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Student Handbook 2018-2019

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pursue your passion earn your degree STUDENT HANDBOOK 2018 2019

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Table of Contents Welcome to College Unbound 1 Mission Statement 3 Program Logistics Academic Calendar 5 College Unbound Staff Contact List 7 Personal Learning Network Contact List 9 Support Services 11 The CU Degree Organizational Leadership and Change Overview 13 Graduate Requirements 14 Making It Practical How Will I Spend My Time 15 Checklist for Success 17 About Cohort Time 18 Program Components College Unbound The Essential PARTS 19 Transformational Learning 20 Workplace Learning 21 How Projects Are Born 22 Student Project Descriptions 23 The Personal Learning Plan 25 The Big 10 Leadership and Change Competencies 27 Personal Learning Network 29 PLN Responsibilities 30 Assessment 32 CU Assessments 33 Glossary of Terms 34 Student Resources The Big 10 Rubrics 37 Professional Mentor Agreement 53 Workplace Community Assessment 55 Posted Weekly Reflections 56 Sample Reflections 58 Learning Exhibitions 59 Exhibition Tips and Tricks 61 Exhibition Protocol 62 Pocket Guide to Probing Questions 63 The Writing Process 65 6 Traits of Writing 66 Writing Rubric 67

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Student Policies Grading System 69 Standards of Academic Progress Financial Aid Requirements 72 Student Code of Conduct 74 Academic Honesty 78 Complaint Process 79 Support Services 80 Title IX Notice Non Discrimination Policy Harassment Policy 85

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Rethink Higher Education Welcome to College Unbound I am excited to welcome you to College Unbound We have built a quality program over the last seven years and have helped many underserved returning adult learners in Rhode Island complete their degrees with the help of accredited partner institutions The time is right for us to seek our own accreditation as we continue to reinvent higher education with the help of students like yourselves We have learned a lot since 2009 through our extensive experience with adult learners discovering all that they bring to the table and the kinds of supports they need The CU experience has been incredible you can see your peers comments and survey results sprinkled throughout this handbook We have grown every year as we learn more and more from you our students how to offer the most personalized transformative and rigorous program possible We look forward to a fast paced expansion program This handbook explains who we are and how we get things done Enjoy Dennis Littky President College Unbound Important Week of October 15 Dates Exhibitions Invite your mentors Student Voices The atmosphere is something that I wish every person could experience in some way When I get home from seminar my boyfriend can t shut me up I go on and on about what I learned and what I want to learn I always leave with an excited feeling and assurance that I am doing well I couldn t imagine school any other way Rachael C Last night s class really helped me to see the pros and cons and be able to think of different ways to be a voice for the community It was great to hear different views and experiences from my peers I feel this semester WE will become that voice the pioneers to change the views of the people who write the policy which affects the whole community by sharing our concerns feedback and ideas Ja net Hall Week of January 17 1 Exhibitions Invite your mentors

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Mission Statement Mission Our mission is to reinvent higher education for underrepresented returning adult learners using a model that is individualized interest based project driven workplace enhanced cohort supported flexible supportive and affordable Through rigorous and engaged scholarship College Unbound integrates the students own purposes for learning with the needs of their workplaces and communities improving the lives of the students and the lives of those they touch As a degree completion college College Unbound provides access support through completion and career placement ensuring that students get in stay in and move forward Guiding Principles 1 Learners come to CU with prior experiences knowledge and abilities which must be recognized honored used and credited The multiple roles of these adult learners workers community members partners parents are used as assets not barriers They are supported as scholar practitioners 2 Curriculum begins with the student and builds from there It must be personalized around the unique skills knowledge and needs of individuals acknowledging that students have different goals and are at different places in their lives 3 Learning in the world is multi faceted and interdisciplinary it is not broken into compartmentalized subject matter packages Content of disciplines is important as a means to an end not an end in itself 4 Learning means paying attention to how one knows as well as what one knows paying attention to why it matters and where it can be applied 5 Learning is a process powered by the learner and supported and stimulated by collaboration with others social interaction empowers making meaning 6 Learning is not a linear process learners choose to access content at different times for different purposes in different contexts Arbitrary sequencing decisions may actually impede learning 7 Adult learners have a strong preference for learning that is real problem centered or task centered with immediate application rather than subject centered 8 Expertise exists in many places and forms expertise accessed beyond the professor is encouraged and honored 9 The workplace provides rich opportunities for learning it provides space in which action and reflection can take place in a continuous cycle 10 When assessment is shared between professors academic advisors workplace mentors field experts and peers the learning is rigorous relevant and ongoing When students open their work to public analysis the learning increases 11 Competence is not demonstrated through a single event rather a range of evidence in different contexts over time must be presented before judging competence 12 Technology must be used to do more than deliver content it must be used by students to discover create use share assess discuss manipulate and reshape content and to connect with others 3

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pursue your passion earn your degree Program Logistics

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College Unbound 2018 2019 ACADEMIC CALENDAR DRAFT FALL SEMESTER 20 Fall Term 1 Begins 3 Labor Day ZOOM session AUGUST 18 S M T W Th F 5 6 7 12 13 19 26 S M T W Th F 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 12 13 16 17 18 19 23 24 25 26 S S M T W Th 1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 3 4 5 6 7 8 14 15 16 9 17 18 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 20 21 22 27 28 29 23 24 25 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 S M T W Th F S 1 2 8 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 14 15 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 20 21 22 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 27 28 29 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 SEPTEMBER 18 30 12 22 17 17 21 24 11 Veterans Day ZOOM session Thanksgiving Day Fall Term 2 Ends Exhibitions Winter Break OCTOBER 18 M T W Th 1 2 ZOOM session 11 11 15 18 22 25 Spring Term 1 Ends Exhibition Week Spring Break Spring Term 2 Begins APRIL 19 F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 S M S M W Th 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 S M T F S NOVEMBER 18 T W Th F T F S MAY 19 S W Th 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 25 26 27 28 29 30 26 27 28 29 30 31 S M S M DECEMBER 18 T W Th F T W Th 12 Mother s Day 20 Spring Term 2 Ends 20 24 Exhibition Week 27 Memorial s Day 1 JUNE 19 S F 1 S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 S M F S 6 7 13 24 11 Winter Break SPRING SEMESTER Exhibition Week14 Spring Term 1 Begins 21 M L King Day ZOOM session S Presidents Day 31 8 S F MARCH 19 S 1 Columbus Day ZOOM session 15 Fall Term 1 Ends 15 19 Exhibition Week 29 Fall Term 2 Begins 18 FEBRUARY 19 GRADUATION SUMMER TERM 10 Summer Term Begins 16 Father s Day 30 JANUARY 19 Th JULY 18 T W F S S M 1 2 3 4 5 1 8 9 10 11 12 7 8 14 15 16 17 18 19 14 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 T W Th 2 3 4 5 6 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4 Independence Day Aug 5 Summer Term Ends Aug 5 9 Exhibition Week

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Dennis Littky Adam Bush Tracy Money RobertCarothers Executive Vice President robert carothers collegeunbound org RobertWeygand VP of Administration and Finance bob weygand collegeunbound org LucasLussier JocelynKeith SiriColom Wanda Brown MaureenKayata Tom Norton Tara Hagopian President dlittky collegeunbound org 401 374 2477 Director of Partnerships Interim Director of Development jocelyn collegeunbound org Business Manager maureen kayata collegeunbound org Provost CU Advisor abush collegeunbound org 917 279 2874 Dean of Instruction and Student Services CU Advisor siri colom collegeunbound org Financial Aid Coordinator tnorton collegeunbound org 7 Vice President of Strategic Planning tmoney collegeunbound org 509 308 1046 Assoicate VP of Administration and Finance llussier collegeunbound org Case Manager Prison Education Program wbrown collegeunbound org Executive Assistant CU Site Coordinator tcorso metmail org 401 752 2640

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My Personal Learning Network Contact Information College Unbound Advisor Professional Mentor s Field Experts and Instructors Peer Partners 9 6

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Student Support Services Student Support Services Disabling Conditions College Unbound provides accommodations and supports to students with disabling conditions All on ground facilities are physically and socially accessible and staff are creative about accommodations that make it possible for students to achieve their academic goals Students who wish to request reasonable accommodations must schedule an appointment with their Faculty Advisor and present documentation of a disability diagnosed by a an appropriate practitioner e g Neuropsychologist or Clinical Psychologist Neurologist Psychiatrist Audiologist Otolaryngologist School Psychologist Social Worker LICSW Speech Language Clinician Optometrist Ophthalmologist In addition to agreed upon accommodations College Unbound offers on ground and e tutoring for math writing and other subjects and a weekly on ground writing lab is open to all students Academic Accommodations Appeal Procedures Appeals for Academic Accommodations such as but not limited to exams courses degree programs degree requirements t PMMFHF 6OCPVOE NFNCFS PS B TUVEFOU NBZ SFRVFTU B SFWJFX PG BO BDDPNNPEBUJPO EFDJTJPO t 5IF SFRVFTU GPS SFWJFX JT UP CF TVCNJUUFE UP UIF TUVEFOU T BDVMUZ EWJTPS XIP XJMM MJBJTF XJUI 4UVEFOU Support Services t 4UVEFOU 4VQQPSU QFSTPOOFM XJMM BUUFNQU UP GBDJMJUBUF B NVUVBMMZ BDDFQUBCMF BDDPNNPEBUJPO BHSFFNFOU CZ discussion with the student the professor and other staff as needed t G OP BDDFQUBCMF BHSFFNFOU DBO CF SFBDIFE UIF SFRVFTU GPS SFDPOTJEFSBUJPO XJMM CF GPSXBSEFE UP UIF Provost for Academic Affairs t 5IF 1SPWPTU XJMM SFWJFX UIF JOGPSNBUJPO SFDFJWFE SFRVFTU BEEJUJPOBM JOGPSNBUJPO JG OFDFTTBSZ BOE NBLF B OBM EFDJTJPO 5IF 1SPWPTU XJMM USBOTNJU B EFDJTJPO UP UIF TUVEFOU UIF PMMFHF 6OCPVOE NFNCFS BOE Student Support Services Bias Discrimination Or Harassment Any student who is disturbed by or who experiences incidents of Bias Discrimination or Harassment may BWBJM UIFNTFMWFT PG TVQQPSUT BOE SFTPVSDFT GPS BTTJTUBODF GSPN UIF 1SPWPTU T P DF Inconsistencies With Other Institutions of Higher Education 5IF NFSJDBOT XJUI JTBCJMJUJFT DU QSPWJEFT UIF QSFNJTF VQPO XIJDI FRVBM BDDFTT UP FEVDBUJPO JT CBTFE 5IF EPDVNFOU EPFT OPU BUUFNQU UP QSPWJEF TQFDJ D HVJEBODF GPS FRVBM BDDFTT U JT UIF QPMJDZ PG PMMFHF Unbound in discussion with students regarding accommodations to take into consideration the accommodations provided by the students previous institution However College Unbound retains the right to make decisions based on its own policies curriculum guidelines and procedures College Unbound is not obligated to provide the same or similar accommodations as did another institution Accommodations are NBEF DBTF CZ DBTF JO BDDPSEBODF XJUI P DJBM EPDVNFOUBUJPO UBLJOH JOUP DPOTJEFSBUJPO CPUI SFBTPOBCMFness and appropriateness of the request When accommodations previously provided by another institution conflict with those provided by College Unbound the latter will take precedence 11

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Degree Program Bachelor of Arts Organizational Leadership and Change The Organizational Leadership and Change bachelor s degree program provides prospective leaders with both a theoretical and practical understanding of leadership skills and change management processes within organizations and communities of all types and sizes Through theoretical and practical exploration students are given opportunities to hone management and leadership skills as well as gain a broader understanding of the manager s role in creating and leading successful change initiatives Students experience leading edge concepts as well as the challenges associated with applying what they learn to the practice of leadership and change Students will prepare for rapidly changing organizational contingencies in an evolving cultural context and develop expertise in a chosen area of inquiry In addition students will develop a stakeholder perspective and with their research and practice contribute to positive social change Graduates from the College Unbound Organizational Leadership and Change program are able to t FNPOTUSBUF DPNQFUFODF JO UIF PMMFHF 6OCPVOE FBEFSTIJQ BOE IBOHF BCJUT XIJDI HVJEF TUVEFOU action research and the design and implementation of each course at College Unbound t OHBHF JO BO JOUFOUJPOBM QSPDFTT PG DPOUJOVPVT MFBSOJOH DPOTDJPVTMZ BOBMZ JOH QFSTPOBM EFDJTJPO making and actions as well as the reactions they prompt in themselves and others drawing on theory and experience and modifying actions for the benefit of themselves and the communities they serve t WBMVBUF TZTUFNT UIJOLJOH QSJODJQMFT BU UIF DPSF PG UIF EFTJHO BOE FWPMVUJPO PG PSHBOJ BUJPOBM BOE TPDJBM systems t QQSBJTF UIF SFMFWBODF PG TFNJOBM DVSSFOU BOE FNFSHJOH MFBEFSTIJQ BOE PSHBOJ BUJPOBM DIBOHF UIFP ries and practices from an interdisciplinary and social change perspective t FUFSNJOF UIF F DBDZ PG BMUFSOBUJWFT BOE DIBMMFOHFT UP UIF DPOWFOUJPOBM XJTEPN JO UIF FMET PG MFBEFS ship and organizational change with a particular emphasis on developing and utilizing new knowledge to help achieve positive social change t FTJHO BQQSPQSJBUF TUSBUFHJFT BOE JOUFSWFOUJPOT UIBU XJMM MFBE UIF PSHBOJ BUJPO UP BQQSPQSJBUF outcomes and implement a successful organizational change project using participatory action research methods t 0QFSBUF GSPN B TUBODF PG DPOUJOVPVT JNQSPWFNFOU TVSGBDJOH BOE EF OJOH QSPCMFNT GBDJMJUBUJOH BOE implementing solutions and reviewing the results t O VFODF UIF EFWFMPQNFOU PG BO PSHBOJ BUJPOBM DVMUVSF XIJDI GPTUFST FYDFMMFODF BOE DPOUJOVPVT improvement t YBNJOF BQUJUVEFT TLJMMT WBMVFT BOE QSFGFSFODFT UP VOEFSTUBOE UIF QFSTPOBM UIBU JO VFODFT decisions behaviors and productivity t 6OEFSTUBOE UIF DVMUVSBM QSPDFTTFT CFIBWJPST BOE QSJPSJUJFT PG B DPNNVOJUZ BOE IPOPS UIPTF QSBDUJDFT t FTJHO BOE JNQMFNFOU JODMVTJWF DPMMBCPSBUJWF QMBOOJOH QSPDFTTFT UP IFMQ TUBLFIPMEFST NPWF GSPN UIFJS current situation to their desired future state 13

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Collaboration Communication Creativity Critical Thinking Re ection Resiliency Demonstrate competence at Practitioner level prior to graduation Intercultural Engagement Problem Solving Human Expression Participatory Action Research Self Quantitative Reasoning Social Reasoning Science and Math 3 credits in Natural Science 4 credits Experiential Science 3 credits in Math 3 credits in Individual Group Dynamics 6 credits in Research Methods Social and Behavioral Sciences 3 credits Workplace World Lab A 3 credits Workplace World Lab Z Integrated Applied Learning Organizational Leadership and Change Major 36 Liberal Arts credits 6 credits in Advanced Composition 3 credits in Literature and Fine Arts 3 credits in History Arts Humanities General Education Distribution Requirements 46 Liberal Arts Credits Ethical Reasoning Historical Reasoning Community Development Theory Place Based Reasoning Public Narrative Media Message Globalization A N D Reframing Failure 3 credits L E A R N I N G P L A N CAPSTONE Looking Back Looking Forward 3 credits After the rst semester student schedules vary as they choose classes according to their Personal Learning Plans and Degree Plans Workplace World Lab 3 credits FINAL TERM TIME TO COMPLETION P E R S O N A L TERM 2 Contextualizing Work 3 credits Workplace World Lab 3 credits Wrtg for Chge Adv Comp 3 credits FIRST SEMESTER P R O J E C T Intro to Org Ldrshp Chge 3 credits TERM 1 76 credits are prescribed Liberal Arts credits within General Education Requirements 40 credits and the OLC Major 36 credits Students work with academic advisors to choose courses appropriate to their interests for the remaining 38 credits to reach 120 At least 10 of these 38 credits must be Liberal Arts credits Free Electives 28 credits These outcomes are addressed in courses required for the OLC major Labor and Democracy Reframing Failure Organizational Theory Writing for Careers PA Research Career Mentorship Adaptive Leadership PA Research Community Contextualizing Work There are two 9 week terms in the semester Students enroll in two 3 credit courses and enroll in Workplace World Lab in which they develop and maintain a Personal Learning Plan design and manage an ongoing action research project interact with a Personal Learning Network and integrate theories and ideas from their two courses 3 credits in Power and Difference 6 credits in Global Citizenship Civics Digital Fluency Empirical Reasoning These outcomes are addressed in General Education courses which meet the distribution requirements listed below General Education Learning Outcomes Content and Process Outcomes Advocacy for Self and Others Accountability These competencies are addressed in Workplace World Lab required each semester through graduationto integrate courses projects and life General Education Skills and Application Outcomes The Big 10 Leadership Change Competencies 10 Credits COLLEGE UNBOUND PLAN FOR GRADUATION Students must complete a minimum of 120 credits and meet CU requirements in order to receive a bachelor s degree

