Covering the world
of
com
etition
in the
did
_..
.
w
I
BFGOODRICH JiA RADIALS
TAKE
ON
THE
ROAD™
-~
IAZDAWINS
OFF-ROAD
CHAIPIONSHIP
GRAN
PIii
AT
ROSE
BOWL
..
,,,,,
.-.;..d•
-
-~-,rt:·•rl,,~!:~~:;:!-
On
May 3
at
the
Rose Bowl
in
Pasadena, California, a very special
Mazda
B2000 faced off against
some
of
the
world's fastest
and
most
exotic race trucks for
round
five of Mickey Thompson's Off-Road
Championship
Gran
Prix.
And
as a
crowd
of 40,000watched, driver
Glenn
Harris
guided
his
270
horsepower,
13B
rotary-
powered
B2000 to victory
in
the
10-lap
main
event.
Mazda
ahd
Harris
are
currently
in
second place
in
1.1
---z~
the
Manufacturers'
and
Drivers'
point
standings. lliil......
~
C
Volume
3
Number
8
August
1986
In
This
Issue
•••
FEATURES
Page
HDRA
Fireworks
250
......
.
.......................
18
Outlaws
at
El
Cajon
Speedway
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30
_ . .
ra
SNORE
Twilight
Race
................
..
............
32
VORRA
Virginia
City
200
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
Spring
Run
101
in
Wisconsin
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
Pro
CanAm
Horn
Rapids
Sagebrush
Shootout
.........
42
Editor-Publisher
Jean Calvin
Associate
Publisher
Brad Goodrow
...................
_
Susquehannock
Trail
Pro
Rally .
...
..
................
46
ADRA
High
Country
150
...
.
..
.
......
.
.. ..
...
.
....
48
Prime
Challenge
at
Trego
..
.........................
51
International
Rally
of
New
Zealand
...................
52
Associate
Editor
Richard
K.
Schwalm
Controller
John Calvin
Circulation
Jerry Lawless
Traffic
Frank McCombs
Contributors
Darla Crown
Leonard Day
Daryl D. Drake
Winnie Essenberg
Homer Eubanks
Tom
Grimshaw
Dennis Henneberg
Martin Holmes
Danny McKenzie
Brenda Parker
David Ryskamp
Walt
Schwalbe
Wayne Simmons
Judy Smith
John Sprovkin
Joe Stephan
Darlene Thackston
3-D Photography
Trackside Photo Enterprises
Art
Director
Larry E. Worsham
Typesetting
&
Production
Michelle's Typesetting Services
THE OFFICIAL VOICE
Of
SC()RE
CANADA
AND
-w~¾wt~
=~t=-
-
~
==-
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SNAPSHOT
OF
THE
MONTH
•••
Rothmans
Jordan
Rally .
......................
..
..
. .
53
Interview
with
Larry
Ragland
.. .. ..
.
..
.
....
.
..
...
: . . . 54
1986
Score
Show
..
.
......
.
...
.
...
...........
. .
...
.
55
H
ot
Action
for
100 Miles in
Alabama
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56
Mazda
RX-
7 4
WD
Rally
Car
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Road
Report
on
the
4
WD
Nissan
Stanza
.........
....
.
59
DEPARTMENTS
Snapshot
of
the
Month
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Soap
Box
by
James
Sansom
..
.
..
...
..
....
.
..
....
. .
..
. 6
Trail
Notes
.
'.
............
.
....
..
.............
.
.....
6
Happenings
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Side
Tracks
by
Judy
Smith
......................
....
14
Pony
Express
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
The
Losers
by
Judy
Smith
........
...
...
.....
.......
.
36
Yokohama
6-50
Club
Report
.
...
.
."
..................
57
California
Rally
Series
.
..........
..
....
....
.
........
58
Pit
Team
Register
and
R
epo
rts
..
. .
...
.
.........
.......
60
SCCA
Di
visional
Rally
Report
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
61
Good
Stuff
Directory
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
62
Classified
Ads
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
66
Index
to
Advertisers
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
67
ON
THE COVER - Rob MacCachren flew high, wide and
handsome over the tough terrain around Barstow, CA, in his
Chenowth Magnum built by Butch Dean
of
Valley Performance in Las
Vegas, NV. The young driver from Las Vegas
is
already a star
in
off
road racing, and his win in Class 1 and overall
was
so overpowering at
the HDRA Fireworks
250
that even a time penalty did
not
take away
his winning margin. Color Photography by Harold Crawford
of
T rackside Photo Enterprises.
f\~
DUSTY
TIMES
THE
FASTEST
GROWING
OFF
ROAD
MONTHLY
IN
THE
COUNTRY!!
1 year -
$12.00
2 years -
$20.00
3 years - $30.00
Take advantage
~f
your subscription bonus
...
Free one time classified ad up
to
45
words.
(Form
on
inside
back page)
Name-----------------------------
The release
of
the proposed Score/ HDRA rules for 1987, which virtually eliminates
the four wheel drive rigs in Classes 3, 4 and 14 from competition, has brought some
serious objections from those competitors whose race vehicles will have no class
in
which to compete. This pair
of
photos from the tech line at the HDRA Fireworks 250
is
an example
of
the feelings
of
the troops. Rock Bradford went
on
to
win Class 14 in his
Jeep Commando,
but
we
do
not know the fate
of
the unknown Class 3 entry. Photos by
Trackside Photo Enterprises.
Address
-------------------------
City
State
__________________
Zip
________
_
Send
check
or
money
order
to:
DUSTY
TIMES
DUSTY TIMES will feature pictures
of
humorous racing incidents, woes on the course,
or
a spectacular from sho
rt
course events on this page each month. Send us your
photo
of
something comic, a mechanical disaster,
or
anything fitting for consideration.
DUSTY TIMES will pay
$10
for the picture used. If you wish the photo returned,
5331
Derry
Ave
.,
Suite
0,
Agoura,
CA
91301
enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Only black & white prints, 5 x 7
or
8 x 10 I (Canadian _ 1 year $15.00 U.S. Overse::is subscription rates quoted on request)
,..
___
w
..
i_ll_b_e_c,.;,o_n.:..si_d.:..
·
e..::r.e
_
d_f_o_r...,:.p_u_b_lic_a_t_io_n_.
___________________
_..;
·
,::;.__;;;:;..
_________________________________
___,
L
Dusty
Times
August
1986
Pages
SoaP-
Box
•••
By
James
Sansom
Mousetrap Enterprises, Riverside,
CA
In
the
ongoing war
of
words
about
racing in
the
desert, may I
fire
off
these few shots.
Classes
8,
9
and
10
- Classes
would
be
for motorcycles
of
125cc,
250cc
and
open.
There
s,eems
to
be a
lot
of
ideas
and
opinions
about
the
number
of
classes in
desert
racing,
and
the
number
of
entries in each class.
Here
then
is
some
more
ammo
for the war
of
words.
How
about
the
following class
set
up? '
Class
10
-
to
merge with Class
1
or
Class
2.
Class 1 -
to
remain
the same.
Class 2 -
to
remain the same.
Class
3,
7
4x4
and
14
to
merge
into
one
class. Engine displace-
ment
not
to
exceed
283
cubic
inches,
one
carburetor
of
650
c.f.m. for V-Ss,
two
carburetors
for
4
and
6
cylinder
cars,
twin cam engines
for
4 cylinder
cars only.
No
turbos
allowed.
Class 4 -
to
remain the same.
Class 5 -
Change
to
1600cc
engines
only,
full
bodies,
fiberglass fenders,
hoods,
trunks.
Stock
floor
pan
and
no
wings
allowed.
Class 6 -
Mini
trucks,
4
and
6
cylinder engines, steel cabs. All
other
parts
may be fiberglass.
Must
retain
stock
appearance,
suspension
unlimited. Engines
not
to
exceed 3 liters, twin
cam
engines, 4 cylinder only.
Two
wheel
drive
only,
and
no
turbos
allowed.
Class 7 -
Two
wheel drive
standard
pickup
truck.
Engine
limited
to
360
cubic
inches.
One
carburetor
of
750
c.f.m., steel
cab, all else can
be
fiberglass.
Other
rules
same
as Class 6 mini
trucks.
Classes
11
and
12 -
Three
wheel A
TVs
under
250cc
and
open.
Classes 13
and
14
-
Four
wheel
ATVs
under
250cc
and
open.
All
of
the
above
classes
to
be
Pro
classes. All drivers
must
have
a medical card
and
license
from
Score/HORA
to
compete
in
these classes.
To
be elibigle for a
Pro
class, the
driver
or
co-driver
must
have
completed
eight
Score/HORA
sanctioned
events
in
the
last
two
years.
All
other
drivers, co-drivers
and
classes
are
to
be
considered
Sportsman
and
race in
that
category.
To
move
up
to
Pro
classes,
one
must
have finished in
the
top
four
of
the class in eight
Score/HORA
sanctioned
events
in any
two
consecutive years.
Classes starting with
number
15
would
be
Sportsman
classes.
Class
15-1-2-1600
would
remain
the
same.
Class
16
would
be
the
former
Class 6 sedans. Class 6 cars
would have
to
run
with Class 1
or
2.
Class 1 7
would
combine
Class
9
and
Challenge Class cars.
Challenge Class rules
would
be
followed, except any
stock
VW
front
end
could
he
used.
Class
18
would
be
stock
VW
sedans, with cur:rent Class
11
rules
to
apply.
Class
19
would
be
stock
mini
trucks
with
two
wheel drive. All
trucks
are
to
remain
stock
except
for
the
following changes. Fuel
cells
mounted
in the
bed,
battery
West
Coast
Distributor
fOR
HEWLAND
OFF
ROAD
GEARS
ALL
GEARS
AVAILABLE
SEPARATELY
NEW
RATIOS
AV
AI
LAB
LE
Valley
Performance
3700
Mead
Ave.
las
Vegas,
NV
89102
702/873-1962
OUR
PRICE
$695.00
Per
Set
2 Ratio's
Available
McKenzie
Automotive
12945
Sherman
Way
#4
North
Hollywood,
CA
91605
213/764.;6438
.
DEALER
INQUIRIES
INVITED
Page6
moved
to
the
bed, seats
and
seat
belts may be changed,
shocks
not
to
exceed 3 inches
over
stock.
Two
shocks
per
wheel
maximum
allowed in
stock
location,
some
relocation
for
clearance.
Tires
not
to
exceed
10:00
x 15, steel
wheels only.
