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Conference Program final 8-4-22

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CELEBRATIONS & TRANSFORMATIONSMinnesota Network of Hospice & Palliative Care 2022 Virtual ConferenceSeptember 29 & 30Conference Program*program still in development & subject to change

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1265 Grey Fox Road, Suite 2Arden Hills, MN 55112Minnesota Network of Hospice & Palliative Careemail: info@mnhpc.orgphone: 651-917-4616www.mnhpc.orgStaff Jessica HausauerExecutive DirectorAra SchmidtCommunications & Development CoordinatorElinor JacksonAdministrative CoordinatorJenna KornbergAdministrative CoordinatorLores VlaminckCOVID-19 Consultant

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MNHPC is pleased to announce that our annual conference is virtual again this year with the theme, “Celebrations & Transformations.”Our theme reflects on our collective experience working in serious illness and end-of-life care through the heightened complexities of a pandemic. While we will gather virtually again this September, we are excited to be together in community, and conversation and to celebrate each other and our work. We are celebrating our professions, clients, families, connections, colleagues, resilience, determination, passion, heart, and ongoing dedication to providing the highest quality end-of-life care. Simultaneously, we bring attention to the ways we may have been called to transform our work and day-to-day existence. We rely on our hospice and palliative care community to acknowledge both the challenges and beauty brought forth by transformation. To provide flexible and convenient education the conference will be presented virtually. It will be the same high-quality continuing education experience that attendees have come to expect from MNHPC conferences. Likewise, it will be an opportunity to connect with others in the serious illness and end-of-life care community in new and exciting ways.

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Jearlyn is a member of the internationally acclaimed family, The Steeles, who have performed from Carnegie Hall to Brazil and to the Super Bowl Live Verizon stage in 2018. For more than a decade, she has been the Entertainment Reporter for Twin Cities Public Television’s award-winning political show Almanac interviewing local, national and international acts. As a keynote speaker, facilitator and emcee, Jearlyn has inspired audiences around the country and the Caribbean. Maintaining her four-hour Sunday night radio show called Steele Talkn’ on WCCO Radio 830AM, has been a joy for more than two decades. Developing and delivering her TedX Talk in 2016 offered a revisit of her Personal Values Statement, which has emboldened her as a woman, mother, entertainer andstudent.Musically, she has performed with the Minnesota Orchestra, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Prince, Mavis Staples and more. She was a frequent special guest on the national radio broadcast A Prairie Home Companion performing duets with music greats CaroleKing and Elvis Costello. Her vocal talents landed her a feature in the Robert Altman film, A Prairie Home Companion starring Meryl Streep, Lily Tomlin, Woody Harrelson, Tommy Lee Jones and Garrison Keillor.Jearlyn has served on Boards for Chrysalis—a women’s resource center and the Ordway Circle of Stars, who unite children with the world of art. She is pursuing a Master of Arts degree in Leadership and Innovation in Ministry at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, MN.In 2016, an Honorary Doctorate degree was conferred upon her by the University of Indianapolis and in October 2019, she received an Emmy for narrator of the TPT documentary, Flour Power.MNHPC's 2022 ConferenceJearlyn SteeleConference Emcee

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Contact Hour Information for Live and Enduring Content Provider awarding contact hours: Minnesota Network of Hospice & Palliative Care Goal: To advance the knowledge of healthcare professionals who provide serious illness and end-of-life services. Learning Outcomes: Participants will self-report a knowledge gain related to: 1. Best practices and innovations in serious illness and end-of-life care. 2. Specific pain and symptom management interventions for patients receiving hospice and/or palliative care. 3. Common emotional and spiritual needs of patients, families, and professionals caring for patients with serious illness and end-of-life. 4. Techniques to address complex family dynamics, grief, bereavement, and trauma at the end-of-life. 5. Ethical challenges related to caring for patients with serious illness or at the end-of-life. 6. Hospice and palliative care regulations, policies, and reimbursement strategies and identify strategies for compliance. 7. Strategies to raise awareness of hospice and palliative care across all Minnesota communities. 8. Strategies to improve quality of hospice and palliative care services for underrepresented groups. Target Audience: This conference is designed for nursing, administration, music therapy, physical therapy, chaplaincy, physicians, occupational therapy, social work, physician assistants, home health care, and volunteers.Contact Hours The full MNHPC Annual Conference provides up to 43 total contact hours. Social Work This conference has been designed to meet the Minnesota Board of Social Work requirements and is approved for up to 43 clock hours. (CEP#490)Nurse/ANCC This activity has been submitted to WNA CEAP for approval to award contact hours.Wisconsin Nurses Association is accredited as an approver of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Physician/ACCME This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the Minnesota Medical Association and Minnesota Network of Hospice & Palliative Care. The Minnesota Medical Association (MMA) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.The Minnesota Medical Association designates this activity for a maximum of 43 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.Goal: To advance the knowledge of healthcare professionals who provide serious illness and end-of-life services. Continuing Education Information for Live and Enduring Content

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Fully attend or view the sessions either live, virtual or on-demand. Live virtual education will be delivered September 29th and 30th.Enduring material is available October 14th to December 31st. Log-in individually using links provided. If you do not log-in individually, there is no official documentation of your attendance, and you will not receive credit. Complete online evaluation by December 31st, 2022. A link to the evaluation will be emailed to you and posted on the virtual conference platform. CEU Certificates will be sent via email by January 16th, 2023. Please note that some sessions are not eligible for contact hours. Contact Hour Information for Live and Enduring Content Music TherapyThe 2022 MNHPC Conference is approved by the Certification Board for Music Therapists (CBMT) for 38 credits. Minnesota Network of Hospice & Palliative Care, #P-153 maintains responsibility for the program quality and adherence to CBMT policies and criteria. Other Disciplines Check back for updates regarding executives for long-term services and supports. All other disciplines are self- submit. Contact Hour Requirements To receive contact hours, conference attendees must: DisclosuresNo planners or faculty have any financial relationships (with companies whose primary business is producing, marketing, selling, re-selling, or distributing healthcare products used by or on patients) that are relevant to the content of this educational activity, except Logan Hoover, Stock, Walgreens, CVS, Abbott, Amazon. Financial Support There is no financial support to disclose.Goal: To advance the knowledge of healthcare professionals who provide serious illness and end-of-life services. Continuing Education Information for Live and Enduring Content

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Haider Warraich is a physician, author and researcher at the VA Boston Healthcare System and Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. His research focuses on the intersection of palliative care and heart failure and he has published more than 140 papers including original research in the NEJM, JAMA and BMJ. He frequently writes for the New York Times and Washington Post, and is the author of the books Modern Death, State of the Heart and the just published The Song of Our Scars – The Untold Story of Pain (April 2022).MNHPC's 2022 ConferenceHaider Warraich, MDKeynote Speaker

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Marisa Renee Lee is a called-upon advocate, writer, and speaker on coping with grief. In 2008, she lost her mother to breast cancer, in 2019 Marisa and her husband lost a much-wanted pregnancy, and most recently, she lost a young cousin to the COVID-19 pandemic. These losses transformed her life and led her to question what grief really is and what healing truly requires.As a leading grief advocate, Marisa offers incisive and compassionate advice on managing life after loss with unique insights for women and African American communities. She recently partnered with Ritual's well-being app as a writer and narrator alongside other leaders in science, faith, and culture. Her first book, Grief Is Love: Living with Loss, was published in April 2022 under Hachette’s new imprint, Legacy Lit, and is already a national bestseller. As a former appointee in the Obama White House, Marisa previously served as the Deputy Director of Private Sector Engagement, a Senior Advisor on the Domestic Policy Council, and as the Managing Director of the MBK Alliance, the nonprofit born out of President Obama's call to action to address the barriers to success that boys and young men of color disproportionately face in their lives. She is a rabble-rouser of social healing and currently serves as CEO of the social impact consulting firm Beacon Advisors, co-founder of the digital platform Supportal, and founder of The Pink Agenda, a national organization dedicated to raising money for breast cancer care, research, and awareness.Lee is a public speaker and regular contributor to Glamour, Vogue, MSNBC, and The Atlantic. She is a graduate of Harvard College and lives in the DC area with her husband Matt, son Bennett, and dog Sadie.MNHPC's 2022 ConferenceMarisa Renee Lee Keynote Speaker

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Jen Crow serves as Senior Minister at the First Universalist Church of Minneapolis. She is the founder of Wellspring, a Unitarian Universalist program of spiritual deepening used across the country. Her commitment to recovery, spirituality, transformative love, and authenticity is at the center of her life and work. She lives with her wife and two amazing kids in Minneapolis, Minnesota. MNHPC's 2022 ConferenceJen CrowKeynote Speaker

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Julie McFadden, BSN, RN has been a nurse for 14 years. Julie is an experienced ICU, and now Hospice/Palliative Nurse.Julie has been featured in Newsweek, USA today, The Atlantic, and several other articles worldwide.Julie has been passionate about normalizing death through education to the masses using social media. Her tiktok has over 800k followers, and Instagram has over 60k, and growing.MNHPC's 2022 ConferenceHospice Nurse JulieCelebrity Interview

