve their goals and discover what
they CAN do. We know that with innovative medical and surgical intervention, proven
therapies and assistive technology, and the support of compassionate health care
professionals, children who have complex conditions can thrive and live happy,
healthy, productive lives.
EXHIBITOR LISTING, CONTINUED
Global Help
Global HELP creates, distributes, and compiles free, relevant, non-commercial
healthcare information that prioritizes affordable and effective healthcare solutions and
promotes sustainability. The organization’s long-term goal is to create sustainable
improvement in healthcare throughout the world by helping people help themselves.
Globus Medical
Globus Medical, Inc. is a leading musculoskeletal solutions company and is driving
signicant technological advancements across a complete suite of products
ranging from spinal and trauma therapies to regenerative solutions, to robotics,
navigation and imaging. Founded in 2003, Globus’ single-minded focus on
advancing spinal surgery has made it the fastest growing company in the history
of orthopedics. Globus is driven to utilize superior engineering and technology
to achieve pain free, active lives for all patients with musculoskeletal disorders.
Implanet
Implanet is a global company with a singular focus to provide novel solutions
to complex spinal pathologies through the use of the JAZZ™ polyester
band system. The JAZZ Band & Frame hybrid approach for complex
deformity correction has been shown to reduce implant volume, decrease
surgical cost, and reduce blood loss and OR time while demonstrating signicant improvement in
Sagittal Balance. JAZZ Lock is the rst, and only, rodless band xation device. JAZZ Lock allows for
rapid posterior xation of spinal fractures, is a low-prole tension band for top-of-construct protection
and provides additional xation options in compromised bone.
Inion
Inion is a medical device company focused on the development and commercialization
of innovative biodegradable and bioactive implants for Spinal, Specialty Orthopaedic
and Craniomaxillofacial applications. Inion’s proprietary blending technology enables
application specic implants which have ‘custom-t’ capabilities for patients that do not
interfere with imaging.
K2M
K2M Group Holdings, Inc. is a global leader of complex spine and minimally
invasive solutions focused on achieving three-dimensional Total Body Balance™.
Since its inception, K2M has designed, developed and commercialized innova-
tive complex spine and minimally invasive spine technologies and techniques
used by spine surgeons to treat some of the most complicated spinal pathologies.
K2M has leveraged these core competencies into Balance ACS™, a platform of
products, services, and research to help surgeons achieve three-dimensional
spinal balance across the axial, coronal and sagittal planes, with the goal of
supporting the full continuum of care to facilitate quality patient outcomes. The
Balance ACS platform, in combination with the Company’s technologies,
techniques and leadership in the 3D-printing of spinal devices, enable K2M to
compete favorably in the global spinal surgery market.
96
EXHIBITOR LISTING, CONTINUED
97
Life Bridge Health, Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics
Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics (RIAO) is home to some of
the world’s most renowned orthopedic surgeons and offers state-of-
the-art treatment in a variety of orthopedic services for children and
adults. The Institute hosts an annual CME-accredited course in limb
deformity correction and lengthening. Clinical and research fellowship
opportunities are available. The Multiplier and Bone Ninja apps were
developed here. The RIAO is located in Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
Medicrea, USA
The Medicrea Group is pioneering the transformation of spinal
surgery through Articial Intelligence, predictive modeling and
patient specic implants with its UNiD™ ASI (Adaptive Spine
Intelligence) proprietary software platform, services and technologies. MEDICREA®’s proprietary UNiD
ASI™ technology is a surgeon-centric platform that provides a planning service staffed by biomedical
engineers, precise intra-operative execution with personalized solutions, and insightful analytics of
surgical results with the ultimate goal of improving clinical outcomes.
Medtronic
As a global leader in medical technology, services and solutions,
Medtronic improves the lives and health of millions of people each year.
We use our deep clinical, therapeutic, and economic expertise to address
the complex challenges faced by healthcare systems today. Let’s take
healthcare Further, Together. Visit our booth to learn more about our innovative solutions.
Merete Technologies, Inc.
Merete is Innovation. Our stated aim is to discover and react to market
demands at any time. As a manufacturer, the health and the mobility of
the patient is top priority. We offer an increasing product portfolio for
foot and ankle surgery, the treatment of major bone defects in oncology as well as trauma, hip revision
and pediatric implants. Our latest innovation for simpler and faster guided growth and growth arrest
is PediatrOS FlexTack™ and RigidTack™. These novel staples correct leg length discrepancies and
angular deformities through improved temporary epiphysiodesis. Merete’s PediatrOS staples
offer a safer and more effective alternative for your patients.