Skid
plates
to
protect
the
engine
and
transmis-
sion allowed.
Must
use engine
and
transmission as manufac-
tured. Extra cooling allowed. In
other
words, the
truck
must
remain as close
to
stock
as
possible.
The
stock
dash
must
remain as well as all
the
interior
trim
and
floor covering.
Class
20
-
Stock
two
wheel
drive
standard
pickup
truc;ks.
The
rules
to
be
the same as Class
19
concerning being stock.
Class 21 -
This
would
be
whatever else needs a class
or
anything
that
Score/HORA
want
it
to
be.
Also, let us get going
on
having
one
tech inspection
team
and
one
set
of
officers·
on
the
race course.
As
for these officers, they
should
be
clearly identified as
such
by
clothes,
armbands,
whatever it
takes. Also, all
pit
and
chase
vehicles
should
be
clearly
marked
with the, race vehicle
name
.
or
the
pit
organization
name.
Any
pit
crew vehicle
or
chase vehicle
found
in
an
area
that
is
closed
would
cause the
race vehicle
to
be
disqualified. A
written
notice
of
disqualification
to
be
given
to
the
pit
or
chase
crew,
and
the
driver
to
be
notified
at
the
start/finish
line
A.S.A.P.
The
next
Parker
400
would
be
a
good
place
to
start
this action.
Closed
areas
should
be labeled
as
such
with orange
ribbon
and
signs.
The
ribbon
should
be
3 inches by
50
feet
minimum
and
the
signs
to
be
10
inches by 12 inches
minimum.
All
of
this
is
one
man's
thoughts
about
off
road
racing
and
the
direction
it might take in
the future.
Our
sincere thanks
to
James
Sansom for his well researched
opinions on
what
the classes might
evolve
to
in desert racing.
Of
course,
with
only the four Score races each
year featuring motorcycles
and
A
TVs
these days, it might be tough
for a competitor
in
those classes
to
get the credentials needed
to
be
a
Pro
racer.
Also,
we
might
add
that there are
rules now
in
ef{ect concerning the
marking
of
closed areas on the race
course.
Along
with
the markings
placed in the actual areas on course,
we think that detailed maps
of
the
course should be provided
for
pit
crews
with
the closed areas clearly
marked on the
map
and
identified
by
mile markers, both on the
map
and
on the course.
The
majority
of
pit crew members searching for a
broken race car have not pre-run the
race course. And,
we
know from
personal experience during a rescue
effort
at
the recent
Mint
400,
you
can wander into forbidden land in
the desert on
an
access road,
and
not
even realize you are doing the bad
thing.
. - Volunteers are
i1wiced
to
climb
on
their
"Soap
Box"
and
fill
chis
space
U'ith
their thoughts about U'hat
is
good
and
«hat
is
not
so
good about
the state
of
off
road racing.
We
U'ould «'elcome some discussion on
the state
of
the Pro Rally Series as
«'ell.
Call
or«'rite
DUSTYTlMES
iiith your ideas for a Soap Box
/ column,
and
get on the schedule.
August
1986
Trail Notes
•••
ALL
CONCERNED
RACERS
should
call
or
write
both
Walt
Lett
and
Sal
Fish
immedi
ately with
their
opinion
of
the new rules-
proposed
for
1987,
no
matter
what
your
feelings.
We
understand
. the
door
is
still
open
for a
coupl
e
of
weeks, as
of
this writing. So if
you
like them, say so.
If
you
don't
like
them,
say
so
to
thes
e
two
men
now!
Don't
wait
to
grouse
about
the
rules after the
new rule
book
comes
out.
It will be
too
late.
There
is
a possibility
that
the
drastic rules changes in class
structure
could
be delayed until the
1988
season,
if
there
are
enough
competitors
who
feel the notice
is
too
short
for
the 1987
season. But, if you
don't
let
Walt
and
Sal
know
your
views, they will assume
you
like the rules as
proposed
and
proceed
accordingly.
PIKES PEAK belongs
to
the
Unser
clan
once
again,
and
old
timers on the
hill
can
breathe
a sigh
ofrelief
that
the
title
no
longer belongs
to
a French lady
driving a
German
car
.
Of
course,
the
weapon
Bobby
Unser
used
to
take
back
the
absolute
record
time
at
Pikes Peak was
an
Audi
Sport
Quattro,
with
increased
horsepower
and
fancier
skirts
than
last year's record
holder.
Bill
Brister,
who
seems
to
win every
other
year,
took
the
open
wheel
victory
in
a
Wells
Coyote
powered
by
Chevy. Local
driver
Leonard
Vasholtz
won
the
stock
car class
in
a
Ford
Thunderbird,
besting Roger Mears, in a
Camaro,
by
just
split
seconds.
John
Crawford
won
his fifth
Production
Rally title in a
Dodge
Shelby
Turbo
Charger,
and
Crawford
has
won
this class every year
since its inception.
Watch
for
the
full
report
on
the
Climb
to
the
Clouds
in the
September
issue.
TOYOTA
AND
TRD
have
joined
in
establishing
annual
"T
oyota
/
TRD
Cup"
championship
awards.
There
are
two
categories for the
Cup,
pavement
racing
and
off
road/rally
competition.
Only
independent
competitors
are
eligible
to
enter,
and
Toyota
factory
backed
drivers
and
teams
are
excluded.
The
·
off
road
and
rally category
covers
the Mickey
Thompson
stadium
series,
the Score/
HORA
series,
and
the
major
SCCA
rally series. Each
winner
will
receive a personalized
TRD
Championship
jacket, an
award
certificate
and
a
Simpson
racing
helmet
along with an engraved silver
cup.
The
deadline
for
entry
is
December
3
I,
1986,
with the
winners
being
announced
in
January
1987.
The
winners will
be
those
judged as having
·
contributed
the
most
to
Toyota's
performance
image
during
1986.
Get
the
full details
and
entry
forms
from
Gary
Reed,
Toyota
Motorsports
Dept.,
19001 So.
Western
Ave.,
Torrance,
CA
90509.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
TO
THE B.L.M.
1986
marks
the
40th
Anniversary
of
the
creation
of
the Bureau
of
Land Management,
out
of
the
Department
of
the Interior. Federal land
management
started
much
earlier,
back
in
1812,
to
provide
some
order
for
the
pioneers
moving west
and
onto
land they
could
homestead.
Congress
created the General Land
Office
to
act
as the
government's
real estate agent in
1812,
and
at
that
time;
it was the national
policy
to
sell these western lands.
Now
you
know
where
the
expression
"land
office
business"
comes
from. · ·
It was
over
100
years until the next step,
1939
to
be
exact,
when
Congress
created
the
U.S.
Grazing Service
to
administer
grazing
districts
and
manage the land. But,
it
wasn't
until
1946
that
the
General
Land
Office
and
the
U.S. Grazing Service were
combined
into
the single agency called the
Bureau
of
Land Management.
Then
there
were
only
seven offices
in
the whole
country.
In
1954
the
concept
of
individual state offices began,
and
in 1961
the
current
organization headed
by
individual state
directors
came
into
being.
A few statistics in
the
press release
are
staggering.
The
United
States
contains
slightly
more
than
2.3 billion acres
of
land,
and
about
32
percent,
730
million acres, are
under
the
jurisdiction
of
the
Federal
Government
.
Of
that
approximately
340
million acres remain
under
B.L.M.
management,
most
of
it in the western states.
That
is
more
land
than
is
held by all
other
Federal agencies
combined.
In California alone the B.L.M. manages 17. I
million acres
of
land.
Of
note
is
that
1986
also
marks
the
tenth
anniversary
of
one
of
the
most
significant
and
all encompassing pieces
oflegislation
affecting
federal land use
ever
enacted,
the
Federal L1nd Policy
and
Management
Act.
Now
you
know
why
off
road
racers in
the
early
1970s
did
not
have the
permit
hassles
and
land use costs
that
desert
events
do
today. But, the
Act
did
eliminate a
lot
of
overlapping
land use laws
and
mandates.
At
any rate,
Happy
Birthday
to
the
B.L.M.,
and
especially
to
its officers
who
work
so
closely with
off
roaders
of
all types
to
keep the lands
open
to
vehicles.
THE
FRONTIER
500
is
the next big
desert
race in the
combined
Score
/
HORA
series,
and
the first
of
a pair
of
back
to
back
double
points
races.
The
entry
forms
are in the mail
now
for the
September
5-7
desert
dash,
and
a
good
deal
of
the
course
will
be
fresh
stuff
on
the west side
of
1-15.
Included in
the
course
is
a
short
trip
into
the California
desert
near
Stateline.
Because
of
the
mountain
trails used
on
the
course,
spark
arresters
will
be
mandatory
on
all vehicles.
So
get
yours
fitted
soon,
before
you
get to Las
Vegas
and
the tech inspection line.
FLORIDA OFF
ROAD
RACING
ENTERPRISES have moved
to
a new
race track
for
the
rest
of
the
1986
season.
Their
June
30
race at the Florida
State
Fairgrounds
Speedway, in
Tampa,
was canceled because
of
the
insurance
problem,
meaning the Speedway lost its coverage. Both
F.O.R.E.
and
F.O.R.D.A.
worked
together
and searched
hard
to
find a new race site,
and
they have,
at
East Bay Raceway
south
of
Tampa
on
U.S.
41.
The
schedule
of
classes will
be
somewhat
curtailed, as the
off
road
cars will
share
one
Saturday
evening a
month
with
the
stock
cars.
The
off
road
races are
planned
for
the
third
Saturday
night
of
each
month.
Get
all the
information
by
calling
·
either
Carl
Johnson,
(8
I
3)
933-794
7
/996-6826
or
Chuck
Gurr,
(813)
937-
8535
/
920
-
5102.
THE
MINT
400
is
on
for 1987!
The
Mint
Hotel
and
Casino
and
the High
Desert
Racing Association have reached agreement
to
stage the
20th
annual
Mint
400
Desert
Race in 1987
on
May
9.
The
course
will be similar
to
the
dandy
used last May,
operating
out
of
Sloan.
The
Mint
Hotel
General
Manager
Bill
Kiser feels the entry will be
much
larger
next
year
than
in
1986.
He stated
that
the early
winter
notice
of
cancellation
of
the
1986
race,
and
then the rescheduling
of
the
event
well
into
1986
hurt
the size
of
the
entry,
particularly affecting
those
who
come
from
far away
to
compete.
