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The Benzine - Fall 2020 Issue

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Issue 1 Fall 2020An Art-Chem Zine

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Content01 Letter From the Editors 02 What is a zine? What is The Benzine?03 Nature’s Mother Earth Samantha Knott (Ge Group)04 Inspired by Micelles Samantha Knott (Ge Group)05 Buoys to NowhereMorgan Howe (Pazicni Group)06 UntitledMorgan Howe (Pazicni Group)07 Way HomeKeyu Zeng (Fredrickson Group)

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08 The Eye HungersIzzy Foreman-Ortiz (Pedersen Group)09 UntitledAmber Lim (Fredrickson Group)10Escape This Burning HouseIzzy Foreman-Ortiz (Pedersen Group)11 Alligators don’t have allergies, right? Kyana Sanders (Fredrickson Group)12 AloneKeyu Zeng (Fredrickson Group)13 Dreams of SpaghettiAmber Lim (Fredrickson Group)14 Hexagonal Hamantaschen Katherine Parrish (Goldsmith Group)15 Chipotle ChickenRylie Morris (Gellman Group)

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16Chai Tea Latte MixTesia Janicki (Schmidt Group)17 Miscellaneous Crochet ProjectsMackinsey Smith (Goldsmith Group)18 If you knit your dog a sweater...Peyton Higgins (Buller Group)19 Caught ExploringDominic Mattock (Wang Group)20 Asleep at WorkManar Alherech (Stahl Group)21 Anti-Racist Pet PortraitsNatalia Spitha, Tesia Janicki, Angela Ablaberdieva(Wright/Jin Group, Schmidt Group, Instructional Sta)22 Superconduckting amphiphilic duckminster fullerenes for applications in sub and supermarine environments Paige Kinsley and Liz Laudadio (Hamers Group)

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23 Let’s Meet a Scientist: John GoodenoughKendall Kamp (Fredrickson Group)24 Information for New Graduate Students25A Short List of Departmental Resources and Organizations26 How to Register to Vote as a New Graduate Student27 Interested in submitting your work for the next issue of The Benzine?28 Thank You To...29 Meet the Editorial Board

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01Letter From the EditorsWe are thrilled to release the rst issue of The Benzine, a zine celebrating art and science in the UW Madison chemistry community. We’ve spent almost a year on this project, and to nally share it with you brings us joy. What we’re most proud of is the community which brought this zine into being. In these pages you’ll see work from 18 dierent scientists across 13 groups. You’ll see original paintings, photos, recipes and crochet creations. You’ll see talents that you never knew your colleagues had. We’re fortunate to be able to share this with you, and we’re grateful to all who submitted their work. To say the least, this has been a tough year. We hope The Benzine can do for you in some small way what it’s done for us - lift our spirits and remind us that community is more than a building. - The Benzine Editorial Board

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02What is a zine? What is The Benzine?A zine is a self-published, noncommerical publication devoted to a specialized or unconventional subject matter. Zines can come in many forms and styles, ranging from avant-garde to punk. Zines are important because they oer places to publish work that may be too niche for a traditional publication. -The Benzine is an art and chemistry zine! Peer-written, edited, and published, we’re an outlet for UW Madison chemists to express themselves and an avenue for you to see our community from a dierent angle. We’re here to celebrate the chemistry, art, poetry, hobbies and interests of our department. Our goal is to produce a causal, student-led, self-sustaining, art and chemistry publication which promotes good science and scientists in the UW Madison chemistry community.

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The practice of using natural products for health and human disease has “given birth” to a new generation of possibilities.03Nature’s Mother EarthSamantha Knott (Ge Group) Oil Paint

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A member of my group, Kyle Brown, and I work with a photocleavable surfactant he developed. This work depicts the order and beauty found in micelle formation for the solubilization of intact proteins.04Inspired by Micelles Samantha Knott (Ge Group) Watercolor and Sharpie

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05Buoys to NowhereMorgan Howe (Pazicni Group) Digital Photograph

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06Untitled Morgan Howe (Pazicni Group) Digital Photograph

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07 Way HomeKeyu Zeng (Fredrickson Group)Digital Photograph

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08The Eye Hungers Izzy Foreman-Ortiz (Pedersen Group)Pen on Paper@izzy_aka_gg

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09UntitledAmber Lim (Fredrickson Group)Ink

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10Escape This Burning HouseIzzy Foreman-Ortiz (Pedersen Group)Pen on Paper@izzy_aka_gg

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11Alligators don’t have allergies, right? Kyana Sanders (Fredrickson Group)Watercolor

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This was my rst serious attempt at water coloring, which is a hobby I picked up during the early months of the pandemic. Painting the yellow owers kind of helped to bring the summer inside since I often couldn't go outside. If only I had learned this trick during my rst two winters in Madison!