MHE Research Foundation
The MHE Research Foundation is a nonprot 501(c) (3) organization
dedicated to the support of Researchers, Physicians & Families dealing
with Multiple Hereditary Exostoses Syndrome (MHE) Multiple Osteo-
chondroma Syndrome (MO) a rare genetic bone disease.
EXHIBITOR LISTING, CONTINUED
NuVasive, Inc.
NuVasive is transforming spine surgery and beyond with minimally
invasive, procedurally-integrated solutions designed to deliver
reproducible and clinically-proven surgical outcomes. The
Company’s portfolio includes access instruments, implantable hardware, biologics, software systems for
surgical planning, navigation and imaging solutions, magnetically adjustable implant systems for spine
and orthopedics, and intraoperative monitoring service offerings.
nView Medical
nView medical unveils nView s1, a breakthrough surgical imaging system specically
designed for pediatrics. nView s1 provides instant 3D images based on low dose
x-rays. Our mission is to make surgeries safer, faster and consistently accurate.
nView s1 is 510(k) pending.
Ortho Care Casting, LLC
Ortho Care Casting, LLC is a manufacturer of a full line of FDA approved liner
and casting products. Our full line allows healthcare providers to fulll all of
their casting needs in one place. Founded by a manufacturer of orthopedic
products with over 10 years of experience, Ortho Care Casting is committed to
providing the most up to date technology and products in the waterproof casting market. We are a woman
owned enterprise who services leading hospitals as well as health care clinics and private practices.
Orthox
Orthox offers innovative and minimally invasive solutions for surgeons to help
improve the quality of life of our patients. Our extremity xation products are
designed to address the lifelong bone-and-joint health needs of patients of
all ages, helping them achieve a more active and mobile lifestyle. Our limb reconstruction and deformi-
ty correction products restore normal anatomy for patients with a physical deformity, either congenital
or post-traumatic, as well as for patients needing limb lengthening. JuniOrtho™ is the range of prod-
ucts and resources created by Orthox, dedicated to children and young adults with bone fractures
and deformities.
OrthoPediatrics Corp.
Founded in 2006, OrthoPediatrics is an orthopedic company focused
exclusively on providing a comprehensive product offering to the
pediatric orthopedic market to improve the lives of children with
orthopedic conditions. OrthoPediatrics currently markets 26 surgical
systems that serve three of the largest categories within the pediatric orthopedic market. This offering
spans trauma & deformity, scoliosis and sports medicine/other procedures. OrthoPediatrics’ global
sales organization is focused exclusively on pediatric orthopedics and distributes its products in the
United States and 38 countries outside the United States.
98
EXHIBITOR LISTING, CONTINUED
99
Pega Medical
For more than two decades, Pega Medical has been offering innovative
deformity correction solutions. Pega’s family of IM Nails (Fassier-Duval
Telescopic Rod, SLIM and GAP Endo-Exo Medullary Systems) are speci-
cally designed for small bones, often seen with metabolic and genetic
disease. Additional products such as the Hinge Plate and the Free-Gliding SCFE Screw complete our
portfolio of growth modulating orthopedic devices. For limb deformity and length discrepancy, the
Paley’s Osteotomy System offers unique instrumentation for complex procedures. Our latest innova-
tion: The LolliPOP modular hip plating system, completes a portfolio of forward thinking technologies
developed in collaboration with expert orthopedic surgeons from POSNA and from around the world.
Solution Matrix, Inc.
Solution Matrix, Inc. is a Veteran-Owned and Operated manufacturer of Cold Com-
pression Therapy Products that revolutionize post-op patient care by allowing for
effective non-pharmacological pain and edema control with products that are simple
to use. In 2018, Solution Matrix brought the “Simple is Always Better” concept to the
Pediatric market by developing cost-effective post surgical Cold Compression
Therapy that is safe and effective for children of all ages.
Stryker
Stryker is one of the world’s leading medical technology companies
and, together with our customers, is driven to make healthcare better.
We offer innovative products and services in Orthopaedics, Medical and
Surgical, and Neurotechnology and Spine that help improve patient and
hospital outcomes.
Vilex in Tennessee, Inc.
Vilex is a high growth US based device manufacturer of precision engineered
extremity solutions, specializing in internal and external xation devices for
foot and ankle, pediatrics, deformity correction, and reconstructive surgery.
The Orthex ring system is the most advanced computer dependent hexapod, featuring the Orthex’s
“Point & Click” based Ring Positioning System (RPS) and advanced HA Coated implants for
large and small bone corrections.