The
1987
Mint
400
will again be
part
of
the Score/
HORA
desert
series,
so
save
your
pennies
and
be a
part
of
the ·biggest sh,nv on the desert,
;
:ilf·
'I
·,
{mor
e
TRAIL
NOTES
on page
io)
,
Dusty
Times
a
Dave Ashley, driving Dick
Landfield's rugged Ford Ranger,
wins
his
f"irst
truck
race ever.
You
might
call
Dave Ashley a rookie.
After all,
this
year's Fireworks 250
was only
the
third
truck
race he's ever
run.
But at 25 years of age, Dave is a
he
15-year veteran of racing.
He started racing motorcycles at age
ten.
And
went
on
to race buggies.
And
on
the
4th
of July weekend, ·
Dave
won
his first
truck
race ever
ih
the
highly-competitive Class 7-4x4.
The tires
that
took Dave to victory:
Goodyear Wrangler radials.
"We owe a lot to
the
tires:' said team
owner, Dick 1.andfield.
"The
course was real rough.
And
the
impact from a big rock actually bent
two of
our
alloy wheels. But
the
tires
didn't
give out.
If
they did,
we
wouldn't
have won'.'
Landfield,
who
owns two Ford
dealerships
in
Southern California, is
no rookie to off-road racing. He's -
250
been
racing Goodyear Wrangler radials
for over
ten
years.
"We believe
in
Goodyear Wranglers.
We
race them.
And
we sell
what
we
race;' he said.
At Goodyear, we share
that
same
philosophy.
We
race
the
tires you buy.
And
there
is no better place to prove
the
superiority
of Goodyear Wrangler radials
than
on
the
rugged courses of off-road racing.
So no matter
what
kind
of
truck
you
own, get a set of Goodyear Wrangler radials.
The same tires
that
took Dave Ashley
to victory
on
the
4th
of July weekend.
They
will
give you
the
independence
to take your
truck
just about anywhere
you want.
You
either
have
Wrangler Radials.
Or
you
need
them.
GOOD;riEAR
John Buffum
is
not one to rest on his laurel
s.
After capturing first place in the Quebec, SCCA
Tulip 200 and the Nor'wester Pro Rallies, Buffum
and co-driver Tom Grimshaw
went
on to race their
Audi Sport Quattro to yet another victory. This time
beating out a field
of
91
competitors to take first place
in the Susquehannock Trail· Rally.
But Buffum wasn't the only one maneuvering
through the torturous and muddied forest roads
of
Wellsboro, Pennsylvania.
Driving Audi 4000CS Quattros, Paul Choiniere
and Scott Weinheimer capped fourth place in the
Production Class while Bruoo .Kreibich and .
C
lark
Bond finished
si"xt
h -oveta
ll.
©1986 Audi
Although we 're proud
of
these achievements,
we 're never satisfied. Because at Audi, we don't
just
race to win.
We
race to test the limits
of
our
engineer-
ing. And apply what we learn. : .
That's why every Audi 4000CS Quattro and
5000CS Turbo Quattro utilizes the very same, basic
permanent all-wheel drive technology which helps
power John Buffum and Tom Grimshaw to victory.
So, if you 're looking for a car that can give you
enhanced traction and driver control, take a look at
our all-wheel drive Audis.
After all, if there's one environment more chal-
lenging than the harsh world
of
rallying, it's the
real world
of
everyday driving.
The arto·
engineerin
g_.
Additional
HAPPENINGS
SNORE
Southern
Nevada
Off
Road
Enthusiasts
P.O.
Box
4394
Las Vegas;
NV
89106
(702)
452-4522
September
26-28
SNORE
250
November
16
Black
Jack
100
S.O.R.R.P.
Speedway
Off
Road
Racing
Productions
Bernie
Weber
P.O.
Box
402
Temple,
Texas
76503
(817)
773-3548
August
16
Waco
Short
Course
..
September
20
Waco
Short
Course
STADIUM
RACING,
U.S.A
Marty
Tripes
228
Faxon
Drive
SpringValley,
CA
92077
(619)
463-0654
September 13
Imperial
Fairgrounds
El
Centro
,
CA
October 11
El
Cajon
Speedway
.
El
Cajon,
CA
SHORT
TRACK
OFF
ROAD
ENTERPRISES
FORMULA
DESERT
DOG
SERIES
S.T
.
O.R.E.
Co-Ordinator:
Gil
Parker
7406
So.
12th
St.
Kalamazoo,
Ml
49009
(616)
375-1233
August
3
Indiana
Off
Road
Challenge
Parragon,
IN
Gary
Hardin:
(812)
988-4783
August
30-31
Brush
Run
101
Crandon,
WI
Dennis
Rosa:
(715)
478-2924
September
20
Dixie
Autocross
·
Birch
Run,
Ml
Tom
Arthur
:
(517)
832-3274
SUPERIOR
OFF
ROAD
DRIVERS ASSOCIATION
Karen
Jenkins
2345
Hopkins
Crossroad
'
Minnetonka,
MN
55343
(612)
544-2370
August
2-3
Hodag
50
Rhinelander,
WI
Info: Bernie
Eckert
(715)
362-6550
August
16-17
Off
Road
Week
end
·
Fountain
City, WI
Info: Bill
Schirm
(608)
783-1187
August
30-31
Brush
Run
101
Crandon,
WI
Info:
Dennis
Rosa
{715)
478-2924
September
13-14
Colorama
100
Sugar
Camp,
WI
Info
:
Scott
Schwalbe
(414)
786-8766
VORRA
Valley
Off
Road
Racing
Association
"1833
Los
Robles
Blvd.
Sacramento,
CA
95838
(916)
925-1702
August
30-31-
. September 1
VORRA
/
Dayton
300
Desert
Race
Dayton,
NV
September
20-21
Millican Valley
400
Bend,
OR
October
12
.
Prairie
City
OHV
Park
_
Sacramento,
CA
The
Blue Line is here.
\LLE
PRODUCTS,
INC
Filler
Safety
Is
now
offering
all
seat
belts
.
an
_d
harnesses
In
BLUE
at
an
addllional
10%
over
existing
prices.
We
are
also
stocking
harness
pads,
horse
collars,
arm
restraints
and
tie
downs
in
blue
at
no
Increase
In
cost.
To order
use
existing
numbers
and
specify
blue
:
No. 62625-3
...............
$127.85
;•
(Also available
In
standard
I.
black)
....................
$116.25
SIMPLE
TO
ORDER
.
Phone
or
mail
order
using
Visa.
Mastercharge
or
we
do
ship
C.0.0.
No
personal
checks
please.
Order
now
and
receive
the
new.
20
page
1985
c,
alalog
and
price
·
list
free.
·
FILLER
PRODUCTS,
INC.
9017 San Fernando Road, Sun Valley,
CA
91352
(818) 768-7770
Page
10
November
1-2
Prairie
City
OHV
Park
Sacramento,
CA
WHEEL
TO
WHEEL, INC.
P.O.
Box
688,
Dept
.
4W0R
Bancroft,
Ontario,
Canada
KOL
IC0
(61,3)
332-1766
(613)
332-4128
August
2-3
4x4
& Buggy
Wheel
to
Wheel
Brighton
Speedway
· Brighton,
Ontario
Canada
August
,
15-17
8th
Annual
Bancroft
4x4
Challenge
Sand
Drags,
Wh
eel
to
Wheel,
Obstacle
Bancroft,
Ontario,
Canada
WESTERN OFF
ROAD
RACIN
G ASSOCIATION
19125
-
87
A Ave.
Surrey,
British
Columbia,
V3S
5X7,
Canada
(604)
576-6256
ATTENTION
RACE
ORGANIZERS
Lisf
your
coming events in
DUSTY
TIMES
free!
Send
your
, 986 schedule
as
soon
as
poss
i
ble
for
1isting in this
column. Mail
your
race
or
rall
y schedule
to:
.
DUSTY
TIMES,
533
r
Derry
f,.ve.,
Suite
0,
Agoura,
CA
91301.
Don't
miss
the last big
off
road
race
at
Riverside ... -
where
major
short course
racing
began.
BE
THERE
August
.
15th
thru
August
17th
For
more
information
and
tickets
call
SCORE
.INTERNATIONAL
(818)
889-9216
August 1986
more
•••
TRAIL
NOTES
TOYOTA
TRUE
GRIT
AW
ARD.
While
it seems inevitable
that
the
overall
points
leader in the
Score/HORA
desert
series
should
also be the
leader in the
Toyota
True
Grit
Award
standings,
it
does
not
necessarily
follow.
The
True
Grit
leader
may
not
even
be
the
points
leader in a class. But,
after five
of
the
eight races
in
dte
1986
series have
been
completed,
Steve
Tetrick has
the
True
Grit
.lead along with the lead in Class
JO
and
overall
points.
True
Grit
standings are based
on
an overall average speed,
and
Tetrick's
is
a swift
49
.05
mph,
the
results
of
four
class wins
and
one
second
place, with Fred
Ronn
co-driving the
O.R.E
.
Second
in
True
Grit
standings is Class 2
driver
Jerry
Penhall, w'ith a
45.54
mph
average in
the
first five events.
Third
behind
Penhall ·
is
another
Class 2
driver,
Bob Richey,
at
44
.86
mph.
As
usual in these awards,
there
are
sub
categories
for
trucks
.
Manny
Esquerra
is
leading the mini metal class in
his
Ford
and
Dave
Shoppe
is leading
the
heavy metal
in
his
Class8
Ford.
To
be
eligible
for
the
True
Grit
awards,
$10,000
is
split
three
ways
for
the
thr
ee
categories,.a
driver
must
have
completed
six
of
the eight
desert
series races
with the fastest average speed in his category.
. I .
~
WESTERNOFFROADRACINGASSOCIATION,
outofVancouver,
British C~ilumbia, has a new race site
at
Mission, with the first race
happening
late in July.
WORRA
lost their base
for
short
course
racing this year
due
to
the usual hassles with insurance
problems,
like everyone else.
To
check
out
the
rest
of
the
1986
schedule
from
WORRA,
contact
them
at
19125-87
A
Ave.,
Surrey,
B.C., C'lnada, V3S
5X7,
or
call
(604)
576-6256.
SEVEN MILLION FANS
attended
207
racing even
ts
in
1985,
an increase
of
more
than
half
a million
over
1984,
according
to
the
numbers
released by
Goodyear,
who
k
eep
track
of
this
sort
of
thing.
