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DMin Handbook

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D . M I N . H A N D B O O KBIRMINGHAMTHEOLOGICALSEMINARYA F F O R D A B L E , R E F O R M E D , F L E X I B L EPastoral Leadership andBiblical Counseling

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Birmingham Theological SeminaryAFFORDABLE, REFORMED, AND FLEXIBLEBTS Mission and VisionMission: BTS is committed to making quality reformed theological education affordable and flexible to learners everywhere, equipping leaders for Christ’s church.Vision: BTS strives to be the number one seminary for quality, sound, affordable theological education that extends to learners in diverse environments for kingdom impact on their communities.Philosophy of Education: BTS is committed to making quality reformed theological education affordable and flexible to learners everywhere. We offer multiple graduate and postgraduate programs, both locally and online, to bring value to the church and the surrounding community. We serve individuals and churches by training future and current pastors, counselors, and lay leaders both domestically and internationally. We are a historic, reformed seminary committed to biblical inerrancy, infallibility, and authority and hold ecclesiastical accreditation from multiple Protestant denominations. BTS utilizes pastor-professors to bring focused academic and theological training with practical application, designed to develop vocational and volunteer leaders in the church. BTS is a multisite seminary that provides resources to students on a full-time and part-time basis. BTS believes education is a service that should be extended as far as reasonably possible to help the church grow spiritually and to bring kingdom impact to local communities with the good news of salvation through Christ alone. 1

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TABLE OF CONTENTS BTS Mission and Vision ................................................................................................... 1 General DMin Information ............................................................................................. 3 Honors DMin Information ............................................................................................ 10 Program Tracks ................................................................................................................ 12 Pastoral Leadership ........................................................................................................ 12 Biblical Counseling ......................................................................................................... 14 Apologetics ....................................................................................................................... 17 Church Multiplication .................................................................................................. 202

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THE DOCTOR OF MINISTRY PROGRAM (DMIN) General Information Introduction: BTS has designed its Doctor of Ministry program to accommodate both the bi-vocational pastor and the full-time pastor active in the ordained ministry. We offer four tracks in our Doctor of Ministry Program: • Pastoral Leadership • Biblical Counseling • Apologetics • Church MultiplicationAll faculty members in each program have obtained a terminal postgraduate degree and are/have been full-time ministry practitioners in their fields of expertise. They have learned to integrate biblical, historical, practical, and theological resources into successful ministries; therefore, they serve as “practical academicians” as well as mentors to our students.The BTS DMin program is a cohort-based, class-oriented program that challenges its students through educational innovation and community-driven learning, encouraging students to achieve a balance between learned content and applied professional behaviors. Our Goal:The Association of Theological Seminaries (ATS) defines doctor of ministry programs as those “[t]hat should demonstrate the candidate’s ability to identify a specific theological topic[s] in ministry, organize an effective research model[s], use appropriate resources, and evaluate the results, and should reflect the candidate’s depth of theological insight in relation to ministry.”The goal of the BTS Doctor of Ministry program is to challenge students with advanced learning that enables the learner to pursue unique research in their respective fields, bringing new perspectives to ministry challenges. We believe a covenantal approach to biblical studies, within the historic reformed tradition, enables practicing ministers, counselors, and church leaders to produce biblically faithful, academically sound, and appropriately practical solutions to the many challenges facing the church and Christians today in diverse ministry communities. We strive for our graduates to be known by the appropriate characteristics of orthodoxy, orthopraxy, and orthopathos: that we might learn the truth, practice the truth, and love the truth. Our Program:The DMin program is a four-year program. Uniquely, BTS starts with a course on research and design, enabling the students to set up all four years in the pursuit of their final dissertation. 3

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Beginning in the academic fall, students will pursue two and a half years of semester-based coursework, leading to a year and a half of independent study and dissertation research and writing. The dissertation is defended in the spring of the fourth year, and the final summer is reserved for revisions, if deemed necessary, before publication. The student will take a total of 33 hours in each program track. General Admission Requirements:BTS requires all doctoral candidates to hold a graduate degree from a respected seminary. Applicants who hold theological master’s degrees are given equal consideration in applying to the program, but MA degree holders may be required to demonstrate more significant sustained, applicable work experience than master of divinity graduates. The applicant will be required to have completed a minimum of 60 hours of graduate work. If the applicant has not completed 60 hours, BTS can supply a specially designed program to help them reach that standard in order to gain admittance to the postgraduate program. Consideration for admittance to the BTS Doctoral Program by the Doctoral Admissions Committee includes the following requirements: • The completed application • Existing subject knowledge • Evidence of cultural appreciation • Evidence of the application of Scripture to the care of souls • Administrative skills in managing ministry requirementsThese matters will be assessed through personal references, a personal interview, and/or whatever testing the administration deems useful. BTS does not generally require the GRE for admittance. Applicants may secure the required forms at the seminary office or online at http://bts.education/resources. Applications must be submitted prior to admission to the program. International students whose primary language is not English may be asked to submit TOEFL scores after a formal interview, if necessary. In addition, procedures required for foreign students in relation to immigration policies may be found on the BTS website or will be sent to the applicant after contacting the seminary. Program Limitations:BTS holds to a traditional reformed theological framework. As such, we hold to a position on complementarianism regarding the Bible’s teaching on the roles of men and women in pastoral leadership positions in the local church. Considering this commitment, two of our programs (Pastoral Leadership and Church Multiplication) are only open to men. Our programs in Biblical Counseling and Apologetics are open to men and women. For more information on BTS’s stance, 4