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Making it Practical How Will I Spend My Time Instructional Delivery Perhaps the most important aspect of the College Unbound program is that it is both high tech and highsupport College Unbound instruction is delivered both online and on ground College Unbound students go online to gain specific knowledge and get offline to apply that knowledge and develop necessary skills Online courses facilitated by Instructional Faculty are complemented by required weekly on ground seminars weekly one on one meetings with an Academic Advisor and weekly meetings with members of the student s Personal Learning Network PLN The PLN is composed of an Academic Advisor a professional mentor in the workplace or community content and field experts and peers This team is focused on growth and completion and supports the student from enrollment through graduation College Unbound s online Learning Management System is designed as an e portfolio interface where students create their own homepage as an active and ever evolving archive for their work Instructional Faculty similarly are asked to create their own personal portfolios as part of the course design process Course materials are housed within faculty portfolios mirroring how student s projects and coursework are housed within their personal portfolios Students are asked to comment on their peers work throughout the week so that student interaction online is always tied to the development of their portfolio of practice On average students are required to spend 25 hours of active online engagement in their portfolio and in interaction with their peers and faculty Credit Hour Workload College Unbound operates 18 week semesters that include two 9 week terms joined by an 18 week 3 credit Workplace and World Lab WWL WWL is required of every student each semester it is the space in which among other learning the student s Personal Learning Plan is developed and monitored ongoing action research projects are designed and monitored specific research skills are developed course ideas and theories are integrated applied and tested development of the Big 10 Leadership and Change competencies is coached documented and analyzed engagement with the student s Personal Learning Network takes place student learning exhibitions are planned rehearsed and executed CU offers both core courses and elective courses every 9 weeks Each semester working with their academic advisors students choose an academic plan and number of courses to enroll in tailored to their circumstances Full time students at College Unbound enroll in 12 credits per semester There are students who opt to take only 9 credits some semesters and students who opt to take 15 credits some semesters Each plan must be approved by the Academic Advisor 15

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Engaged Academic Time Credit Hour Policy The College Unbound Credit Hour Policy codifies practices for all CU courses and labs regarding instructional contact hours and out of class student work in accordance with Federal State and CIHE NEASC guidelines A credit hour represents the amount of work governed by intended and clearly identified student learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that approximates one hour or 50 minutes of classroom or direct faculty instruction or instructional equivalencies and a minimum of two hours of out of class student work each week for a fifteen week term or the equivalent amount of work over a term of a different length Classroom or direct faculty instruction and out of class student work leading to the award of credit hours may vary for courses that require laboratory work internships practica studio work online work research guided study and other academic work to achieve the identified student learning outcomes College Unbound defaults to two course lengths 18 weeks semester long and 9 week sessionlong courses The Engaged Academic Time tied to each are detailed below Students can expect to spend around 15 hours per course per week with an additional 7 5 hours for Workplace and World Lab Hours include scheduled weekly seminar meetings as well as other intentional direct faculty student contact time and time spent completing assigned readings contributing to online discussion boards preparing written assignments and other course related tasks 16

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CHECKLIST FOR SUCCESS WEEKLY RESPONSIBILITY Record Goals questions for the week Readings for the week Tasks activities for the week Deliverables for the week Big 10 work for the week Schedule with Academic Advisor Bring computer reflection calendar questions deliverables In a paragraph or two record Project progress Learning experiences New questions Breakthroughs Problems to solve Participate in Whole learning community experience Cohort time Course support Writing lab if needed Via phone computer or faceXtoX face share Project progress Questions Resources Successes Per course complete Readings Discussion posts Assignment s Integrate ideas across courses and throughout project Apply your learning through Meetings with Professional Mentors Reviewing and updating PLP Participating in self assessment PURPOSE Personal Learning Plan PLP Degree Plan Personal and Professional Goals College Unbound Requirements Project Plan Weekly 1 1 Meeting Weekly Reflection Weekly Seminar Personal Learning Network PLN Course 1 Course 2 Workplace and World Lab Change you want to make in the world Request resources troubleshoot problems celebrate successes analyze progress toward goals review and revise plans Make thinking visible Build fluency in critical thinking writing Pay attention to changing ideas how you know as well as what you know and figure out next steps Learning Community building Leadership and Change Habits Application project progress and support cohort strengthening course support tutoring Build and stay in touch with a team that provides encouragement relevance depth validity accountability and integration Using technology well students grapple with academic and specific field knowledge and skills accessing analyzing discussing creating and assessing content Address Leadership and Change Habits creating deliverables that demonstrate growth and learning in each as they relate to course theories and project goals

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Cohort Time Weekly Seminar Weekly cohort time is a key tool for building student engagement motivation and confidence It is a time when they feel and access the support of their peers to further their learning and achieve their goals This is the tool that creates College Unbound culture Student voices are at the center and their needs and successes direct how the time and space are used While they may occur at different times during the cohort meeting there are five anchor points that are critical to building the culture for a College Unbound learning community The bulleted items that follow the anchor titles below are examples of what might occur Community Building t 5ZQJDBMMZ BU UIF CFHJOOJOH PG UIF TFTTJPO t 4UVEFOU TIBSJOH BOOPVODFNFOUT DPODFSOJOH UIFJS XFFL XIBU T HPJOH PO JO UIFJS MJWFT t 4UPSZ DJSDMF BSPVOE QSPWPDBUJWF UFYU BO FWFOU B WJEFP DMJQ B UPQJD PG JOUFSFTU t FMFCSBUJPOT JH XBSET UP BDLOPXMFEHF JOEJWJEVBM PS HSPVQ BDDPNQMJTINFOUT Big 10 Application t VFTU TQFBLFST UP EFNPOTUSBUF IPX TLJMMT BSF VTFE JO MJGF t 4FMG TTFTTNFOU VTJOH JH SVCSJDT GPMMPXFE CZ EJTDVTTJPO t DUJWJUZ UP FYQMPSF B QBSUJDVMBS JH DPNQFUFODZ t 7JEFP 5FE 5BML GPMMPXFE CZ EJTDVTTJPO t 1BJS TIBSF BCPVU IPX B QBSUJDVMBS JH TLJMM XBT VTFE JO UIFJS QSPKFDU UIJT XFFL t JH XBSET UP TUVEFOUT TUB XIP IBWF EFNPOTUSBUFE B JH DPNQFUFODZ Project Progress Support t 4UVEFOUT SF FDU PO BOE TIBSF QSPKFDU QSPHSFTT t EFOUJGZJOH OFFET t 5SPVCMFTIPPU EJ DVMUJFT XJUI QFFST t 3FRVFTUT GPS SFTPVSDFT UJQT TVQQPSU t 4USFOHUIFOJOH 1FSTPOBM FBSOJOH FUXPSLT t FMFCSBUJOH TVDDFTTFT New Learning Unlearning t 5ZJOH UIFPSJFT JEFBT GSPN DPVSTFT UP QSPKFDU t 8PSLJOH UISPVHI DPOGVTJPO t 4IBSJOH iBIB Tw t 5SPVCMFTIPPUJOH IPX UP CMFOE DPVSTF SFRVJSFNFOUT BOE QSPKFDU QSPHSFTT t 5JNF NBOBHFNFOU UJQT USJDLT Leave with Direction Purpose t 4UVEFOUT LOPX XIBU T FYQFDUFE JO DPVSTFT t 4UVEFOUT IBWF JEFOUJ FE QSPKFDU OFYU TUFQT t 4UVEFOUT IBWF QMBOT UP BDDFTT OFX SFTPVSDFT DPOUBDU OFX FME FYQFSUT PS NFOUPST t NFFUJOHT BSF TDIFEVMFE

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pursue your passion earn your degree Program Components

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CU educates adult learners one student at a time in out of the classroom settings Our target market is adults who began degree delivery model these adult students are able to work full time in addition to being full time students The Essential PARTS CU is a project driven course supported delivery model Working in collaboration with Personalization experts and their peers students create personal learning plans using interests strengths and Each student develops a personal learning plan designed to meet his or her goals interests and learning needs All learning is fully integrated and embedded throughout the students lives work and degree plan Time for professional learning is structured into the work day and around students lives path to earning a bachelor s degree Students work their plans by engaging with a variety of online resources and discussions participating in workplace learning experiences conducting individualized research designing and completing high interest projects through which they demonstrate university content competencies professional competencies and other skills necessary for lifelong learning Acceleration Full Time Worker Full Time Student Students can earn 15 credits per semester while working full time Life experience is honored and credited Most transfer credits are accepted Once per week they meet with their College Unbound learning community for common experiences such as guest speakers and relevant reading discussion Students maintain online portfolios of their work and every eight weeks students participate in learning exhibitions to receive targeted feedback on their work and their thinking from peers professional mentors field experts College Unbound instructional faculty and advising faculty Relevance Workplace Learning is used honored and credited speakers ensures that skills and information are useful and current Transformation Students develop new frames of reference and transform personally and professionally In addition to what they know they learn to pay attention to how they know and in Advocacy Accountability Collaboration Communication Creativity CU is committed to t EFFQMZ QFSTPOBMJzed education that fosters intellectual curiosity and improves the life of the student and the lives of those they touch t QSBDUJDFT UIBU IPOPST UIF JOEJWJEVBM BOE the demonstration of competencies over seat time t MFBEFSTIJQ JO JOOovative practices that disrupt conventional higher education Critical Thinking Intercultural Engagement Problem Solving Reflection Resiliency Support A team that includes a College Unbound advisor professtudent 19 14

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Transformational Learning is Personalized and Self Directed Learning is a process powered by the learner and supported and stimulated by collaboration with others Sparking and feeding the desire to learn ensures that the process repeats itself the learner wants to learn more Without the desire to learn attempts to teach at a student are counterproductive Additionally adult learners come to College Unbound already engaged in and living and working in a diverse complex and ever changing society At College Unbound those experiences are considered assets Students come with diverse ideas skills talents and experiences Curriculum must begin with the student and build from there Coursework is not separate from the student s life something they get to in the evenings after a full day at work when the kids have gone to bed Instead the learning is woven throughout the student s day and takes advantage of the opportunities that provides Because their lives are integrated in their coursework and their coursework is integrated throughout their lives it is possible for students to continuously develop Leadership and Change habits and reflect on their growth At CU that means taking advantage of opportunities for integrcultural engagement thinking critically posing and solving problems communicating ideas collaborating holding themselves accountable practicing creativity developing the skills of resilience becoming reflective individuals and advocating for themselves and others Students pay attention to how they know as well as what they know and why it matters crafted by the students with input from members of their Personal Learning Networks provides the blueprint for the learning To a large extent the students decide 1 What they want to accomplish 2 What areas of knowledge and skills they need to gain in order to accomplish it 3 How they will gain that knowledge and develop those skills the necessary resources experiences and activities 4 How they and others will know they have gained the appropriate knowledge and skills CU instructional and advising faculty contribute to a rich storehouse of experts resources learning experiences from which the students can draw and required to use the world around them 20

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At College Unbound Workplace Learning is Honored Supported and Credited At most higher education institutions students who must work full time delay their education by several years They take a course or two per semester hoping that the courses they need to complete their degrees will be offered at a time that complements their work schedule Time gaps between courses result in fragmented learning and discouraged learners who often give up This situation contributes to the current U S statistic of 36 million adults who have some college credits but no degree At College Unbound the workplace is viewed as an asset rather than a barrier Students who are not already working full time find internships that are in line with their learning plans The workplace provides rich opportunities for learning It provides space in which action and reflection can take place in a continuous cycle Students design projects that feed their interests goals and learning needs and that also benefit the organization in which they work They have opportunities to work with professional mentors and field experts as they test theories and processes When student deliverables are actually put to use assessment is real and immediate A bachelor s degree anchored in workplace learning empowers students and prepares them to deal with complexity diversity and change In addition employers report that College Unbound students become better employees demonstrating leadership greater engagement and growth in each of the Leadership and Change competencies described on pages 27 and 28 Did you design your project with your Professional Mentor or another supervisor in your workplace pursue your passion earn your degree Applying what I learn at our seminars pertaining to change innovation and the technology we use together has pushed me along as an educator and broadened my mind I m actually taking the tools I m given and applying the knowledge to my internship and personal work It s a great feeling to make this connection and is making me a stronger more effective leader James I Was your project relevant to you and your interests Was your project ultimately used in the workplace or the real world Responses to a survey of the College Unbound student body at the end of the 2015 2016 school year

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How Learning is Integrated and Projects are Born One student speaks It has been tough trying to understand readings exploring ideas of parenting among low income and working class African American fathers mass incarceration and the economics of child support Applying them to everyday situations and my learning plan has been confusing but as I am continuing to learn and grow I see it is father I recognize some key issues of marginalization are incarceration crime unemployment poor health and toring group I now understand more of the issues that young black men face as felons reintegrating back into society discussing these things as a group and sharing personal experiences and beliefs about mass incarceration and the criminal justice system has been great controlling my own emotions and the ways I handle myself when things get tough I ve learned to take the good teach the youth Anthony T Learning at College Unbound has inspired projects such as Designing an Environmental Classroom Developing a Spoken Word Curriculum Designing an LGBT Elder Care Center Founding a Single Fatherhood Collective Creating an ECE Science Curriculum Building a Successful Family Involvement Program 21 22

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Pursue your passion Earn your degree Celebrating Student Projects Anjel To ensure the implementation of holistic human resources for adults working in non profit youth focused arts organizations Anthony To pursure a career as a sequential artist that uses comics and illustration as a mentorship and education tool Belita To facilitate engagement within the Cape Verdean immigrant community of New England Bill To create housing opportunities for homeless adults in Rhode Island navigating through addiction Chris To create and curate arts based practices to help imagine a more inclusive world David To grow as both a writer and advocate for his community Erroll To create digital media opportunities for young people who are actively working towards a more just society Joyce To raise funds and awareness for undocumented adult learners looking to re engage with higher education Kofi To create emotional literacy practices for adults within Rhode Island Lauren To create and publish a zine for teenage girls who have experienced sexual violence to become a dancer providing my body and mind with holistic health care and accessing wielding and providing authentic love as a way to realize and actualize empathy Melanie To create new on demand services for elder care in Rhode Island Michelle To design and facilitate arts based practices for women around the issues of self esteem collective action and emotional health Natalia To explore and support grief grieving and recovering from trauma through community support Rosey To write personal stories that empower young girls to understand and demand healthy relationships Zuli To design a fashion line that raises awareness and funds for social justice issues while also building its brand out of materials and labor practices that help engage with urgent issues 23

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Hear More from Since I have been here at CU I know this is the type of structure I need Nobody allows you to fail give up or let yourself down Everyone from the advisors and the staff to the students in the cohort is so supportive that every time I have thought about giving up they haven t let me Vanessa V I really feel like I ve made close friends and created this strong second family Chris S CU is inspiring because being in this cohort has pushed me to be introspective acknowledge my passions and pursue them with intensity It s exciting because I m involved in work that I never thought I would be doing Joyce A My cohort mates all of them have really contributed to the growth of my project Adam F 25 24 Students

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The Personal Learning Plan Each student at College Unbound works with members of his or her Personal Learning Network PLN to design a Personal Learning Plan PLP as a blueprint for the semester and a structure to integrate project development course outcomes and personal goals into an engaging arrangement Each PLP is meant to be accessible for comments by members of the student s PLN Students upload current Essential Questions each week as well as progress on their project reactions to connected readings and notes from relevant meetings A link to a calendar on which the student records deadlines and scheduled events is accessible for all members of the student s PLN PLPs are student centered varied and flexible They draw upon different resources to honor student interests strengths commitments and responsibilities while addressing learning gaps and providing a clear pathway to a bachelor s degree PLPs encourage personal and professional excellence through goal setting and evaluating achievement of those goals through a variety of assessments with an emphasis on self reflection PLPs are living breathing documents that are revisited regularly and guide the work PLPs consider t DBEFNJD PBMT t BSFFS PBMT t 1FSTPOBM PBMT t FBEFSTIJQ IBOHF BCJUT t 4USFOHUIT OUFSFTUT SFBT UP NQSPWF t 1SJPS FBSOJOH TTFTTNFOU t VSSFOU PNNJUNFOUT BOE 3FTQPOTJCJMJUJFT t SFEJU JTUPSZ t FHSFF 3FRVJSFNFOUT t 8PSLQMBDF FBSOJOH 1SPKFDU EFBT t 0UIFS 1SPKFDU EFBT 1MBOT t 5JNFMJOFT GPS PNQMFUJPO PLPs are developed revised and assessed by the student s Personal Learning Network t 4UVEFOU t DBEFNJD EWJTPS t 1SPGFTTJPOBM FOUPS t 4VCKFDU JFME YQFSUT JODMVEJOH OTUSVDUJPOBM BDVMUZ t 1FFST 1 1 QSPHSFTT JT FWBMVBUFE SF OFE SFHVMBSMZ VQPO SFWJFX PG t 0OHPJOH XSJUUFO TFMG SF FDUJPO t 1SPGFTTJPOBM FOUPS FWBMVBUJPO t 4UVEFOU FBSOJOH YIJCJUJPOT t 0OMJOF 1PSUGPMJPT t 1SPHSFTT UPXBSE EFHSFF SFEJU SFDPSE t 1SPHSFTT UPXBSE JH FBEFSTIJQ IBOHF BCJUT t 0OHPJOH EJBMPHVF BNPOH 1 26 25 The only way to do great work is to love what you do Steve Jobs