Attendance
increased
in
eleven
of
13 selected
North
American
auto
racing series
monitored
by
Goodyear,
and
decreased
in
two
series than
ran
fewer events in
1985.
Needless
to
say, with
no
gate
to
count,
desert
off
road
racing
is
not
included
in
the statistics.
The
records
concern
Pro
stock
cars,
drag
racing,
CART
and
spo
rts
car
series,
and
do
not
include
thous
ands
of
regional
and
local races held
each year. S
ourc
,es
estimat
e the total annual
North
American
motor
sports
attendance
at
up
to
60
million,
and
worldwide
attendance
at
more
than
twice
that.
Makes
you
wonder
why the bigg
est
events, like
NASCAR,
CART
and
Formula
1,
only
rate
a
couple
of
inches
of
copy
in the
major
Los Angeles
newspaper
on
M
onday
morning, unless,
of
course,
somebody
crashes badly.
That
is
always
good
for
a few
more
inches
of
type. . .
FISA'S EMERGENCY EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
confirmed
last
June
that
rhe
World
Rally
Championship
will be held exclusively
for
cars in
Group
A
and
Nin
1987.
Gn,iup B
cars
can still
run
,
but
without
scoring
points
and
on
ly
if
driven
by
non-graded
drivers
and
in
the
under
1600cc
class.
No
cars
homologated
into
Group
A
under
the limited
edition
evolution
rules
will be allowed
to
compete.
FISA reserves
the
right, relevant
mostly
to
the
turbocharged
cars,
to
take such measures needed
to
keep
power
output
under
300
bhp
.
Cars
in
Group
A
and
N have
to
be
built
in a
minimum
production
run
of
5000,
compared
.with
200
for
Group
B,
and
they
must
be
designed as
four
seaters.
Additional
rules
prevent
the use
of
thin materials
for
bodywork
and
enforce
stricter
fire extinguishing eq
uipm
ent rules. Banished
from
international
rallying totally in
1987
wi
ll
bc
cars
sti'ch as the
Ford
RS
200,
the
Peugeot
205
Turbo
16, the
Austin
Metro_6R4.
the Lancia Delta S4, the
Citroen
BX4TC
and
the
Audi
Sport
Quattro.
For
non
championship
international events,
most
other
existing
Group
B cars will
be
eligible
to
compete,
and
this
group
includes the Lancia Rally,
Porsche
911SC,
Nissan
240 RS,
Opel
Manta
400
,
and
the
two
valve, long chassis
Audi
Quattro.
At
this time
no
rally
Group
A car achieves
power
outputs
of
300
bhp
in
non-evolution
form,
though
several
come
close.
The
recently
announced
"new
generation"
Group
A projects, like the'Lancia Delta HF 4
WD
_
and
the
Audi
200
Quattro,
are-expected
to
surpass
this level.
AMSA
started
their sho~t
course
season
at
Santa Maria late in July
at
the
Santa Barbara
County
Fair. It was a Class 1 event, limited
to
20
entries,
and
eight
starters
in the
main
event. Ncxt
on
the
AMSA
circuit
is a race
at
the
Tulare
County
Fair
on
Sl.'ptember
21.
This
series closes with the biggie
on
the
long track
at
the
Fresno
Fairgrounds,
but
it is
not
during
the fair.
This
race will
be
open
to
all
of
the regular
AMSA
classes.
TRICK
RACING
GAS has
posted
$4200
in contingency prizes
for
the
Score
Riverside
Off
Road
World
Championship
races. Kevin
Reno,
Vice
President
of
the
racing gasoline firm
announced
that
each class
winner
will
cam
$100
in
Trick
products,
and
$50
worth
of
product
will go
to
second
place
~n
each class.
The
firm's new
Rad Red
118
octane
gas
or
112
octane
racing gas will be available
at
Riverside for participants. But,
order
in
advance
to
be
sur
_e
of
getting exactly
what
suits
your
engine.
STEVE MILLEN
had
a tough
month
in July. First, his
TrueSports
Racing
ARS
program
was
discontinued,
even
though
hc is leading
the
points
series.
"The
ARS
car
was
bought
for
my father
to
run,"
said Michelle
Trueman.
"He
was unable
to
drive because
of
his illness,
and
we ran it
on
an
interim
basis
with Steve Millen,
on
the
assumption
my
father
would
drive
when
he
was
able."
(Jim
Trueman
dicd
shortly
after
the Indy
500
-
cd.)
Next,assumingthat
he
would
miss the
Toronto
ARS
round
,, Millen'agreed
to
attend
a pre-race·
function
for
the
MTEG
Coliseum
race in Los Angeles.
Then
he was offered
one
of
the
"House"
Wildcat-Buicks
to
drive
at
Toronto,
but
Stew
elected
to
stand
by
his
word
to
Mickcy
Thompson.
Finally, Millen finished
second
in
the
wreck
strewn
Class 7 event
at
the
Los
Angeles
Coliseum,
but
he
did
score
valuable
points
for
himself
and
Toyota.
THE
MICKEY
THOMPSON
STADIUM
RACE
at
the
Los
Angeles
Coliseum
in mid-July was a-real slam banger.
The
rugged driving tactics
and
the damage progressed as thc evening
got
latn
, with the final event
over
just
before
midnight.
Traffic
jams
and
course
blockages were
common
in
most
races
on
the
narrow
track.
The
car class winners in the hectic
main
events were
Wes
Elrod
ir;i
1-1600,
Monte
Crawford,
UltraStock,
Tommy
Croft,
Class 10
with a sick engine in his
Chcnowth,
and
Sherman
Balch, Nissan, in Class 7. A
full
report
on
this wild
and
wooly race
action
will
be
in the
September
issue•
.
(more
TRAIL
NOTES
on
page
65)
' . . \
D~styTimes
I
I
,.
U16k
-
Wt
IOI
August
29,
30
&
31
S20,000
Point
Serie
Purse
.
Expected
to
Extend
ta
-$75,DDD
1
00°10
+
Payback
CRANDON. WISCON·SIN INFO
CALL
715-478-3435
or
3617
WELCOME
RACE
FANS
TO
THE
GENERAL
TIRE
0011'11
fflllllli
WORLD
CHAMPIONSHIP
OFF-ROAD RACE
FRIDAY
AUGUST
29th
10:00
a.m.-6
:
00
p.m
. Off Road
Swap
Meet
Noon-8:00
p.m
. Registration
and
inspection
at
track
1 :00-3:00 p.m.
Prerun
3:00-5:00 p.m. Fast
time
laps
SATURDAY.
AUGUST
30th
7:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. Registration &
Inspection
8:00-8:45
a.m
.
Prerun
9:
00 a.m. Classes 1 M & 2 M
8:00-8:45 a.m.
9:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
Noon
1:
00
pm.
2:00 p.m
3:00 o.m.
4:
00 p.
m.
5:00 p.m.
SUNDA Y AUGUST 31 st
7:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
8:
30-9:30
a.m
.
10:00 a.m.
11
:00 a.m.
Noon
1 00 p.m.
2:
00 p.rn.
3:
00 p.m.
4:00
p.m
.
5:00 p.m.
5:30:00 p.m.
Prerun
Classes
·1
M & 3M
Classes 5
-1
600 &
11
Classes 17 & 18
Class 2-16
Classes 2M &
4M
Classes 1 & 5 & 7
Classes 4 & 13
Glasses· 19 &
14
& 15
Class 8
Registration & I
nspection
Prerun
Classes 9 & 1 O
Class 14
' Classes 11600 & 2
Classes 3 & 6
Class WCRE Li mited
Ciass WCFE
Class WCRE
Unlimited
Women
's Races
Good
Ole Boys Race
~BUD,
LIGHT.
..
....
Oneida
Wholesale
Liquor
House,
Inc.
IIHIN£LANDER.
WISCONSIN
M50i
1
Mile
West
of
Crandon
On
U.S.
8.
Valvoline
Motor
Oils
-
Racing
Oils
rat/I,
··
ARDWA STORE
· Chewing
their
way
through
404
~les
of
the.
most diabolical desert racing
known
to
man and gila
monster, General Grabber
radials
took
two
big wins
in
the
19th annual Mint 400.
Willie Valdez finished first
in
Class 7 S alinost an
hour
ahead
of
everybody else.
AndJerry
McDonald
Q made it
three
for
three
~~
in
the
SCORE/HORA
4>
0
~
series this year
'1;-,
~
/]ii.
with
his
win
<tuG({s>,~~~~,
..__.___
3o
h 4>~
~~~~
~
0
s
/o
~~~
·
'/.
'?
in
Class 7
4x4.
Which only goes
to
show,
once
again, that winners
run
on
Grabbers.
The Grabber
AP®
for all-
around on- and off-road
· driving.
The Grabber
AT®
for more
aggressive all -terrain use.
Or
the big-lugged Grabber
MT®
for
people
who
really
like
to
play
in
the
dirt. .
There's a set waiting for
you
now
at your General
Motorsports dealer.
ns.
un~
1
"'
flCiiWS.
© 1986,General Tire, a 6acoAP Company
-rRANSIVIISSION:
susPENSION:
WHEELS/flRES:
2
_s
Liter
EFI
V6
4
ed
auto
with
overdrive.
· . V
6
(rac
e-
mo
dif
i
ed
)
28
uter
special
torsion
bars,
punce
. I
minum
wheels
1
s-inch
mud
terrain
radials
on
au
. n
windshield
pillars,
cowl,
oouble*'u
eons""'"t \
and
bO"
side
panels
hood,
front
fenders,
tai
ga
e
Side Tracks •••
By
Judy
Smith
The
Green
Sticker
Saga,
continued:
We
didn't
have
our
own
pre-runner
anywhere
near
close
enough
to
take
it for a
Green
Sticker,
but
since
our
publisher,
Jean Calvin, was going
to
be
otherwise
occupied
at
the
time,
and
had
her
race
car
ready
to
be
stickered, w,e
volunteered
to
run
it
through
the
DMV
/C
HP
thing
at
Barstow.
We
wanted
to
see
how
it all
worked,
after all
these
wordy
columns
we've
been
writing.
Jean
had
collected
about
three
pages
of
a ledger
which
itemized
expenses
incurred
when
she
was
building
the
race car,
back
in
'72.
She
also
had
an
old
check
register,
showing
she'd
actually
written
those
checks
at
the
time.