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Barbara Karnes, RN, is an internationally recognized author, speaker, thought leader and expert on end of life care and the dynamics of dying. Barbara was recognized in 2018 as a Hospice Innovator by the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization and was named the 2015 International Humanitarian Woman of the Year by the World Humanitarian Awards.Barbara’s experience as a hospice care provider at the bedside of hundreds of people, and as an administrator overseeing the care of thousands, led to the 1985 publication of Gone from My Sight: The Dying Experience. Affectionately referred to in the industry as the “little blue hospice book,” Gone from My Sight has sold over 30 million copies worldwide, is published in 12 languages, and remains the leading resource on the market today educating families on the signs of approaching death. In 2015, Barbara’s film New Rules for End of Life Care was featured in film festivals around the world and was the recipient of 10 prestigious film awards.MNHPC's 2022 ConferenceBarbara Karnes, RNCelebrity Interview

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The Future of Hospice & Palliative Care: Celebrating the Past, Planning for the FutureHaider Warraich, MD Understand the history and origin of palliative care and hospice Learn about some of the major achievements of hospice and palliative care Explore opportunities for and challenges to future growthIn this talk, Dr. Warraich will chart the history of palliative care from its inception, some of the great achievements of this field and movement, and touch upon challenges it might face in the future. Learning Objective:1.2.3. KeynoteHaider Warraich, MDConference Program

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1ACultural Considerations at End of Life: A Physician Panel and their PerspectivesDennis Cross, MD ; Yer Xiong, MD ; Kathy Wedemeyer, BSIdentify skills that will enhance their ability to provide optimal end-of-life care to patients from diverse cultural backgrounds.Describe how history influences culture and its relevance in caring for patients and families from certain marginalized groups.This panel of diverse Hospice Physicians will examine culturally appropriate care for patients at the end of life as well as explore their own journeys in Health Care as Providers with diverse backgrounds.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.Culturally Appropriate Care | 60min | Fundamental | Hospice & Palliative | Live 1BCollaboration Pearls forAssisted Living and HospiceLores Vlaminck, MA, BSN, RN, CHPN, LALDArticulate the roles and responsibilities of the hospice providers and non- hospice providers in provision of collaborative care.Define experiences of barriers and solutions of successes.Share pearls of wisdom that expedite practical standard communication flow.Collaboration with Non Hospice Providers is essential to the best possible delivery of care to mutual patients and their families. Join this presentation to share in the pearls of wisdom to prevent redundancy, confusion and a shared care plan.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Optimizing the Interdisciplinary Team | 60min |Proficient | Hospice | Live1C“When the world is messy, how do we stay grounded?”Lynn Liberman, Rabbi, BCC ; Tara Burns, MAState methods of self care.Appreciate individual Spiritual health and wellbeing.Find strength in their own resiliency.Often people view a disaster as something on a large scale leaving us feeling lost, vulnerable, at odds with life. The pending death of a loved one is its own microcosm of disaster. We will consider issues of resiliency, depression, mending and supporting the spirit, and finding our wellbeing.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Family Dynamics & Trauma | 60min | Proficient | Hospice & Palliative | LiveThursday, September 29Breakout Session 1 | 9:15 - 10:15 amConference Program

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1ACultural Considerations at End of Life: A Physician Panel and their PerspectivesDennis Cross, MD ; Yer Xiong, MD ; Kathy Wedemeyer, BSIdentify skills that will enhance their ability to provide optimal end-of-life care to patients from diverse cultural backgrounds.Describe how history influences culture and its relevance in caring for patients and families from certain marginalized groups.This panel of diverse Hospice Physicians will examine culturally appropriate care for patients at the end of life as well as explore their own journeys in Health Care as Providers with diverse backgrounds.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.Culturally Appropriate Care | 60min | Fundamental | Hospice & Palliative | Live 1BCollaboration Pearls forAssisted Living and HospiceLores Vlaminck, MA, BSN, RN, CHPN, LALDArticulate the roles and responsibilities of the hospice providers and non- hospice providers in provision of collaborative care.Define experiences of barriers and solutions of successes.Share pearls of wisdom that expedite practical standard communication flow.Collaboration with Non Hospice Providers is essential to the best possible delivery of care to mutual patients and their families. Join this presentation to share in the pearls of wisdom to prevent redundancy, confusion and a shared care plan.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Optimizing the Interdisciplinary Team | 60min |Proficient | Hospice | Live1C“When the world is messy, how do we stay grounded?”Lynn Liberman, Rabbi, BCC ; Tara Burns, MAState methods of self care.Appreciate individual Spiritual health and wellbeing.Find strength in their own resiliency.Often people view a disaster as something on a large scale leaving us feeling lost, vulnerable, at odds with life. The pending death of a loved one is its own microcosm of disaster. We will consider issues of resiliency, depression, mending and supporting the spirit, and finding our wellbeing.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Family Dynamics & Trauma | 60min | Proficient | Hospice & Palliative | LiveThursday, September 29Breakout Session 1 | 9:15 - 10:15 amConference Program

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1DSafer, Simpler Opioid Conversions: Moving Beyond Equianalgesic TablesDrew Rosielle, MD FAAHPMDescribe the safety challenges which are inherent to equianalgesic tables.Practice a method of converting between opioids that is simpler and safer than what is promoted with equianalgesic tables.Equianalgesic Tables have been central to how our community has discussed switching between opioids. However, they are complicated, and due to their fixed and rigid structure, force us into promoting opioid switching ratios which are not evidence-based and dangerous at times. By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.Pain & Symptom Management | 60min | Advanced | Hospice & Palliative | LiveThursday, September 29Breakout Session 1 | 9:15 - 10:15 amThursday, September 29Breakout Session 2 | 10:30 - 11:20 am2ARegulatory Hot TopicsJudi Lund Person, MPH, CHC2BMicrowellness! Ideas and strategies to fit calm and self care into your day.Amy Greminger, MD Describe how stress physiology can negatively impact patient care.Employ 2-3 strategies to help mitigate stress.I will discuss stress physiology, and outline some exercises to help mitigate this. The emphasis will be on quick strategies that can be done in between patients.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.Mental Health & Terminal Illness | 60min | Proficient | Hospice & Palliative | Live

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Celebrity InterviewHospice Nurse Julie; Barbara Karnes, RN Explore the value of hospice care and the variety of experiences within it. Understand how public death and dying education is imperative. Learn about some of the changes in hospice care over time - both long and short term.In this interview style session between two hospice nurses, Barbara will bring the perspective of a veteran and pioneer in hospice care, while Julie brings her experience as a newer nurse and influencer.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3. KeynoteCelebrity InterviewHospice Nurse Julie & Barbara Karnes, RNConference Program

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2DGIP - Facts, Focus, and Practical ApplicationsMichael Pinchback, MD, HCMD ; Lindsey Pelletier, RN, BSN, CHPNIdentify indications of GIP level of care.Discuss regulatory requirements specific to GIP.We will examine the General Inpatient level of Hospice care through a discussion of both the regulatory requirements specific to and practical uses of GIP. Our presenters will use both a lecture format and case studies involving audience participation.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.Best Practices in Education & Field Training for Providers | 60min | Proficient | Hospice | Live2EGenerosity: Stories of Re- moralizationMaggie O'Connor, MDIdentify demoralization for self and team members. Understand Frank's concept of generosity and identify such interactions in their experience and apply it intentionally in future work.Those in health care are finding it harder to be the “person they want to be” at work. The resulting dissatisfaction is often treated symptomatically with “self-care”. This is not an enduring fix. Arthur Frank offers an alternative, Generosity, that will be presented through his work and case studies.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.Team Dynamics & Self Care | 60min | Fundamental | Hospice & Palliative | LiveThursday, September 29Breakout Session 2 | 10:30 - 11:20 amThursday, September 29Breakout Session 3 | 1:00 - 2:00 pm3AImplementing Age Friendly Care - The Next Level of Patient Centered CareJennifer Kennedy, EdD, MA, BSN, RN, CHCDescribe the current aging population of the U.S.Explain Age Friendly Care and the “4Ms”.Discuss the relationship of the “4Ms” to healthcare quality.Implementing Age-Friendly care involves reliably providing a set of four evidence- based elements of high-quality care, known as the “4Ms” to all older adults. This session will discuss age friendly care and hospice providers can drill down to the next level of patient centered care.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Redefining Service Delivery | 60min | Proficient |Hospice & Palliative | LiveConference Program