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please refer to “The Role of Women in the Church: A Rationale for the BTS Position” available as an appendix in our Faculty and Student Handbooks. Admittance Requirements:BTS requires the following for admittance to our Doctor of Ministry program: • Master of divinity or its educational equivalent (MA with appropriate ministry experience) * • Greek and Hebrew studies (waived for Biblical Counseling—may be replaced with another language study for Apologetics) • Proof of scholarly capacity (15–20-page submission) in Turabian format • Appropriate application and references • Formal interview with DMin program director *limited exceptions may be made for students with theology degrees totaling less than 60 hours but who hold significant ministry experience (20+ years). Extensive recommendations will be required in these cases. Application DeadlineApplications for Fall admittance are due no later than July 1 of entrance year. The Doctoral Admissions Committee will determine if any other requirements or prerequisites are necessary for admittance. Late applications must be turned in by August 1 and are subject to an additional $50 late fee. Non-American citizens who wish to pursue the program by moving to the United States must be willing to relocate to Birmingham, AL (in compliance with our SEVIS standards) and must have their application done by June 1 of the year of matriculation. For more information on non-American citizens and BTS, please see our Student Handbook. International students who wish to pursue the doctoral program and remain in their country of origin are not required to obtain SEVIS approval and may follow the general application guidelines. General Information:The Doctor of Ministry program, including a dissertation or project, cannot be completed in fewer than four years. Students are expected to stay current with their starting cohort. The degree must be completed seven years from the date of enrollment, but if a student must pause their studies during the coursework section of the program, they must wait until the following year when the next cohort arrives at the same program location. In exceptional circumstances, a student may request the doctoral committee for a one-year extension beyond the seven-year limit. The Doctor of Ministry degrees requires satisfactory completion of 24 hours of coursework (eight classes) and a dissertation, with a minimum of 6 course hours, totaling 33 hours. Prescribed coursework is specific to each program. The student is expected to maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 with no more than one C grade in the entire program. The student must register and pay tuition each semester 5

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($200 per credit hour). It is strongly recommended that students move forward with their incoming cohorts, as this is the system for course rotation. Lapsing out of your cohort can cause significant delay in program completion. A student will be considered to have a lapsed registration after one calendar year without activity. If this occurs, the student is required to make a formal written reinstatement request. Program Structure:Doctor of Ministry courses are generally held on Mondays. These courses are normally taught evenings from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. (CST) via videoconference but may be offered during a morning timeframe to accommodate international students (non-residential) and various time zones. Occasionally, courses may be offered in a seminar format, and we also make use of the Lampstand Conference at Briarwood Presbyterian Church. Courses are offered each semester, fall, spring, and summer, normally with a four-to-six-week break between semesters. Some programs (Pastoral Leadership and Church Multiplication) take advantage of the Lampstand Conference at Briarwood Presbyterian Church, generally offered in January. This is the one time it is recommended that students physically come to Birmingham for the learning experience. All program tracks are fully available for through videoconference technology. Attendance Requirements:The BTS DMin program is primarily done via videoconference in order to extend this educational opportunity to students around the world. However, we do have three tentpole opportunities where we request that students make every effort to join in Birmingham as a group. The first is during the initial orientation phase, which takes place the first Friday and Saturday of the semester and includes the first class of Research and Design (required for all students). The second is during the Lampstand Conference. While this will occur at different stages in the Pastoral Leadership and Church Multiplication programs, it is a significant time of fellowship and learning with other church leaders from across America and even around the world. The third is at the beginning of the dissertation (or for Biblical Counseling students, the capstone project), which takes place in September of the last year. This is a vital opportunity to do a final review of the writing process, share ideas, learn from each other, and engage with BTS Faculty. Exceptions to the in-person attendance policy for each on-site (Year 1/2/3) are made for students who do not reside in the contiguous United States of America borders, and they are allowed to attend the primary sessions via video conference. Students cover their travel costs, and BTS promises to provide host families to help alleviate other expenses. Students may choose to stay at a hotel at their own expense, however. In addition, most primary meals for the students, while they are in Birmingham, are covered by BTS—including dinner at President Reeder’s home the Friday evening of their visit. 6