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pursue your passion earn your degree The Big 10 Leadership Change Competencies College Unbound students develop broad knowledge of the wider world as well as in depth achievement in a specific field of interest Students develop a sense of social responsibility as well as strong intellectual and practical skills that span all areas of study CU maintains a strong focus on specific skills and qualities that are often talked about but are seldom emphasized within a traditional college curriculum Personal development holds a prominent position within the curriculum It is included in the individual student s learning plans Each skill topic is broken down into specific components and assessed over a range of experiences and project work Those skills are discussed and analyzed as part of the personalized program Students learn to self assess and share in critique with their work based supervisors as well as with their fellow students Integrating college studies with the workplace in this way develops individuals with competence in the rich theoretical concepts appropriate to their degree program of study as well as competence in Intercultural Engagement t CMF UP BSUJDVMBUF JOTJHIUT JOUP PXO DVMUVSBM SVMFT BOE CJBTFT t 0QFO UP PUIFST WBMVFT CFMJFGT BOE CFIBWJPST t POTJEFST BOE BQQMJFT B EFFQ VOEFSTUBOEJOH PG NVMUJQMF XPSME WJFXT FYQFSJFODFT BOE MJGFTUZMFT t CMF UP DIBMMFOHF NJTDPODFQUJPOT QSFKVEJDFT BOE JOKVTUJDFT t 8PSLT BDUJWFMZ UP BEWBODF TPDJBM KVTUJDF BOE FRVJUZ Critical Thinking t TTFTTFT BDDVSBDZ BOE DSFEJCJMJUZ PG TPVSDFT t DDFTTFT BOBMZ FT BOE DPOOFDUT JOGPSNBUJPO t BLFT JOGPSNFE BOE F FDUJWF EFDJTJPOT CBTFE PO SFMFWBOU DSJUFSJB t 5FTUT DPODMVTJPOT BOE HFOFSBMJ BUJPOT t 3FDPOTUSVDUT POF T CFMJFGT PO UIF CBTJT PG XJEFS FYQFSJFODF Communication Written Oral Visual t SUJDVMBUFT BOE EFGFOET JEFBT DMFBSMZ BOE F FDUJWFMZ t 1SPWJEFT TQFDJ D EFUBJMT BOE DPODSFUF FYBNQMFT t 6TFT NFEJB BQQSPQSJBUF UP BVEJFODF BOE QVSQPTF t CMF UP DPNNVOJDBUF B DPODFQU EJ FSFOUMZ TP UIBU BMM understand t FNPOTUSBUFT DPOUSPM PWFS JEFBT BOE DPOUFOU WPJDF PSHBOJ BUJPO XPSE DIPJDF TFOUFODF VFODZ BOE conventions 27 Problem Solving t TLT UIF SJHIU RVFTUJPOT t CMF UP EF OF UIF QSPCMFN t BUIFST BOE JOUFSQSFUT OFDFTTBSZ EBUB t WBMVBUFT BOE TFMFDUT BMUFSOBUJWF TPMVUJPOT t FDUJWFMZ JNQMFNFOUT TPMVUJPOT

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The Big 10 College Unbound Leadership Change Competencies con t Accountability t BSSJFT PVU B MFBSOJOH QMBO TZTUFNBUJDBMMZ BOE TFRVFOUJBMMZ t YFSDJTFT QFSTPOBM SFTQPOTJCJMJUZ UPXBSE MFBSOJOH BOE MJGF HPBMT t BOBHFT UJNF BOE XPSLMPBE XFMM t 1SBDUJDFT JOUFHSJUZ o XBMLT UIFJS UBML t T BDDPVOUBCMF GPS EFBEMJOFT SFTVMUT FOE QSPEVDUT t PMET PUIFST BDDPVOUBCMF GPS GPMMPXJOH UISPVHI PO DPOUSJCVUJPOT to the learning Collaboration t 7JFXT TFMG BT B NFNCFS PG OVNFSPVT DPNNVOJUJFT t JTUFOT UP EJTTFOU BOE BMUFSOBUF QPJOUT PG WJFX t OHBHFT JO EJBMPHVF SBUIFS UIBO EFCBUF t 4FFLT BOE P FST IFMQ t FHPUJBUFT BOE NBOBHFT DPO JDU t 0 FST BOE SFDFJWFT DPOTUSVDUJWF DSJUJDJTN t 7BMVFT EJWFSTJUZ BOE IPOPST FRVJUZ t OHBHFT F FDUJWFMZ XJUI IJT IFS 1FSTPOBM FBSOJOH FUXPSL Creativity t T DVSJPVT BCPVU UIF XPSME BSPVOE UIFN t PPLT GPS NBOZ QPTTJCMF BOTXFST OFX TPMVUJPOT PME QSPCMFNT t FNPOTUSBUFT PQFOOFTT UP OFX JEFBT t FBSOT GSPN XIBU EJEO U XPSL BT XFMM BT XIBU EJE t PNGPSUBCMF EPJOH UIJOHT EJ FSFOUMZ GSPN UIF OPSN Reflection t OHBHFT JO IPOFTU TFMG BQQSBJTBM t JOLT BCPVU BOE BOBMZ FT BDUJPOT XJUI UIF HPBM PG JNQSPWJOH t TLT iXIBU JG w t EFOUJ FT BOE SFTPMWFT QSPCMFNT Advocacy GPS TFMG BOE PUIFST t 4ZOUIFTJ FT JEFBT t EWPDBUFT GPS QFSTPOBM JOUFSFTUT BOE OFFET t BLFT PXO EFDJTJPOT BCPVU TIPSU MPOH UFSN QMBOT Resilience t 6TFT UIF TUSFOHUIT PG TFMG PUIFST UP BDIJFWF HPBMT t 8PSLT UISPVHI GBJMVSF TFFJOH TFUCBDLT BT UFNQPSBSZ t DUT BOE UBLFT DIBSHF XJUIPVU OFFE PG B NBOBHFS t FWFMPQT BOE VTFT DPQJOH SFTPVSDFT t DDFTTFT B TZTUFN PG TVQQPSUT t FNPOTUSBUFT FYJCJMJUZ t EBQUT SFBEJMZ UP DIBOHF t FNPOTUSBUFT DPOUSPM PWFS JEFBT BOE DPOUFOU WPJDF PSHBOJ BUJPO XPSE DIPJDF TFOUFODF VFODZ BOE DPOWFOUJPOT 28

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Personal Learning Network An essential component of the College Unbound program is the student s Personal Learning Network PLN It is this team that ensures encouragement relevance depth validity accountability and integration When it comes to learning this is the team that keeps it real and makes it possible The hand may be a helpful metaphor in thinking about this support team Just as the hand s function is to grasp hold and manipulate making it essential to daily tasks so is the student support team essential for the same reasons This team helps the student to grasp hold and manipulate the learning using it for their own purposes The student is the thumb This is the most unique essential digit that allows the hand to perform its functions The rest of the team depends on the student to keep them informed and to let them know the kinds of resources and assistance that are needed The professional mentor is the index finger the one that points the way toward authentic assignments and beckons others to gather around workplace problems The subject or field expert is the third or ring finger ensuring a tight grip on essential information Just as placing a ring on the third finger signifies and publicly validates a relationship so does the subject expert ensure the accuracy and validity of the learning The academic advisor is the longest finger standing tall enough to see the entire team and plan able to identify needs and to see when there is a necessary change in direction Peer s as pinky finger is appropriate as the pinky provides at least 33 of a person s hand strength Working closely with others in similar circumstances and with similar goals provides an ongoing sounding board against which to test ideas share frustrations and celebrate successes 29

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Specific Responsibilities of Each Member of the Student s PLN Student t POEVDUT BO JOWFOUPSZ PG JOUFSFTUT TUSFOHUIT XFBLOFTTFT BOE QFSTPOBM QSPGFTTJPOBM HPBMT UP ESJWF UIFJS MFBSOJOH t EFOUJ FT BOE JOWJUFT NFNCFST PG IJT IFS MFBSOJOH TVQQPSU UFBN t FWFMPQT NBJOUBJOT BOE VTFT B MFBSOJOH QMBO BHSFFNFOU UP HVJEF UIF BDDPNQMJTINFOU PG QFSTPOBM BOE QSPGFTTJPOBM HPBMT t 1PTUT MFBSOJOH QMBO PO JHJDBUJPO BOE VQEBUFT UIF QMBO BT DIBOHFT BSF NBEF t 1PTUT B XFFLMZ SF FDUJPO BCPVU QSPHSFTT BSPVOE UIF QMBO PO JHJDBUJPO t 1PTUT BMM SFRVJSFE BTTJHONFOUT PO JHJDBUJPO t OHBHFT XFFLMZ XJUI NFNCFST PG IJT IFS TVQQPSU UFBN BOE PUIFST JO UIF 6 MFBSOJOH DPNNVOJUZ t UUFOET BOE QBSUJDJQBUFT JO XFFLMZ 8PSLQMBDF BOE 8PSME BC TFNJOBS t 4FFLT IFMQ GSPN TVQQPSUJWF UFBN NFNCFST UP PCUBJO SFTPVSDFT OFDFTTBSZ GPS MFBSOJOH t PNQMFUFT BTTJHONFOUT CZ TQFDJ FE EFBEMJOFT t 1SFQBSFT BOE EFMJWFST POF MFBSOJOH FYIJCJUJPO QFS UFSN BOE BQQMJFT GFFECBDL UP POHPJOH MFBSOJOH QMBO t PDVNFOUT MFBSOJOH UP NFFU TUBOEBSET PG 6 BOE NBJOUBJOT BSUJGBDUT JO BO POMJOF QPSUGPMJP Professional Mentor s t 1BSUJDJQBUFT JO UIF EFWFMPQNFOU PG UIF MFBSOJOH QMBO BHSFFNFOU FOTVSJOH UIBU HPBMT UP JNQSPWF UIF TUVEFOU BT XPSLFS BOE EFMJWFSBCMFT VTFGVM UP UIF TJUF BSF JODMVEFE t VJEFT TUVEFOUT JO FOUSZ MFWFM XPSL BOE TUVEZ PG UIFJS FMET t FFUT XJUI TUVEFOU SFHVMBSMZ UP HBVHF QSPHSFTT QSPWJEF JOQVU BOE TVHHFTU SFTPVSDFT t UUFOET TUVEFOU MFBSOJOH FYIJCJUJPOT t TTFTTFT TUVEFOU T XPSL QFSGPSNBODF BOE EFNPOTUSBUFE MFBSOJOH PVUDPNFT t FFUT BU MFBTU UXJDF QFS UFSN XJUI TUVEFOU T BDBEFNJD BEWJTPS DBO CF B QIPOF DPOWFSTBUJPO FMFDUSPOJD DPOGFSFODF PS EFUBJMFE F NBJM FYDIBOHF t 3FTQPOET UP TUVEFOU SF FDUJPO MFBSOJOH QMBO PO JHJDBUJPO BU MFBTU PODF QFS UFSN Subject Field Expert Community t POUSJCVUFT UP UIF POHPJOH EFWFMPQNFOU PG UIF TUVEFOU MFBSOJOH QMBO XIFO BQQSPQSJBUF t DUT BT DBUBMZTU UP QSPWPLF UIPVHIU BOE TUJNVMBUF OFX JEFBT t 4VHHFTUT SFTPVSDFT BOE QSPWJEFT MFBSOJOH PQQPSUVOJUJFT XJUIJO UIF FME t DUT BT HVFTU TQFBLFS BOE POF PO POF DPBDI TVQQMZJOH 6 TUVEFOUT XJUI XPSLJOH LOPXMFEHF PG DVSSFOU JOEVTUSZ TUBOEBSET BOE QSPDFTTFT t UUFOET TUVEFOU MFBSOJOH FYIJCJUJPOT XIFO QPTTJCMF BOE BQQSPQSJBUF t POUSJCVUFT UP BTTFTTJOH MFBSOJOH PVUDPNFT Subject Field Expert Instructor t F OTUSVDUPS JT SFTQPOTJCMF GPS EFUFSNJOJOH DPVSTF DPOUFOU BMJHOFE UP TUVEFOU MFBSOJOH PVUDPNFT t F OTUSVDUPS QSPWJEFT SFTPVSDFT OFDFTTBSZ UP BDIJFWFNFOU PG UIF MFBSOJOH PVUDPNFT t F OTUSVDUPS JT SFTQPOTJCMF GPS EFUFSNJOJOH UIF FYUFOU UP XIJDI TUVEFOUT IBWF NFU MFBSOJOH PVUDPNFT BOE GPS BXBSEJOH HSBEFT UIPVHI BTTFTTNFOUT BSF DPMMBCPSBUJWF t F OTUSVDUPS JT SFTQPOTJCMF GPS LFFQJOH TUVEFOU T BDBEFNJD BEWJTPS BCSFBTU PG TUVEFOU QSPHSFTT 30

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Specific Responsibilities of Each Member of the Student s PLN con t Peer Partner s t T DPNNJUUFE UP UIF TVDDFTT PG DMBTTNBUFT t SBJOTUPSNT JEFBT BOE USPVCMFTIPPUT EJffiDVMUJFT t UUFOET BOE BDUJWFMZ QBSUJDJQBUFT JO TUVEFOU MFBSOJOH FYIJCJUJPOT t 1SPWJEFT GFFECBDL PO MFBSOJOH QSPDFTTFT BOE QSPEVDUT BMPOH UIF XBZ BOE VQPO DPNQMFUJPO t TLT RVFTUJPOT UP QSPNQU EFFQFS SF FDUJPO BCPVU UIF MFBSOJOH Academic Advisor t 1BSUJDJQBUFT JO UIF EFWFMPQNFOU PG UIF TUVEFOU MFBSOJOH QMBO t 3FTQPOET UP TUVEFOU SF FDUJPOT MFBSOJOH QMBO PO JHJDBUJPO FBDI XFFL t ODPVSBHFT NFBOJOHGVM XPSL SFMBUFE UP UIF TUVEFOU T QSPGFTTJPOBM BOE QFSTPOBM MFBSOJOH HPBMT t TTJTUT UIF TUVEFOU JO EJTDPWFSJOH FYQFSUT SFTPVSDFT USBJOJOH DPVSTFXPSL UP TVQQPSU MFBSOJOH HPBMT t BDJMJUBUFT TIBSFE JOUFHSBUFE BTTFTTNFOU QSBDUJDFT BDSPTT UIF TUVEFOU MFBSOJOH UFBN BTTFTTJOH MFBSOJOH EFNPO TUSBUFE UISPVHI QSPKFDUT QBQFST QSFTFOUBUJPOT FYIJCJUJPOT BOE PUIFS NFUIPET t 4VCNJUT TUVEFOU FWBMVBUJPO GFFECBDL UP JOTUSVDUPST t WSJUFT FOE PG TFNFTUFS OBSSBUJWFT PG TUVEFOU QSPHSFTT t POEVDUT XFFLMZ NFFUJOHT TLZQF QIPOF POMJOF PS GBDF UP GBDF XJUI FBDI TUVEFOU UP FOTVSF UIBU UIF 1 1 BDDVSBUFMZ SF FDUT UIF POHPJOH OFFET PG UIF TUVEFOU UIBU UIF TUVEFOU BQQSPQSJBUFMZ JOWFTUT UJNF FOFS gy and SFTPVSDFT UP UIF DVSSFOU QSPKFDU BOE HPBMT BOE TVHHFTUT SFTPVSDFT t FFUT BU MFBTU UXJDF QFS UFSN XJUI TUVEFOU T QSPGFTTJPOBM NFOUPS DBO CF B QIPOF DPOWFSTBUJPO FMFDUSPOJD DPOGFSFODF PS EFUBJMFE F NBJM FYDIBOHF UP FOTVSF UIBU UIF XPSLQMBDF GBDJMJUBUFT TUVEFOU MFBSOJOH t FFUT BT BQQSPQSJBUF XJUI FME FYQFSUT UP GBDJMJUBUF TUVEFOU MFBSOJOH t UUFOET QBSUJDJQBUFT BOE TIBSFT GBDJMJUBUJPO EVUJFT GPS 8PSLQMBDF BOE 8PSME BC TFNJOBST DPMMBCPSBUJOH UP FOTVSF TVDDFTTGVM MFBSOJOH TFTTJPOT JT JODMVEFT TVHHFTUJOH BOE OEJOH TQFBLFST EFWFMPQJOH SFTPVSDFT BOE NBUFSJBMT BOE TIBSJOH QFSTPOBM FYQFSUJTF F BEWJTPS JT SFTQPOTJCMF GPS BMM 88 QMBOOJOH BOE BTTFTTNFOU GPS IJT IFS DPIPSU 31