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3BContinuous Commitment: Learning To Communicate With Patients and Families for Patient-Centered End- of-Life CareDr. Frank Bennett, PhD, MDiv, BScIdentify communication strategies to employ at admission and as patients’ conditions progress.Identify a documentation plan for increasing comprehension and interdisciplinary collaboration.Describe a model to guide the EOL communication process.End-of-life (EOL) care has been studied extensively and it is established that effective EOL care communication reduces decision-making uncertainty, improves care outcomes and satisfaction with EOL care. However, there are few established guidelines for the complex process of communicating with patients.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Best Practices in Education & Field Training for Providers | 60min | Proficient | Hospice & Palliative | Live3C"This can't continue...I justdon't have the Fortitude:" Palliative Care Intervention at the Intersection of Countertransference, Grief, and Ethical UncertaintyFlorence Wright, MSW, LICSW, APHSW-C ; Jodie Capecchi, AGPCNPDiscuss the potential challenges caregivers face in the medical setting, particularly related to serious illness and end of life.Discuss ethical considerations surrounding withdrawing life-sustaining treatment.Identify ways in which countertransference can impact practice and how to respond appropriately.This case presentation centers on a young patient who suffered emergent and unexpected complications during an elective surgical procedure. Lessons learned, ethical reflection, and palliative care intervention aimed at supporting decision- making, grief, and ameliorating staff distress will be highlighted.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Clinical Considerations in Palliative Care | 60min | Proficient | Live3DDelirium at End of Life*no contact hoursJeremiah Kruckemeyer, PharmDRecognize the presentation of the various subtypes of delirium based on diagnostic criteria.Differentiate delirium from other common conditions such as dementia and depression.Recommend appropriate management of delirium, including pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies.Delirium is one of the most prevalent conditions for hospice patients and can have a significant impact on quality of life for both patients and caregivers. Despite prevalence, delirium often goes unrecognized. Participants will be able to recognize delirium and recommend appropriate management.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Mental Health & Terminal Illness | 60min | Fundamental | Hospice & Palliative | LiveConference Program

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3EDon't Panic: Buprenorphine as an Analgesic for Patients with Serious IllnessDrew Rosielle, MD, FAAHPM ; Annette Nijjar, MDDescribe two unique aspects of buprenorphine pharmacology that distinguishes it from other opioid agonists.Prescribe buprenorphine safely to opioid tolerant patientsOpioid pain management in the US is shifting markedly, due to deepening appreciation of the harms of chronic opioid therapy, and the superior safety profile of buprenorphine. We will review the pharmacology of buprenorphine along with practical aspects of how to provide this therapy to our patients.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.Pain & Symptom Management | 60min | Advanced | Hospice & Palliative | LiveThursday, September 29Breakout Session 4 | 2:15 - 3:15 pm4AHow Can Technology Better Support Spiritual Care? Guidance and Future Innovations for Spiritual Care in the Aftermath of the COVID-19 PandemicC. Estelle Smith, MS, PhD ; Susan O'Conner-Von, PhD, RN-BC, CNE, FNAPDescribe prerequisites and characterizing aspects of online spiritual support.Discuss best practices for helping patients to utilize online spaces for spiritual support.Compare and contrast future possibilities for tech-based spiritual care interventions in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic.This webinar explores tech-based spiritual care for patients, especially via on- and offline support communities. We present research findings and case studies that reflect work conducted collaboratively with CaringBridge and an interprofessional team of computer scientists and spiritual care experts.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Best Practices in Education & Field Training for Providers | 60min | Proficient | Hospice & Palliative | LiveConference Program

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Thursday, September 29Breakout Session 4 | 2:15 - 3:15 pm4BThe Changing Landscape of Hospice and Value-Based Care; Medication Administration by Unlicensed PersonnelBeth Werner, MS, RN, MHA ; Lores Vlaminck, MA, BSN, RN, CHPN, LALDExplore the MN State Board of Nursing, CMS, MDH’s stance on delegation of medication administration to unlicensed staff.Describe best practices for ensuring safety, accuracy and adherence to your agency policy.Discuss the value of medication administration by the agency’s hospice aide.With a shift toward value-based reimbursement models, hospices must be innovative and hone in on strategies that promote broader service models of care. The depth and accessibility of our electronic highways provide consumers (our patients and families) with a wealth of information about their health and their health care. As consumers become better informed about what is possible, they not only desire, they demand more care. For hospice programs to keep up with the demands of our consumers, we must find ways to be innovative and demonstrate value in the services provided. Delegating medication administration to unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) is one way to increase our ability to provide service to the patient and family who may desire or require more caregiver relief while in the home setting. Medication administration by Hospice Aides may offer ths relief. This session explores the benefits of delegating medication administration to the Hospice Aide, the state statutes, the stance of the Board of Nursing as well as the education, training and sample competency required for safe clinical practice. By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Best Practices in Education & Field Training for Providers | 60min | Advanced | Hospice | Live4CMaximizing Interdisciplinary Team Support to Meet a Patient's Needs: A Case StudyJennifer Kuyava, MD, HMDC ; Amanda Jackson Wilber, BSN, RN, CWCNImplement techniques for trust and relationship building with patients and families.Improve communication within an interdisciplinary team.Optimize utilization of interdisciplinary team members to both meet pt/family needs and to support team members.Our presentation will focus on the case of a middle-aged male with metastatic cancer. His care was challenging due to past trauma and severe physical symptoms. By using a multidisciplinary team approach, we were able to build the trust necessary to alleviate his complex symptoms.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Optimizing the Interdisciplinary Team | 60min | Proficient | Hospice & Palliative | LiveConference Program

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Grief is LoveMarisa Renee LeeWe're approaching the holiday season. Can you talk about grief from the perspective of entering this time of year? What should we expect from ourselves if we are grieving during the holidays?In April, you wrote an article for the Atlantic called "Grief is Everywhere" that coincided with Covid deaths in America hitting the 1M mark. Can you talk a little bit more about what you have called "the collective grief" that our country is facing and why you think now, more than ever, we need better bereavement policies and mental health services?Can you talk about what it might look like to support someone grieving?Can you talk about how your book debunks the myth about the "5 Stages of Grief?" How does the research you've done and your experience contrast what we knew from Elisabeth Kubler Ross?One of the unique things about your perspective and your book is that it explores the unique impact grief has on Black people – for example; you talkabout your inclination to act as a "strong Black woman" when your mother passed as a way to cope with her loss. Can you talk a little more about grief as a privilege and how it complicates the process for Black people? Identify what it looks like to honor loss and uniquely grieve Understand grief as a privilege Marisa Renee Lee, grief advocate and author of the bestselling book "Grief Is Love: Living with Loss," explores how we can still have a beautiful and joyful life amid grief. Utilizing research-based advice, Marisa demonstrates what it looks like to honor loss on your unique terms and debunks the idea of grief stages. She explores how death requires that you learn to love yourself and the one you lost with the same depth, passion, joy, and commitment you did when you were alive, perhaps even more.Sample Questions: By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2. KeynoteMarisa Renee Lee

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Thursday, September 29Breakout Session 4 | 2:15 - 3:15 pm4DPalliative Sedation : Ethical ConsiderationsVineetha Jose, MBBSDiscuss with patients and team members about the ethical and legal considerations of palliative procedure.This session will discuss in-depth ethical and legal considerations of Palliativesedation. It will also discuss a case study and the procedure of palliative sedation itself and decide when a palliative sedation procedure is appropriate for a patient. By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.Ethics | 60min | Advanced | Hospice & Palliative | Live4ETransformed by Caregivers:Personal/Professional/Bibli otherapeutic ReflectionsTed Bowman, MDivDiscern and evaluate the quality of caregiver support in their settingsDevelop a plan for the use of the content and process of this session.The quality of life for hospice patients is influenced by caregivers. Attention to the well-being of caregivers can be minimized by family care approaches. Drawing on 14 years of facilitating a caregiver support group and perspectives of bibliotherapy, caregiver lives will be discussed.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.Clinical Considerations in Palliative Care | 60min | Proficient | Hospice & Palliative | LiveConference Program

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5AHospice and Palliative Care Policy and AdvocacyLucy Schmitz, MPP; Logan Hoover TBA 5BMusic Therapy and Resource-Oriented ApproachesNoah Potvin, PhD, LPC, MT- BC Resource-oriented approaches to hospice music therapy provide a framework for culturally reflexive practices that draw directly from patients' and caregivers' strengths. This presentation will focus on the role of religion and spirituality in music encounters that helpe actualize healthy death and dying experiences. 1. Attendees will be able to articulate what resource-oriented work is and how it informs music therapy at the end of life. 2. Attendees will be able to identify three ways a resource-oriented approach informs music therapy practice 5CPsychedelics in Palliative Care and Hospice: A Perspective from Spiritual CareLeonard Hummel, MDiv, STM, PhDArticulate at least two perspectives on the use of psychedelics in palliative care and hospice.Articulate at least two perspectives from spiritual care on the use of psychedelics in palliative care and hospice. Identify strategies for the development of their own individually informed perspectives on the administration of psychedelics.Administration of psychedelics in palliative care/hospice is expanding, as are proposals for more widespread utilization. Participants will identify opportunities and challenges afforded by psychedelics from the perspectives of both their own disciplines and that of spiritual care.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Innovations in Hospice & Palliative Care | 60min | Proficient | Hospice & Palliative | LiveFriday, September 30Breakout Session 5 | 9:15 - 10:15 amConference Program