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Schedule of Fees• Application Fee: $100 (nonrefundable)• Student Services Fee: $75 annual (fall) • Tuition: $200 per credit hour (three-hour classes) • Binding Fee (dissertation): established annually• Graduation Fee: determined annually ($200)• Reader Fee (one-time): $400• Estimated Total Cost of DMin Program: $9,000 or less.Scholarships:Students may apply for a scholarship on a yearly basis. Scholarship applications must be renewed before the beginning of the new academic year (fall). BTS scholarships for doctoral students are awarded automatically at 50%. Scholarship applications may be found on the BTS website under the Resources tab.Initial Orientation:Students are expected to come to Birmingham on Friday and Saturday of the opening week of classes for the Orientation Seminar. Included in this visit is the first meeting of the Research and Design class. In addition, all books required for the class are available from the Briarwood Book Store. While on campus, students may choose to pick up and pay for their books. As mentioned above, American-based students may request an exemption from travel with approval from the DMin program head, while non-American based students are expected to attend the Orientation Seminar sessions via videoconference. This is an important time for students in different tracks to fellowship, study, share their goals and aspirations, and grow in unity in Christ. Independent Study Course:All programs include an Independent Study semester before beginning the dissertation. The program head, working with the student, will assign a faculty mentor appropriate to the subject matter of the proposal, or the student may contract an outside expert upon approval. He or she must then submit a proposal for the Independent Study that the faculty member or outside agent must approve. Upon approval by the faculty member, the student must deliver the signed proposal to the program head for final approval. We recommend that this is done prior to the beginning of the summer semester in which the Independent Study will be attempted in order to maximize the learning opportunity and its impact on the dissertation. The Independent Study course will be taken at the completion of the required courses of study (summer semester), prior to the dissertation courses. General Reading Requirements:Each Doctor of Ministry course offered includes a minimum 1,500 pages of reading that must be 7

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completed in the increments prescribed by the professor and the syllabus. The professor may ask to receive the following as evidence of reading assignment completion: • An analysis of the theological implications of the material • A presentation of the salient theological implications of the material • A personal reflection paper giving evidence of the student’s personal interaction with the material and its application to his or her ministry Candidacy:Candidacy for the Doctor of Ministry program is defined as the time frame in which a student is deemed ready to pursue independent study and research prior to the writing of their dissertation. A student is admitted to a program to pursue coursework, then sits for candidacy to complete their dissertation. The Candidacy Exam is administered as part of students’ final coursework in each program. Students have two opportunities to take the exam (once at the beginning of the course DM9111 and once at the end) and will be given the topics for study prior to sitting for the exam. The Doctor of Ministry Committee will grant candidacy status based upon the following criteria:1) The completion of a written qualifying theological examination, including an understanding of reformed theology as summarized in the Westminster Confession of Faith (the student need not agree with this position, but they must be able to articulate it) and the ability to properly exegete Scripture and present an acceptable homiletical outline or appropriate teaching tool for their program. The qualifying exam is specific to each track 2) Completion of the course: DM9111 Independent Study/Understanding the Dissertation or DM9121 Counseling Practicum/Understanding the Dissertation in the Biblical Counseling program3) Submission of an acceptable dissertation/project proposal (this is the capstone project of the DM9111 and DM9121 classes)Dissertation:The final phase of the program is the dissertation. In general, the BTS dissertation may be understood as the application of biblical theology, research abilities, and capacity applied to an understanding of a contemporary ministry program, devising biblical and practical steps to solve this problem. This is slightly different for the Biblical Counseling students, who produce a significant amount of their research through their own counseling practicum; but in principle, both are the same. All dissertations must be presented in standard academic format as denoted in the current Turabian style manual. Dissertations are required to be between 50,000–65,000 words. When completing the dissertation or thesis project, the student will register each semester for the course DM9122 (Dissertation/Project) and pay the tuition fee of $600 until the dissertation/project has been completed. This registration must occur during the registration week at the beginning of each semester.8

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During the project, the student will be assigned a mentor and will be expected to meet with the mentor at least twice a semester. The mentor will file a report on these meetings with the Doctor of Ministry Committee using the appropriate form. Except for medical or extreme personal reasons, the student is expected to make progress each semester. Mentors are expected to be available to the student throughout the program.Once the primary draft is deemed acceptable by the mentor and second reader, the student must submit a third copy for an approved outside reader (non-BTS personnel), approved by the respective directors of the DMin programs. The student may suggest an outside reader, or the seminary will help the candidate find an outside reader. A $400 outside reader fee must accompany this submission. Five copies of an abstract of not more than 1,500 words must also be submitted at this time to the program director. The DMin director will then notify the student to schedule a time for an oral defense of his work before the committee. Biblical Counseling Capstone Project:Biblical Counseling candidates engage in a capstone project as opposed to a traditional dissertation. This is not to say the work is not academic in nature or that it does not require significant research. However, the Biblical Counseling student is engaged in developing a project to address specific issues in the biblical counseling community and draws a significant amount of research from their personal counseling observations. Meticulous detail is necessary in recording these encounters, so their final project is more concentrated but will include significant assessment of the counseling project. For whatever topic the Biblical Counseling student chooses to write on, they must develop a strong biblical framework, connect their counseling observations to valid academic research, and include a section that demonstrates consistent methodological learning and practice from their practicum. The research and theological portion of their capstone project should be 35,000-50,000 words. See the Biblical Counseling Program section for more information. Oral Defense:The oral defense will generally be scheduled during the final week of April (after the last week of classes and two weeks before graduation). It will be conducted before the Dissertation Review Committee consisting of the DMin program director, vice president or his designee, the student’s program track head, and other selected BTS Faculty. The chair of the Board Academic Committee may also attend as a nonvoting member unless they hold a faculty position and are attending also as a selected faculty member. Any faculty member may be a nonvoting attendee and ask questions. Only the Doctor of Ministry Dissertation Committee may vote as to the condition of the interview and the student’s dissertation. The student will receive a Pass, a Pass with Revision, Suspension, or a Failing Grade. 9