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Assessment What to Assess The Importance of CU Leadership Change Habits of Practice and Mind Students work their individual learning plans by engaging with a variety of online resources and discussions participating in workplace learning experiences conducting individualized research and designing and complet ing projects which demonstrate the habits of practice and mind necessary for Leadership Change These habits include academic practices professional practices and social emotional practices These habits of practice and mind are at the heart of our work and are developed through within and across the student s learning plan These habits are the windows through which one can view student understandings and application of the knowledge and rich theoretical underpinnings of their degree program Collaboration Intercultural Engagement Communication Accountability Resilience Advocacy for Self and Others College Unbound operates according to the following principles of assessment How to Assess Shared Assessment At CU the student and each member of the student s support and his her plan rather than stand alone lists of content outcomes are at the heart of all assessment at CU All members work in process and as it is used in the workplace and or comon his her progress Peers Subject Field Experts Professional Mentors and Academic Advisors are present at student learning exhibitions engage with the student on Digication responding to student Instructors play a key role clarifying College Unbound learning outcomes for courses and parameters for student performance Each member of the team contributes to painting an overall picture of student learning and performance 32 1 Assessment is used to inform and improve student performance rather than to audit student performance 2 Assessment is worthwhile and interesting It pays attention to process and happens for real purposes in authentic situations 3 Assessment at CU is to measure competency rather than mastery Mastery is about reaching a certain level of understanding regarding a chunk of content area information Measuring competency requires assessing the students ability to apply what they have learned assessing their ability to sort through knowledge sift out the pieces that are relevant and apply that knowledge in real situations in various contexts over time

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CU Assessments Exhibitions Self Assessment Students prepare and present public exhibitions of their learning at the end of each term These exhibitions are performance assessments providing opportunities for students to demonstrate achievement of the goals outlined in their learning plans Peers professional mentors field experts academic advisors and general community members attend and provide feedback ing It causes one to be responsible for his her actions sional growth is a focus at College Unbound It academic advisors and professional mentors discussions within cohorts on Monday nights in learning exhibitions and formally in written self evaluation at themselves against the goals and outcomes listed in their learning plan They use the Leadership Change rubrics to evaluate their progress at every step of the learning exhibitions and in the midterm and end semester self evaluation Learning Projects Deliverables Students work with their support team to design learning projects and deliverables that contribute in real ways to their workplace and or community and demonstrate competence in their learning goals they were created are assessed against the outcomes listed in the student learning plan and against the CU Leadership Change rubrics Workplace Assessment student through project development and implementastudent s growth in the personal and professional goals declared in their learning plan Professional Mentors student employee s growth at the end of the semester 33

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CU Glossary Academic Advisor Academic Advisor Meetings Exhibitions the student s Personal Learning Plan and facilitating the Learning Team that supports the student and their work Students meet one on one with their academic advisor at least once each week to partners accountable Students prepare and present public exhibitions of their learning at mid term and at the tunities for students to demonstrate achievement of the competency goals outlined in the general community attend and provide feedback Field Experts Field Experts may be current faculty at a partner university or may be industry experts leaders practitioners with a wealth of experience and knowledge Field Experts will give talks conduct workshops lead discussions and work one on one with Guest Speakers Experts on topics of interest are frequently invited to share their expertise with College Unbound students at Weekly Seminars and special event nights Ideas for speakers spring from current events student personal learning plans project experiences and learning community conversations Learning Outcomes Working together students instructors academic advisors and professional mentors determine the essential learning outcomes required to earn credit Outcomes spring sional goals suggested by members of the learning team Leadership Change Competencies Big 10 College Unbound students develop high levels of competence in intercultural engage ment critical thinking problem solving communication accountability collaboration creativity reflection resilience and advocacy for self and others These skills are woven throughout the student s learning plan and are addressed in Weekly Seminars Evidence of growth in the Big 10 is shared in student learning exhibitions 34

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CU Glossary con t Personal Learning Network Each student is supported by a Personal Learning Network committed to the student s success contributing to and monitoring achievement of the goals in the student s Personal Learning Plan assessing learning outcomes providing resources and acting as sional Mentor Field Experts and peers Personal Learning Plan Each student has a personalized learning plan that considers their interests strengths weaknesses and career aspirations and outlines the necessary steps to achieve the desired degree through workplace learning experiences readings research personal development professional networking seminars technological skills development Prior Learning Assessment traditional classroom setting Learning that parallels learning obtained in traditional university settings may occur through readings work experiences travel volunteer activities hobbies and self directed learning projects Through a CAEL CU partnership students may submit portfolios that highlight their documented verified experiences tied to conten related college course descriptions The Prior Learning Portfolio Development course must be taken before you can submit a portfolio for credit Professional Mentor Professional mentors are professionals who have agreed to supervise students in their workplace or community learning experience These mentors guide students in the work and study of their fields Professional Mentor Meetings Students meet one on one with their professional mentor regularly to discuss progress Program Evaluation provide feedback after each Monday Night Seminar and any events or workshops Students complete a written program evaluation at mid term and the end of each semester Feedback is taken seriously and used to quickly improve the program Self Evaluation in required blog posts discussions with academic advisors and professional mentors discussions within cohorts on Monday nights in learning exhibitions and formally in written self evaluation at mid term and the end of each semester Weekly Seminar analyze personal and professional growth 35

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pursue your passion earn your degree STUDENT RESOURCES

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37 Expert Acknowledges and corrects mistakes identifying and facing up to problems quickly and directly Identifies own role in both problem and solution and has acquires necessary knowledge to correct things Behaviors align with personal beliefs values strengths and limitations of self and others Expresses thoughts and feelings in an honest authentic manner while still maintaining control of emotions and situations Prioritizes life and learning goals appropriately and acts on those prioritizations Creates realistic timelines and schedules for projects follows them and evaluates progress against schedules and goals achievement Fulfills obligations in the time originally allotted or sooner without requiring supervision and reassurance Balances quality of work with meeting deadlines Criteria Demonstrates personal responsibility Practices integrity walks their talk Effectively prioritizes and manages life and learning goals Is accountable for deadlines results and end products Fulfills obligations in the time originally allotted though convinced the quality would improve given time Minimal supervision and reassurance needed Prioritizes life and learning goals appropriately and creates timelines and schedules to honor priorities and accomplish goals Behaves in consistent professional manner Behavior coincides with beliefs and feelings Is honest and authentic with others Acknowledges and corrects mistakes facing up to problems quickly and directly Identifies own role in both problem and solution Practitioner Fulfills obligations with occasional requests for more time for completion Needs some supervision and reassurance Identifies there are varying levels of urgency but does not effectively apply to their own life and learning goals issues Has understanding of own beliefs values strengths and limitations of self others May not always act accordingly Can identify own role in problem but make excuses or want others to fix it Apprentice Accountability College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Sometimes fails to fulfill obligations on time without prior permission to extend Needs regular supervision and direction Cannot identify levels of urgency is too worried or is too blas resulting in inaction Does not have adequate knowledge of own values beliefs strengths and limitations of self others Therefore does not necessarily act in ways that are consistent with values and beliefs in various situations Behavior is often variable Blames others for problems Novice

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38 Anticipates what additional information may be needed and brings that information to seminar appointments in addition to the basic requirements Consistently shows up to seminars appointments ahead of schedule leaving room for emergencies Understands and consistently applies all of the following use of debt calculator planning and managing payment of student loans planning and implementing budget and savings regularly checking credit report and demonstrate a full understanding of the ethical and legal responsibilities concerning student debt Demonstrates preparedness Is punctual and honors meeting commitments Demonstrates financial accountability Openly seeks and responds positively to feedback on strengths and weaknesses Seeks and acquires new competencies methods ideas and information that will improve personal effectiveness Seeks feedback and is open to constructive criticism Understands and consistently applies three of the following use of debt calculator planning and managing payment of student loans planning and implementing budget and savings regularly checking credit report and demonstrate a full understanding of the ethical and legal responsibilities concerning student debt Is consistently on time for seminars appointments Rarely shows up late and always with notification well ahead of time Brings basic information and or materials necessary for seminar appointment Welcomes constructive criticism Asks for and uses feedback to improve performance Understands and consistently applies two of the following use of debt calculator planning and managing payment of student loans planning and implementing budget and savings regularly checking credit report and demonstrate a full understanding of the ethical and legal responsibilities concerning student debt Shows up for all seminars appointments but may be late without notification Occasionally comes to seminar appointments without the necessary information and or materials Recognizes the need for feedback in order to improve but may be uncomfortable with constructive criticism and or may not apply it College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Is aware of and occasionally applies some of the following strategies use of debt calculator planning and managing payment of student loans planning and implementing budget and savings regularly checking credit report and demonstrates basic understanding of the ethical and legal responsibilities concerning student debt Does not show up for seminar appointments and does not notify necessary parties of absence Regularly comes to seminar appointments without the necessary information and or materials Avoids feedback and deflects constructive criticism

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39 Develops and follows a personal plan to achieve short term and long term life and learning goals and uses that plan to advocate negotiate opportunities for him herself Asks for what he she needs using I statements and without blaming others Proposes solutions consistently restating message while maintaining respect for others and keeping emotions under control Actively engages in multiple communities and initiatives Challenges others to work interdependently and accept responsibly for welfare of others Actively negotiates positive change for self and or others clearly seeing both sides of the issue and proposing new processes or parameters that more effectively meet the needs of all stakeholders Makes own decisions about short and long term plans Practices assertive communication Fosters group responsibility of welfare of selves and others Works for positive change Expert Criteria Often proposes new processes or parameters attempting to make change when needs of self and or others aren t met Sees both sides of the issue and uses compromise to move forward when necessary Actively engages in multiple communities Fosters group responsibility for welfare of not only themselves but also others Understands that to perform to fullest potential personal needs and rights must be met Develops and follows a personal plan to achieve short term and long term life and learning goals Practitioner Understands that people groups and communities have the ability to make change when needs aren t met by current processes and parameters May focus on one side of the issue Has membership but not active engagement in multiple communities Recognizes the personal needs of alternate groups Values self and personal needs and rights Establishes personal life and learning goals and works on them in and around a plan that may have been set up by others Apprentice Advocacy for Self and Others College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Accepts current processes and parameters without question Is primarily concerned with seeing that their personal needs are met Limits involvement in other communities Allows others to ignore or violate his her rights Expresses thoughts feelings needs and wants in such an apologetic timid manner that others can easily disregard them Is unaware of personal life and learning goals Allows others to determine his her short and long term plans Novice

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40 Expert Recognizes and uses the special talents of each team member Engages network members to facilitate contributions from each constructively building upon or synthesizing contributions of others and inviting non participants to engage In large and small group discussions always clearly expresses helpful ideas Is a leader in discussion making it effective by asking probing questions making sure everyone is heard and responding thoughtfully to new information and perspectives Spends a large amount of time listening accurately paraphrasing others ideas and asking questions to understand diverse perspectives Remains in control of emotions Addresses conflict directly facilitates discussion of differences between group members and helps to manage resolve it in a way that strengthens overall group cohesiveness Criteria Engages effectively with the members of his her Personal Learning Network Ensures contributions of self and others Objectively listens to dissent and alternate points of view engaging in dialogue rather than debate Negotiates and manages conflict Identifies and acknowledges conflict and stays engaged with it through resolution facilitating discussion of differences between group members Listens to others and can paraphrase another person s idea Understands many different perspectives Almost always remains in control of emotions In large and small group discussions clearly expresses many helpful ideas asks probing questions and responds thoughtfully to new information and perspectives Recognizes and uses the special talents of many network members Engages network members to facilitate contributions by constructively building upon or synthesizing the contributions of others Practitioner Redirects focus toward common ground toward task at hand away from conflict Sometimes listens to others If interested can partially paraphrase another person s idea but the focus is primarily on arguing their own point of view In large and small group discussions sometimes shares helpful ideas Makes the required effort to participate but no more Sometimes expresses ideas clearly asks probing questions and elaborates in response to questions in discussion Recognizes and makes some attempt to use special talents of some network members Engages network members to facilitate contributions by restating the views of other team members and or asking questions for clarification Apprentice Collaboration College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Passively accepts alternate viewpoints ideas opinions Sometimes laughs at puts down or gets angry at the ideas of others Rehearses what to say instead of truly listening Makes little or no attempt to see a different point of view In large and small group discussions rarely shares helpful ideas Participates minimally or not at all Does not ask probing questions express ideas or elaborate in response to questions in discussion Does not recognize or use special talents of network members Engages network members by taking turns and listening to others without interrupting Novice

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41 Offers and receives constructive criticism Seeks opportunities to engage in analysis of own work and the work of peers providing welcoming and using constructive criticism to revise and improve the work Actively participates in feedback sessions and offers many ideas and suggestions to peers Graciously accepts and carefully considers the advice of peers Participates in feedback sessions when required Accurately applies objective criteria in giving feedback May disagree with feedback on their own work without careful consideration College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Is uncomfortable receiving constructive criticism Lacks the knowledge or expertise to adequately critique the work of peers

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42 Expert Demonstrates self awareness in responding to audience expectations and context through effective professional language content media and style Communication is sophisticated Controlling idea is compelling precisely stated appropriately repeated memorable and strongly supported It reflects a nuanced sophisticated understanding of the complexity of the material A variety of types of supporting materials make appropriate reference to information or analysis that significantly supports the controlling idea or establishes credibility authority on the topic Demonstrates skillful use of high quality credible relevant sources to develop ideas that are appropriate for the discipline and genre Uses graceful language that skillfully communicates meaning with clarity and fluency gives a clear picture of the person behind the words and is virtually error free Criteria Uses knowledge of audience and context to shape communication Articulates and defends a compelling controlling idea clearly and effectively Uses sources and evidence effectively Demonstrates control over organization voice word choice and conventions of English Uses straightforward language that conveys meaning and gives a sense of the person behind the words There are few errors in organization word choice or conventions Demonstrates consistent use of credible relevant sources to support ideas that are situated within the discipline and genre Controlling idea is clear and consistent with the supporting material It may reflect a solid but predictable understanding of the material Supporting materials make appropriate reference to information or analysis that generally supports the controlling idea or establishes credibility authority on the topic Demonstrates sound understanding of audience and context through general to formal language content media and style Communication is appropriate but not sophisticated Practitioner Communication generally conveys meaning with clarity although it may include some errors in organization word choice and conventions of English Demonstrates an attempt to use credible and or relevant sources to support ideas appropriate to the discipline and genre Controlling idea is understandable but is not memorable It may be located at the end of the communication or be implicit Supporting materials make appropriate reference to information or analysis that partially supports the presentation or establishes credibility authority on the topic Demonstrates some understanding of audience and context in using generally appropriate language content media and style but may make inappropriate departures into informality or stilted material Apprentice Communication College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Communication sometimes impedes meaning because of errors in organization word choice and conventions of English Demonstrates an attempt to use sources to support ideas Controlling idea is not present or does not control the support If the controlling idea is present insufficient supporting materials explanations examples illustrations statistics analogies quotations from relevant authorities only minimally support the controlling idea and fail to establish credibility authority on the topic Demonstrates little to no understanding of audience and context in language content media or style Communication is frequently marred with inappropriate choices or demonstrates ignorance of context Novice

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43 Chooses a variety of information sources appropriate to the scope and discipline of the research question Selects sources after considering the importance to the researched topic of the multiple criteria used such as relevance to the research question currency authority audience and bias or point of view Students use correctly all of the following information use strategies use of citations and references choice of paraphrasing summary or quoting using information in ways true to original context distinguishing between common knowledge and ideas requiring attribution and demonstrate a full understanding of the ethical and legal restrictions on the use of published confidential and or proprietary information Evaluates Information and its Sources Critically Accesses and Uses Information Ethically and Legally Accesses information using effective well designed search strategies and most appropriate information sources Effectively defines the scope of the research question or thesis Effectively determines key concepts Types of information sources selected directly relate to concepts or answer research question Accesses the Needed Information Determines the Extent of Information Needed Students use correctly three of the following information use strategies use of citations and references choice of paraphrasing summary or quoting using information in ways true to original context distinguishing between common knowledge and ideas requiring attribution and demonstrate a full understanding of the ethical and legal restrictions on the use of published confidential and or proprietary information Accesses information using variety of search strategies and some relevant information sources Demonstrates ability to refine search Chooses a variety of information sources appropriate to the scope and discipline of the research question Selects sources using multiple criteria such as relevance to the research question currency and authority Defines the scope of the research question or thesis completely Can determine key concepts Types of information sources selected relate to concepts or answer research question Students use correctly two of the following information use strategies use of citations and references choice of paraphrasing summary or quoting using information in ways true to original context distinguishing between common knowledge and ideas requiring attribution and demonstrate a full understanding of the ethical and legal restrictions on the use of published confidential and or proprietary information Chooses a variety of information sources Selects sources using basic criteria such as relevance to the research question and currency Defines the scope of the research question or thesis incompletely parts are missing remains too broad or too narrow etc Can determine key concepts Types of information sources selected partially relate to concepts or answer research question Accesses information using simple search strategies retrieves information from limited and similar sources College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Students use correctly one of the following information use strategies use of citations and references choice of paraphrasing summary or quoting using information in ways true to original context distinguishing between common knowledge and ideas requiring attribution and demonstrate a full understanding of the ethical and legal restrictions on the use of published confidential and or proprietary information Chooses a few information sources Selects sources using limited criteria such as relevance to the research question Accesses information randomly retrieves information that lacks relevance and quality Has difficulty defining the scope of the research question or thesis Has difficulty determining key concepts Types of information sources selected do not relate to concepts or answer research question