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12Alone Keyu Zeng (Fredrickson Group) Watercolor

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13Dreams of SpaghettiAmber Lim (Fredrickson Group)Ink, Digital

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14Hexagonal HamantaschenKatherine Parrish (Goldsmith Group)

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Since getting a slow-cooker I’ve been making more and more recipes that you can set and forget. Marinades have become my friend because they’re an easy way to make avorful delicious meals without much eort. You simply marinate your protein of choice overnight then place in the slow-cooker and let it go until dinner. This recipe is one of my new favorites to create a mock-Chipotle burrito bowl.15Chipotle Chicken Rylie Morris (Gellman Group)

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Ingredients 1 package chicken thighs2 dried guajillo peppers2 dried ancho peppers4-6 dried mushrooms1 ½ cup boiling water2 tsp coriander2 tsp cumin1 can chipotle peppers in adobo1 tsp cinnamon1 tsp saltJuice of 1 lime4 tsp of neutral oilThe guajillo and ancho peppers can be found at any specialty grocery store, spice shop, or can be ordered online. There is a Penzeys Spices near my apartment where I usually go for all of my spice needs. I also re-cently discovered Whole Foods carries whole peppers as well. The amount of avor you get here for whole pep-pers instead of powdered or pepper akes is denitely worth the investment.

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Instructions (adapted from Joshua Weissman)1. Deseed the guajillo and ancho peppers. I would recommend investing in kitchen gloves for this task. You don’t want to accidentally rub your eye after handling the seeds of dried peppers.2. Place the guajillo peppers, ancho peppers, and dried mushrooms in a bowl and cover with about a cup and a half of boiling water.3. Cover and let soak for about 10 minutes. 4. While soaking the peppers, combine coriander, cumin, can of chipotle peppers in adobo, cinnamon, and salt in the blender.

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5. Zest and juice one lime and add to the blender. 6. Add rehydrated peppers and mushrooms along with about half the soaking liquid to loosen up the marinade to a pourable consistency. Blend until smooth.7. While the blender is running, slowly stream in about 4 tsp of neutral oil to create an emulsion. You should end up with a dark red marinade.8. Pour over package of chicken thighs and place in refrigerator to sit at least one hour or overnight.9. Once done marinating, place in slow cooker set to low for about 5-6 hours or set to high for about 3-4 hours. Shred chicken when done to make a great ad-dition to any burritos, bowls, or whatever other dishes you wish!If you don’t have a slow cooker, another cooking option is to sear the chicken thighs on the cooktop for about 3-5 minutes per side then bake in a 350° oven until they register 165 °F internal temperature to make sure they’re fully cooked.

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My favorite afternoon sugar/caeine supplement.Ingredients 1 c milk powder1 c plain dry creamer1 c vanilla dry creamer2 ½ c white sugar1 ½ c unsweetened instant tea3 tsp cinnamon2 tsp ginger2 tsp cloves2 tsp allspice½ tsp cardamomInstructionsCombine all ingredients and blend cup-by-cup into a ne powder. Store in air-tight containers (mason jars are good). To serve, use ~3 tbs per 8oz hot water. Stir.16Chai Tea Latte Mix Tesia Janicki (Schmidt Group)

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17 Miscellaneous Crochet ProjectsMackinsey Smith (Goldsmith Group)

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...your girlfriend will probably ask you to make her one too! I have never met a dog who loves wearing clothes as much as my dog Quincy does, so of course I had to knit him a sweater. My girlfriend, Brady, wanted one to match, and I nally nished it this summer! Our other dog, Eliot (photobombing in the background), hates clothes, so we have spared her from the matching sweater club.18 If you knit your dog a sweater... Peyton Higgins (Buller Group)

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19 Caught ExploringDominic Mattock (Wang Group)

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20 Asleep at Work Manar Alherech (Stahl Group)