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• Pass: The student has adequately defended their dissertation and that the dissertation is ready for publication as is or with minor revisions. The grade is determined by a majority vote of those eligible to vote. • Pass with Revision: The defense of the dissertation was satisfactory, but there are substantial revisions that must occur in order for the dissertation to be made acceptable to publication standards.• Suspension: The committee believes that there is a shortcoming in both the dissertation and in the student’s ability to defend his or her work and sustain the interview. In such cases, it is at the committee’s discretion as to how the student resolves the difficulty. If the dissertation requires significant revisions, the committee may deem the need for a follow-up interview with either the whole committee or a representative appointed by the committee. • Failing Grade: There is no recourse, and the student must complete another dissertation or thesis project if he or she desires to complete the program.Based upon the completed and approved rough draft, the student (following the oral defense) will present the final draft to the DMin director for approval. Three copies of the final draft are required three weeks prior to commencement. Specific print requirements are in the BTS Dissertation Guide. Students requiring dissertation/project revision have the summer semester of their final year to complete their revision and will be granted permission to walk at graduation immediately following their oral defense, but their diploma will be withheld until their final revisions are approved. More detailed information on the dissertation project, content, timeline, and requirements is given to the student during the Research and Design class (DM9120) at the beginning of their doctoral journey; this information is also reviewed and reiterated at the beginning of the Independent Study/Understanding the Dissertation class (DM9111) during the third year of the program. A full “BTS DMin in Biblical Counseling Capstone Project” checklist can be found in the BTS Dissertation and Capstone Project Handbook.  Honors DMin:Students with a GPA of at least 3.5* at the master’s degree level may apply for the Honors Doctor of Ministry. The Honors Doctor of Ministry program functions much more like a research PhD program, with the caveat that it is still focused on current and contemporary problems (as opposed to historical issues). The Honors DMin requires a dissertation of 75,000–100,000 words. The Doctor of Ministry Committee will carefully consider the application. They may require a personal interview and—if the student is not a BTS graduate or former BTS student—the committee will require the submission of significant scholarly research, written in the master’s degree program, for consideration. The prospective student will attend via videoconference or live, 10

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extensive orientation to the program, and they will work on the development of a personalized syllabus for the program. If, from the interview, the administration deems it wise and necessary, the student will be required to join a cohort via videoconference to complete DM9120 and DM9121. If a new cohort is not available, the seminary will provide direct education through directed study.The program must be completed in five years. Graduation from the program is contingent upon the dissertation/project publication and oral defense (see previous Oral Defense section). The student must keep an annotated bibliography and journal of his or her reading for the program. Said readings must total at least 30,000 pages by the end of the program. *Prospective students with a GPA of less than 3.5 may be considered upon the following criteria: • At least seven years of ministry experience that reflects above-average abilities. • Demonstration through an interview with the vice president or director of the Doctor of Ministry program that he has acquired the necessary skills to complete the program. • Submission evidence of current scholarly capabilities. Honors DMin Committee:The student will be assigned a committee of three readers for their advanced dissertation project. The chairman will be a BTS faculty member. The student, in conjunction with the mentor, will develop a proposal that must be approved by the committee. One committee member may be a non-BTS faculty member who is approved by the vice president and DMin director. Honors DMin Mentor:The mentor will be the advisor for the program and may be anyone in the area of study with proper credentials approved by the DMin director. The student must have a personal interview with the DMin director and/or an approved representative of BTS in which he presents his proposal for the mentor. The student’s progress must also be examined each semester with the DMin program. Students will be responsible for negotiating a contractual arrangement with the mentor regarding time and financial remuneration. A copy of this contract must be filed with the vice president and DMin director, and both must approve the contract. See the DMin fee schedule; the same semester fees are applicable. 11

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PROGRAM TRACKSPastoral LeadershipMission: The mission of the Pastoral Leadership program at BTS is to train pastors to become biblical servant leaders who are capable of ministering in a post-Christian culture with fidelity to God’s word, sensitivity to growing cultural differences, a passion for the local church, and a heart for discipleship and leadership development. CurriculumDM9120 Research and Design Required of all DMin students, this course will prepare the student for the DMin program and the necessary research for his or her dissertation or project. Students will become acquainted with the latest in research methods and tools. This will include a detailed study of Turabian format in review of student’s previous work and confirmation that students are equipped to report on their studies appropriately and in the correct academic format.DM9102 Counseling Methodologies for the Pastor/Caring & Curing of Souls This class will examine a biblical model of counseling as well as explore a biblical model of caring for the sheep of God’s fold. The personal and professional development of the minister and the biblical counselor is the focus of this course. Elements of this class include reading, lecture, role-playing, peer evaluation and case studies, and a project applicable to the student’s ministry setting. DM3550 Advanced HermeneuticsThe purpose of this course is to explore the interpretation and application of Scripture to human problems and gain a deeper understanding of the theory and practice of biblical interpretation (hermeneutics). This course will further the development of the skills and knowledge necessary to determine the meaning of any passage of Scripture, apply it authentically to the contemporary context, and refine one’s comprehension of the truths and values of Scripture. Special focus will be given to contemporary challenges against traditional reformed hermeneutics. DM9103 Contemporary Theology and the Church This course will instruct the student in understanding contemporary theological thought within a biblical theological context. Emphasis will be given to developing a biblical theological response to contemporary and emerging theological systems relevant to the church today. Topics covered will include the rise of liberal theology, neoorthodoxy, theology and language theory, liberation theology, sonship, the emergent church, and theology and critical ideologies. 12