But
she
had
no
actual receipts,
and
of
all things,
couldn't
find
the
receipt
for
the
chassis,
the
one
thing
she
knew
she'd
had
until
recently. Figuring
she'd
thrown
it
out
in a
recent
fit
of
cleaning,
before
we all
knew
about
the
Green
Sticker
thing,
Jean
decided
that
since
it
represented
only
a small fraction
of
the
whole
cost,
they'd
probably
accept
her
records
without
it.
As
it
happened,
we
came
across
Gil
George
of
Funco,
(from
whom
she'd
bought
the
chassis
way
back
then)
at
Barstow,
and
he
graciously
hand
wrote
a
new
receipt
for
the
correct
amount,
and
including
the
'72
taxes.
With
that
paperwork,
and
a
$20
bill, we
took
the
car
and
went
in search
of
the
DMV
and
the
CHP.
Unfortunately,
we
went
in
the
wrong
direction
first,
and
spent
about
20
minutes
fruitlessly
searching
for
the
DMV
folks,
who
were in
the
THE
most
logical
of
places, inside
the
big
room
where
the
registration
for
the
race was being
handled.
Having finally
found
the
CHP,
and
been
p
ointed
in
the
right
direction
,
we
got
in line
behind
about
five
other
folks
at
just
.
about
nine
a.m.
There
wei:e
two
peopk
helping
us
fill
out
our
forms,
and
then
two
to
take
our
money
and
make
some
mysteri-
ous
lists.
The
forms, which
we'd
picked
up
at
Lucerne,
were already filled
out
to
the
best
of
Jean's
ability
and
had
all
been
signed ( we
thought).
The
DMV
gentleman asked a
few
pertinent
questions,
such
as
"What's
the
value
of
the
car
not
covered
by
receipts?",
and
·
"What's
the
total
value
of
the
car?"
We
ad-libbed,
and
they
noted
down
our
answers.
By
now
we'd
been
in line
20
minutes.
They
also asked
us
to
write
a
·
description
of
how
the
car
was
built,
and
in a fit
of
creativity we
wrote,
"bought
chassis,
attached
component
parts".
That
was
just
what
they
wanted,
apparently
and
went
on
to
ask a few
more
questions.
They
wanted
to
know
if
we had
paperwork
to
match
the
part
of
the
car
covered
by
receipts,
and
we
showed
them
what
we had.
We
also explained
that
the
original receipt for
the
chassis
had
been
lost,
but
that
the
seller
had
written
us
a
new
one
that
morning.
They
said
that
was
fine.
While
the
two
pleasant
folks
from
the
DMV
did
the
paperwork,
John
Krieger,
the
·
Office
Manager
of
the
Barstow
DMV,
hovered
in
the
back-
ground,
cheerfully answering
the
hard
questions,
whether
put
to
him
by a racer
or
a
OMV
person.
WRIGHT
PLACEk
COIL
SPRING
YOUR
FRONT
END!
The
coil
springs
you
are seeing
on
cars in
magazines
and
at
the
finish
line, are
products
of
The
Wright
Place. You
can use
them
on
Fox,
Bilstein,
or
Rough
Country's
Nitro
Charger.
Springs
are
available
in
1,
2,
or
3 stages, and
various lengths. Easy
to
install and adjust.
Wrenches
come
with
the
kit
for
adjustments.
Another
great
idea
from
the
front
end
experts
of
off
road
racing.
9420 FLINN SPRINGS LANE,
EL
CAJON, CA
92021
Page
14:i
\
(619) 561-4810
One
question
,
not
so
cheerfully
put,
was
asked
by Bob
Schindler
;
who'd
been
told
by
one
of
the
OMV
folks
that
his fee
would
be
$30,
since
he'd
been
using his vehicle in '
86,
and
he
would
therefore
have
to
pay for
'86,
as well
as
his
new
'87
/'88
sticker.
Bob
had
a
hard
time
with
that
one,
because
Green
Stickers
hadn't
been
required
for
our
vehicles
before
this,
and
in fact,
weren't
actually
required
yet.
He
asked
Mr.
Krieger
about
it,
and
Krieger was
quick
to
set
the
OMV
person
straight,
and
to
assure Schindler,
and
the
rest
of
us,
that
only
the
$20
fee for
the
upcoming
years
would
be
necessary. Keep
that
in
mind,
folks,
in
case you,
too,
get a
OMV
person
who
doesn't
fully
understand
the
situation
.
One
fine
point
to
remember
also, is
that
the
OMV
folks will
want
to
keep
your
paperwork.
It
seems
they
send
it all
to
Sacramento,
and
there
it's
microfilmed,
and
the
old
receipts
and
things are
stored
there
somewhere,
or
maybe
destroyed,
they
weren't
sure.
So
if
you
forsee
some
future
need
( as
an
IRS
audit)
for
those
papers,
be
sure
to
bring
copies.
The
OMV
doesn't
need,
or
want,
your
originals.
By
9:32
a.m. we were
through
with
the
OMV
for
the
time
being,
had
paid
our
$20,
and
had
our
signed
form
to
take
to
the
CHP.
As
we waited
our
turn
to
have
the
Vehicle Identification
Number
(V.I.N.)
assigned, we .
chatted
with
some
of
the
other
folks in
line,
and
found
that
those
who
had
purchased
their cars
within
the
last year
or
so,
and
hadn't
paid
the
sales tax, were definitely
being assessed
the
taxes
now.
So
bring along
some
extra .cash,
or
the
checkbook,
just
in
case.
There
were
two
CHP
officers
working
at
Barstow
(no
others
were available,
due
to
a
rock
concert
in
Adelanto),
and
they
. were being
kept
mighty busy.
Officers Paul Crescenti,
and
Steve
Hobart
were
handling
the
paperwork,
scraping
off
paint,
drilling holes
and
attaching
the
V .I.N. tags
without
much
chance
for
a
break.
Their
battery
operated
hand
drill was a
bit
slow ·
when
it
came
to
drilling holes in
chrome
moly,
but
worked
like a
champ
on
mild steel.
When
we first
got
out
to
the
CHP
station
there
were
three
or
four
cars in
front
of
us.
We
were
all
through,
with
a shiny
new
V .I.N.
number
on
the
horizontal
bar
at
the
front
of
the
driver's
compartment,
by
10
o'clock.
We
then
took
a
short
detour
of
about
10
minutes,
to
borrow
a
copier
and
someone
who
knew
how
to
work
it,
to
copy
Jean's
records
so
she
could
keep
her
originals for
her
files.
Then,
back
at
the
OMV
desk,
at
10:10,
we
had
another
short
wait while they
matched
numbers
and
assigned
the
actual
Green
Stickers.
The
paperwork
is tedious, and
the
OMV
folks
must
carefully
match
each
application
with
the
correct
V.I.N.,
and
then
assign
the
correct
Green
Sticker
number.
It
takes a while,
but
they're
doing
· all
the
work,
and
you
can
chat
with
your
buddies
while
you
wait.
One
final
form
is filled
out,
and
they check
for
signatures,
and
woe!, we
had
one
signature
missing,
and
had
to
leave
AUgust
1986
everything
on
the
tab!~
and
hustle
back
to
the
contingency
line
to
get
Jean's
signature.
That
accomplished, it was
just
a few
seconds
more
and
we
had
it all
done,
and
that
Green
Sticker
in
our
hands.
By
10:32
a.m.
we
were
completely finished.
A few things
we'd
been
told
by
the
OMV
and
CHP
need
to
be
passed
on.
First,
the
OMV
told
us
that
the
Stickers will be
required
for all
California
race
cars
at
the
next
HORA
race in
Barstow
in
December.
This
is
so
that
all
of
us will
be
properly
stickered
when
it
comes
to
February,
and
Parker.
Neither
SCORE,
nor
HORA,
nor
the
CHP
want
to
have
to
deal
with
the
thing
at
Parker.
They
want
it
to
be
an
accomplished fact. ·
So
get
to
work
folks,
and
get
those
papers
together. Barstow will be
the
final
chance
to
do
it easily -
and
believe us, it is easy.
When
the
CHP
gentlemen
attached
the
V.l.N.
sticker they
told
us
that
·we are
never
to
remove
it, deface it,
or
paint
over
it.
And,
if
something
should
damage
the
bar
to
which it's
attached, we
should
cut
out
the
piece
with
the
tag,
and
take
it
to
the
nearest
CHP
office
and
make
an
appointment
to
have a
new
one
assigned.
Your
Green
Sticker
should
be
attached
to
some
part
of
the
frame
that
won't
take
too
much
abuse.
It
needs
to
be
visible
to
the
CHP,
but
shouldn't
be
on
some
part
of
the
car
that's
likely
to
be
changed
(like
a fender,
or
engine sheet metal).
ft was
something
of
a
chore,
but
nothing
like
the
chore
it
would
have been
had
we been
forced
to
go
to
the
separate
offices, back
and
forth,
to
accomplish
the
same thing:
Once
again, we say,
"Thanks!",
to
the
folks
who
made
it happen, and
the
few
hard
working
souls
who
came
out
to
the
college
to
work
on
Saturday,
on
a holiday
weekend,
to
help
us
get
the
chore
done.
Nice folks. ·
We
heard
about
something
nice being
done
by
some
other
folks, while we were sitting
in
the
contingency line recuperating
from
all
the
DMVing
and
CHPing.
Next
to
us was a
beautiful little
1915
Chevrolet
,
which is being raffled
off
by
the
Muscular
Dystrophy
Associa-
tion
of
Las
Vegas.
Ron
Stephenson,
one
of
the
many Las
Vegas
off
road
racers,
spent
the
day sitting with
the
car
and
selling raffle tickets.
He
had
it
at
the
Mint
also,
and
many
of
you
may
have
seen
it
in
the
contingency
hne
there.
Ron
tells
us
that
the
car, which
is in very nice shape, was
donated
by
one
of
off
-road's
nice guys,
Danny
Letner.
Danny
wanted
to
do
something
to
help
the
Muscular
Dystrophy
Assocfa-
tion,
of
which
Ron
is
the
Las
Vegas President,
and
thought
maybe
the
old
car
would
help.
Stephenson
accepted it, finished
up
the
wheels,
put
tires
on
it,
did
the
upholstery,
and
began taking
it here
and
there
to
sell raffle
tickets
at
$1
each.
The
car, which
Stephenson
tells us
is
valued
between
$13,000
and
$15,000
,
will finally
be
awarded
to
its
lucky
winner
in
November
.