WishBone
WishBone Medical is a Warsaw, Indiana, based pediatric orthopedic company focused
globally on the unmet needs of children suffering from orthopedic issues. Our mission
is to provide anatomically appropriate, innovative implants and instruments in sterile
packed, single-use disposable kits to surgeons and their patients who are still grow-
ing... Because KIDS are not just little adults.
EXHIBITOR LISTING, CONTINUED
100
Wolters Kluwer
Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information and
point of care solutions for the healthcare industry. Our solutions are
designed to help professionals build clinical competency and improve
practice so that healthcare organizations can succeed in value-based care delivery models. Product
solutions include Lippincott, Ovid
®
, and UpToDate
®
.
Wright Medical
Wright Medical Group N.V. is a global medical device company focused
on Extremities and Biologics. We deliver innovative, value-added solutions
improving quality of life for patients worldwide. We are a recognized
leader of surgical solutions for the upper extremities (shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand), lower extremi-
ties (foot and ankle) and biologics markets, three of the fastest growing segments in orthopaedics.
Zimmer Biomet
Zimmer Biomet Spine is a leader in restoring mobility, alleviat-
ing pain, and improving the quality of life for patients around
the world by delivering surgeons a comprehensive portfolio of
quality spine technologies and procedural innovation, best-in-class training, and unparalleled service
via a network of responsive team members and sales professionals.
ZipLine Medical
ZipLine Medical offers surgical (Zip Surgical Skin Closure) and chronic (PreLoc
Wound Closure) solutions based on proven, non-invasive force distribution
technology. Published clinical studies have demonstrated superior clinical and
economic benets vs. standard of care, including shorter procedure time,
fewer wound-related complications and readmissions, and fewer post-operative provider visits.
CHOOSE YOUR
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SOLUTION
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®
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®
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Delivering innovative solutions to enhance patient care
Learn more at GlobusMedical.com/Deformity
POSNA ANTITRUST POLICY
It shall be the policy of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) to be in strict
compliance with all Federal and State Antitrust laws, rules and regulations. Therefore: These policies
and procedures apply to all membership, board, committee, and all meetings attended by representa-
tives of the POSNA.
Discussions at POSNA meetings often cover a broad range of topics pertinent to the interests or
concerns of orthopaedic surgeons. As a general rule, except as noted below, discussions at POSNA
meetings can address topics without raising antitrust concerns if the discussions are kept scrupulously
free of even the suggestion of private regulation of the profession. However, a number of topics that
might be (and have been) discussed at POSNA meetings may raise signicant complex antitrust con-
cerns. These include:
Membership admissions, rejections, restrictions, and terminations;
Method of provision and sale of POSNA products and services to non-members;
Restrictions in the selection and requirements for exhibitors at the POSNA Annual Meeting or
in CME activities;
Collecting and distributing certain orthopaedic practice information, particularly involving
practice charges and costs;
Obtaining and distributing orthopaedic industry price and cost information;
Professional certication programs;
Group buying and selling; and
Inclusions or exclusion of other medical societies in organizational activities or offerings.
When these and related topics are discussed, the convener or members of the POSNA group should
seek counsel from its General Counsel.
POSNA urges its Board, committees and other groups not to participate in discussions that may give
the appearance of or constitute an agreement that would violate the antitrust laws. Notwithstanding
this reliance, it is the responsibility of each POSNA Board or committee member to avoid raising
improper subjects for discussion. This policy has been prepared to ensure that POSNA members and
other participants in POSNA meetings are aware of this obligation.
The “Do Not’s” and “Do’s” presented below highlight only the most basic antitrust principles. POSNA
members and others participating in POSNA meetings should consult with the General Counsel in all
cases involving specic questions, interpretations or advice regarding antitrust matters.
Do Nots
1. Do not, in fact or appearance, discuss or exchange information regarding:
a. Individual company prices, price changes, price differentials, mark-ups, discounts, allowances,
credit terms, etc. or any other data that may bear on price, such as costs, production,
capacity, inventories, sales, etc.
b. Raising, lowering or “stabilizing” orthopaedic prices or fees;
c. What constitutes a fair prot or margin level;
d. The availability of products or services; or
e. The allocation of markets, territories or patients.
2. Do not suggest or imply that POSNA members should or should not deal with certain other
persons or companies.
3. Do not foster unfair practices regarding advertising, standardization, certication or accreditation.
4. Do not discuss or exchange information regarding the above matters during social gatherings,
incidental to POSNA-sponsored meetings.
5. Do not make oral or written statements on important issues on behalf of POSNA
without appropriate authority to do so.