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DM9101 The Lampstand Conference At the heart of the DMin program is the vision for healthy churches and biblical leaders. The Lampstand Conference is held annually at Briarwood Presbyterian Church and serves as the catalyst for this course. This intensive seminar stimulates pastoral self-examination, church vitality, and the mission of the church. In addition to the seminar, students will complete assigned readings and present papers interacting with the seminar content, readings, and ministry site. Students are required to attend the conference on-site unless they are international students or receive special exemptions. DM9105 Personal Leadership Development and Training Church Leaders The personal development of existing and new leaders is the focus of this course. The purpose is to assist the student in the critical task of self-evaluation or examination. The course will look to both inward (heart of the leader) and outward (leadership principles) training and facilitate further development of good and faithful servants of our Lord to lead the church in spiritual and numerical growth; it will provide students with the tools to impart a worldview and life view and equip others to become leaders. DM9108 Preaching in a Neo-Pagan World Preaching in a Neo-Pagan World seeks to develop pastors and their preaching within the context of Christ-centered, exegetically sound, and expositional preaching within the context of a culture that is fundamentally opposed to the Christian message. Careful study is made regarding the world in which we serve and understanding how to address the culture that has infiltrated the church. This course will help the student grasp the issues that need to be addressed in the church today and realize the importance of the preaching of the Word as one seeks to speak to those issues apologetically. The goal of this class is to develop pastors who are biblically faithful in their preaching while relevant to the challenges presented by the current cultural climate.DM9109 Pastoral Ministry in a Cultural ContextThe course will explore types and models of leadership that are necessary to do ministry in a post-Christian society. The course will explore the contextualization of ministry considering the racial, ethnic, cultural, and economic diversity that characterizes the church of the 21st century. In addition, it will closely exam the “Christ and Culture” problem in its contemporary idiom.DM9111 Independent Study/Understanding the DissertationThe Independent Study/Understanding the Dissertation class begins with an exploration of the methods, models, and processes of writing a successful DMin dissertation and dissertation proposal. The program director will assign a faculty mentor appropriate to the subject matter of the proposal. Students will submit a proposal to the director for this independent study. The proposal must include at least 3,000 pages of reading and a scholarly paper of no fewer than 25 pages, a significant part of which will constitute the student’s dissertation proposal. This course 13

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also includes the Theological Examination for Candidacy to the dissertation. Students can take the exam at the beginning of the semester and, if they do not pass, have a second opportunity to take the test at the end of the semester. Successful completion of both exam and proposal grants the student candidacy. DM9122 DMin Dissertation/Project (6 credit hours/two semesters)Students will first be assigned a committee, then will submit a proposal and complete the final project. Please see the BTS Dissertation Guide for more information.  Biblical Counseling ProgramMission: The Biblical Counseling program at BTS is taught from a biblical theological framework and believes in the sufficiency of Scripture for addressing the problems of the human condition, specifically in relationship to heart issues. We seek to develop graduates who are experts in counseling ministry, empathetic shepherds who stand on firm theological footing, and those who are committed to the shepherding ministry of the local church. Our prayer is that this program will spawn a resurgence of counseling ministries that are located in the local church, with members trained by BTS graduates to lead people to the healing work of Jesus Christ. Special Program Requirements: The Doctor of Ministry in Biblical Counseling degree requires satisfactory completion of 24 hours of coursework as prescribed in the curriculum, 3 hours of independent study and a six-hour capstone project. The student is expected to maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 with no more than one C grade in the entire program. Different than other tracks, the capstone project for Biblical Counseling will draw heavily from the student’s Counseling Practicum, which will be incorporated into the research on a counseling topic, paradigm, or practice of the student’s choice. More information is contained in the BTS Dissertation and Capstone Project Handbook. The DMin Biblical Counseling capstone project is 25,000–35,000 words, including a significant section analyzing the trends in their Counseling Practicum, but not including the actual response sheets (which may be included as an appendix, but cannot be counted toward overall word count). Biblical Counseling and Human Physiology/Psychopathology (DM1112)If an applicant has not had a class in theological anthropology (usually a systematic theology class) in their graduate coursework, they will be required to take BTS’s Systematic Theology 2: Anthropology class before admittance to the program. The Internship, Practicum, and Capstone Project:Unlike other tracks in the BTS doctoral program, the Biblical Counseling track employs a capstone project as opposed to a dissertation or thesis. The capstone project is shorter than the dissertation, 14