So
if
you'd
like
to
help a
couple
of
off
roaders
help
the
MDA,
track
down
Ron
at
Tire
Town
in Las Vegas,
and
buy a
bunch
of
raffle tickets. Maybe
SCORE
and
HORA
will
come
up
with
a Class A - for
Antique
Racer.
Subscribers
...
ARE
YOU
GETTING MORE
THAN
ONE
COPY OF
DUSTY
TIMES?
A
number
of
subscribers
now
have
two
subscriptions,
because they get
one
with
their
membership
in
HDRA,
or
they
subscribed
to
both
Off
Road
Action
News
and
Dusty
Times. If
you
,
don't
really
need
two
copies each
month,
drop
u"s
a
note
and
assign
your
duplicate
subscription
to
a
friend,
pit
crew
worker,
anyone
you
choose
.
Send
us
the
full
name
and
address with zip code,
of
your
friend,
and
the mailing label
from
the
subscription
you
wish
to
assign
to
them.
We
will take care
of
the
paper
work.
Dusty
Times
Conner
and
Fram/Autolite
Destroy BAJA
500
Class 7-4 WD
••. Win
by34
Minutes!
Autolite
spark
plugs
powered
Jim
Conner's
Nissan
4x4
while
Fram
filters
handled
the
grueling
dust
of
.
the
Baja
penin-
sula
as
Conner
won
Class
7-4WD
by
34
minutes
over
his
closest
competitor.
Jim
covered
the
entire
500
miles
without a
single
plug
or
filter
problem.
Conner's "right stuff"
proved
to
be
a
cut
above
the
rest
of
the
competition.
And
at
Fram/Autolite
we
know
that
feeling
well.
Congratulations,
Jim.
'
..
,;
'
...
,.,
..
, ' '
· Allied Manufactures Fram, ·
Bendix and Autolite Quality Parts
Allied
Aftermarkel Olvlsioil
105
Pawtucket Avenue
· East Providence,
RI
0;1916
~IED
, Automotive
Pony
-
Express
•••
THE
1987
RULES
MESS
OR
NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION
OF
OFF
ROAD
DRIVERS! MAYBE?
Mess is
the
least
to
say of
th
e
proposed
Score
and
HORA
rule
changes
for
1987
.
One
need
no
t
go
into
the
ridiculous
callmg of
Class
10
as
Class
6 in
1987
,
and
vice versa,
or
combining
Class
1,
2
and
14
(high
entries)
and
leave
Class
7,
7S
and
Class 7 4x4
(low
entries)
to
understand
the
utter
confusion
and
chaos
these
new
rules will
cause
.
If
you
haven't
been
convinced,
then
we will call
old
Class
3
and
4 Class 9
next
year.
Convinced
now
, Huh??
Recently
in
DUSTY
TIMES
-Jean Calvin
went
into
how
off
road
racers
are
racing
for
their
own
_
money,
etc.,
so
I
just
mention
that
here,
and
say
that
as
long as
this
situation
exists
then
it
is
up
to
the
promoter
to
offer
them
the
classes
the
y wish, as
long as
the
number
of
entries
·
warrants
. In a
feature
situation,
·
with
an
umteen
dollar
purse
put
up
by
any
manufacturer
,
then
let
them
select
the
rules
and
classes
and
call
them
what
you
will,
for
now
you
are
paying
the
drivers
.
Off
road
racing,
with
·its
various
names,
desert
racing
and
endurance
racing,
depending
on
your
part
of
t
he
country,
as
we
know
it
and
love
it
has
been
a
family
sport
since its
inception
many
years ago. It has
been
promoted
mostly
by
non-profit
clubs,
and
a few
independent
promoters
that
have
been
tremendously
successful,
but
they also use
volunteer
help
because
of
the
nature
of
the
enterprise.
Volunteers
have
been
available
because
of
the
tremendous
enthusiasm
and
love
many
peop
le
have
for
this
sport,
whether
they
be
driver
or
fan.
Rule
changes have
to
be
made
-
with
this
in
mind,
and
nothing
should
be
done
to
destroy
a class
if
a
good
number
of
entries
exist.
Marketing
is a
respectable
occupation
and
off
road
racing is
a loved
sport,
and
somewhere
the
two
should
meet,
but
not
in
the
rule
making
room.
If
the
marketing
people
~ant
t~
use
th
e
sport
for
the
ir
purposes,
then
let
them
set
up
their
rules
and
thos
e
of
us
who
wish
may
join
them.
There
1s
only
so
much
room
for
those
highly
sponsored
vehicles
anyway,
and
at
least
this
way
ou
r
sport
will
not
be
destroyed
.
For
those
of
you
who
don
't
know
me, I've
been
active in
th
e
sport
in the
Midwest
for
a few
years,
and
I
know
that
the new
rules will
not
be
acceptt;d
by
the
Midwestern
racers.
What
will
happen,
eventually, will be a
Midwest
set
of
rules,
and
hopefully
a
Midwest
Associa-
tion
,
but
as
that
takes
time,
Score
rules,
modified,
from
1983,
1984,
1985
and
1986
(?) will
be
accepted as
the
rules
for
1987,
using
old
rule
books
until
something
can
be
done
.
Notice
the
word
modified
in
the
above
paragraph, as
that
has
been
in
our
rules
(SODA)
for
a
long time, even
though
we
wished
to
keep
the
·
rules
National, basicaUy,
so
drivers
could
move
from
here
to
there
and
expect
to
race legally.
Because
of
the
sometimes
quick
rule changes
in
the
past,
without
notification, we have
been
forced
to
use
modifications
of
the
Score
rules.
Some
of
the
rule
changes have
been
quick
and
not
easily
understood,
or
so
late
in the year
that
we
would
be
unable
to
accept
them.
And
now,
this massive ,change
for
1987
is
quite
obviously
unacceptable.
Where
does
this leave
us??
As
off
road
~ace
drivers,
this
situation
should
tell
us
we have a
need
for
a
rule
making
body
that
takes time
to
change rules,
and
one
that
is
not
influenced
by
anything
except
a
genuine
love
for
the
sport.
This
body
could
be
of
your
·
own
making
by
the
formation
of
a
National
or
Iriternational organization
of
off
roaders
that
puts
out
a
set
of
rules.
These
rules
could
only
be
changed in a way
set
down
by
your
constitution
and
by-laws,
so
that
time
is necessary for
changes
and
side influences have
less effects.
AffENTION
DESERT
R4CERS
DUSTY
TIMES
has
contingency money posted
at
all Score
and
HDRA
desert races. Check
it
out
on
contingency
row
- Two
different
classes
each event.
The
problem
of
rules
has
been
a
topic
for
editorials
by
various
people
in
past
years,
and
maybe
this is the year
for
action.
It
would
take
some
.
work,
discussions, local organizations
to
elect representatives, etc. But,
it
might
be
worth
it
to
help
our
sport
grow
and
to
contro
l its
direction
.
If
enough
of
you
show
interest
, a meeting
could
be set
up
for
discussions
on
where
to
go
from
he
re
.
Walt
Schwalbe
1736
So.
82nd
St
.
West
Allis,
WI
532
14
For
years
Walt
Schwalbe has
been involved
in
the Superior
Off
1
Road
RacinR Association, helpinR
to
form its tules
and
schedules as a
many time President
of
SODA,
and
also helpinR
to
keep their rules in
line with those
of
other midwestern
off
road racinR
voups.
He speaks
with
an
authority Rained
by
many
years
of
experience in volunteer
UiOTk
for
the betterment
of
o
ff
road
racinR.
This
letter
is
to
whoever
cares!
After
being away
from
all
the
excitement
and
disappointments
of
off
road
racing
for
the
past
18
months,
I
could
hardly
wait
to
get
out
to
the race
last
month
at
Barstow. I
wanted
to
get
to
the
pits
and
start
keeping times,
not
only
for
our
car,
but
for
other
classes
as
well. A
stopwatch,
pad,
pencil
and
eraser were
not
needed!
What
a
disappointment
the
Fireworks
250
turne
d
out
to
be.
The
"Awards"
business
was
really an eyeopener! lt seems like
the integrity
of
the
promoters
has
really changed,
or
perhaps
it
is
just
the
"Rules
"
that
have
changed these
past
months.
·
These
new
-
rules
are
great ...
especially
when
a
driver
has .
had
"down
time
."
It is really a relief
to
know
that
our
entry
fee
hasn't
been
"lost"
and
that
it
is still
partially going
to
the
winners!
What
a
joy
to
know
a
car
with
"down
time"
can
still
recoup.
Now,
if
you
need
to
make
up
time,
or
you
don't
want
to
make
a
pest
of
yourself
getting
past
all
those
"slow"
cars
in
front
of
you,
you
can
just
skip
a
checkpoint.
Or,
better
,yet,
you
can
bypass
the
checkpoint
AND
cut
the
course!
And,
you
can
still
do
good
,
maybe
even fantastic.
The
next
time
a
car
is
down
for
some
reason
or
another,
the
crew
can
figure
out
which
checkpoint
to
miss
that
will
be
to
the
car's
advantage,
minus
the 15
or
20
minute
penalty,
and
still
"go
for
it."
If
a
car
is really
behind,
the
driver
can
cut
the
course,
miss a
checkpoint
and
only
be
penalized
35
minutes.
But
he
might
possibly
make
up
60
minutes
on
the
next
guy.
Let's
get
back
to
the
"old
fashioned world'..'
of
off
road
racing
where
the
honest
racer
gets a
chance
at
the gold ring
too
,
and
the
cheaters
get disqualified!
Thanks
for
listening
to
an
old
Class 9
diehard
and
a
new
Class
2:..
1600
crew
membe
r.
Beverley
Watson
Barstow,
CA
Our
thanks
to
Bev
Watson
for
her insiRht into the way a clever crew
can
make
the current fashion
of
rules interpretation work
to
a
rea
i
advantaRe. She knows
off
road
racinR well, since
she
crewed for her
husband Larry who raced and won
in Class 9 since the class was
started,
and
now her ·sons are both
racinR
i/1
restricted
bul{Ky
classes.
In
the olden days
of
stubs in a can
at
checkpoints,
if
one missed a check
the lap was lost.
Time
penalties
came. into fashion
for
missinR a
check
at
the r985 Baja rooo.
. However, a set amount
of
time does
not penalize equally.
At
the recent
Fireworks
250,
three class winners
were given time penalties
for
both
missinR a check
and
cuttinR the
course, and retained the class
championship. However three other
class winners lost their title with
time penalties, as they were runninR
in classes where the competition u,as
much tiRhter.