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21Anti-Racist Pet Portraits Natalia Spitha, Tesia Janicki, Angela Ablaberdieva(Wright/Jin Group, Schmidt Group, Instructional Sta)

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Anti-Racist Pet Portraits is a social media collaboration initiated by Angela Ablaberdieva (UW Chem MS ’19) to boost donations supporting the Black Lives Matter movement. In its rst month, Anti-Racist Pet Portraits has encouraged $1086.96 in donations to organizations ranging from The Foundation for Black Women’s Wellness to The Bail Project and Black Girls Code. The “artist” team behind Anti-Racist Pet Portraits (which includes Chemistry’s very own Tesia Janicki and Natalia Spitha!) has been sketching pet portraits for individuals who donate to organizations ghting racial inequality. Typically, the drawings successfully represent the shape of an animal.You can nd us on:Facebook (@ARPPortraits) Instagram (@antiracistpetportraits)

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One of the limitations of Buckminster fullerenes is the hydrophobic nature of carbon structures. Post-synthesis functionalization requires additional modication, and these surface chemistries may be unstable. We propose an amphiphilic alternative to traditional Buckminster fullerenes using sp2 duck as the major component. The process requires simply a jaunt in the park, and no additional processing steps. Exposing Buckminster fullerenes to high concentrations of ducks in the presence of stale bread chunks initiates the replacement of carbon with ducks. Sucient feeding will allow the bread-exposed ducks to reach an excited state, at which point they can overcome the activation energy of atomic replacement. Duckminster fullerenes were characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV), and CV traces were compared with that of traditional Buckminster fullerenes (J. Phys. Chem. 1990, 94(4), 8636) to conrm ecient exchange. We observed unbilleavable high current values on the scale of giga-amperes, which led us to consider potential future applications of the Duckminster fullerenes as superconducktors for both sub and supermarine computing. 22Superconduckting amphiphilic duckminster fullerenes for applications in sub and supermarine environmentsBill Mallard & Q.U. Acker [Paige Kinsley and Liz Laudadio (Hamers Group)]

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One of the limitations of Buckminster fullerenes is the hydrophobic nature of carbon structures. Post-synthesis functionalization requires additional modication, and these surface chemistries may be unstable. We propose an amphiphilic alternative to traditional Buckminster fullerenes using sp2 duck as the major component. The process requires simply a jaunt in the park, and no additional processing steps. Exposing Buckminster fullerenes to high concentrations of ducks in the presence of stale bread chunks initiates the replacement of carbon with ducks. Sucient feeding will allow the bread-exposed ducks to reach an excited state, at which point they can overcome the activation energy of atomic replacement. Duckminster fullerenes were characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV), and CV traces were compared with that of traditional Buckminster fullerenes (J. Phys. Chem. 1990, 94(4), 8636) to conrm ecient exchange. We observed unbilleavable high current values on the scale of giga-amperes, which led us to consider potential future applications of the Duckminster fullerenes as superconducktors for both sub and supermarine computing. 22Superconduckting amphiphilic duckminster fullerenes for applications in sub and supermarine environmentsBill Mallard & Q.U. Acker [Paige Kinsley and Liz Laudadio (Hamers Group)]

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23Let’s Meet a Scientist:John GoodenoughKendall Kamp (Fredrickson Group)

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24Information for New Graduate StudentsThe Benzine editorial board would like to welcome 2020’s cohort of new graduate students! An important part of a student’s rst year is establishing relationships with people across the chemistry department and settling into one’s new Wisconsin home. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and quarantine, this task is greatly complicated.To assist our new colleagues, The Benzine editorial board has assembled a list of departmental resources and information concerning voting in Wisconsin. While there is still much more to learn as a rst year, we hope this serves as a start for your entry into our community. We look forward to getting to know you!- The Benzine Editorial Board

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25A Short List of Departmental Resources and OrganizationsBook ClubThe Chemistry Book Club started life as an idea by Cathy Clewett in early 2020 and has now grown toencompass over 100 participants including students, sta, and faculty. Participants are organized into small groups to promote a welcoming and safe space to discuss dicult topics via honest conversations with colleagues. Each group is given the freedom to develop its own personality and schedule while reading the same selection of books as the rest of the Chemistry Book Club. Bookshave been provided to those who were not able to access them with funding from the Regents Diversity Award. Looking forward, The Chemistry Book Club will continue to enrich our community by sustaining the program and expanding beyond the initial 3 books which are: “White Fragility,” “How to be an Anti-Racist,” and “Feminism is for Everybody.”Contact:Cathy Clewett - clewett@wisc.eduDesiree Bates - dmbates@chem.wisc.eduAJ Boydston - aboydston@wisc.edu