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principally because of the original research required of the Biblical Counseling student over the course of the program. In addition, the capstone project uses extensive analysis and capitulation of primary, observable research as opposed to going as deeply into current literature. Two courses with significant differences are the Biblical Counseling Internship Seminar and the Biblical Counseling Capstone Project. Biblical Counseling Internship Seminar (DM7800)The setting or place of the internship program and faculty responsibilities are to be arranged by the student with the approval of the DMin Biblical Counseling director. The internship program will begin with DM9551 Biblical Counseling Internship Seminar after the accumulation of 9 hours of coursework. After this class and over the course of the following two years, the student must accumulate 150 hours of supervised counseling prior to beginning DM9552 Biblical Counseling Capstone Project. Ideally, the setting of the internship should reflect the commitment to biblical counseling (e.g., in a church or Christian counseling organization). The purpose of the internship program is to provide the student with the opportunity to apply biblical counseling. If this is not possible, the student shall inform the DMin director of how he or she is going to apply biblical counseling in a non-Christian setting or environment. It is incumbent upon the student to set up the internship program with the DMin director and ensure that the setting and location of the internship are appropriate and qualify to be an internship program. The internship program then provides the framework from which the student will ultimately write his or her project (see curriculum description DM9552 Biblical Counseling Capstone Project for further information and a brief description of the Capstone Project below).Biblical Counseling Capstone Project (DMin9552) and Oral Defense:Biblical Counseling candidates (see General Information for more information on candidacy) write a capstone project as opposed to a dissertation. The reason for this is that Biblical Counseling students draw more on observation, analysis, and critique based on the extensive records of the Biblical Counseling Practicum and Internship. Since more of the work is done in direct analysis of observable phenomena and the record keeping required to make such research viable, the Biblical Counseling Capstone Project is measurably shorter than the dissertation project of the other three doctoral tracks. More information on the Biblical Counseling Capstone Project is available in the BTS Dissertation and Capstone Project Handbook. After completing an acceptable draft of the capstone project by the mentor and second reader, the student must submit a third copy for the outside reader (non-BTS personnel). A $400 outside reader fee must accompany this submission. Five copies of an abstract of not more than 1,500 words must also be submitted at this time. The vice president and DMin director will then notify the student to schedule a time for an oral defense of his/her work before the committee. An oral defense is required for the capstone project. Please see the information on the oral defense and grading in the General Information portion of this handbook. 15

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Curriculum:DM9120 Research and Design Required of all DMin students, this course will prepare the student for the DMin program and the necessary research for his or her dissertation or project. Students will become acquainted with the latest in research methods and tools. This will include a detailed study of Turabian format in review of students’ previous work and to make sure students are equipped to report on their studies appropriately and in the correct academic format.DM9102 Counseling Methodologies for the Pastor/Caring & Curing of Souls Required of all DMin students, this class will examine a biblical model of counseling along with exploring a biblical model of caring for the sheep of God’s fold. The personal and professional development of the minister and the biblical counselor is the focus of this course. Elements of this class include reading, lecture, role-playing, peer evaluation and case studies, and a project applicable to the student’s ministry setting. DM5513 Advanced HermeneuticsThe purpose of this course is to explore the interpretation and application of Scripture to human problems and foster a deeper understanding of the theory and practice of biblical interpretation or hermeneutics. This course will further the development of the skills and knowledge necessary to determine the meaning of any passage of Scripture, apply it authentically to the contemporary context, and refine one’s comprehension of the truths and values of Scripture. Special focus will be given to contemporary challenges against traditional reformed hermeneutics. DM9551 Biblical Counseling Internship Seminar This course is designed to prepare the student to conduct the Biblical Counseling Internship Practicum and to provide an understanding of the requirements for the 150 hours of supervised counseling. The internship seminar will provide the framework from which the student will write his or her capstone project. DM1112 Biblical Counseling and Human Physiology/Psychopathology The purpose of this course is to teach the student the relationship between human physiology and human behavior and the application of biblical counseling principles to this relationship and its appending problems. Students will conduct extensive exploration of biblical categories of human problems in comparison to the DSM IV diagnostic system. Advanced, biblical counseling approaches to anorexia, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive behaviors will be developed, as well as gender and sexuality issues. See note on prerequisites. DM9221 Biblical Counseling and Marriage & Family The student will explore preventative measures that can be employed in the church to eliminate family problems, as well as biblical strategies and methods of counseling to provide the rebuilding of broken relationships. 16