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5DJourneying in the Dark: Lessons of Hope and Healing When Grief is LongDee Dee Haines, DMinistry, MDivAssess signs, symptoms and layers of loss that often remain unnamed as grief.Articulate the definition of multiple types of grief including prolonged, delayed and disenfranchised.Articulate person-centered interventions and goals that tend to symptoms of grief and encourage healing.For grief to heal, it needs to be seen. Grief companioning education supports meeting patients and families where they are at, partnering with them to name, and tend to grief, exploring the possibility of hope and meaning-making that may be found, even in the midst of pain.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Patient & Family Education | 60min | Fundamental |Hospice & Palliative| Live5ETransforming Decedent Transfers with Small Moments of CeremonyAngela Woosley, MAInternalize the benefits of bedside ceremonies after death. Confidently partner with families and morticians at the initial transfer. Use inclusive and inviting language around decedent transfers.Every moment we have with the dead is profound - or at least it can be. Bringing ceremony to the bedside of the dead forms a bridge of care from healthcare to deathcare, and invites families into caring for their dead, instead of excluding them from these important and intimate moments.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Patient & Family Education | 60min | Proficient | Hospice & Palliative | LiveFriday, September 30Breakout Session 5 | 9:15 - 10:15 amFriday, September 30Breakout Session 6 | 10:30 - 11:15 am6AUsing Data to Drive Racial and Health Equity in Patients with Serious IllnessesSumee Lee, MPP ; Zander Holleran, BHBP ; Sumair Akhtar, MD, MHCDSArticulate the importance of data collection and data quality.Make data-driven business decisions that advance racial and health equity.Begin data driven work even with limited capacity.We understand the importance of data as a driver of business decisions. We also acknowledge diversity, equity and inclusion and equitable care delivery has become a core focus in health care. How do we use data to show if our organization is providing equitable care and where do we start?By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion in Hospice & Palliative Care | 45min | Proficient | Hospice & Palliative | LiveConference Program

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6BMusic TherapyNoah Potvin, PhD, LPC, MT- BC Resource-oriented approaches to hospice music therapy provide a framework for culturally reflexive practices that draw directly from patients' and caregivers' strengths. This presentation will focus on the role of religion and spirituality in music encounters that helpe actualize healthy death and dying experiences. 1. Attendees will be able to articulate what resource-oriented work is and how it informs music therapy at the end of life. 2. Attendees will be able to identify three ways a resource-oriented approach informs music therapy practice 6CLet's Talk About IntimacyAnnette Nijjar, MD ; Rachel Bialostosky, MSW, LICSWIdentify the domains of sexuality and intimacy. Overcome barriers to the discussion of sexuality and intimacy. Direct their patients to helpful resourcesIn this session Rachel and Annette will explore how serious illness can affect our patients’ experience of sexuality and intimacy. They will have an interprofessional conversation between social worker and physician highlighting the importance of intimacy for quality of life.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Clinical Considerations in Palliative Care | 45min | Proficient | Hospice & Palliative | Live6DReplenishing The WellTony Del Percio, BPsy, NLPLearn how to stay within the window of Tolerance and use your 5 core organizers.Identify the impact on your personal life when the "Well" runs dry. Identify 10 things you can do to keep your "Well" from running dry.The “Well” is the place within our wellbeing that contains the knowledge, skills and tools and the place we go when we need to care for ourselves. Healthcare professionals are constantly being drained from all directions. When drained we may feel run-down and lack motivation.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Mental Health & Terminal Illness | 45min | Fundamental | Hospice & Palliative | Live6ESpiritual Care - It is not just for ChaplainsBrian Kroeger, MDiv ; Kae Evenson, RN, CHPN ; Nancy Larson, MSWIdentify how their discipline can participate in providing spiritual care to patients and families.Our panel will explore the importance of all Hospice team members to be familiar with the role of Spiritual care and suffering. We will identify actions that anyHospice staff can take to meet the spiritual needs of patients and families.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.Optimizing the Interdisciplinary Team | 45min | Fundamental | Hospice & Palliative | Live

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Conference ProgramProfession Specific Workshop - Celebrating our Work, Transforming CareJessica Hausauer, PhD;Identify key trends impacting the various disciplines in hospice and palliativecareRecommend actions for education and advocacy Develop connections for collaborationIn this interactive session, attendees will review data and trends specific to thehospice and palliative care workforce. Attendees will join breakout rooms based ontheir profession or role to identify challenges they are facing in the field and toidentify ways to improve care delivery. Attendees will have the opportunity to shaperecommendations for education and advocacy and to connect with colleagues. Objectives: Profession Specific Workshop - Celebrating our Work, Transforming Care

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7APitfalls in DeprescribingGlen Varns, MD, HMD-C ;Deb Klein, PharmDIdentify medications and combinations that could potentially cause harm to a seriously ill individual.Rationally reduce the burden of unnecessary medications in a safe manner.Guide patients and families through the process of deprescribing.Deprescribing is a fundamental task of the HPM provider, and presents clinical as well as psychological and emotional challenges for patients and care teams. We will use a case-based format to illustrate concepts of rational and safe deprescribing in patients with serious illness.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Clinical Considerations in Palliative Care | 45min | Advanced | Hospice & Palliative | Live7BWe are family! Celebrating and fostering family connection through virtual music therapyCasey Haukos, MA, MT-BC ; Marissa Endorf, MA, MM, MT-BC ; Valerie Drewes, MA, MT-BCIdentify the value of facilitating telehealth visits with family in light of the COVID- 19 pandemic and beyond.Analyze case studies from music therapists who worked virtually and in person throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and will reflect on how the use of telehealth adapted over time.Identify best practices for using telehealth within their own discipline to provide psychosocial support and foster connection with patients and their families.Though COVID-19 restrictions have been lifted, families face barriers to visiting loved ones during their end of life journey. Our team will identify benefits of virtually involving family in music therapy, share case studies, and provide best practices for incorporating telehealth into everyday practice.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Telehealth | 60min | Proficient | Hospice | Live7CExploring the Unknown: Experiences in Hospice CareJoe Amberg, MD, HPM-BC, HMD-BC; Laura Odegard, LISW, MSW; Jodi Relopez RN Incorporate their own experience to the care of their patients.Critically judge current practices and understanding of the dying process.View the hospice experience from the patient and family perspective.Many truths about hospice care and the dying process are learned by experience and cannot be verified by the scientific method. This will be a participatory exercise: does morphine treat total pain?; which family member can help you the most?; can a person choose when to let go?; and others.By the end of the session, learners will be able to:1.2.3.Clinical Considerations in Palliative Care | 45min | Fundamental | Hospice | LiveFriday, September 30Breakout Session 7 | 2:00 - 2:45 pmConference Program

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7DA Creative Transformation of On-Call StaffingBrenda Hansen, RN, BSN ; Kristy Husen, PTIdentify the benefits of having designated on-call staff. Consider a program unique to their own agency needs.CentraCare has redesigned our on-call staffing model to include designated staff to cover after-hours shifts. We have creatively incorporated a program that gives nurses the ability to elect a position that includes on-call shifts, which allows other nursing positions to not include on-call shifts.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.Redefining Service Delivery | 45min | Proficient | Hospice | Live7ERenewing and Restoring: Ourselves and our TeamsAnne Supplee, MDiv, MS ; Maia Twedt, MDiv, BCCEngage in two new techniques for "micro moments" (brief practices to recalibrate and restore), which they will be able to share with their team.Integrate restorative practices to build team cohesion and improve communication.This experiential session will invite participants to try new practices that develop internal strength and resilience and honor the diverse wisdom and expression of each team member. Strength needed to do transformational work in an ever- changing environment.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.Team Dynamics & Self Care | 45min | Proficient | Hospice & Palliative | LiveFriday, September 30Breakout Session 7 | 2:00 - 2:45 pmFriday, September 30Breakout Session 8 | 2:55 - 3:25 pm8APost Traumatic Stress in VeteransCory Moss, MDiv, BA ; Amy Jo Fanslow, CNAArticulate an understanding of how PTS may manifest in our Veterans and how PTS impacts their care at the end of life. Identify modified approaches that will better assist them to provide end-of-life care and increase quality of life for the Veteran and their loved ones.This presentation will show how Post Traumatic Stress manifests in Veteran patients at end of life and how it impacts their care, their families, and their care providers. The aim is to help those who provide care to dying Veterans with PTS, with information and tools to better serve them. By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.Mental Health & Terminal Illness | 30min | Fundamental | Hospice & Palliative | LiveConference Program