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CatalystEstablished in 2016, the Catalyst program supports participating students during their rst year of graduate school. Targeted toward (but not limited to) underrepresented minority, low-income, and/or rst-generation graduate students, the program consists of a peer-mentoring scaold and a career development seminar series that helps to create a sense of belonging and connection between participating rst-year students and their peers, department, campus, and the Madison community.Contact:Desiree Bates - dmbates@chem.wisc.eduCheri Barta - cbarta@chem.wisc.edu

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Graduate Student - Faculty Liaison Committee (GSFLC)The Graduate Student – Faculty Liaison Committee, or GSFLC, was created to give chemistry graduate students and postdocs a voice in departmental aairs. Now it consists of subcommittees on outreach, professional development, community building and wellness, each planning events to support the graduate student and postdoc community. Some of our previous events include the Snout-Out picnic, trivia, Dogs on Call and Family Science nights!Contact:Peyton Higgins - pmhiggins@wisc.eduBrandon Hacha - hacha@wisc.edu

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National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE)Are you a Black STEM student or ally? Are you interested in fostering a community for underrepresented students in the UW Madison community? If you answered yes to either of these, come check out UW Madison’s chapter of NOBCChE, the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers.Contact:Jamorious Smith - jsmith96@wisc.eduDanica Gressel - gressel@wisc.edu

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Queer+ in Chemistry (QiC)Queer+ in Chem is a student-led organization that aims to build community in our department by hosting social events, seminars, and workshops that promote an inclusive campus climate for LGBTQ+ students & sta, as well as for all underrepresented groups. While QiC events are advertised to the Everyone or Students email lists, we do have a listserv (lgbtq@chem.wisc.edu)! We primarily use this email to send out polls for scheduling events or informing students of non-QiC events they may be interested in. If you’d like to be added to the listserv, or have suggestions for future events or workshops, just email one of the QiC organizers!Contact:Laura Elmendorf - lelmendorf@wisc.eduRay Czerwinski - rczerwinski@wisc.edu

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Science is FunTo better connect science and society, Professor Bassam Shakhashiri and his group, the Wisconsin Initiative for Science Literacy, provide purposeful interactions with a wide variety of audiences in dierent settings. Our mission is to promote literacy in science, mathematics, and technology among the general public and to attract future generations to careers in research, teaching, and public service. We help people explore, discuss, and cultivate the intellectual and emotional links between science, the arts, and the humanities. We use electronic and print media, radio and TV, and in-person programming to reach youth, adults, professionals, community leaders, and elected ocials. We facilitate explaining PhD scholarly research to non-science audiences. Online presentations, home experiments, and faculty and teacher workshops, are among the oerings on our website (scifun.org). Ultimately, we aim to inuence attitudes and behavior for responsible action. Science literacy enlightens and enables people to make informed choices, to be skeptical, and to reject shams, quackery, unproven conjecture, and to avoid being bamboozled into making foolish decisions where matters of science and technology are concerned.Contact: Bassam Shakhashiri - bassam@chem.wisc.edu

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Yoga for ChemistsYoga for Chemists is a series of free yoga classes led by Andjela Radmilovic, a fth-year graduate student. Andjela started these classes her second year as a way to oer an accessible opportunity for members of the department to de-stress and practice mindfulness while building community within the department. Classes used to take place in-person, but moved online this past April to ensure everyone’s safety. Classes are unique in providing a no-pressure opportunity to practice yoga from the comfort of your own home. Online classes are 60-75 minutes long and are appropriate for all levels of yoga practitioners. Beginners are encouraged to join! If you’d like to join the yoga email list please contact Andjela. Contact: Andjela Radmilovic - radmilovic@wisc.edu