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DM9222 Biblical Counseling and Ecclesiology, Legal Issues and Peacemaking This course will explore the role of counseling in the church, contemporary legal issues, and the proactive role of the counselor in peacemaking.DM9321 Biblical Counseling & Professional/Personal Development The personal development of the biblical counselor is the focus of this course. The purpose is to assist the student in the critical task of self-evaluation and examination. The course will look to the professional and personal development of good and faithful servants of our Lord; it will provide students with the tools to impart a personal, biblical worldview and life view and to be equipped to counsel and train others for this diverse 21st Century.DM9121 Counseling Practicum/Understanding the Dissertation peThe first two weeks of this course reviews general dissertation guidelines that are applicable to the capstone project. After the first two to three weeks, the student is free to resume their counseling practicum. This course will explore methods, models, and processes of writing a DMin project. By the end of this course, the student should have completed at least 80% of the required hours for supervised counseling. The student will also turn in a 15–20-page paper with initial reactions to their counseling practicum and a proposal for what issue, topic, practice, or paradigm he or she would like to address for their capstone project. In addition, the student will take the Biblical Counseling Theological Examination for Candidacy to the final step of writing the capstone project. The examination will include a section on biblical exegesis. The student may take the test once at the beginning of the semester and, if they do not pass, may retake the exam at the end of the semester. Failure to pass the exam or to not include their capstone project proposal in their final paper may result in suspension from the program. DM9552 Biblical Counseling Practicum and Capstone Project (6 credit hours/two semesters) Biblical Counseling students have two semesters to complete their practicum, do their analysis, research for their capstone project, and complete their work. Students will first be assigned a committee, then will submit a proposal and complete the final project. See BTS Dissertation and Capstone Project Handbook for more information. ApologeticsMission: The mission of the Apologetics doctoral program at BTS is to develop ministry leaders that are equipped to meet the challenges of proclaiming and defending orthodox Christianity in the marketplace community. Students will be challenged by immersion in the theological and philosophical foundations required for engaging the current cultural climate, studying a range of topics that include foundational beliefs, anthropology, moral thought, and cultural development. Each class is designed to be academically challenging, with rich content that requires principle 17

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application to a variety of cultural, ethnic, positional, and geographic arenas. The program concludes with a dissertation project that should include significant original research and application to a current area of apologetics ministry that is considered to be underdeveloped in apologetic literature. Note on Apologetics PhD vs. DMin: There are several seminaries that offer doctor of philosophy programs in apologetics. The principal reason for BTS’s Doctor of Ministry in Apologetics is that we are founded on the principle of ministry application. PhD programs, by their nature, are principally concerned with researching historical topics or problems from angles of study that have been previously unexplored. The DMin program is interested in original research that is applied to current problems existing within the current cultural context of ministry. We believe that DMin students greatly benefit from the research and conclusions that are built and discovered in PhD programs and that PhD students can greatly benefit from the ministry applications brought forth by DMin students. Curriculum:(course descriptions are subject to slight alteration during first offering of program)DM9120 Research and Design Required of all DMin students, this course will prepare the student for the DMin program and the necessary research for his or her dissertation or project. Students will become acquainted with the latest in research methods and tools. This will include a detailed study of Turabian format in review of students’ previous work and confirmation that students are equipped to report on their studies appropriately and in the correct academic format. DM2201 Philosophical Theology and Reformed Dogmatics This course provides a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between philosophy and theology, with specific attention given to the philosophical problems that arrive from theological study, and will explore potential answers to those problems from a reformed theological perspective. DM2206 Metaphysical and EpistemologyStudents will engage in the study of the theological and philosophical positions that establish our understanding of the very nature of reality and how we can have knowledge of that reality. In addition, students will be challenged to develop a clear, reformed epistemology, setting the stage for public discourse in defense of the faith. DM9120 Advanced Apologetics and MethodologyIn this course, students will study the variety of approaches to apologetic methodology, build consistency in their methodological system, and interrogate and further develop their personal 18

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approach to apologetics. This course will draw heavily on the philosophical and theological foundations of the previous courses and will challenge the student to build their best positive case for the truth of Christianity. DM2207 Theological Anthropology and Moral TheologyThis course begins to look at principal objections to Christianity, starting with the issues of personhood and social discourse. Students will engage in a rich study of theological anthropology and identify, then move to the study of, the ethical and moral issues raised in the marketplace. Graduate Ethics study is a prerequisite for this course. DM2208 Cultural Development and Culture StudiesA study on the nature of culture and issues surrounding cultural studies, this course will explore both theological and secular frameworks for understanding society and will challenge students to develop a biblical theology of culture and cultural engagement. DM2209 Contextual Apologetics This course focuses on applying the student’s theological framework and apologetic methodology with deep understanding of cultural perspectives without compromise. This is the culmination of the coursework; students will focus on understanding, sharing, and growing together—with a theologically sound and appropriately contextualized method of ministry—in the varied cultural contexts in which they seek to engage individuals. DM8791 Developing an Apologetic MinistryIn this course, students work with the supervising professor and outside mentors to develop and study strategic ministry deployment of apologetics in the marketplace. Whether directly from the church, in the business community, with a youth ministry, in an academic context, or in different socioeconomic (and possibly ethnic) contexts, students will be challenged to develop a usable, strategic plan for ministry deployment. Attention will be paid to foundational positions, biblical approaches, avenues of contextualization, and to leadership initiatives and reproduction in assessing final projects. DM9111 Independent Study/Understanding the DissertationThe Independent Study/Understanding the Dissertation class begins with an exploration of the methods, models, and processes of writing a successful DMin dissertation and dissertation proposal. The Program Director will assign a faculty mentor appropriate to the subject matter of the proposal. The student will submit a proposal to the director for this independent study. The proposal must include at least 3,000 pages of reading and a scholarly paper of no fewer than 25 pages, a significant part of which will constitute the student’s dissertation proposal. This course also includes the Theological Examination for Candidacy to the dissertation. Students can take the exam at the beginning of the semester and, if they do not pass, have a second opportunity to take 19