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Take What You NeedJen CrowSupport common emotional and spiritual needs of patients, families, and professionals caring for patients with serious illnesses and end-of-life. In particular - supporting spiritual and emotional capacity to hold complexity and tension (gratitude and grief, joy and pain, etc.), and identifying and increasing flexibility in spiritual framing of experiences of suffering. To increase flexibility as patients and caregivers review their lives, expanding the different narrative possibilities and understandings of key life events and their meaning. To provide emotional and spiritual support to professionals - recognizing that their experiences supporting patients, families, and caregivers at end of life can provoke spiritual and emotional questions, crises, and opportunities for intentional reframing of their own spiritual and emotional foundations.Jen Crow's transformation was triggered, quite literally, by a bolt of lightning. That jolt, which destroyed her home in a subsequent fire, forced her to consider what she really needed as she looked to rebuild her life. We see with the immediacy of someone who nearly lost it all that our possessions won't carry us. Our responses to the regrets, losses, separations, addictions, and unexpected twists and turns of our lives are shaped by the spiritual values that sustain us and the people who support us. We may not have control over the events - or illnesses - that come our way, but we do have control over how we respond to them. Shaping our own stories can enable us to make meaning that nurtures hope and resilience. In our time together, we will explore the expected and unexpected turns our lives can take—and all the ways we can pay attention to what we truly need to survive the painful moments and live lives of meaning. Learning Objectives:1.2.3.4. KeynoteJen CrowConference Program

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8BDeath Certificates - For Public Health and For FamiliesSally Almond ; Maria SchaffDescribe the value of accurate death records.Find and share resources with family members.Know how to get help.Learn about death certificates, how data is used and how to expedite filing when families need them quickly. We will share resources you can give to families wishing to manage after-death care. Session is appropriate for physicians, nurses, APRNs, care coordinators and social workers.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Redefining Service Delivery | 30min | Proficient | Hospice | Live8CLife Review: Modern Tech Options for Patients and FamiliesKaren Vento ; Mary McGreevyIdentify a growing body of research on the therapeutic benefits of life review at the end of life.Examine an array of the latest tech options to help patients and families in simple life review exercises, which will include examples and demonstrations.There is increasing interest in providing nonpharmacological treatments, including life review, to enhance patients' mental and physical well-being. Life review can also be therapeutic for families. We’ll bring participants up to date on the latest tools for life review, with examples and demos.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.Patient & Family Education | 30min | Fundamental | Hospice & Palliative | Live8DCreating Interprofessional EducationAmy Greminger, MD ; Linda Koskiniemi, NP ; Jeffrey JonesDiscuss the value of having an interprofessional group focused on education.Outline a process for how a similar group could be created in their organization.We recently developed an interdisciplinary education group to roll out education focused on all team members. We record 10 minute education sessions that go out to all team members. We would discuss our process for doing this, and how a similar process could occur at other organizations.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.Best Practices in Education & Field Training for Providers | 30min | Proficient | Hospice | LiveFriday, September 30Breakout Session 8 | 2:55 - 3:25 pmConference Program

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Bonus Content!Exclusive On-Demand Sessions for Full Conference Registrants

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Leaving a Legacy of Hope and Healing Through Eye DonationPatty Stockdale, AS, CACPFAssociate donation with the legacy of hope and healing.Examine the increase in eye donation among hospice patients.Examine how the need for eye, tissue and organ donation is a matter of public health.Eye donation is the most common form of donation and can be an important part of hospice patient and family care. Lions Gift of Sight works closely with patients, families, and providers to explain the donation process, answer questions, and coordinate eye and cornea donation.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Patient & Family Education | 60min | Proficient | Hospice & Palliative | On-DemandCommunity Centered RitualsAnne Murphy, BSDescribe how to support families through end of life rituals.Describe the structure of ritual.Recommend rituals for pre and post death.Creating thoughtful rituals can be healing, meaningful, and supportive during times of loss and transition. Learn how rituals can support families in demarcating death as a rite of passage as well as a way to metabolize and give meaning to grief and loss.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Best Practices in Education & Field Training for Providers | 45min | Fundamental | Hospice & Palliative | On-DemandThe Star Thrower’s Hope: Healing for Clinicians and Caregivers in Hard TimesDee Dee Haines, DMinistry, MDivSelf-assess signs/symptoms of distress including threads of moral injury.Articulate the role of self-story in healing and wholeness. Articulate creative interventions and practices for healing, health and well-being.Building on Loren Eiseley’s creative story, The Star Thrower, participants will be invited to self-assess and claim the extraordinary impact of each act of care, comfort and support that has been offered to patients, families and caregivers in our complicated context that continues to unfold.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Team Dynamics & Self Care | 60min | Fundamental | Hospice & Palliative | On- DemandOn Demand SessionsConference Program

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A Life Transformed: The Power of Empathy in Clinical PracticeDee Dee Haines, DMinistry, MDivArticulate a deeply layered definition of empathy as a practice in clinical relationships.Assess self-empathy obstacles as a necessary grounding for providing empathetic presence.Articulate creative interventions used to co-create plans of care with patients and families.When we feel seen and heard, we are able to do the hard inner work that is necessary for healing and hope. Empathy creates a kind of compassionate shelter so patients and families can self-assess, explore feelings, and co-create plans of care that invite healing, meaning and hope.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Patient & Family Education | 60min | Fundamental | Hospice & Palliative | On- DemandBuprenorphine for Pain in Terminal Illness: A Comprehensive ReviewVineetha Jose, MBBSChoose the best formulation of Buprenorphine for their patients. Prescribe buprenorphine with confidence for treating pain. Manage complex rotations to and from other long acting opioids including methadone. In-depth explanation of the complex pharmacology of Buprenorphine and understand why it's an invaluable tool in our field. To improve practical knowledge in prescribing (initiating, rotations, starting infusions and treating pain crises at the end of life while on Buprenorphine). In the context of the opioid epidemic, physicians will be at more ease when a patient with opioid use disorder comes to their practice, as they will know how to help them due to the knowledge they got from this session.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Pain & Symptom Management | 60min | Advanced | Hospice & Palliative | On- DemandGrant Funded Honoring Choices North Dakota Advance Care Planning Facilitator Certification CourseNancy Joyner, MS, CNS-BC, APRN, ACHPNDefine two requirements for individuals to participate in the Honoring Choices North Dakota’s (HCND) Advance Care Planning (ACP) Facilitator curriculum.Describe three key factors in HCND ACP Facilitator curriculum.Identify four steps for completion of the HCND ACP Facilitator Certification.Honoring Choices North Dakota (HCND) fosters advance care planning (ACP) through community and professional outreach and education. HCND received a grant to create and implement a virtual ACP facilitator course.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Best Practices in Education & Field Training for Providers | 60min | Fundamental | Hospice & Palliative | On-DemandOn Demand Sessions

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Estate Planning and Medical Assistance Planning: Issue Spotting and Ethics ConsiderationsRachel Schromen, JD, ELJSIdentify potential estate and MA issues, and suggest potential remedies.Better support families with legal uncertainties at the end of life.Provide such support in a manner that does not expose them to potential liability.This session, which I have provided a CEU training previously, gives an overview of estate and MA planning to support hospice providers in identifying when and how to suggest legal remedies without engaging in the unauthorized practice of law and opening themselves to liability.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.3.Ethics | 60min | Fundamental | Hospice & Palliative | On-DemandBuprenorphine in Real Life: Cases from our Palliative ClinicsDrew Rosielle, MD FAAHPM ; Allyson Stevenson-King, DOIdentify clinical situations in which buprenorphine is the preferred opioid analgesic. Safely transition patients off full mu-opioid receptor agonist opioids to buprenorphine.Our team is transitioning to prescribing buprenorphine as the preferred opioid analgesic in many scenarios: patients with extended prognoses, frailty, and with higher-risk substance use including opioid use disorder. In this session we will present multiple cases reflecting our current practice.By the end of the session, learners will be able to: 1.2.Pain & Symptom Management | 60min | Advanced | Hospice & Palliative | On- DemandSelflessly and Sacrificially Serving OthersDeb Hadley, MEProvide companionship to the bereaved.Work with families who are resistive to Chaplaincy in hospice.Have a better understanding of the need for grief support groups in the 13 months following a patient's passing.Educating others on Servant Leadership and how it pertains to each role that makes up a Hospice team. When providing bereavement services, you are working with people who are dealing with loss and deep grief. Education will be provided on learning how to be a companion to those who are broken.By the end of the session, learners will be able to:1.2.3.Family Dynamics & Trauma | 60min | Hospice & Palliative | Live and On-DemandOn Demand Sessions

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Contemplative Practices For Here and NowKaren Naus, BS, RM, MAVACommit to self care tools that expand on the gift of silence to restore, the act of creation to inspire and power of intention to release tension. Utilize guided meditation that releases their own emotional blocks.This session will focus on 3 contemplative practices for anyone to enhance your self care tool kit for the challenges we face daily in end of life care. The following 3 practices will be presented. Centering Prayer, Emotional release meditation, and Contemplative space vision boards.By the end of the session, learners will be able to:1.2.Team Dynamics & Self Care | 45min | Hospice & Palliative | On-DemandOn Demand Sessions