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44 Integrates alternate divergent or contradictory perspectives or ideas fully Embraces contradictions Perceives or approaches the problem in many different ways Sees novel combinations or new permutations when reviewing the list leading to new ideas Takes the assignment project to a new level Demonstrates a high degree of willingness to take chances defending ideas experimenting predicting and putting plans into action Demonstrates fluency and flexibility in brainstorming Takes risks Extends a novel or unique idea question format or product to create new knowledge or knowledge that crosses boundaries Demonstrates imagination and innovative thinking suggesting new solutions to old problems Expert Criteria Incorporates alternate divergent or contradictory perspectives or ideas in an exploratory way Perceives or approaches the problem in a number of different ways Lists many ideas or responses Incorporates new directions or approaches to the assignment project in the final product Deals with unstructured situations predicts guesses and experiments to a sufficient degree Creates a novel or unique idea question format or product Practitioner Creativity Includes recognizes the value of alternate divergent or contradictory perspectives or ideas in a small way Perceives or approaches the problem in a different way Lists a sufficient number of ideas or responses though may limit the list with early judgments Considers new directions or approaches without going beyond the guidelines of the assignment project Deals with unstructured situations experiments and guesses with assistance Experiments with creating a novel or unique idea question format or product Apprentice College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Acknowledges mentions in passing alternate divergent or contradictory perspectives or ideas Lists a limited number of ideas and responses Stays strictly within the guidelines of the assignment project targeting minimum requirements Reformulates a collection of available ideas Novice

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45 Reconstructs one s beliefs on the basis of wider experience Fair mindedly follows where evidence and reason lead acknowledging and articulating specific changes in beliefs or assumptions Specific position perspective thesis hypothesis is imaginative taking into account the complexities of an issue Limits of position perspective thesis hypothesis are acknowledged Others points of view are synthesized within position perspective thesis hypothesis Develops an informed and effective position based on relevant criteria Identifies and considers the influence of bias and others assumptions Thoroughly systematically and methodically analyzes bias and others assumptions and viewpoints of experts are questioned thoroughly Information is taken from source s with enough interpretation evaluation to develop a comprehensive analysis or synthesis Carefully evaluates the relevance of contexts when presenting a position Accesses analyzes and connects information considering its relationship to context and evidence Expert Criteria Fair mindedly follows where evidence and reason lead Acknowledges that personal beliefs or assumptions have changed Specific position perspective thesis hypothesis takes into account the complexities of an issue Others points of view are acknowledged within position perspective thesis hypothesis Identifies bias and others assumptions and understands that the viewpoints of experts are subject to questioning Information is taken from source s with enough interpretation evaluation to develop a coherent analysis or synthesis Reviews several relevant contexts when presenting a position Practitioner Questions personal views and preconceptions based on evidence and reason Specific position perspective thesis hypothesis acknowledges different sides of an issue Questions some assumptions Viewpoints of experts are taken as mostly fact with some questioning Information is taken from source s with some interpretation evaluation but not enough to develop a coherent analysis or synthesis Identifies several relevant contexts when presenting a position Apprentice Critical Thinking College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Regardless of the evidence or reasons maintains or defends views based on self interest or preconceptions Shows an emerging awareness of present assumptions sometimes labels assertions as assumptions Viewpoints of experts are taken as fact without question Specific position perspective thesis hypothesis is stated but is simplistic and obvious Information is taken from source s without any interpretation evaluation Begins to identify some contexts when presenting a position Novice

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46 Begins to initiate and develop interactions with culturally different others Begins to suspend judgment in valuing her his interactions with culturally different others Open to others values beliefs and behaviors Initiates and develops interactions with culturally different others Suspends judgment in valuing her his interactions with culturally different others Adapts and applies a deep understanding of multiple worldviews experiences lifestyles and power structures while initiating meaningful interaction with other cultures to address significant global problems Open to others Considers multiple worldviews Analyzes substantial connections between the worldviews power structures lifestyles and experiences of multiple cultures historically or in contemporary contexts incorporating respectful interactions with other cultures Practitioner Recognizes new perspectives about own cultural rules and biases e g not looking for sameness comfortable with the complexities that new perspectives offer Expert Articulates insights into own cultural rules and biases e g seeking complexity aware of how her his experiences have shaped these rules and how to recognize and respond to cultural biases resulting in a shift in self description Criteria Understands own cultural identity Explains and connects two or more cultures historically or in contemporary contexts with some acknowledgement of power structures demonstrating respectful interaction with varied cultures and worldviews Expresses openness to most if not all interactions with culturally different others Has difficulty suspending any judgment in her his interactions with culturally different others and is aware of own judgment and expresses a willingness to change Apprentice Identifies own cultural rules and biases e g with a strong preference for those rules shared with own cultural group and seeks the same in others Intercultural Engagement College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Describes the experiences of others historically or in contemporary contexts primarily through one cultural perspective demonstrating some openness to varied cultures and worldviews Receptive to interacting with culturally different others Has difficulty suspending any judgment in her his interactions with culturally different others but is unaware of own judgment Novice Shows minimal awareness of own cultural rules and biases even those shared with own cultural group s e g uncomfortable with identifying possible cultural differences with others

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47 Actively advances social justice Works actively to advance social justice and equity Demonstrates ability and commitment to collaboratively work across and within community contexts and structures to achieve social justice Demonstrates ability and commitment to work actively within community contexts and structures to achieve social justice Demonstrates experience identifying intentional ways to participate in community contexts and structures Experiments with civic contexts and structures tries out a few to see what fits College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Challenges Challenges misconceptions Makes it clear that racial Uses language and behavior Recognizes biased language cultural ethnic religious or sexual that is non biased and and behaviors prejudices and injustices in misperceptions order to influence and or jokes or slurs or any actions inclusive of all people implement positive change that demean any person or regardless of race ethnicity sex disabilities sexual Works collectively with others group will not be tolerated Addresses such orientation class age and supports efforts that combat prejudice harassment misconceptions promptly religion or other identities discrimination exclusion and setting an example for others oppression in all its forms

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48 Demonstrates the ability to construct a clear and insightful problem statement with evidence of all relevant contextual factors Questions are focused make use of the issues concepts related to the problem display original thought and clearly target the root of the problem Identifies multiple approaches for solving the problem that apply within a specific context Seeks advice of those who have solved similar problems Identifies and defines the problem Asks the right questions Identifies strategies for solving the problem Implements the solution in a manner that addresses thoroughly and deeply multiple contextual factors of the problem Reviews results relative to the problem defined with thorough specific considerations of need for further work Implements solution Evaluates outcomes Proposes one or more solutions that indicate a deep comprehension of the problem and its contextual factors as well as all of the following ethical logical and cultural dimensions Carefully examines feasibility and weighs impacts of solution Proposes evaluates and selects from among alternative solutions Expert Criteria Reviews results in terms of the problem defined with little if any consideration of need for further work Reviews results relative to the problem defined with some consideration of need for further work Implements the solution in a manner that addresses the problem statement but may ignore relevant contextual factors Proposes one solution that is off the shelf rather than individually designed to address the specific contextual factors of the problem Gives little attention to feasibility or impact Identifies only a single approach for solving the problem that applies within a specific context Questions consider surrounding issues and identify a focus though may address symptoms rather than the root of the problem Begins to demonstrate the ability to identify and state the problem with evidence of many relevant contextual factors but problem statement is superficial Apprentice Implements the solution in a manner that addresses multiple contextual factors of the problem in a surface manner Proposes one or more solution that indicates comprehension of the problem and its contextual factors as well as the one of the following ethical logical or cultural dimensions Adequately examines feasibility and weighs impacts of solution Identifies multiple approaches for solving the problem some may not apply within a specific context Questions are focused demonstrate understanding of the issues concepts related to the problem and target the root of the problem Demonstrates the ability to identify and state the problem with evidence of most relevant contextual factors and adequate detail Practitioner Problem Solving College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Reviews results superficially in terms of the problem defined with no consideration of need for further work Implements the solution in a manner that does not directly address the problem statement Proposes a solution that is difficult to evaluate because it is vague or only indirectly addresses the problem statement Does not consider feasibility or impact Identifies one or more approaches for solving the problem that do not apply within a specific context Questions are too broad or too narrow neglect surrounding issues and do not help to focus the problem Demonstrates a limited ability in identifying and stating the problem and its relevant contextual factors Novice

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49 Applies their core beliefs strengths weaknesses as well as personal interaction and learning styles consistently using selfawareness to achieve success Uses selfawareness to guide choices and behaviors Thinks before stating conclusions Forms a vision of the product plan of action or goal considering consequences and alternatives Actions are thoughtful and deliberate Manages impulsivity Engages in critical criticism of personal knowledge skills and process and offers alternatives for future practice Engages in honest selfappraisal analyzing performance with the goal of improving Self selects and explores a topic in depth yielding fresh insight and or little known information indicating intense interest in the subject Reviews prior learning past experiences inside and outside of the classroom in depth to reveal significantly changed perspectives about educational and life experiences which provide foundation for expanded knowledge growth and maturity over time Connects learning experiences and growth acknowledging and articulating changed perspectives Displays curiosity Expert Criteria Articulates core beliefs strengths weaknesses interaction and learning styles and often uses that knowledge to set self up for success Usually thinks before drawing and stating conclusions considering consequences and alternatives Actions are usually thoughtful and deliberate Self selects and explores a topic in depth yielding a rich awareness and information indicating interest in the subject Engages in critical criticism of personal knowledge skills and process in order to inform future progress Reviews prior learning past experiences inside and outside of the classroom in depth revealing fully clarified meanings or indicating broader perspectives about educational or life events Practitioner Reflection Aware of core beliefs strengths weaknesses and personal interaction and learning styles Can understand why certain situations are more comfortable than others Delays speaking writing before considering alternatives but too frequently draws conclusions before fully understanding the problem Self selects and explores a topic with some evidence of depth providing occasional insight and or information indicating mild interest in the subject Reflects critically on learning experiences in order to inform future progress Reviews prior learning past experiences inside and outside of the classroom with some depth revealing slightly clarified meanings or indicating a somewhat broader perspective about educational or life events Apprentice College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Aware of personal strengths and weaknesses Usually blurts the first answer that comes to mind Fails to consider alternatives and makes judgments before fully understanding the problem Self selects and explores a topic at a surface level providing little insight and or information beyond the very basic facts indicating low level interest in the subject Reflects on learning experiences but does not connect to future progress Reviews prior learning past experiences inside and outside of the classroom at a surface level without revealing clarified meaning or indicating a broader perspective about educational or life events Novice

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50 Stays on task no matter how difficult it is to find the answers to problems Evaluates the use of a variety of strategies to solve the problem Searches for and draws on wide range of resources Shifts priorities in response to the changing demands of a situation Plans ahead but has alternative options in case things go wrong or alternate decisions are made Easily seeks and offers help according to knowledge of strengths and weaknesses in self and others Uses interdependence to achieve common goals Independently breaks complex tasks into manageable steps Sets mini targets for daily weekly accomplishments Frequently evaluates progress along the way adjusts as necessary and celebrates wins Is almost always able to laugh at self Has the ability to perceive situations from an original interesting and more positive vantage point Challenges self to remain playful and find the whimsical and unexpected in potentially tense situations Persists in finding necessary resources to accomplish goals Demonstrates flexibility and adapts readily to change Uses humor to maintain perspective Breaks an initially complex task into manageable steps Develops and accesses a system of supports Expert Criteria Is usually able to laugh at self Usually has the ability to perceive situations from an original interesting and more positive vantage point Understands and uses humor appropriately as a coping tool Independently breaks complex tasks into manageable steps Sets mini targets for daily weekly accomplishments Evaluates progress along the way and adjusts as necessary Seeks to discover strengths and weaknesses of self and others and doesn t hesitate to use that knowledge to seek or offer help when needed Shifts priorities in response to the changing demands of a situation Adjusts resources tasks and schedule as needed Stays on task when trying to find answers or solutions to problems Draws on available resources Practitioner Resilience Not yet able to laugh at self but can see situations from a more positive vantage point when encouraged to do so With assistance can break the larger task into smaller components and schedule their completion Recognizes strengths and weaknesses of self and others and offers help once a need is identified Looks for ways to make changes work rather than identifying why changes won t work Tries to complete tasks when the answers or solutions are not readily available but gives up when task is too difficult Gets off task easily Draws on limited range of resources Apprentice College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Finds humor in all the wrong and inappropriate places such as human differences and ineptitude Unable to laugh at self Task appears so complicated he she doesn t know where to begin Works independently without consideration of strengths and weaknesses rarely asking for or offering help Clings to the original plan process when circumstances change Gives up easily and quickly on difficult tasks Is unaware of resources Novice

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51 Enjoys learning Enjoys figuring things out independently Challenges self to be a lifelong learner Is curious about the world around them Looks for problems to solve Enjoys learning Is curious about the world around them Looks for problems to solve Occasionally challenges self to figure things out independently Is not yet very curious about the world around them College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18 Is a passive learner Avoids challenging courses tasks readings asking When am I ever going to use this

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52 Chooses and uses learning resources appropriate to situation Chooses a variety of information sources appropriate to the scope and discipline of the research question Selects sources after considering the importance to the researched topic of the multiple criteria used such as relevance to the research question currency authority audience and bias or point of view Adapts and applies independently skills abilities theories or methods gained in one situation to new situations to solve difficult problems or explore complex issues in original ways Transfers skills theories and methods applicable to their work Chooses a variety of information sources appropriate to the scope and discipline of the research question Selects sources using multiple criteria such as relevance to the research question currency and authority Adapts and applies skills abilities theories or methods gained in one situation to new situations to solve problems or explore issues Chooses a variety of information sources Selects sources using basic criteria such as relevance to the research question and currency Uses skills abilities theories or methods gained in one situation in a new situation to contribute to understanding of problems or issues Chooses a few information sources Selects sources using limited criteria such as relevance to the research question Uses in a basic way skills abilities theories or methods gained in one situation in a new situation When prompted presents examples facts or theories from more than one field of study or perspective When prompted connects examples facts or theories from more than one field of study or perspective Identifies connections between life experiences and those academic texts and ideas perceived as similar and related to own interests Novice Compares life experiences and academic knowledge to infer differences as well as similarities and acknowledge perspectives other than own Apprentice Independently connects examples facts or theories from more than one field of study or perspective Makes connections across subject areas and perspectives Independently synthesizes or draws conclusions by combining examples facts or theories from more than one field of study or perspective Effectively selects and develops examples of life experiences drawn from a variety of contexts e g family life artistic participation civic involvement work experience to illuminate concepts theories frameworks of fields of study Meaningfully synthesizes connections among experiences outside of the formal classroom including life experiences and academic experiences to deepen understanding of fields of study and to broaden own points of view Makes connections to experience Practitioner Expert Workplace and World Lab Integrated and Applied Learning Criteria College Unbound Leadership and Change Competencies v3 5 18

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Professional Mentor Agreement The Professional Mentor is a vital part of the Personal Learning Network of each College Unbound student The Professional Mentor is the professional who holds the experience and knowledge associated with the student s selected area of interest That interest is at the center of the student s college requirements A Professional Mentor provides students with first hand professional guidance that makes the college work relevant to the real world Each College Unbound student has a Personal Learning Network comprised of the following Student Academic Advisor Professional Mentor Peers Additional subject area experts The student works with each member of their Team as they address their college requirements The main attributes of a Professional Mentor include Appreciates the value of a Mentor in providing guidance and input in a student s work Enjoys providing suggestion to a willing Mentee to enhance their project work Has expertise in the workplace or with the project that the student develops It is the student s responsibility to do the following with the Professional Mentor Explain the structure and goals of the College Unbound program Share his or her goals and college requirements with the Professional Mentor Identify and develop a project that is outside the realm of his or her regular work but will also benefit the workplace or the larger community It is the responsibility of The College Unbound Academic Liaison to Support the PM in their role as the student s mentor Connect with the PM on an agreed upon scheduled basis to reinforce their support Assure the student s effective communication with the PM Request the PM s appropriate expertise in helping the student develop the project 53