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test at the end of the semester. Successful completion of the exam and the proposal grants the student candidacy. DM9122 DMin Dissertation/Project (6 credit hours/two semesters)Students will be assigned a committee, submit a proposal, and complete the final project. Please see the BTS Dissertation Guide for more information.Church Multiplication Mission: The mission of the Church Multiplication track in the BTS doctoral program is to explore and study the mission of the church and apply those principles to the multiplication of Christ’s church around the world. The program has three salient study areas—Church Planting, Church Revitalization, and Coach Training—to help other churches and pastors. The goal of the program is to see networks and denominations of healthy, gospel-centered churches, reproducing and revitalizing to expand the kingdom of God through his bride. Students will be equipped to lead churches, plant churches, revitalize churches, and help coach churches and pastors through difficult times and transitions. The foundation of this program is the Lampstand Conference at Briarwood Presbyterian Church, and students will be required to attend (preferably in person, but videoconference is available). All subsequent courses are theologically and philosophically built out from this conference. N.B.BTS is working with several nonprofit organizations (e.g., Embers to a Flame, Flourish Ministries, and MNA) to certify the BTS program as a pathway to coaching and mentoring certifications. Curriculum: (course descriptions are subject to slight alteration during first offering of program)DM9120 Research and Design Required of all DMin students, this course will prepare the student for the DMin program and the necessary research for his or her dissertation or project. Students will become acquainted with the latest in research methods and research tools. This will include a detailed study of Turabian format in review of students’ previous work and confirmation that students are equipped to report on their studies appropriately and in the correct academic format.DM9101 The Lampstand Conference At the heart of the DMin program is the vision for healthy churches and biblical leaders. The Lampstand Conference is held annually at Briarwood Presbyterian Church and serves as the catalyst for this course. This intensive seminar stimulates pastoral self-examination, church vitality, 20

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and the mission of the church. In addition to the seminar, students will complete assigned readings and present papers interacting with the seminar content, readings, and ministry site. Students are required to attend the conference on-site unless they are international students or receive special exemptions.DM3550 Advanced HermeneuticsThe purpose of this course is to explore the interpretation and application of Scripture to human problems and a deeper understanding of the theory and practice of biblical interpretation or hermeneutics. This course will further the development of the skills and knowledge necessary to determine the meaning of any passage of Scripture, apply it authentically to the contemporary context, and refine one’s comprehension of the truths and values of Scripture. Special focus will be given to contemporary challenges against traditional reformed hermeneutics.DM9103 Contemporary Theology and the Church This course will instruct the student in understanding contemporary theological thought within a biblical theological context. Emphasis will be given to developing a biblical theological response to contemporary, emerging theological thought relevant to the church today. Topics covered will include the rise of liberal theology, neoorthodoxy, theology and language theory, liberation theology, sonship, the emergent church, and theology and critical ideologies.DM9021 Contemporary Church PlantingThis course will explore a biblical view of church planting, building on the Lampstand Conference, and then will transition to studying, understanding, and assessing contemporary views on church planting—both inside the reformed community and outside the reformed community. This course, and each following course, will specifically consider the variety of different church planting fields: geographic, socioeconomic, ethnic, etc. DM9022 Biblical Multiplication and DevelopmentWhat are the principles of biblical multiplication and discipleship? This course examines how discipleship is at the heart of church planting and church health and helps the student to evaluate discipleship for new churches or replants from a biblical, methodological, and systematic perspective. DM9023 Transformational Church DevelopmentHow do our churches develop into healthier bodies of discipleship and ministry? This course studies the essential elements of institutional transformation, biblical leadership, and tasks of the pastor, helping churches move from plants to formative institutions. DM9024 Mentor Development and TrainingIn the final course before students complete their dissertation research, they will go through 21

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a coaching and mentoring training program. BTS is currently working with Embers to a Flame Ministry, Flourish Ministries, MNA, and other organizations championing church planting, church revitalization, and church vitality to secure certification as an official coach or mentor after completion of this course. DM9111 Independent Study/Understanding the DissertationThe Independent Study/Understanding the Dissertation class begins with an exploration of the methods, models, and processes of writing a successful DMin dissertation and dissertation proposal. The program director will assign a faculty mentor appropriate to the subject matter of the proposal. The student will submit a proposal to the director for this independent study. The proposal must include at least 3,000 pages of reading and a scholarly paper of no fewer than 25 pages, a significant part of which will constitute the student’s dissertation proposal. This course also includes the Theological Examination for Candidacy to the dissertation. Students can take the exam at the beginning of the semester and, if they do not pass, have a second opportunity to take test at the end of the semester. Successful completion of the exam and the proposal grants the student candidacy. DM9122 DMin Dissertation/Project (6 credit hours/two semesters)Students will first be assigned a committee, then will submit a proposal and complete the final project. Please see the BTS Dissertation Guide for more information.22