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Allyson Stevenson- King, DO Dr. Allyson Stevenson-King is a Palliative Medicine Physician in Minnesota and is affiliated with M Health Fairview University of Minnesota Medical Center. She received her medical degree from TCU and UNTHSC Amanda Jackson Wilber, BSN, RN, CWCN earned a BSN at Metropolitan State University in 2012. She worked in long-term care and short term rehabilitation prior to transitioning to Allina Hospice in 2018. She is currently a Hospice and Home Care Services Liaison at United Hospital in Saint Paul. Amanda is also a Master Gardener and enjoys spending free time with her Labradors and urban chickens.Amy Greminger, MD is an Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Campus. Clinically, she works with Essentia Hospice to care for patients and families at the end of life. Outside of work, she enjoys spending time with her family, hiking, and sewing.Amy Jo Fanslow, CNA is, in addition to being a Hospice Aide for Seasons Hospice, a mother of an active duty veteran, her daughter, who suffers from Post Traumatic Stress. Amy Jo’s daughter began basic training in June 2019, and gradually, Amy Jo noticed a change in her daughter’s behavior. Her daughter became argumentative, hyper-vigilant to her surroundings, reclusive and her attention span was affected. She was deployed to Kuwait, then to Afghanistan, and when she returned home for Holiday Block Leave, her behavior had worsened to the point where she would sleep on the floor, loud noises would cause her to hit the ground, and her reactions were explosive. Amy Jo provides a first- hand perspective of what it’s like to live with a Veteran suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress. And while her daughter is in the prime of her life, she is emblematic of the suffering our Veterans with PTS experience at the end of life. In her role as a hospice aide, Amy Jo has experience working with our Veteran patients, some of whom have PTS.Angela Woosley, MA is a MN-licensed mortician, educator, and funeral celebrant. After teaching in the Program of Mortuary Science at UMN for ten years, Angela founded Inspired Journeys, and works to invite everyone into the experience of caring for their own dead in order to demystify funeral care, reduce barriers of equity and access to the dead, and build a bridge between the worlds of healthcare and deathcare. She currently serves as the president of the National Home Funeral Alliance and performs decedent transfers with Metro First Call.Anne Murphy, BS is a celebrant, home vigil guide, and death educator. Anne is trained in the art of supporting individuals and families through the season of death and dying through heart-centered, compassionate and meaningful conversations, rituals, and ceremonies. Anne is the co-founder of the Minnesota Death Collaborative and serves on the Minnesota Threshold Network Leadership Committee. For more information: athousandhands.comAnne Supplee, MDiv, MS is a chaplain at The ALS Association and in a local hospital system. She loves stories and listening to how they unfold, appreciating that each one holds sameness and mystery all at once. She is a cofounder of Way Opening Workshops and facilitates group processes in a creative and nurturing environment.Annette Nijjar, MD completed medical school in Germany and completed her internal medicine residency in the US, at Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia, PA. Following that she kept moving West and came to Minneapolis, MN for a fellowship in Hospice and Palliative Medicine at the University of MN. After spending a few years at Hennepin County Medical Center, she transitioned to working exclusively in palliative care with MHealth in 2016. Two years later she also became the program director for the Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship at the University of MN.Conference Program

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Anthony Del Percio is Director of the Bradshaw Funeral & Cremation Grief Resource Center in St. Paul, MN. Which provides grief support groups, seminars, training, and grief coaching. He has been a Grief Counselor for 35 years and knows all too well the personal and emotional toll it can play when your “Well” runs dry being a professional and caregiver himself.Beth Werner, MS, RN, MHA is a Registered Nurse with a Master’s Degree in Healthcare Administration. She has over 28 years of experience in Hospice and Palliative Care. Beth is a compassionate and passionate leader who has held a number of leader positions over the past many years. Her current role is with Ecumen Hospice as the Quality Coordinator. Beth has worked on a variety of projects and presented locally, statewide and on the national level. She is an ELNEC trainer and is a past Board of Director for the Hospice & Palliative Nurses Association.Bill DevineSupervisor, Statewide System & Application Support at Minnesota Department of HealthBrenda Hansen, RN, BSN has worked in the hospice industry for more than 15 years. She has worked as a hospice case manager, the director of nursing at a hospice house, and currently serves at the hospice manager for CentraCare Hospice. Brenda has special interest in performance improvement and workflow enhancements to support field staff.Brian Kroeger, MDiv Experienced Reverend with a demonstrated history of working in the religious institutions industry. Skilled in Pastoral Counseling, Preaching, Church Growth, Public Speaking, and Religion. Strong community and social services professional with a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) focused in World Religions from Iliff School of Theology.C. Estelle Smith, MS, PhD is a Postdoctoral Associate at the University of Colorado Boulder in the Department of Information Science. Estelle completed her PhD in Computer Science at the University of Minnesota in 2020 with an emphasis in Human-Computer Interaction and Social Computing. Through industry and interdisciplinary partnerships with organizations like CaringBridge, Wikimedia, and Reddit, Estelle’s research explores online systems, communities, and Data Science or Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning-based interventions for improving mental and spiritual wellbeing during health crises. Estelle employs a Human-Centered Design approach to evaluate stakeholder values, needs, and behaviors, and to design future sociotechnical innovations to support spiritual healing and flourishing, even in the face of life-critical illness. Estelle is an avid outdoor enthusiast who loves rock climbing, skiing, biking, yoga, and hiking with her Siberian husky, Zosima. Find her on Twitter at @EstelleSmithPhD or email c.estelle.smith@colorado.edu.Casey Haukos, MA, MT-BC has been a Board Certified music therapist since October of 2018. Casey has worked professionally in populations of hospice, palliative care, and in special needs settings. Casey was employed through Optage during the entirety of the COVID-19 pandemic and worked interdisciplinarily with chaplains, social workers, home health aides, and nurses to facilitate virtual music therapy visits. Casey has co-presented guitar skills in music therapy at the Minnesota Music Therapy Conference and the Great Lakes Regional Music Therapy Conference.Conference Program

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Rev. Cornelius Moss, MDiv, BA has been honored to serve in hospice Chaplaincy for 10 years . He is honored to have served persons in this capacity. Cory has co-created services to honor Veterans and has journeyed alongside several Veterans and their families and care providers. He completed a chaplain residency at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN , and has also served parishes in Indianapolis, IN, and Rock Valley, IA. He has also served parish settings for nine years . He received a Masters of Divinity from Sioux Falls Seminary in Sioux Falls, SD, and his Bachelors from Northwestern College in Orange City, IA. Cory is an ordained Minister of Word and Sacrament of the Reformed Church in America, and is also endorsed for ecumenical ministry. He and his wife, Janelle, and their five children reside in Pine Island, MN. Cory enjoys motorcycling, snowmobiling, camping, woodworking, and family time.Diana Freed is a PhD candidate at Cornell University in the Department of Information Science. Her research focuses on digital security and privacy, and technologies for mental health and chronic conditions. She combines techniques from computer security, HCI, psychology, and law to develop new tools, technologies, and theories to detect and mitigate technology-enabled abuse. She has been awarded a 2020 Facebook Fellowship, was a 2019-2020 Doctoral Fellow at the Digital Life Initiative, and is a recipient of the Engaged Cornell Graduate Student Grant. Previously, she worked as a Technologist-in-Residence at Cornell Tech in the Small Data Lab where her research focused on mHealth, mobile sensing, and patient-centered design. She is an Affiliate and 2015-16 Fellow at the Data and Society Research Institute, a Visiting Scholar and a graduate of NYU-ITP '15, and a graduate of Columbia University.Deb Hadley's mission is to selflessly and sacrificially serve others. She has dedicated her life to supporting and walking alongside those who are grieving the loss of a loved one, friend, or family member. As a result, she has educated a tremendous amount of people on how to allow healing to take place and bring restoration of hope into their lives.Deborah KleinHospice Pharmacist at Allina HealthRev. Dr. Dee Dee Haines, DM, MDiv is the Supervisor of Spiritual Care & Music Therapy, Bereavement Coordinator of Interim Healthcare & Hospice in Roseville, Minnesota, and is a graduate of the MDiv and DMin programs of EdenTheological Seminary in St. Louis, MO. Dee Dee has been educated by the University of Madison, WI, as a grief specialist and is also an ordained minister of the United Church of Christ. Grounded in the study of Celtic spirituality, Dee Dee uses this lens as a method of reinterpreting contemporary spiritual identity and community. Dee Dee has served abroad in multiple intercultural contexts and draws upon this rich experience as a public speaker and educator. She is currently researching multiple pastoral care issues surrounding death, dying and living well.Dennis Cross, MDOur Lady of Peace Hospice Physician