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AGREEMENT As a Professional Mentor I agree to provide support and guidance to the College Unbound student in the course of his or her college work This support includes Guidance in identifying an appropriate workplace project that will be the core of the student s Learning Plan Guidance and support in reviewing the project plan including the multiple stages toward its development and potential implementation Review of the project at specified stages Meetings with the student in an agreed upon schedule but no less than twice a month Communication with the Academic Advisor personally in phone meeting OR in email in an agreed upon schedule but no less than twice a month Attendance and participation in the student s exhibition of their work at the college at least once per semester the day and time to be provided in advance by the student Student Name _______________________________________________________ Workplace _______________________________________________________ PM name print _______________________________________________________ PM s role in the organization _______________________________________________________ PM contact info email ________________________________________________________________ phone ______________________________________________________________ I have read and understand the responsibilities of the Professional Mentor in the College Unbound program and agree to mentor student s name ______________________________________ for the __________________ semester of the 2013 14 school year _____________________________________________ _________________________________ Signature Date Please attach a personal bio or resume with this form 54

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Workplace Assessment Student Name ____________________________________________ Date ____________________________________________________ College Unbound is based on the principle that we all learn best when we re invested in what we re learning when we have a personal interest and when our work has the potential for real world outcomes To this end College Unbound students identify and develop projects that are related to their interests and that may ultimately be implemented in the workplace or the community We ask Professional Mentors to assess their mentee s work in these areas as s he worked on the project Yes No Can t Assess Project Identification Worked with mentors and others in workplace to identify a viable project Sought input from field experts Was able to articulate a particular need the project would support Project Planning Laid out the stages needed to develop the project Laid out the research and resources needed for each stage of the project Set up timelines for each stage of the project Project Development Followed the stages laid out in the plan Evaluated each stage as it was developed Adjusted the stages as evaluated added or deleted steps Used the expertise of others to carry out the plan Completed the project or took it to the appropriate level of completion College Unbound Lifelong Learning Competencies As a Professional Mentor you have had the opportunity to work with a College Unbound student both before and during their College Unbound experience Please consider growth in your mentee s performance that you would attribute to his or her college experience Attached is a brief description of each of the Big 10 skills to aid your assessment Some growth Reflection Resilience Collaboration Creativity Communication Critical Thinking Applied Knowledge Accountability Advocacy for Self and Others Problem Solving 55 Significant No growth observed change

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The College Unbound Posted Weekly Reflection I don t know what I think until I try to write it down Joan Didion I write because I don t know what I think until I read what I say Flannery O Connor Habit rules the unreflecting herd William Wordsworth reflection r fl k n n 1 something reflected or the image so produced as by a mirror 2 mental concentration careful consideration 3 a thought or opinion resulting from such consideration The CU Weekly Reflection is all of these things It is time to look back on the week and see yourself your actions your thinking reflected back at you It is time to carefully concentrate and consider those actions and that thinking analyzing personal growth and progress and determining next steps Why a written weekly reflection Writing is a thinking tool Posting a personal weekly reflection provides space to explore your ideas both personally and in community Posting regularly improves your fluency as a thinker as a writer and as a member of a learning community Posting a weekly reflection and engaging with the weekly reflections of others fosters both collaboration and intellectual curiosity a big part of what College Unbound is all about CU Weekly Reflections make your thinking visible for yourself your academic advisor and your classmates They help you pay attention to your changing ideas and to figure out next steps At CU learning is transformational paying attention to how you know and what you know Weekly Reflection Requirements Set aside a minimum of one hour per week to maintain your own posts and interact with the posts of College Unbound classmates on The CN Once per week post a reflection about your current progress toward answering the essential question s for your semester project s Possible posts include answering the following Did you discover new information that surprised you Did you refine your question in some way Did you have a terrific learning experience Are you stuck or puzzled by something you discovered Did you find a terrific resource that you want to post Do you just need space to think through an idea and explore multiple perspectives Did you have a break through or difficulty in applying one or more of the Big 10 to your project attempting a creative innovation learning from failure accessing your system of supports negotiate and manage conflict in a collaboration manage your time and workload in a unique way At least once per week respond to two classmates posts React to their thinking Ask them a question Share a resource with them Proofread your writing While we do not expect your posts to contain perfect polished writing it is at least semi public and you must communicate clearly That means writing in complete sentences cleaning up spelling paying attention to punctuation and capital letters and paragraphing like ideas Academic advisors will respond to their students posts at least once per week CU Weekly Reflection Expectations 56

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CU Weekly Reflections make your thinking visible for yourself your academic liaison and your classmates They help you pay attention to your changing ideas and to figure out next steps At CU learning is transformational and that means we pay as much attention to how you know as to what you know The weekly reflection ensures that you engage with your Personal Learning Plan weekly and update it to reflect your current questions and tasks A quality reflection is Honest Thoughtful Useful A snapshot of what you are thinking right now about your progress A quality reflection does what it needs to do at the time it s posted Considers the Big 10 Lifelong Learning Competencies though they may not always be mentioned Considers the goals from the student s personal learning plan Addresses new questions and new tasks Considers accessing supports advisor mentor field experts peers Celebrates successes Shares failures Poses and solves problems Asks for help Reminds the writer of their goals and personal accountability Provides practice and builds fluency in clearly sharing ideas Builds community with other learners 57

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Samples CU Weekly Reflection January 25 2013 I had a break through today on my project Figured out that my essential question was not specific enough I was asking Is it possible to change an organization s culture That s really a Yes NO kind of question I just read Bob Kegan s Immunity to Change and now my question is How can I use the processes from Kegan s Immunity to Change to change the culture at LivCo from a top down organization to a learning organization I m excited about this If I could create a clear plan I think my professional mentor would be excited Staff morale sucks at LivCo Nobody thinks their ideas matter because the big boss is just going to tell them what we re going to do Maybe my question should include something about changing morale Improving culture instead of changing it I wonder if I could actually talk to Bob Kegan Tracy says she knows him I wonder if she could introduce me I will ask her January 30 2013 I am so frustrated I am registered for Organizational Theory and Management and the articles that Tracy posted don t match what I m trying to do It seems like she wants me to look at leadership skills in general I know it takes a good leader to run an organization but right now I want to focus specifically on how you change a negative culture to a positive one I guess I could make it fit and use the leadership tips and apply them how a good leader would influence culture But the articles don t really give me specifics and I don t know enough There have to be better resources out there One of the goals in my learning plan is to do better research I m going to get on Google Scholar tonight and see if someone has studied how to change an organization s culture I think this is self advocacy Instead of just accepting the articles I ve been given I am going to ask if I can substitute better ones She might say no but at least I am going to try February 5 2013 Great talk with Bob Kegan today He is amazing He told me about a YouTube video he did awhile back that really explains Immunity to Change I will put the link here http www youtube com watch v FFYnVmGu9ZI This will be good to share with my mentor so he really gets what I am talking about Bob says that we are on the right track starting with the mission vision Most of the LivCo supervisors can t even say clearly what we stand for what we want to accomplish down the road I did interview three of them last week I met the deadline in my learning plan and it was pretty clear they all see it differently Bob said we can t trans form our organization until we understand the form of our organization Brilliant I need to find some examples of how other companies have reshaped their mission mission 58

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College Unbound Learning Exhibition Welcome to our learning exhibitions We are delighted to have you with us and appreciate your participation in student learning We encourage you to question the students about their learning contribute to the discussion and provide feedback Following are some reminders about the purpose of exhibitions what they are what they aren t and the kinds of information they provide Exhibitions require a student to attempt to clearly articulate their learning Exhibitions are an opportunity to test ideas with a larger public with their CU cohort the general public their professional mentor and experts in the field Exhibitions are one piece of a much larger whole They do not describe all of a student s learning Rather they provide a snapshot a student s decisions about key insights key learning key experiences and their analysis of personal growth Remember that the exhibition is for the student to share their learning and for the participants to probe and help the student clarify their thinking It is more appropriate for participants to ask questions and discuss than to advise and instruct Again we value your presence and trust that you will enjoy the experience Thank you College Unbound Staff and Students Need help framing a probing question Try one of the following Why do you think this is the case What criteria did you use to What would have to change in order for When have you done experienced something What do you wish like this before What s another way you might What might you see happening if What would it look like if How did you decide determine conclude What do you think would happen if What is your hunch about How was different from What was your intention when What sort of an impact do you think What do you assume to be true about 59 61

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What and How to Prepare Review your learning plan project Be selective about the important relevant pieces to share Artifacts of your work Include samples evidence and assessments of the work completed or in progress associated with the deliverables you ve outlined in your learning plan photos transcript of an interview you conducted video forms materials machines drafts annotated bibliography of the things you ve read activities related to your work Use examples from the discussion board to talk through your interactions with your cohort Rehearse so that you know you will meet your time limit and appear confident Exhibition Goals To assess your progress around term one and program wide learning goals To demonstrate your academic as well as personal growth and development to date To receive feedback and suggestions for going deeper into your learning To showcase and share the work that you are doing To get a clear sense of the work and support needed for the remainder of the semester Who Attends Academic Advisors Members of your cohort and other CU peers Professional Mentors Community Members Field Experts Participant Responsibilities Ask insightful open ended questions Provide specific constructive feedback that will help the presenter go deeper into their work You did well is not specific constructive feedback Tips Remember This is a presentation of what and how you learned how you ve grown It is not just a listing of what you did Be yourself Talk honestly about your journey Talk about your learning plan as a whole rather than chunking it up into course equivalents and workplace learning e g I am working toward a degree in Early Childhood Education I have a passion for making sure that all children have access to an excellent education My particular passion is advocating for and providing services for undocumented children so I have developed a project plan that will My work at allows me to You will see that this semester I am applying principles Organizational Theory and Management as I and you ll see evidence that I am working on my communication and collaboration skills by Evaluation Make sure to convey Evidence of self reflection Evidence of your participation in the CN Evidence of Learning Plan goals met Attendance Participation in seminar 53 61 Evidence of progress in The Big 10 Ability to demonstrate progress toward completing Course and Personal Outcomes deliverables outlined in your learning plan

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Your exhibition will be allotted a total of 35 minutes 15 Minutes Your Presentation Introduce your Professional Mentor and any visitors Distribute your Learning Plan and appropriate artifacts and deliverables Provide participants with a focus for feedback For example I am looking for feedback concerning my process and next steps I would appreciate feedback on my oral presentation skills clarity pacing interacting with the audience I will be asking you for your input about where to go from here how I can take this work to the next level Use slides e g PowerPoint Prezi to highlight the key points of your presentation as you share your change goals and progress your project s your learning plan including career personal and Big 10 goals as well as course equivalents Provide an overview of the semester accomplishments challenges and what you expect to do as you move forward 5 Minutes Probing questions Participants ask questions to help the presenter think more deeply about their work Why do you think What do you wish What do you think would happen if What s another way you might How was different from Why did you choose What is the connection between and What evidence do you have that 10 Minutes Participant Critical Response Statements of Meaning The presenter steps back and takes notes while the participants 1 provide the requested feedback facilitator may need to remind and 2 share what was meaningful about what they just heard Statements of meaning examples It was meaningful for me when It surprised me when I got excited when My thinking was challenged when 5 Minutes Debrief facilitator leads Presenter comments on what he she learned from the participants Group comments on process Presenter thanks group for their participation in his her learning 52 62

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Pocket Guide to Probing Questions The distinction between clarifying questions and probing questions can be difficult to understand for participants new to exhibitions So is the distinction between probing questions and recommendations for action The basic distinctions are Clarifying Questions are simple questions of fact They clarify the dilemma and provide the nuts and bolts They have brief factual answers and don t provide any new food for thought for the presenter The presenter doesn t have to think much before responding Some examples of clarifying questions How much time does the project take How were the members invited What resources did you have available for this project Probing Questions are intended to help the presenter think more deeply about the issue at hand If a probing question doesn t have that effect it is either a clarifying question or a recommendation with an upward inflection at the end If you find yourself saying Don t you think you should you ve gone beyond probing questions The presenter often doesn t have a ready answer to a genuine probing question Hints for crafting probing questions Try the following questions and or question stems Why do you think this is the case What criteria did you use to What would have to change in order for When have you done experienced What do you wish something like this before What s another way you might What might you see happening if What would it look like if How did you decide determine conclude What do you think would happen if What is your hunch about How was different from What was your intention when What sort of an impact do you think What do you assume to be true about Example At a CU exhibition you just heard your colleague share his research and plan for the company to spend less money on duplicating costs As a participant at the exhibition you are preparing to respond to what you heard You could Make a recommendation that implies judgment This is not a good idea 1 You could have called a staff meeting and had them come up with solutions rather than provide the team with answers right away Make a recommendation disguised as a probing question Sneaky Also not a good idea 2 What would happen if you called a staff meeting and asked them to brainstorm possible solutions Ask a real probing question 3 How do you think staff view this problem What might they want to see happen Ask an even better probing question 4 What would have to change for staff to see themselves as part of the solution 6362

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Since probing questions are the hardest to create productively we offer the following suggestions Check to see if you have a right answer in mind If so delete the judgment from the question or don t ask it Refer to the presenter s original question focus point What did s he ask for your help with Check your probing questions for relevance Check to see if you are asserting your own agenda If so return to the presenter s agenda Sometimes a simple why asked as an advocate for the presenter s success can be very effective as can several why questions asked in a row Try using verbs What do you fear Want Get Assume Expect Think about the concentric circles of comfort risk and danger Use these as a barometer Don t avoid risk but don t push the presenter into the danger zone Remember There is a difference between offering feedback and asking probing questions Your classmate will also be asking for a specific kind of feedback at his or her exhibition For example she may ask you to offer feedback on the process she used during her project or for specific feedback on the quality of her presentation It is important to provide that feedback In addition it is important to ask probing questions that take them someplace deeper someplace they might not think to go unless you asked them about it In summary good probing questions are general and widely useful different expertise don t place blame on anyone avoid yes no responses allow for multiple responses are usually brief help create a paradigm shift elicit a slow response empower the person with the dilemma to move thinking from reaction to reflection solve his or her own problem rather encourage taking another party s perspective than deferring to someone with greater or 64 63

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The Writing Process Each of us has a speaking voice even when we write Our readers hear us clearly when we care about our ideas write from our hearts choose and order words as only we can Following a process ensures that voice is heard STRATEGIES accessing prior knowledge establishing purpose identifying audience formulating questions understanding criteria for task STAGES PROCESSES discuss out loud read more about your topic list map key words ideas draw role play free write organize classify outline major points supporting details PREWRITING Discovering What You Have to Say considering organization considering voice considering word choice DRAFTING discovering how your writing is received rereading with audience purpose focus questions and criteria in mind noting deficiencies in organization clarity details tone FEEDBACK Saying It refer frequently to your prewrite follow your road map keep asking What am I trying to say keep asking How will my audience see understand this share with at least two readers share purpose intended audience ask specific questions about organization clarity details tone evaluate validity usefulness of feedback Hearing What Others Think You Said seeing the writing with new eyes reaffirming or strengthening purpose REVISING Clarifying Your Message add facts details eliminate unnecessary details and redundancies reorganize rephrase for clarity tone style and coherence save all drafts prewrites as you may change your mind about phrasing rereading with standard English conventions in mind choosing the appropriate place to publish seeing the writing through the eyes of the intended audience EDITING Ensuring That What You Want to Say Can Be Easily Read PUBLISHING Sharing With a Wider Audience 6564 correct paragraphing correct grammar usage correct spelling correct capitalization correct punctuation blog website portfolio cohort share

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6 Traits of Writing IDEAS AND CONTENT Is the writing clear focused and interesting Do main ideas stand out with good support What this looks like Writing has strong developed main ideas relevant rich supporting details Writing is exceptionally clear throughout and holds the reader s attention throughout ORGANIZATION Does organization enhance the central idea Is the piece sequential Does it have a strong beginning middle and end Are there effective transitions What this looks like The organization enhances the central idea and its development Written work has a strong inviting beginning and strong satisfying closure Smooth effective transitions and sequencing are noted in the work The order and structure are compelling VOICE Does the topic come to life Does the writing convey feelings convictions and personality Does the writing make you feel something What this looks like Writing demonstrates an exceptional sense of audience topic and purpose It is engaging original and appropriate to the task The author communicates a deep commitment to the topic WORD CHOICE Do the words convey the intended message Are the words interesting precise natural Are they carefully chosen placed for impact What this looks like Message is conveyed in an exceptionally interesting precise and yet natural way Expression is original with rich deep powerful range of words SENTENCE FLUENCY Does the writing have an effective flow rhythm Are the sentences strong w varied structures that make reading easy enjoyable What this looks like Writer uses extensive variation in sentence structure which flows and has rhythm Sentence structure is used to draw attention to key ideas TextWrite demonstrates strong control CONVENTIONS Does the writing demonstrate control over punctuation spelling and grammar What this looks like Writer demonstrates exceptional control over conventions There are no noticeable errors in grammar punctuation or spelling There is very little or no need for editing 66 65