102
POSNA ANTITRUST POLICY, CONTINUED
The Do’s
1. Do adhere to prepared agenda for all POSNA meetings. It is generally permissible for agendas
to include discussions of such varied topics as professional economic trends, advances and
problems in relevant technology or research, various aspects of the science and art of
management, and relationships with local, state or federal governments.
2. Do object whenever meeting summaries do not accurately reect the matters that occurred.
3. Do consult with General Counsel on all antitrust questions relating to discussions at
POSNA meetings.
4. Do object to and do not participate in any discussions or meeting activities that you believe
violate the antitrust laws; dissociate yourself from any such discussions or activities and leave any
meeting in which they continue.
Special Guidelines for Collecting and Distributing Information
The collection and distribution of information regarding business practices is a traditional function of
associations and is well-recognized under the law as appropriate, legal and consistent with the antitrust
laws. However, if conducted improperly, such information gathering and distributing activities might
be viewed as facilitating an express or implied agreement among association members to adhere to
the same business practices. For this reason, special general guidelines have developed over time
regarding association’s reporting on information collected from and disseminated to members. Any
exceptions to these general guidelines should be made only after discussion with General Counsel.
These general guidelines include:
1. Member participation in a statistical reporting program is voluntary. A statistical reporting
program should be conducted without coercion or penalty. Non-members should be allowed to
participate in a statistical reporting program if eligible; however, if a fee is involved, non-members
may be charged a reasonably higher fee than members.
2. Information should be collected via a written instrument that clearly sets forth what is being
requested.
3. The data that is collected should be about past transactions or activities; particularly if the survey
deals with prices and price terms (including charges, costs, wages, benets, discounts, etc,),
it should be historic, i.e., more than three months old.
4. The data should be collected by either POSNA or an independent third party not connected with
any one member.
5. Data on individual orthopaedic surgeons should be kept condential.
6. There should be a sufcient number of participants to prevent specic responses or data from
being attributable to any one respondent. As a general rule, there should be at least ve
respondents reporting data upon which any statistic or item is based, and no individual’s data
should represent more than 25% on a weighted average of that statistic or item.
7. Composite/aggregate data should be available to all participants – both members and
non-members. The data may be categorized, e.g., geographically, and ranges and averages may
be used. No member should be given access to the raw data. Disclosure of individual data could
serve to promote uniformity and reduce competition.
8. As a general rule, there should be no discussion or agreement as to how members and
non-members should adjust, plan or carry out their practices based on the results of the survey.
Each member should analyze the data and make business decisions independently.
103
2019 RESEARCH GRANT and AWARD WINNERS
2019 KUO MEMORIAL RESEARCH AWARD
Matthew Oetgen, MD
“Modulation of the Injury Associated with Acute Compartment Syndrome”
2019 HUENE MEMORIAL RESEARCH AWARD
B. Stephen Richards, MD
“Opportunities to Optimize Ponseti Brace Wear Compliance and Success”
2019 ST. GILES YOUNG INVESTIGATOR RESEARCH AWARD
Rachel Thompson, MD
“Muscle Disease in Cerebral Palsy”
2019 POSNA DIRECTED RESEARCH GRANTS
Scott Luhmann, MD
“Biomarkers and Cytokines in the Work-Up of Septic Arthritis”
Selina Poon, MD
“Pedicle Screw Placement with a 3D Deformity Model”
2019 POSNA BASIC SCIENCE RESEARCH GRANTS
Roger Cornwall, MD
“Proteasome Inhibition for Contracture Prevention in NBPI”
Charles Johnston, MD
“Thoracic Volume Expansion by Ventral Directed Costo-sternoplasty”
2019 POSNA CLINICAL RESEARCH GRANTS
Todd Milbrandt, MD
“Anterior Vertebral Body Tethering vs. Fusion for Idiopathic Scoliosis”
David Podeszwa, MD
“Are Patients as Active as They Say: Subjective/Objective Activity Measures”
2019 POSNA START UP RESEARCH GRANTS
Juan Brito Campana, MD
“Shared Decision Making in the Treatment of Scoliosis”
Ryan Goodwin, MD
“Risser vs. Sanders in AIS: A Prospective Cohort Study Assessing Mismatch”
Mark Adamczyk, MD
“Primary Cilia Alterations in the Hypothyroid Porcine Growth Plate”
104
2019 POSNA/ZIMMER BIOMET SPINE RESEARCH GRANT
Daniel Hedequist, MD
“Reliability of the AOSpine Classication System in Children”
2019 RESEARCH GRANT
and AWARD WINNERS, CONTINUED
December 3 – 7, 2019
Loews Royal Pacic Hotel, Orlando, FL
105
Expert Spine
Care from Simple
to Complex
“Our overall volume lends us a
degree of clinical expertise that
isn’t seen in other institutions in
the region or the state.”