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Dr. Frank Bennett, PhD, MDiv, BSc is the founder and program leader of Living Well/Dying Well and Senior Fellow at the Earl Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing. Living Well, Dying Well’s goal is to improve end-of-life care communication, outcomes and quality of life for individuals, their families, providers and healthcare professionals through academic courses, continuing education and research. Dr. Bennett’s specific areas of interest include palliative and hospice nursing education and practice, patient-centered care and interpersonal dynamics in end-of-life care. He also has an interest in end-of-life care for persons with dementia. Dr. Bennett is the author of three published research studies on efficacious end-of-life care communication, and continues to write, teach and conduct research to support communication for goal-concordant care in the last weeks, months and years of a person’s life.Drew A Rosielle, MD, FAAPHM is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Family Medicine and Internal Medicine at the University of Minnesota, and the Medical Director of palliative care for M Health Fairview. He directed the University of Minnesota Medical School Hospice & Palliative Medicine fellowship from 2010-2018. He graduated from the University of Minnesota Medical School, completed an internal medicine residency program at the University of Colorado, and palliative care fellowship at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Currently he practices mostly ambulatory palliative medicine at the M Health Fairview Masonic Cancer Center in Minneapolis MN. Dr Rosielle helps edits Fast Facts and Concepts, and blogs about palliative care at Pallimed.org. He is the winner of a 2013 Hastings Center and Cuniff-Dixon Foundation early career award and the University of Minnesota Medical Center Staff Award for Clinical Education in 2017.Glen Varns, MD, HMD-C is a board-certified HPM physician with experience providing palliative care in inpatient, clinic and community settings.Janie Lonsdale SydorOur Lady of Peace Nurse EducatorJeffery Jones, MDivEssentia Health St Mary’s Hospice Spiritual Care CoordinatorJennifer Kennedy, EdD, MA, BSN, RN, CHC is the Vice President for Quality and Standards at CHAP. She has more than 35 years of experience as a leader and nurse in diverse healthcare settings and has worked in hospice and palliative care for the last 20+ years. She has a bachelor’s degree in nursing, a dual master’s degree in health education and case management, and a doctoral degree in health care education and policy and is a certified healthcare compliance professional. Jennifer is the lead for the CHAP quality team and interacts with CMS and their contractors related to hospice regulatory and quality issues for hospice, home health, home infusion, pharmacy, and durable medical equipment. She also collaborates with the CHAP Center for Excellence, a content developer and faculty.Jennifer Kuyava, MDAllina Health Hospice Hospice & Palliative Care physician

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Jeremiah Kruckemeyer, PharmD joined Enclara Pharmacia in March 2021 and is currently serving in the role of Clinical Manager. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from The University of Texas and his Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Texas Tech University Health Science Center. He has more than 14 years’ experience and has enjoyed working in a variety of Pharmacy settings including: Institutional, Behavioral Health, Pharmacy Benefits Management, and Hospice.Jodi Relopez RN has been a hospice nurse case manager at Allina Health since 2017, with previous hospice nurse experience since 2008 and experience as a nursing home nurse supervisor.Joe Amberg, MD, HPM-BC, HMD-BC practiced primary care and hospital Internal Medicine from 1986 to 2004. He joined the National Hospice Organization in 1994, and began full time Palliative Care practice in 2004 at North Memorial, and in 2012 at Allina Health. He works part-time since 2020 as a hospice team physician. He is a member of the Palliative Care Advisory Council for the state of Minnesota.Judi Lund Person, BA, MPH, CHCJudi serves as a key contact with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, interfacing with hospice payment policy, Part D, survey and certification, contractor management, and program integrity functions, among others. She also represents hospice and palliative care with the Medicare Administrative Contractors and other federal agencies and many national organizations. Recent issues include advocating for changes in the Notice of Election filing and payment process, advocating for new guidance regarding Part D and hospice, and ongoing work with the Medicare Administrative Contractors on hospice payment policy issues.Karen Naus is Volunteer Services lead for Allina Health Hospice, supporting Coordinators, volunteers, staff, patients and families. She is currently Volunteer Coordinator for a Community team and J.A. Wedum Residential Hospice House. Her past experiences in HR and Management for Nordstrom as well as her Hospice Volunteer Coordinating years in Rhode Island and here in Minnesota have all shaped her wealth of knowledge. She has a heart for contemplative practices and complementary therapies in end of life care. She is focused on mentorship and education in her current role.Karen Vento has always had that knack with older folks. She’s always been fascinated with how one generation relates to another generation, especially with regard to aging issues. It was the same interest in learning how a culture ages that lead her to her degree in gerontology years ago. She’s worked in elder and patient care (of all ages) her entire career and has held direct care and leadership roles in multiple end of life organizations throughout the Twin Cities.Katie Schrek, HHAOur Lady of PeaceKristy Husen, PT has worked in home health and hospice for more than 15 years. She has been a staff physical therapist, Manager of the Rehab team and is currently Senior Director for CentraCare Home Health and Hospice. Kristy has presented at various conferences throughout the state of MN.

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Rev. Dr. Leonard M. Hummel, PhD, MDiv, STM is Chaplain for Allina Hospice at New Ulm Medical and is Professor Emeritus of Pastoral Theology for United Lutheran Seminary (Gettysburg/Philadelphia). He was a chaplain for Fairview- Riverside Medical Center, Mpls. He has been the John Templeton Foundation Visiting Scholar for The HealthCare Chaplaincy, New York, NY for whom he edited “Practical Bearings: The Critical Bibliography Series for Health Care Chaplains.” He has consulted with the Behavioral Pharmacology Unit/Johns Hopkins University on their “Psilocybin Cancer Project.” Among his many peer-reviewed publications is “By Its Fruits? Mystical and Visionary States of Consciousness Occasioned by Entheogens.” He presented on “The Rebirth of Entheogens: New Medical Research on Drug-Related Mystical Experience and its Implications for Religious Studies,” for the American Academy of Religion. Hummel is a graduate of Haverford College (A.B.), Yale Divinity School (M. Div., S.T.M.), and Boston University (Ph. D. in Pastoral Psychology).Laura Odegard, LISW, MSWLaura has worked for Allina Homecare and Hospice for 30 years. She started her career as a Homecare Social Worker then collaborated on the End Of Life Project team, working with chronically ill patients prior to Hospice enrollment. This work segued into Hospice SW, where she has worked for the past 23 years. Laura participated in the Dementia Champion clinician group, is a member of the Mental Health Committee, and various other focus groups within Hospice. She is a strong advocate for patients and families, enjoys the team aspect of care, and truly feels it is a privilege to care for those facing end of life.Linda Koskiniemi APRN, CNP, ACHPNHospice Nurse Practitioner Essentia HealthLindsey Pelletier, RN, BSNPerformance Improvement Coordinator at Our Lady of PeaceLogan HooverNHPCO / HAN Vice President Policy and Government RelationsLores Vlaminck, MA, BSN, RN, CHPN, LALD has been a provider of consulting, training, and mentoring for hospice, assisted living, home health care and palliative care providing mock surveys, audits, regulatory consultation, education, mentoring and advice as well as assistance in developing post audit correction plans for the past 18 years. Through Lores Consulting, LLC, Lores draws on her 46 years of professional nursing experience to empower her client agency and facility providers to reach their greatest potential. Her extensive nursing background includes clinical practice in cardiac and intensive care, outpatient clinical services as well as serving as a founder/director of a home care and hospice agency for 19 years in greater Minnesota. In addition, Lores is an approved trainer for the ELNEC curriculum. Lores obtained both her BSN and Master’s degrees from Bethel University, St. Paul, MN.Lucy Schmitz, MPPNational Hospice and Palliative Care Organization/Hospice Action Network Legislative Affairs Manager

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Rabbi Lynn Liberman was ordained from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in 1993. She served as acongregational rabbi for over 20 years. Currently, Rabbi Liberman is a Board Certified Chaplain working as the Community Chaplain for the Jewish Family Service of St Paul and as an on-call chaplain for Regions Hospital, Gillette Children’s Hospital and MHealth Fairview Hospitals. Rabbi Liberman has taught and worked in a variety of educational settings, including Jewish Day Schools and as an Adjunct Lecturer in Judaics at Augsburg College, Minneapolis as well as a faculty member for the Melton Adult Learning Program through Hineni. She also has worked as a Hospice chaplain for seven years. Currently she volunteers as a Police and Fire Chaplain for the Mendota Heights/West St. Paul Police and Fire Departments, is an ARC Spiritual Care Disaster Responder, is on the Metro CISM Team, is on the Children’s Hospital Ethics Committee and is on the Executive Board of Neshama: Association of Jewish Chaplains. Lynn is a certified Advanced Care Planner with Honoring Choices.Maggie O'Connor, MD began her medical career in primary care, soup to nuts, private practice delivery babies to hospice care. For her final iteration she did a fellowship in palliative care and worked as lead physician for the Abbott Northwestern palliative care team and opened an outpatient clinic at Sister Kenny Institute. She retired in 2014, but has continued teaching Fellows at the University of Minnesota.Maia Twedt, MDiv, BCC is a board certified, staff chaplain at Hennepin Healthcare. She has had experience leading groups in many different arenas including parish ministry, writing workshops, addiction medicine programs, and for virtual wellness programming in healthcare settings. She is a cofounder of Way Opening Workshops and facilitates group process in a creative and nurturing environment.Marissa Endorf, MA, MM, MT-BC has been a board-certified music therapist since 2014, and she earned her Master’s Degrees in Music Therapy and Music Performance from the University of Minnesota. During the Covid-19 pandemic, Marissa worked with older adults in long term care and gained perspective through connecting residents with their loved ones using various Telehealth platforms. Marissa saw firsthand what a crucial role family connection plays in residents’ social and emotional well-being and is incorporating that knowledge into her current practice. Throughout her career, Marissa has developed two new music therapy programs in a senior living community setting and behavioral health setting, and also has experience working in private practice.Mary McGreevyCo-founder, Epilogg.com: a better obituary. Video producer for Quiet Island Films. Proud wearer of many professional hats. Michael Pinchback, MD, HCMDMichael Pinchback MD is the Chief Medical Officer and Medical Director of Our Lady of Peace Residential and Community Hospice. He joined in 2016. Originally graduating from the University of Arkansas School of Medicine, hefinished his residency at the Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Medicine. He is certified by the American Board of Family Medicine and the Hospice Medical Director Certification Board.Conference Program