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General global information provides the big picture and makes the reader long for specifics Well focused Information blends with repetitive points trivia or meanderings The writer draws on some personal experience but too often settles for generalities or clich d thinking Unneeded Information may eat up space that should have gone to important details Where s the balance The main topic is still unclear out of focus or not yet known even to the writer Missing limited or unrelated details require the reader to fill in many blanks Lists of factlets may be substituted for true development Everything seems as important as everything else the reader to make inferences Readers will likely notice more than one of these problems 1 Sketchy loosely focused information forces defining a topic or mapping out a story line It is easy to see where the paper is headed though more expansion is needed to complete the picture 3 The writer has made a solid beginning in The writer selectively chooses just the right information to make the paper understandable enlightening and interesting without bogging down in trivia Details work together to expand the main topic or develop a story giving the whole piece a strong sense of focus The writer s knowledge experience insight or unique perspective lends the writing a satisfying ring of authenticity The amount of detail is just right not skimpy not overwhelming As yet there is no clear sense of direction to carry the reader from point to point No real lead sets up what follows No real conclusion wraps things up Missing or unclear transitions force the reader to make giant leaps Sequencing feels more random than purposeful leaving the reader with a sense of being adrift The writing does not mover purposefully toward any main message or turning point together Readers will likely notice more than one of these problems 1 Ideas details or events seem loosely strung Sequencing of main ideas seems reasonably appropriate the reader rarely if ever feels lost Transitions are usually present but sometimes a little too obvious or too structured Structure may be so dominant or predictable that it literally smothers the ideas and voice Information is mostly presented in an orderly if not quite compelling fashion The tone and flavor or the piece are Inappropriate for the topic purpose and or audience The writer does not seem to reach out to the audience or to anticipate their interests and needs Though It may communicate on a functional level the writing takes no risks and does not engage energize or move the reader The writer does not project personal enthusiasm for the topic or make it come alive for the reader audience or both as a result the text may lack life spirit or energy Readers are likely to notice one or more of these problems 1 The writer seems definitely distanced from topic The tone and flavor of the piece could be altered slightly to better fit the topic purpose or audience The writer has not quite found his her voice but is experimenting and the result is pleasant or Intriguing if not unique The writer occasionally speaks right to the audience The writer often seems reluctant to let go holding Individuality passion and spontaneity In check Nevertheless voice pops out on occasion The writer is there then gone communicate with the reader on a functional if distant level reader to move through the text without undue confusion The tone and flavor of the piece fit the topic purpose and audience well The writing bears the clear imprint of this writer The writer seems to know his her audience and shows a strong concern for their informational needs and Interests Narrative text is open and honest Expository or persuasive text is provocative lively and designed to hold a reader s attention 3 The writer seems sincere and willing to The entire piece has a strong sense of direction and balance Main ideas or key points stand out clearly An inviting lead draws the reader in a satisfying conclusion ties up loose ends Details seem to fit right where they are placed making the text easy to follow and understand Transitions are strong but natural Pacing feels natural and effective the writer knows just when to linger over details a when to get moving Organization flows so smoothly the reader does not need to think about it drive the writing making the text lively expressive and engaging VOICE 5 The writer s energy and passion for the subject 3 The organizational structure allows the of the piece is compelling and guides the reader purposefully through the text developed and enhanced by the kind of detail that keeps readers reading ORGANIZATION 5 The order presentation or internal structure IDEA DEVELOPMENT 5 The writing is clear well supported or College Unbound Writing Rubric

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The writer s message is remarkably clear and easy to interpret Phrasing is original even memorable yet the language is never overdone Lively verbs lend the writing power Striking words or phrases linger in the writer s memory often prompting connections reflective thoughts or insights Most words are correct and adequate even if not striking A memorable phrase here or there strikes a spark leaving the reader hungry for more Familiar words and phrases give the text an old couch kind of feel Attempts at colorful language are full of promise even when they lack restraint or control Jargon may be mildly annoying but it does not impede readability General meaning is clear but the brush it too broad to convey subtleties Vague words and phrases She was nice It was wonderful The new budget had impact convey only the most general sorts of messages Clich s or redundant phrases encourage the reader to skim not linger Words are used incorrectly The bus impelled into the hotel Inflated or jargonistic language makes the text ponderous and uninviting The reader has trouble grasping the writer s intended message The writer struggles with a limited vocabulary or uses language that simply does not speak to the intended audience Readers will likely notice more than one of these problems 1 workable manner It gets the job done 3 The language communicates in a routine Sentences are mostly grammatical and easy to read aloud given a little rehearsal Graceful natural phrasing intermingles with more mechanical structure More variation in length and structure would enhance fluency Some purposeful sentence beginnings aid the reader s interpretation of the text Fragments may be present Irregular or unusual word patterns make it hard to tell where the sentences begin and end Ideas are hooked together by numerous connectives and but so then to create one gangly endless sentence Short choppy sentences bump the reader through the text Repetitive sentence patterns put the reader to sleep Transitions are either missing or so overdone they become distracting The reader must often pause and reread for meaning Fragments if used seem accidental they do not work takes practice Readers will likely notice more than one of these problems 1 A fair interpretive oral reading of this text 3 The text hums along with a steady beat Sentences are well crafted with a strong and varied structure that invites expressive oral reading Purposeful sentence beginnings show how each sentence relates and builds on the one before The writing has cadence as if the reader hears the beat in his or her head Sentences vary in both structure and length making the reading pleasant and natural Fragments if used add style text a delight to read aloud 5 An easy flow and sentence sense make this strong clear and complete picture in the readers mind SENTENCE FLUENCY 5 Precise vivid natural language paints a WORD CHOICE Errors are sufficiently frequent and or serious enough to be distracting it is hard for the reader to focus on ideas organization or voice The reader may need to read once to decode then again to interpret and respond to the text The paper reads like a rough first draft scribbled hastily without thought for conventions Extensive editing would be required to prepare the text for publication over widely used conventions Readers are likely to notice one or more of these problems 1 The writer demonstrates limited control even There are enough errors to distract an attentive reader however errors do not seriously impair readability or obscure meaning It is easy enough for an experienced reader to get through the text but the writing clearly needs polishing The paper reads much like a second rough draft readable but lacking close attention to conventions Moderate editing would be required to get the text ready for publication most widely used writing conventions creating text that is adequately readable 3 The writer shows reasonable control over the Errors are so few and so minor that a reader can easily overlook them unless searching for them specifically The text appears clean edited and polished Older writers grade 6 up create text of sufficient length and complexity to demonstrate control of conventions appropriate for age and experience The text is easy to mentally process there is nothing to distract or confuse a reader Only light touch ups would be required to polish the text for publication wide range of standard writing conventions and uses them with accuracy and when appropriate creativity to enhance meaning 5 The writer shows excellent control over a CONVENTIONS

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pursue your passion earn your degree Student Policies

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Grading System Any student taking courses from College Unbound are subject to the following grading policies Instructors will use the following grading system A A B B B C C C D D F The instructor must explain the grading system in the course syllabus and must apply it to all the students in the class Grade point average GPA All letter grades are assigned a grade point value according to the following table Grade Grade Points for Each Semester Hour A Superior 4 00 A 3 67 B 3 33 B Above Average 3 00 B 2 67 C 2 33 C Average 2 00 C 1 67 D 1 33 D Below Average 1 00 F Failing 0 FX Administrative Fail 0 The instructor in lieu of a grade of F assigns FX Administrative Fail when a student never attended or ceased attending the class rendering an assessment of academic performance impossible Instructors will be asked to provide the last date of attendance The following grades may appear on your transcript or permanent record however they will not affect your grade point average AUS Audit Successful AUU Audit Unsuccessful IP In Progress N Nonpass P Pass The following marks may also appear on your transcript or permanent record They are not grades and except for the second grade only option will not affect your grade point average I Incomplete O No grade reported You can calculate your grade point average by dividing the total number of grade points you have earned by the total number of credit hours you have taken excluding courses 69

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with grades of AUS AUU IP N P or marks of I O For example if you are a first year student who has completed the following coursework and earned the following grades English 102 3 s h A Gateway 3 s h B Intro to IOC 3 s h A Workplace Lab I 3 s h C your total number of grade points would equal 39 because 4 x 3 3 00 x 3 4 00 x 3 1 67 x 3 38 Your GPA would be 3 2 because 38 12 3 2 In other words for each course you ve taken multiply the appropriate grade points you earned by the number of semester hours in each course then add up all the grade points you ve earned to date and then divide this by the number of semester hours you ve taken to date Mid Semester Reports Halfway through the semester College Unbound requires instructors to report grades for students whose work is below C These reports are sent to the Office of the Registrar which distributes them to the individual students and their advisors These grades are not recorded on the students permanent records Audit Successful Audit Unsuccessful AUS AUU If you audit a course i e take a course normally offered for credit for zero credit you will receive a grade of AUS Audit Successful or AUU Audit Unsuccessful In Progress IP The mark of IP is used to denote a course in progress Pass Nonpass grading option P N Students have the option of taking elective courses P N Pass Nonpass with the permission of the course instructor and or the department offering the course You may register for the P N grading option beginning the first day of classes up to the last day for undergraduates to add a course date listed on the Registrar s Academic Deadlines calendar To take a class P N first ask the course instructor if he she allows P N grading Then print a grade option form and have both your academic advisor and the course instructor sign it Submit the completed form to the Registrar s Office before the published deadline You may not change your P N registration after the deadline P N course policies You may request P N grading only in courses you are using as electives so You may not use courses taken P N to satisfy General Education Program requirements You may not use courses taken P N to satisfy a major minor or certificate requirements 70

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Instructors and or departments may deny students the option to register P N for any course Hours of P N coursework are not used in computing GPAs Hours of coursework graded P count toward graduation but hours of coursework graded N do not The College accepts a maximum of 15 s h of P credit from College Unbound toward the bachelor s degree and a maximum of 30 s h of P and S grades from all sources CU as well as transfer work toward the bachelor s degree Incomplete I A student unable to finish a course may ask an instructor for a mark of I Incomplete Course instructors may approve or deny a student s request You may be granted a mark of Incomplete only if you have finished 2 3 of the coursework exceptions may be made for research thesis or independent study courses and you have an reason acceptable to the instructor for not completing the course and your standing in the course is satisfactory Students cannot graduate with an I mark on their record They must either complete the course for a passing grade or allow the Incomplete to lapse to an F To complete an incomplete course first consult with your instructor about the due date for the remaining work and to make sure you understand all the course requirements You must then complete the unfinished portion of the work and your instructor must submit a final grade for you by following the Registrar s change of grade procedure This grade change must be submitted on or before grades are due for the subsequent spring or fall semester Since the summer and winter sessions are not technically semesters a student with an Incomplete from the spring semester is exempt from completing the work during the subsequent summer session a student with an Incomplete from the fall is exempt from completing the work during that winter session If the grade change is not submitted by this deadline the I will automatically convert to an F or U even if you do not enroll afterward If warranted the instructor may submit a grade change after the I has become an F or U 71

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Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress SAP for Financial Aid Grade Point Average Students must maintain a cumulative minimum grade point average of 2 0 each semester Pace Students must successfully complete 67 of the cumulative attempted credit hours each year Attempted hours are determined by the number of credit hours registered for at the end of the sixth day of the semester Successful grade completions are A B C D P Unsuccessful grade completions are F W INC If students repeat a course both grades will appear on the academic record and the most recent grade will be used to calculate the grade point average Attempted Credits Required Completion Rate 12 8 credits 15 10 credits 18 12 credits 21 14 credits 24 16 credits 27 18 credits 30 20 credits Evaluation of Progress At the end of each term attended academic progress will be evaluated based upon the standards above Students who fail to meet any of the standards of academic progress will receive a notification letter from College Unbound Consequences for Failure to Meet SAP After the first term in which Standards of Academic Progress are not met students are placed on financial aid warning for one subsequent term During the warning period they remain eligible for federal financial aid College Unbound requires that students in financial aid warning status meet with their Faculty Advisor and submit a plan for meeting their educational goals After the second term in which Standards of Academic Progress are not met students become ineligible for federal financial aid In order to regain federal financial aid eligibility students must pay for classes out of pocket until they reach the 67 completion rate and an appropriate cumulative GPA 72

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SAP Appeal Process Students with unusual or mitigating circumstances may submit an appeal requesting to continue to receive federal financial aid Mitigating circumstances must be documented and approved by the Standards of Academic Progress Appeal Committee The appeal must be submitted by the last day to register in the term in which the student is applying for continued federal financial aid If federal financial aid is reinstated as a result of the appeals process the student is placed on probation for one term During the probationary period the student must complete all registered courses and achieve the required grade point average to remain eligible to receive federal financial aid Once the student is at a 67 completion rate for all attempted courses and a qualifying grade point average good standing is reinstated Appeal Procedure STEP ONE Complete the Standards of Academic Progress Appeal form and submit it to the Financial Aid Office along with an explanation and documentation of the reasons for failing to comply with the stated academic standards The explanation must include improvements made to ensure future academic success STEP TWO The Standards of Academic Progress Appeal Committee will review the appeal and render a decision STEP THREE The student will receive the written decision of the Academic Progress Appeal Committee within ten business days of the committee meeting The decision of the Standards of Academic Progress Appeal Committee is final 73

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Student Code of Conduct The purpose of the Student Code of Conduct and the Conduct Review Process that supports it is to help the college maintain a safe healthy and positive learning community and online environment for living learning and working where individuals act lawfully and in compliance with college policies and rules and act with honesty integrity civility and respect for themselves and others and for the college community and the communities in which we live Any behavior that is inconsistent with these goals whether on campus or off is prohibited and constitutes a violation of the Student Code of Conduct For purposes of the Student Code of Conduct and the Conduct Review Process only any person subject to the Student Code of Conduct will be referred to as a student regardless of whether the person is registered for classes Additionally during the Conduct Review Process the person making the complaint will be referred to as the Complainant and the student responding to the complaint will be referred to as the Respondent Conduct that violates the Student Code of Conduct includes 1 Harming or Endangering Yourself or Others a Use of physical force or violence b Threatened use of physical force or violence c Dating violence or domestic violence d Fighting physical or verbal e Endangering or threatening the health or safety of oneself or another person f Intentional possession of a dangerous article or substance that may be used to injure or cause discomfort to any person g Possession or use of firearms or other weapons ammunition BB guns air guns airsoft guns fireworks incendiary devices explosives or other items that resemble a firearm or weapon h Initiating or circulating a report or warning of an impending bombing fire or other crime emergency or catastrophe knowing that the report is false i Intentionally or recklessly starting a fire j Misuse of or tampering with fire safety equipment e g fire extinguishers smoke detectors exit signs and pull stations k Aiding abetting encouraging or participating in a riot commotion or disturbance or other disorderly conduct If Student Conduct assigns a charge of dating violence or domestic violence the College is required by law to inform the Complainant in the matter of the outcome of the Conduct Review Process 2 Bias and Harassment a Any Student Code of Conduct violation against another person committed with bias hatred or animus based on the person s actual or perceived race religion color national origin age sex sexual orientation gender identity or expression genetic information disability status as a protected veteran pregnancy marital status or 74

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any other category protected by law b Harassment or the creation of a hostile environment based on race religion color national origin age sex sexual orientation gender identity or expression genetic information disability status as a protected veteran pregnancy marital status or any other category protected by law c Physical verbal nonverbal written electronic or technological harassment of another person including harassment on social networking sites and other online forums d Stalking e Intimidation f Bullying If Student Conduct assigns the charge of stalking the College is required by law to inform the Complainant in the matter of the outcome of the Conduct Review Process 3 Sexual Misconduct a Sexual assault any nonconsensual oral vaginal or anal sex or any other nonconsensual penetration of the genital or anal opening however slight by any part of a person s body or by any object including instructing an individual to penetrate his her own genital or anal opening or engage in oral sex against his her will b Other unlawful sexual activity c Sexual harassment d Lewd indecent or obscene behavior If Student Conduct assigns a charge of sexual assault other unlawful sexual activity or sexual harassment the college is required by law to inform the Complainant in the matter of the outcome of the Conduct Review Process 4 Drugs a Possession of drug paraphernalia such as bongs scales or pipes b The actual or intended purchase possession or use of illegal drugs narcotics or controlled substances c The actual or intended sale distribution cultivation or manufacture of illegal drugs narcotics controlled substances or prescription drugs A finding of responsibility for intended or actual sale or distribution can be based on the mere presence of a distributable quantity of illegal drugs narcotics controlled substances or prescription drugs or the presence of paraphernalia used for the sale or distribution of illegal drugs narcotics controlled substances or prescription drugs Students can be found responsible for a drug violation based on the presence of residue or paraphernalia alone The College may inform local police of illegal drug violations 75