I
would
like
to
publicly
thank
Steve Kassanyi
and
the
entire
Score
organization
for
their
willingness
to
listen
to
a
problem,
and
for
the
extra
effort
to
solve said
problem.
Last
May,
after
returning
from
a
great
pre-
run
of
the
Baja
course,
I called
Steve Kassanyi
to
compliment
him
on
the
course
layout,
and
to
explain
that
even
though
the
course
was well
marked,
I
had
a
problem
seeing .
the
day glow
orange
markings
due
to
my
being
color
blind.
After
explaining
the
situation
to
Steve, he immedi-
ately
and
without
· reservations
assured
me
that
he
and
Sal
would
put
their
heads
together
and
come
up
with
a
solution
to
the
problem.
They
did
solve it,
by
re-
marking
the
course
using a very
distinguishing silver
border
on
the
markers,
which
made
them
easy
to
see. Even
though
we
broke
out
of
Mike's
Sky
Ranch,
THE GREAT
CANDY
CANE
~
it
was a fantastic race.
Thanks
~
- again
Score,
for
listening,
and
' _
most
of
all
for
acting.
RETURNS
AGAIN
SEE IT·
AT THE FRONTIER 500
·
Page
16
August
1986
\ ,
Bob
Utgard
~,
Dewi-Bug
Off
Road
\ Lancaster,
Ca
1 l
~
-~
~
~
~
~
~
l
~
'
~~
'
~ ~
~
~
\
~'
'
.
~
'
You
a~e
not alone in beinR color
blind, &b,
We
know several other
reRular racers who have a tough
time, particularly
at
Parker, since
they
cannot
tell the difference in the
various colors
of
ribbons.
We
have
remarked
on
this problem editorially
in the past,
and
we are
glad
to
knou•
that Score has done somethinR about
it.
It's
great
to
see
everyone
at
your
publication
give
the
fastest
growing
Score/HORA
class
the
recognition
I feel
it
deserves.
The
Challenge Class !:,rings a, !gt,
9_f
drivers
and
cars
into
_
great
competition
behind
the
wheel
and
not
the
pocket
book
.
The
current
rules
keep
it
that
way.
That
is
the
way I like it.
This
class is
very
competitive;
I've
co-driven
in
other
classes, /
and
have
yet
to
find
competition
like
this
.
This
class
has
made
it
possible
for
.
me
to
own
!JlY
own
race
car
and
drive
solo
in
all
events. I
have
beep.
able
to
open
a
lot
of
doors
leading
to
new
sponsors
and
contingency
donors,
along
with
co-driv.ers.
It
is
this
kind
of
group
effort
and
support
that
is allowing
me
to
set
my
sights
on
Rookie
of
the
Year
honors
and
a
Score/HORA
points
championship
.
Many
thanks
for
the
support.
Rich
Minga
Baja
Concepts
Lemon
Grove,
CA
The
Challei1Re Class certainly
deserves plenty
of
space ih any full
coveraRe
of
the desert series.
With
4 r starters
at
_Barstow it was the
second larRest class. Sometimes
all
the factory support
and
name brand
drivers
cannot
provide the kind
of
close competition found in a class
limited in power
and
chassis by the
rules. ·
We
are
writing
to
thank
you
for
your
ongoing
coverage
of
our
accomplishments
in
off
road
racing:
We
are
doing
our
best
to
achieve success,
and
recognition
is
seldom
found
in
the
magazines.
It
._
is
a·
real
feeling
of
accomplishment
to
see
our
picture
and
read
our
_
names
in
your
articles in
DUSTY
TIMES
Magazine.
We
look
forward
to
seeing
you
at
the
remainder
of
the races
in
the
1986
season
and
reading
the
articles each
month.
Once
again,
thank
you
very
much.
Your
friends
in racing.
Curt,
Jeff
and
Wes
Elrod
San
Jose,
CA
You're welcome folks,
and
we ·
enjoy coverinR
all
classes
at
any
race. ConRratulations
on
winninR
Class
r-r6oo
and
scorinR points in
the Ultrastock class
at
the Los
AnReles Coliseum.
I
want
to
thank
you
for
this
subscription
to
DUSTY
TIMES
and
for
your
generosity
toward
the
National
Jeep
Search
and
Rescue -
teams
in
the
good
old
USA.
I
know
I will like
this
.
magazine,
for
I
drive
a
Jeep
in
my
search
and
rescue
work.
Maybe
I
can
pick
up
some
pointers
from
each issue.
Thank
you
very
much.
LR.
Short
Milford,
Utah
We
hope you enjoy
DUSTY
TIMES
too.
Mr. Short was
one
of
a
dozen people atteiulinR the National
Search
and
Rescue Convention in
Las VeRas,Nevada, lastspringwho
won a subscription
as
a door prize.
DUSTY
TIMES welcomes letters
from all comers
of
off
road activity.
The
Pony Express
column
will
'feature all the mail we can {it into
the space. Please keep your words
fairly
brief.
Because
of
space
limitations, your pearls
of
prose may
be
edited, but
DUSTY
TIMES will
print your gripes
as
well as your'
praises.
Letters
for
publication
should
be
at
the
DUSTY
TIMES
office
by
the,
L5
,th
of
the month in
order
to
appear in the next issue.
.
Dusty
Times
es
over
over
-
Rob
McCachren
and
his
Yokohama shod,
single-
seat
Chenowth
singlehandedly took the
top spot
at
the Fireworks
250
over ·
the Independence
Day
Weekend.
But
Rob
wasn't the only
Yokohama driver to
dominate
the
holiday at HDRA's second event
of
the year.
In
fact, Yokohama tired
out
the drivers in seven other
classes to take first in Class 2
(Cam
Theriot
and
Greg
Lewin),
Class
1/2-1600
(Larry
Job
andJack
Johnson), Class 5 Unlimited Baja
,
·/
:Bug (S~an ,Par8:~ll
andJeffBolha),
,,
Class
5-1600
Baja Bug (Darryl ·
and
'
Wayne Cook), Class 9 (Dave
and
Bryant Wood), Challenger Class
(Mike Burns
and
Carrol
Ditson)
and
Class
10
where Steve Tetrick
-
and
Fred
Ronn
got their fourth win
of
the year to lead overall in points.
So as the fireworks went off
on
the Fourth, the real show·was in
the dirt. Because that's where
Yokohama always shines.
Call
Toll-Free
l-800-423-4544
From Califi>rnia 1-800-221-8744
From Eastern
Canada
1-800-387-4924 From Western Ca
nada
1-800-663-8464
>YYOKOHAMA
©
1986
Yokohama Tire Corporation
.
BIG
BLOWOUT
AT
BARSTOW
Rob MacCachren Sizzles
to
·Victory
at
Fir
ewor
ks
15
0
By
Jud
y Smith
Pho
to
s:
Tra
ckside Pho
to
En
terprises
Rob
MacCachren
had
a
nearly
trouble
free
tough
traffic
filled
run
in the
Chenowth
,
and
he
not
only
won
handily
in Class
1, he
also
won
the
huge
entry
race
overall
.
The
well-liked
July
4th
astopsignonalongpoleinfront
weekend
Fireworks
250
pulled
a
of
the
vehicle.
There
were
two
record
breaking
entry
for
its
15th
scoring
teams,
one
on
either
side
annual
running
at
Barstow.
The
of
the
track,
who
wrote
down
the
HORA
event,
fifth
in
the
numbers
of
each
car
that
came
SCORE/HORA
joint
series,
through.
When
they
signaled,
drew
293
starters,
its biggest field the
man
with
the
pole
let
the
car
ever.
The
course
was lengthened in
anticipation
of
the
big
entry,
because
it
was feared
that
the
old
shorter
route
would
let
the
early
starters
finish
their
lap
before
the
last
of
the
slower
classes
moved
out.
At
one
car
every 15 seconds,
it still
took
an
hour
and
fifteen
minutes
·
to
get
them
all going.
Then
there
was a
breather
of
about
22
minutes
until
the
first
car
came
charging
through.
The
course
was·
about
77
miles
long
and
was
laid
out
in
serpentine
fashion
us
ing
many
miles
of
old
familiar trails
and
some
stuff
from
the
Lucerne
race.
The
start
/ finish was
at
the
Barstow
Community
College
again,
with
pits
stretching
along
the
'Course
on
either
side.
move
on.
With
this
system
there
is
some
additional
time
needed
to
get
checkpoint
reports
on
all
finishers,
but
it's
considered
worth
the
extra
time
to
lessen
the
chance
of
injury
to
checkpoint
personnel.
As
it
turned
out,
the
system was given
the
most
strenuous
possible test,
with
the
huge
entry
and
a·
nighttim
e
problem
with a
course
marker.
There
was a
portion
of
the
course
that
used a
pole
line
road,
then
dropped
off
to
the
right,
made
a little jog,
and
came
to
Check
6.
Then
it
turned
left
and
traveled back across
the
same
pole
line
road
and
beyond.
At
some
time
during
the
day
someone
ran
over
the
markings
which
indicated
the
turn-off
from
the
pole
line road.
At
night
many
cars missed
the
turn
completely
,
and
just
kept
going
down
the
pole
line road.
They'd
pick
up
the
course
where
it
crossed
and
go
on,
none
the
wiser.
Some
realized
something
was
wrong
early
and
turned
around
while still
on
the
wrong
A
new
procedure
was
tried
at
the
.
checkpoints
this
time
which
used
no
beer
cans
or
ticket
stubs.
Most
of
the
checks
were
approached
by
means
of
a
chicane
or
tum
which
slowed
the
approaching
' race cars.
Then
they
stopped
at
a
point
indicated
by
the
checkpoint
official,
who
held
Bob Renz a
nd
Dick
Clark
cha
rged
thr
o
ugh
the
hills
and
valleys to
place
a
s
trong
th i
rd
in Class
1.
fifth
o verall. in their
qu
i
ck
Raceco.
Steve Te
trick
and
Fred
Ronn
are
really
on
a
roll
in the ORE. They
won
Class
10
again
at
the Fireworks,
and
Tetrick
is
also
leading
the 1986
points
chase
overall.
part
of
the
pole
line road,
to
get
back
to
the
tum.
dthers
didn't
realize it until they were
so
far
along
that
they'd
have
to
go
backward
_s
many
miles
to
find
Check
6.
Some,
especially
second
driver
s, never
knew
the
difference.