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Undergraduate Research OceThe Chemistry Undergraduate Research Oce provides resources, career support and advising for undergraduates who would like to become involved in undergraduate research or are currently involved in undergraduate research. This oce also works closely with the faculty, sta, postdoc and graduate student mentors by providing guidance, support and mentor training for those interested in or who are currently working with undergraduate mentees. Dr. Barta, the director of undergraduate research, invites anyone with questions, comments, suggestions or interest in undergraduate research to stop by her oce to chat!Contact:Cheri Barta - chem_ugr_research@chem.wisc.eduGraduate Program OceThe recently expanded Graduate Program Oce assists graduate students with program requirements. This includes managing rotations, research group matches, and collecting minor agreement forms. They also manage the thesis mentoring committee assignment process, notify and track students regarding TBEs, RPs, and fourth-year meetings, announce and post PhD defenses, update course requirements, and facilitate industrial recruiting and professional development opportunities.Contact:Taylor Mathewson - tmathewson@wisc.edu

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Let’s Talk Oce HoursLet’s Talk is a program for UW Madison students that provides easy access to informal and condential support and consultation with counselors from UHS Mental Health Services. Counselor consultants hold drop-in hours at sites around campus Monday through Friday. Any student is welcome at any site. No appointment is necessary and no fee is charged. Students are seen on a rst-come, rst-served basis. Chemistry Let’s Talk will be provided by Josie Montañez-Tyler, LMFT, SUD. She is one of the two crisis specialists on campus and the Chemistry Department’s Mental Health Ambassador.Let’s Talk is not a substitute for ongoing counseling and does not constitute mental health treatment, but consultants can listen to specic problems, help explore solutions, and introduce you to what it is like to speak to a member of our sta. Students can sign up here. The last day to sign up for a session is the day before the session. Contact:Josie Montañez-Tyler - josie.montaneztyler@wisc.edu

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26How to register to vote as a new graduate studentThe United States presidential election is November 3, 2020.If you are a U.S. citizen, will be 18 years of age on or before Election Day, have resided in Wisconsin for at least 28 consecutive days before Election Day, and are not currently serving a felony sentence, you are eligible to vote in Wisconsin.For customized instructions on what you need to do to vote, UW Madison oers an easy to use interactive tool at go.wisc.edu/StepsToVoteUW.More information is available at vote.wisc.edu including details on:- Eligibility- Acceptable Voter ID- Voter registration- Polling locations- Early voting - Absentee ballot requests

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27Interested in submitting your work for the next issue of The Benzine?We hope you enjoyed the work presented in our rst issue! We plan to produce a second issue of The Benzine in Spring 2021.Anyone currently pursuing their education in chemistry within the department is encouraged to apply. This includes postdocs, graduate students and undergraduate students. You are welcome to submit new content or past work! If interested, please submit your original work to: submissions.benzine@gmail.comWe accept a wide range of content including:- Paintings - Photographs - Creative Writing Pieces - Recipes - Poetry - Sketches- Memes

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28Thank you to...Issue 1 of The Benzine wouldn’t have been possible without the advice, support and hard work of the following people:- Dr. Judith Burstyn, Dr. Arrietta Clauss and Tatum Lyles- Dr. John Berry and Dr. Zach Wickens- Bruce Goldade- The GSFLC- Our PIs: Dr. Andrew Buller, Dr. Danny Fredrickson, Dr. Sam Gellman, Dr. Randy Goldsmith and Dr. Sam Pazicni- Olga Riusech- Our contributorsWe are so grateful for all that you’ve done. Thank you.

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29Meet the Editorial BoardRay Czerwinski – Ray is the best. She loves hiking, plays D&D, is an amazing writer and has wacky stories to tell about her siblings (seriously, ask her). rczerwinski@wisc.eduDanica Gressel – Danica is a chemist, artist, music enthusiast and ICON. She is always down to adventure with friends. gressel@wisc.eduPhilip Lampkin – Philip is a hybrid between an organic chemist and philosopher. He keeps trying to argue that isn’t a contradiction.plampkin@wisc.edu

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Robin Morgenstern – Robin’s dedication to The Benzine, friends and chemistry is incomparable. They are cheesier than curds, but we love them. hmorgenstern@wisc.eduJairo Villalona – Jairo is the sort of person you keep in your life forever. He is an amazing cook, friend and chemical biologist.villalona@wisc.edu

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Did you enjoy reading issue 1 of The Benzine?Tell us by taking our survey!