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5 Alcohol a Possession or use of alcohol anywhere on college property except for legal use at events operations programs premises or facilities sanctioned by the college 6 Theft and Abuse of Property a Actual or intended theft or unauthorized use or possession of the resources property or services of College Unbound or of another person business or government b Unauthorized use of the College s name logo or seal c Unauthorized use of ATM cards cell phones credit cards checks long distance accounts identification cards key combinations passwords PIN numbers or other property equipment or accounts belonging to the college or another person business or government d Possession or use of resources property or services which the student knows or should know have been stolen e Unauthorized entry including forcible entry use presence in or occupancy of any premises or facilities f Vandalism g Reckless damage to or destruction of college property or the property of others It is the College s practice to cooperate with local state and federal law enforcement authorities in their investigation of theft identify theft computer Internet crimes and other similar crimes including providing copies of incident reports and other evidence to these authorities 7 Failure to Comply and Interference a Failure to comply with the directions of a college representative acting in the performance of his her duties b Failure to participate in the college s Conduct Review Process c Failure to comply with any college policy or rule d Failure to evacuate any building in which a fire or other emergency alarm has been sounded or when directed to evacuate by a college representative e Failure to comply with any or all sanctions imposed under the Student Conduct Review Process by the dates specified f Failure to pay restitution as required by the college for damage to college property both real and personal g Failure to present a student identification card upon request from a college representative h Interference with college personnel carrying out their duties or other college business i Interference with any member of the college community in the pursuit of the college s mission or purposes j Actions which obstruct disrupt or physically interfere with the use of the college s equipment including safety and security equipment premises buildings rooms or passages k Retaliation against any individual who has made a good faith complaint against another individual or who has participated in the Conduct Review Process 76

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If a student violates a No Contact Order or the directions of a college representative to avoid another person the student will be charged with a violation of the Student Code of Conduct for failure to comply and may be interimly suspended until the completion of the Conduct Review Process 8 Dishonesty a Academic dishonesty including but not limited to cheating plagiarism and unauthorized collaboration b Knowingly furnishing false information c Forgery alteration or unauthorized use of student or college documents records identification passwords library materials or property d Misrepresentation fraud or deceit e Possession or use of falsified forms of identification f Knowingly bringing a false complaint against another person g Falsification distortion or misrepresentation of information before a panel or hearing officer in the Conduct Review Process 9 Other Prohibited Conduct a Illegal gambling wagering betting or bookmaking b Gathering for the purpose of inciting participating in or encouraging a disturbance of the peace c Unauthorized operation of a business on college property or using college resources e Disorderly conduct f Behavior that would offend or frighten a reasonable person g Conduct that interferes with student learning or with the mission of the college h Conduct that adversely affects the security of the college community local residents or property the name of the college or the integrity of the educational process i Any conduct by a guest of a student that violates college rules or policies including the Student Code of Conduct Note Students are responsible for the behavior of their guests and must accompany their guests at all times 77

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Academic Honesty 1 College Unbound believes that the respect for ideas and intellectual property rights is a critical value in academic communities All members of the College Unbound community share responsibility in ensuring that the authentic expression of those ideas is observed 2 The expression of authentic ideas is observed when a a person credits or documents the use of the unique ideas or words of another in speech or in writing and b a person refuses to submit or assist someone else in submitting work prepared by another 3 All assignments submitted and all assessments taken by a student shall be solely performed by the student except where assessment protocol indicates that the student may work with another or others 4 Students may not submit work that is plagiarized representing the work of another as one s own or that otherwise violates the copyright laws of the United States of America 5 Cheating is also a violation of this policy Cheating is defined as taking unfair advantage for the purpose of completing assignments assessments or related activities 6 Alleged violations of College Unbound s policy on Academic Honesty are reviewed and initially adjudicated by Assessment Staff The following guidelines are employed When it appears that plagiarism was due to a lack of skill 30 50 plagiarized citations inconsistent an email is sent to the student s Faculty Advisor asking them to make sure the student understands all the rules that apply to plagiarism A caution is given at a first offense when there is less than 75 quoted material and citations are present but not consistent or three minor offenses have been received from that student A warning is given at a first offense when there is greater than 75 or none of the quoted material is cited A probation notice is given after a second offense The case is referred to the Academic Standards Committee if there is another occurrence 7 The Academic Standards Committee may choose to continue the student on probation or suspend the student Suspension must be for a minimum of six months and requires application for readmission Any subsequent violation of Academic Honesty for students previously on suspension results in permanent dismissal from College Unbound The Committee may make other reasonable requirements of the student such as participating in a writing course or a plagiarism remediation program The judgments of the Academic Standards Committee may be appealed to the Provost whose decisions are final in these matters 8 The Academic Standards Committee consists of an experienced mentor from each academic area The members select a chair from among their members Members are appointed by the appropriate Director Dean and serve open ended terms 78

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College Unbound Complaint Process Recommended Details for Complaints A complaint should contain the complainant s contact information including name address telephone number and email address and specify whether the complainant is a prospective current or former student Complaints should contain as much detail as possible including the names of individuals involved dates supporting documentation and requested solution Internal Complaint Process College Unbound recommends that students and prospective students first file complaints internally before resolution is sought from College Unbound s state licensing entity or accreditor Internal complaints may be filed with College Unbound administrators referenced below Prospective Student Complaints College Unbound prospective students may report all complaints to the College Unbound Director of Recruitment 325 Public Street Providence RI 02905 College Unbound Student Complaints College Unbound students may report complaints to the provost Contact information is located on College Unbound s website http www collegeunbound org If Matters Are Not Resolved Internally Please follow the process outlined by the RI Office of the Postsecondary Commissioner printed below and on their website https www riopc edu page student_complaint The mission of the Office of the Postsecondary Commissioner OPC is to support the work of the Board of Education and the Council on Postsecondary Education in providing an excellent accessible and affordable system of higher education designed to improve the overall educational attainment of the citizens of Rhode Island support economic development and enrich the civic social and cultural life of all living in the state of Rhode Island As such the Office takes consumer protection for students very seriously If your complaint regards a specific institution you are encouraged to seek resolution from that institution first In most cases the Office does not have authority over operations or instruction within an institution and we will therefore refer complaints inquiries to the specific college for clarification and response If your complaint deals with an online course or program the Office can help you seek resolution Please note Under most circumstances the text of a student complaint is considered a public record a copy of which can be requested by any member of the public In response to such a request the Office of the Postsecondary Commissioner will not disclose any personally identifiable information such as a name address phone number or email 79

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Student Support Services Disabling Conditions College Unbound provides accommodations and supports to students with disabling conditions All on ground facilities are physically and socially accessible and staff are creative about accommodations that make it possible for students to achieve their academic goals Students who wish to request reasonable accommodations must schedule an appointment with their Faculty Advisor and present documentation of a disability diagnosed by a an appropriate practitioner e g Neuropsychologist or Clinical Psychologist Neurologist Psychiatrist Audiologist Otolaryngologist School Psychologist Social Worker LICSW Speech Language Clinician Optometrist Ophthalmologist In addition to agreed upon accommodations College Unbound offers on ground and e tutoring for math writing and other subjects and a weekly on ground writing lab is open to all students Academic Accommodations Appeal Procedures Appeals for Academic Accommodations such as but not limited to exams courses degree programs degree requirements A College Unbound member or a student may request a review of an accommodation decision The request for review is to be submitted to the student s Faculty Advisor who will liaise with Student Support Services Student Support personnel will attempt to facilitate a mutually acceptable accommodation agreement by discussion with the student the professor and other staff as needed If no acceptable agreement can be reached the request for reconsideration will be forwarded to the Provost for Academic Affairs The Provost will review the information received request additional information if necessary and make a final decision The Provost will transmit a decision to the student the College Unbound member and Student Support Services Bias Discrimination Or Harassment Any student who is disturbed by or who experiences incidents of Bias Discrimination or Harassment may avail themselves of supports and resources for assistance from the Provost s office General Policies Inconsistencies With Other Institutions of Higher Education The Americans with Disabilities Act provides the premise upon which equal access to education is based The document does not attempt to provide specific guidance for equal access It is the policy of College Unbound in discussion with students regarding accommodations to take into consideration the accommodations provided by the students previous institution However College Unbound retains the right to make decisions based on its own policies curriculum guidelines and procedures College Unbound is not 80

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obligated to provide the same or similar accommodations as did another institution Accommodations are made case by case in accordance with official documentation taking into consideration both reasonableness and appropriateness of the request When accommodations previously provided by another institution conflict with those provided by College Unbound the latter will take precedence Emergencies and Crisis Management Non Traditional Circumstances Student Support Services relies heavily on the concept of thorough and adequate documentation that is prepared by a qualified appropriate and licensed professional In addition the recent date of the documentation and the rationale to support the need for accommodations is key to establishing adequacy of the documentation However in emergency and crisis management situations and in non traditional circumstances the professional staff of Student Support Services will use their discretion in allowing flexibility in the standard protocol described in the working policy document All such decisions made under these conditions are reviewed as soon as possible after the emergency situation subsides Students with disabilities are partners in their own academic success They respond to the same expectations and assume the same responsibilities as their non disabled peers albeit WITH the support of Student Support Services and reasonable accommodations Persons with disabilities are assured reasonable access to programs opportunities and activities at College Unbound that is equal to the access afforded non disabled persons Inclusion of persons with disability in all aspects of life at College Unbound will benefit the community and improve the quality of life within College Unbound community Therefore accessibility beyond the minimum requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act is the standard Disability is a concern of cultural diversity equal opportunity therefore accessibility is a community concern Achieving full participation and integration of people with disabilities requires the cooperative efforts and responsibility of all College Unbound s departments offices and personnel Colleagues from diverse areas of expertise collaborate to create an accessible environment To this end College Unbound will continue to strive to achieve excellence in its services and to assure that its services are delivered equitably and efficiently to all of its members Student Rights and Responsibilities Rights Nondiscrimination Equal access Individualized Assessments Right to not disclose specific disability to faculty Confidentiality Effective academic adjustments aids Responsibilities Request reasonable modification Meet eligibility standard for qualified status 81

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Provide necessary information to Disability Services to obtain Accommodation Letter Present Accommodation Letter to faculty for signatures Make best effort to demonstrate mastery of course material Source Educating Students with Disabilities A Shared Responsibility NASPA 1995 Faculty Rights and Responsibilities Rights Determine content of each course and how it is taught Decide how to best instruct students and assess student learning Consult with knowledgeable professionals on methods to accommodate learning needs of students with disabilities Receive notice of accommodation needs with reasonable advance notice Maintain academic standards of courses Question and negotiate specific accommodations to ensure that they will not change essential requirements of course Determine grades appropriate to the level of student s demonstration of mastery of material with or without disability accommodations Respectful treatment by all students Enforce student handbook policies equally for all students Responsibilities Reasonably accommodate students who provide documentation of a disability through Disability Services Maintain student confidentiality in all environments Respect student privacy about the disability discuss only academic performance needs Address the accommodation letter from Disability Services in a timely manner Understand policies and laws regarding students with disabilities Communicate the availability of support for students with disabilities via a syllabus statement and or by class announcement Understand that student conduct issues require appropriate counseling regardless of the presence of a disability Source http www rosscenter umb edu text sh5 htm five Guidelines for providing documentation of disability to College Unbound Disability is defined as a permanent longstanding significant condition that substantially or significantly limits one or more of the major life functions including but not limited to seeing hearing walking breathing learning working concentrating etc Students with qualifying disabilities may be eligible under the Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act of 2008 ADA for reasonable accommodations that will support equal opportunity and inclusion in College Unbound programs and services 82

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Documentation from a credentialed examiner is required to substantiate the presence of a possible disability and to establish the possible need for accommodations at College Unbound These guidelines are summarized below Temporary conditions are NOT regarded as ADA eligible however depending on the nature of the temporary condition and on the availability of resources environmental supports may be provided Essential Elements of Quality Documentation College Unbound s guidelines for quality documentation are 1 Licensed or credentialed evaluator with specific training or expertise related to the condition being diagnosed and who is not related to the individual ex hearing disability diagnosed by certified Audiologist CCC A or by an Ear Nose Throat M D 2 Clear diagnostic statement including diagnostic sub types where relevant that describes how the condition was diagnosed and provides information on the functional impact of the condition A full clinical description will convey this information as will diagnostic codes from the DSM Diagnostic Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association or the ICF International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health of the World Health Organization 3 Description of the diagnostic methodology used including diagnostic criteria evaluation methods tests and dates of administration clinical narrative observations and results Diagnostic methods must be congruent with the particular disability and with current professional practices in the field 4 Description of the current functional limitations of the disabling condition helps establish the possible disability and identify possible accommodations A combination of the individual s self report results of formal evaluation procedures and clinical narrative are recommended Quality documentation will demonstrate how a major life activity is significantly amply or substantially limited by providing evidence of frequency and pervasiveness of the conditions s 5 Description of the progression or stability of the disability over time and in context 6 Description of current and past accommodations services or medications 7 Recommendations for accommodations assistive devices assistive services compensatory strategies and or collateral support services Note The Americans with Disabilities Amendment Act of 2008 broadened the definition of disability in the number and types of conditions that could be considered The new law also strengthened the importance of quality detailed documentation in determining who is eligible for accommodations Many conditions may now be considered a disability but in order to qualify for accommodations a major life function must be significantly amply or substantially limited in the College Unbound environment For example a person may be considered disabled with a diagnosis of ADHD but the same person with mild moderate limitations to a major life function may not be eligible for accommodations However the person whose documentation demonstrates substantial 83

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significant or considerable impact to a major life function may be eligible for accommodations All determinations for accommodations and disability eligibility are made on a case bycase basis by disability services staff in consultation with the individual student The following practitioners are accepted to provide documentation on the respective disabilities or conditions all must be appropriately credentialed and licensed in their respective fields Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Neuropsychologist or Clinical Psychologist Psychiatrist Neurologist Neurodevelopmental Physician Chronic Illness Health Gastroenterologist Rheumatologist Endocrinologist Internal Medicine or other physician knowledgeable to condition Developmental Disability such as Asperger Neuropsychologist Psychiatrist Clinical Syndrome Psychologist Neurodevelopmental Physician Head Injury TBI Neurologist Neuropsychologist Hearing Audiologist CCC A Otolaryngologist Learning Disabilities School Psychologist Clinical Psychologist Neuropsychologist Neurodevelopmental Physician Mental Health or Psychiatric Psychiatrist Clinical Psychologist Social Worker LICSW Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Mobility Physical Physical Therapist Orthopedic Surgeon other physician knowledgeable to condition Speech and Communication Conditions Speech Language Clinician Vision Optometrist Ophthalmologist 84

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Title IX Notice No person in the United States shall on the basis of sex be excluded from participation in be denied the benefits of or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance Title IX 20 U S C 1681 Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 Title IX prohibits discrimination based on sex in educational programs that receive federal financial assistance While College Unbound is not yet accredited or eligible for federal financial assistance we are in compliance with Title IX Programs and activities which may be included are recruitment admissions financial aid and scholarships course offerings and access hiring and retention and benefits and leave Title IX also protects students and employees both male and female from unlawful sexual harassment in school programs and activities Title IX s prohibition of sex discrimination includes prohibition of sexual harassment and sexual violence Sexual harassment is any unsolicited or unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature It can include unwelcome verbal or non verbal conduct request for sexual favors and physical behaviors that range from sexual gestures or teasing to sexual assault acts of sexual violence and sexually coerced activity In compliance with Title IX College Unbound prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in employment as well as in admissions enrollment and in the provision of all services programs and activities The College s Policy Statements outlining these prohibitions may be accessed online Non Discrimination Policy Statement on Harassment Any student faculty or staff member with questions or concerns about the applicable college policies or who believes that he or she has been the victim of sex discrimination sexual harassment or sexual violence is encouraged to contact the college s Associate Vice President of Administration and Finance Title IX Coordinator Individuals with questions or concerns about violations of the Code of Student Conduct specifically should contact the Title IX Coordinator or the Provost and also may want to review the College Unbound Student Handbook Filing a Complaint of Sex Discrimination or Sexual Harassment Individuals who believe that they have been discriminated against on the basis of protected qualifications including sex discrimination sexual harassment and sexual violence may file a complaint with the college Any concerns of sexual harassment sexual assault and or sex discrimination regardless of the identity of the accused may be brought to the Title IX Coordinator For complaints about employee contact concerned individuals may contact the Title IX Coordinator and or fill out the Discrimination and Discriminatory Harassment Complaint Form Allegations of discrimination made against students including sex discrimination sexual harassment and sexual assault may be directed to the Title IX Coordinator or the Provost College Unbound s Associate Vice President of Administration and Finance acts as Title IX Coordinator and monitors compliance with this law and centrally coordinates the institution s 85

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response to complaints of discrimination based on sex The Title IX Coordinator will ensure complaints of this nature are addressed by the appropriate college entities and will assist complainants in receiving any medical mental health or other services that may be warranted The Title IX Coordinator will also facilitate any interim measures that may be necessary to protect the complainant in the institutional setting Individuals with questions or concerns about Title IX and or those who wish to file a complaint of non compliance may contact the Associate Vice President of Administration and Finance Title IX for more information Title IX Coordinator Lucas Lussier Associate Vice President of Administration and Finance Business Office 325 Public Street 401 752 2604 llussier collegeunbound org Alternatively or in addition to the Title IX Coordinator inquiries may be directed to the U S Department of Education s Office for Civil Rights the federal agency charged with enforcing compliance with Title IX Boston Office Office for Civil Rights US Department of Education 5 Post Office Square 8th Floor Boston MA 02109 3921 Telephone 617 289 0111 Email OCR Boston ed gov 86