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Nancy Joyner, RN, MS, APRN-CNS, ACHPN is a nationally recognized consultant, speaker, educator and author. As a Palliative Care Clinical Nurse Specialist, she works as the palliative care specialist for the University of North Dakota, disseminating awareness and education regarding palliative care statewide. Nancy has over 40 years of nursing proficiency that includes 17 years as an advanced practice nurse in palliative care. Nancy has had training through the Center to Advance Palliative Care and Palliative Care Leadership Center at Fairview Health Services in Minneapolis. Nancy has presented and published at local, state, and national levels. She has researched and published articles on POLST, CPR decisions and advance care planning. Nancy is an ambassador for the Serious Illness Community of Practice, Ariadne Labs. She is currently president of Honoring Choices® North Dakota, North Dakota’s POLST Program Coordinator and co-creator of the HCND ACP Facilitator Certification Course.Noah PotvinAssistant professor of music therapy and director of the Master of Music Therapy program at Duquesne University. Board-certified music therapist and licensed professional counselor working in hospice and palliative care for over a decade.Patty Stockdale has been an eye, organ and tissue donation advocate, educator and friend of Lions Gift of Sight since 2007. She believes that everyone has the same opportunity for donation regardless of where they die. As a donor daughter, Patty has shared her mother’s story with thousands of eye donor family members, Lions organizations, medical teams, funeral directors, scientists, and the general public. Patty delivers a powerful message about discovering the importance of and advancements in ophthalmology research, what that discovery has meant to her family, and how she has successfully used that to influence outcomes in donation. As a member of the Senior Leadership Team at Lions Gift of Sight, Patty holds national committee appointments with the Eye Bank Association of America and Donate Life America organizations. She and her husband Todd enjoy living on the prairie in beautiful Southeast Minnesota, where they welcome their 7 children and 17 grandchildren.Rachel Bialostosky, MSW, LICSW is a transplant from Philadelphia who has called Minneapolis home for the last 17 years. She has served as a palliative care social worker for 10 years working in the inpatient and outpatient settings. Her trainings include completing the University of MN Palliative Care Clinical Social Work Fellowship, Meaning Centered Psychotherapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for patients with cancer and Narrative Exposure Therapy.Rachel Schromen, JD is an estate planning and elder law attorney and owner of Schromen Law, LLC. Since starting to practice law in 2013, Rachel has been named a Super Lawyer Rising Star (2020 and 2021), named one of the Top 3 Best Rated Estate Law firms in St. Paul (2018 - 2021) and most recently was voted Best Estate Law Firm in Minnesota by readers of the Star Tribune. Apart from her law practice, Rachel is a hospice volunteer as an end-of-life doula.Sally Almond is a Health Program and Field Representative with the Office of Vital Records. She provides user support, technical assistance, and training to health professionals involved in Minnesota’s vital records system. Sally has helped vital records partners transition to new systems and has led a national project for interoperable birth registration.Sumair Akhtar, MD, MHCDS leads clinical strategy and oversees all clinical service lines for Livio Health. He is responsible for engaging stakeholders in understanding Livio’s models of care; overseeing care management, social work, community health, pharmacy, clinical education and clinical team functional units; and ensuring high quality and compliance of all clinical activities provided by care teams. Dr. Akhtar is incredibly passionate about advancing value based primary and palliative care for the most vulnerable members of society. Prior to joining Livio, he spent several years working at bold, value-based care delivery organizations including Caremore, Aspire, and Iora Health as a high-risk primary care physician, hospitalist, and physician executive. Dr. Akhtar completed his residency and chief residency in internal medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine. He attended medical school at the University of Maryland in Baltimore. He holds a master in health care delivery science from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. Dr. Akhtar serves on the board of Minnesota Network of Hospice and Palliative Care.

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Sumee Lee, MPP is a Korean-American Minnesotan driven to do good and do well. She is passionate about systems change for health equity and racial justice. Sumee Lee is the Community Partnerships & Racial and Health Equity Lead at Livio Health in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In that role, she develops and manages strategies to promote equitable access to home based care for people with serious illnesses and to build relationships with community non-profits that provide services for older adults. She has a B.S. in Life Science and LL.B. in U.S. and International Law from Handong University, South Korea, and an MPP in Social Policy and Advanced Policy Analysis from Humphrey School of Public Affairs. In the post 2020 virtual world, Sumee finds joy in taking her 5 year old chocolate lab on long walks and volunteering her time on the boards of ServeMinnesota and Trellis.Susan O’Conner-Von, PhD, RN, is a Professor in the School of Nursing, and Director of Graduate Studies, Bakken Center for Spirituality and Healing (CSH). Susan has vast experience as a practicing nurse specializing in pediatric pain management, intensive care, and palliative care. She is a nationally recognized nurse educator, researcher and leader in her field. She inspires students to provide superb holistic care and to deeply consider the humanity of every patient. Susan is motivated by her students and credits them for having shaped her to be the nurse educator she is today. Outside of the classroom, Susan is a long time hospice volunteer and was one of the first in the twin cities to pioneer the use of therapy dogs in hospice care.Tara Burns, MA is a mental health practitioner and PEARLS Counselor at Jewish Family Service of St. Paul. She graduated with a MA in Clinical Mental Health Counseling and is working towards being a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor. Tara is passionate about working with adults across the lifespan on issues relating to grief, loss, depression, anxiety, life changes, and chronic pain. She is a hospice volunteer at Our Lady of Peace Hospice where she previously managed the volunteer program full time while in graduate school and facilitated grief groups and healing through art workshops. She is passionate about all things end-of-life and helping people and loved ones prepare for crossing the threshold. In life, she enjoys being immersed in nature, cooking, and traveling.Ted Bowman, MDiv is an educator, and consultant. He specializes in change and transition. For over 40 years, he has been a frequent trainer, consultant, and speaker with many groups throughout Minnesota, the United States, and other countries. Ted was an adjunct professor at the University of Minnesota (Family Education) 1981-2012; at the University of Saint Thomas (Social Work) 2006 until 2019; and 1989 to 1996 at United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities. Ted is the author of over 125 articles and chapters appearing in books, journals, newspapers, and magazines. His booklets, Loss of Dreams: A Special Kind of Grief, and Finding Hope When Dreams Have Shattered are widely used in grief care. His newest book, Ambiguous Parables: Poem and Prose of Loss and Renewal, was published in November 2021.Valerie Drewes, MA, MT-BC has been a board-certified music therapist for two years and has experience working in hospice, oncology, and eldercare. Valerie worked through the COVID-19 pandemic using telehealth as the primary form of music therapy and has worked with colleagues to expand the use of telehealth going forward. She presented her master’s research at the National AMTA Student Passages conference in 2019 and served on the planning committee for the 2022 Great Lakes Regional music therapy conference.Conference Program

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Vineetha Jose, MBBS is a home hospice physician working in Northern Minnesota. She completed medical school in India (where she’s originally from), came to the US and completed an Internal Medicine Residency from Metro west Medical Center, MA and a Fellowship in Hospice and Palliative Medicine from Cleveland Clinic, OH. The best part about her job is that she gets to have very meaningful conversations with mhery patients and get to know them as a person. She lives in Duluth with her husband and 2 year old daughter. For fun, she loves being out in nature and spending time with family.Yer Xong, MD, MPHFamily Physician Allina Health and Our Lady of PeaceZander Holleran, BHBP is a Philosophy and Biology major that learned Python. A Data Analyst at Livio Health, he enjoys solving hard problems, learning, and teaching those around him. Zander's areas of expertise include medical claims data, highly skewed data, and cohort-controlled study design. Originally from Woodbury, Minnesota, Zander currently resides in Salt Lake City, Utah, and enjoys spending his time ski touring and climbing mountains.Conference Program