Tenner Guillaume, MD,
spine surgeon at Gillette
Gillette Children’s Specialty
Healthcare is internationally
recognized for treating pediatric
spine conditions. From innovative
procedures to pioneering
research—Gillette has the
expertise to help kids.
Learn more: gillettechildrens.org/spineortho
To make an appointment: 651-290-8707
Expert Spine
Care from Simple
to Complex
“Our overall volume lends us a
degree of clinical expertise that
isn’t seen in other institutions in
the region or the state.”
Tenner Guillaume, MD,
spine surgeon at Gillette
Gillette Children’s Specialty
Healthcare is internationally
recognized for treating pediatric
spine conditions. From innovative
procedures to pioneering
research—Gillette has the
expertise to help kids.
Learn more: gillettechildrens.org/spineortho
To make an appointment: 651-290-8707
Proud
sponsor of
POSNA
2019
©DePuy Synthes 2019. All rights reserved.
108220-190225 DSUS 03/19
EXPEDIUM
®
Spine System
Share the
Heritage. Partnership. Trusted Innovation.
DSS-325 POSNA Program Ad.indd 1 3/20/19 12:43 PM
DIAGNOSED WITH MPS VI AFTER 8 YEARS OF SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS.
Aldens 8-year
diagnostic odyssey
is not uncommon
My bones weren’t growing properly, but
none of my doctors could figure out why.
Results in a poster presented at the American College of
Medical Genetics 2018 Annual Meeting found that patients
with MPS may have been initially misdiagnosed with skeletal
dysplasia or spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED)
1
44% of MPS IVA patients had symptoms that raised concerns
for or were misdiagnosed as SED prior to testing for MPS (8/18)
24% of positive MPS diagnoses had a current/past
diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia or suspicion of another skeletal
condition (13/54; MPS IVA [n=10], MPS VI [n=3])
LEARN MORE AT THE BIOMARIN BOOTH
©2019 BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc. All rights reserved. USMPS0304 0319
Reference: 1. Clarke L, Cristian I, Pollard L, et al. Poster presented at:
American College of Medical Genetics Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting;
April 10-14, 2018; Charlotte, NOC (Poster #428).
Age: 11
Height: 5 ft, 3 in
(
160 cm
)
;
98.8th percentile
DIAGNOSED WITH MPS VI AFTER 8 YEARS OF SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS.
Aldens 8-year
diagnostic odyssey
is not uncommon
My bones weren’t growing properly, but
none of my doctors could figure out why.
Results in a poster presented at the American College of
Medical Genetics 2018 Annual Meeting found that patients
with MPS may have been initially misdiagnosed with skeletal
dysplasia or spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED)
1
44% of MPS IVA patients had symptoms that raised concerns
for or were misdiagnosed as SED prior to testing for MPS (8/18)
24% of positive MPS diagnoses had a current/past
diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia or suspicion of another skeletal
condition (13/54; MPS IVA [n=10], MPS VI [n=3])
LEARN MORE AT THE BIOMARIN BOOTH
©2019 BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc. All rights reserved. USMPS0304 0319
Reference: 1. Clarke L, Cristian I, Pollard L, et al. Poster presented at:
American College of Medical Genetics Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting;
April 10-14, 2018; Charlotte, NOC (Poster #428).
Age: 11
Height: 5 ft, 3 in
(
160 cm
)
;
98.8th percentile
Visit the NuVasive booth to learn more
about our deformity solutions today.
©2019. NuVasive, Inc. All rights reserved. 9511491 A
Grow Together
Because every millimeter counts
in EOS, use a treatment that
impacts a lifetime.
Strong Together
When AIS tests their condence,
choose a system with the strength
to bring it back.
GEM-1544 POSNA Program Ad_9511491 A.indd 1 3/18/19 2:58 PM
9400 W. Higgins Road, Suite 500
Rosemont, IL 60018-4976
(847) 698-1692
FAX (847) 268-9694
posna.org
FUTURE ANNUAL MEETINGS
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San Diego, California
May 11–15, 2021
Dallas, Texas
May 11–14, 2022
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FUTURE IPOS MEETINGS
December 3–7, 2019
Orlando, FL
December 1–5, 2020
Orlando, FL
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