One
of
the
early finishers
who'd
found
himself
past
the
turn
,
had
reported
the
problem
to
the
officials,
and
they'd gone
out
to
affirm
that
the
marke
rs
were really
down
.
But
by
then
dozens
of
driver
s
had
made
the
error.
.
HDRA's
officials
didn't
have
to
open
beer
cans
and
co
unt
the ticket
stubs
this
time,
but
were able
to
use
the
written
records
from
the
checkpoint
to
determine
who'd
erred
.
Of
the
finishers,
some
20
drivers
had
missed
that
checkpoint,
and
some
were
class winners.
Taking
the
extenuating
circumstaces
into
consideration
the
committee
decided
that
the
drivers
would
not
be
disqualified
as
the
rules dictate,
but
all
would
be
penalized by
20
minutes.
Three
class winners lost
their
wins
and
many
lost paying
positions
.
But
in
some
cases it
made
no
difference
at
all.
There
were 11
other
penalties
handed
out,
generally for
short
coursing
in
the
area
of
Check
2,
and
a
couple
for charging a
checkpoint
or
passing
too
close
to
a check.
HORA
had
borrowed
SCORE's
"Cheat~r
Patrol"
for
this race, and
had
also
had
some
of
their
own
folk
po
s
ted
here
and
there
to
spot
the
unwar
y
wanderers.
The
weather was great this
year. It was very warm,
but
a sti
ff
breeze
rri
ov
ed
the
air all day
and
night, keeping things
coo
ler
tha
n
c
ould
have
been
e
xp
e
ct
ed in
Barstow in July. It also helped
keep
the
cour
se cle
ar
of
hanging
dust.
The
starting
order
called for
the Class
10
cars
to
go
off
th
e line
first, and this time
there
were
45
of
them
.
By
the
end
of
the
first
lap
Gary
and
Dick W eyrich
had
· their Raceco first
on
the
road,
but
they were
second
in elapsed
time, just six
seconds
slower
than
Jim
Stiles,
Raceco,
running
behind
them.
Brad
Person
and
Tony
Kujala were
just
under
two
minutes
later in
their
Dirtpalm
1,
while Steve
Tetrick
and
Fred
Ronn,
in
an
ORE
were
only
43
seconds
further
back.
As
the
W eyrich car lost a
half
hour
on
the
second
lap, Stiles
moved
into
the
front
of
the
pack,
and
Tetrick,
who'd
been
momentarily
stuck
when
avoiding a
car
that
sudenly
lost
a
wheel in
front
of
him,
now
moved
up
into
second
place.
Alw
ays in
co
nten
tion
.
Bob
Richey
and
Tom
Baker
sail
ed
over
the
rock
s in
thei
r
Raceo en
route
to a
second
in Class 2 .
and
ninth
overall.
Driving
al
one
in
his
spiffy
.Ra
cec
o. Jim Greem,\;i'lf' held it
all
toge'lher in a fine c'rive.
taking
·
second
in Class 10
and
a
neat
se'venth
overall
,
Mike
Mc
D
onnell
and
Bill
Herri
ck
got
very
close
in
their
Raceco.
and
were
third
,n
Class 1
0.
eighth
overall. less 'than
two
minutes
behi
n
d.
Flying
fast across the Bar
stow
desert
Mark
McMillin
go
t a keen
s
econd
in
Class 1
and
overall. a mere
53
seconds
behind
in the
t
idy
Che
n
ow
t
h.
Page
18
August
1986
Dusty
Times
Richey
and
Baker, with a flat ·
on
lap two, fell
to
fourth,
and
Jim
and
Mark
Temple
moved
into
fifth in
their
Raceco, as
Arciero
lost
llis
power
_steering. His
pit
crew used
an
hour
and
a
half
to
get
to
him,
and
he
lost a
lot
of
positions.
In
their
best
season ever.
Cam
Thieriot
and
Greg
Lewin
got
their
second
Class
2 v
ic
tory
of
the
year
in a
trouble
free
run
in the
Funco-ORE
.
Jim
Cocores
and
Dave
Snoddy
actually
finished
first
on
time in Class
5.
but
they
failed
to
visit
Check
6.
and
dropped
Jo
second
officially.
Lewin
continued
to
run
strbngly,
and
he
brought
the
car
back for its
second
win this year.
Kreisler
's
car
needed
major
welding after
the
second
lap,
and
he
lost
about
two
hours.
Richey
and Baker, with
the
fastest
thir
d
lap for
the
class,
moved
back
up
to
second
place
at
the
finish,
and
Collins
and
Cox,
off
the
pace a
bit
, finished third. Jerry Penhall
and
Kent
Pfeiffer,
who'd
run
sixth all day,
had
a
quick
last lap,
picked
up
two
spots
and
finished
fourth
, while Steve
and
Tom
Martin
came in fifth in
their
Raceco.
MacCachren
had a
torn
c.v.
boot,
but
that
was replaced when
he
stopped
to
fuel after a lap and
a half,
and
he
lost
only
five
minutes.
Then
his
ride
was
uneventful
the
rest
of
the
way in.
He'd
been
the
first car
on
the
road
since
the
second
lap,
and
came
across
the
finish line first,
at
dusk
in
just
four
hours
and
39
minutes,
to
get
both
the
Class 1
and
overall
win.
McMillin
finished
second,
15
minutes
and
.
53
seconds
behind
him
, while
Renz and
Clark
were
third
.
Leighton, re
portedly
having
had
six flats
during
the
day, came
home
fourth
and
Symonds
was
After
the
penalty
phase
of
the race was over.
Stan
Parnell
and
Jeff
Bo/ha
were fifth.
the
winners
in Class
5.
driving
the
Larry
Bitcon
Baja
Bug.
MacCachren
was assessed a 15
Tetrick
stopped
to
fuel,
and
put
way.
He
had
to
have lengthy
minute
penalty
for
running
a
co-driver
Ronn
into
the
seat,
and
repairs
and
fell
out
of
contention
check,
but
it
made
no
difference
at
the
end
of
lap
two
they
were for
the
win.
McMillin
now
took
in his finishing
position
at
all.
five
minutes
back.
Now
the
over
second
place, and
Jerry
The
next
group,
Class 2,
had
Raceco
of
Rick
and
John
Hagle Leighton, in his
LRP
Raceco,
24
entries,
and
Brian
Collins
and
moved
into
third
, followed by
moved
into
third
as
Symonds,
Ken
Cox
took
the
early lead in
Person
and
Kujala,
then
Jim
his
alternator
gone, managed
to
their
Chenowth.
Bob
Richey
and
Greenway,
in a Raceco,
who'd
flatten
two
rear
tires
at
once, as
Tom
Baker
had
their
Raceco
been
having
serious
clutch
well as
doing
damage
to
his
front
second,
a
tad
over
a
minute
later,
trouble.
Mike
McDonnell
and end.
He
fell
to
fifth with a long
pit
followed by
Cam
Thieriot
and
Bill
Herrick,
Raceco,
were
a
stop,
but
while they fixed his
Greg
Lewin, in
their
Funco
ORE,
minute
behind
him.
front
end
they also replaced
the
just
another
minute
back.
Frank
St
i I
es
seemed
to
have
alternator.
Bob
Renz
and
Dick
Arciero
was
fourth
in
the
Toyota
everthing going his way,
but
then
Clark
moved
into
fourth
in.their
truck,
followed
by
David
·
on
lap
three
, disaster, in
the
form
Raceco.
Kreisler
in
his
camouflaged
of
a
broken
spring
plate,
put
an
---
-
----
----
-
-----
--
---
--
- -
end
to
his race.
Tetrick
and
Ronn,
with
no
further
trouble
at
all, charged
on
to
the
finish line,
completing
the
231
miles in four
hours
and
55
minutes,
for an
average
speed
of
46
.
99
miles
per
hour.
Greenway,
who
soloed
this
time, finished second,
about
16
minutes
later,
followed
by
McDonnell
and
Herrick,
only
two
minutes
behind
him
.
The
Hagles were
fourth
and
Person
and
Kujala came
home
fifth.
The
Class 1 cars were
the
second
group
to
start,
with
20
entries.
Rob
MacCachren
moved
his
Chenowth
to
the
front
quickly,
and
at
the
end
of
theiirst
lap was
the
second
car
to
come
around,
meaning
he'd
gone
by
the
four
Class 1 cars
and
the
34
Class
10
cars
that
had
started
in
front
of
him
.
Two
minutes
and
1 7
seconds
behind
him
was
Tom
Koch
in his Raceco, followed
by
Gregg
Symonds,
in
another
Raceco, seven
minutes
later.
Mark
McMillin
ran
30
seconds
later in his
Porsche
Chenowth.
MacCachren
had
no
problems
except
that
his
pumper
motor
didn
't
work,
and
he
got
hot
inside his
helmet
. Every time
he
got clear
of
the
dust
he
had
to
lift
his visor
to
let
some
air in.
Koch's
car
broke
a linkpin,
and
when
he
got
out
to
fix
it
he
discove
red
that
the
trailing
arm
had
broken
up
inside
the
beam
Another
Class 5 team
who
dropped
a
position
with
a
pen
alty
were
Bob
Utgard
first, causing
th
e link
pin
to
give
and
Jeff
Hibbard.
moving
down
from
second
to
third
on
the results.
Dusty
Times
August
1986
Raceco
in fifth place.
Thieriot
and
Lewin,
running
a
very
smooth
race,
took
over
the
lead
on
lap two. Lewin,
who
drove
the
second
half
had
a flat
front
tire,
and
his
pit
changed it
and
a badly
bent
rear wheel
at
the
same
tim
e. Kreisler
moved
into
second
place,
while
Collins
and
Cox
lost
about
six
minutes
and
that
put
them
back
to
third.
This
is
the system
run
by
most
off
road race
winners
Sixteen big
motor
Baia Bugs
showed
up
for
this race, and
Greg
Diehl and
Mike
Longley, in
their
'56
convertible
led for
the
first
lap with a very
quick
hour
and
44
minute
lap.
They
~
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(213)
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WHOLESALE
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INQUIRIES
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Page
19
The
swift
t~am
from
Las Vegas,
Larry
Job
and
Jack
Johnson.
outran
52
others
in Class 1-2-1600 to
win
the class
by
the
incredible
margin
of
20
minutes'
Despite
having
three
flats
on
the
third
and
final
lap.
Rob
Tolleson
brought
his
Mirage
in a
convincing
second
in
the
giant
Class 1-2-
1.6?._0.
_
__
_
were followed
by
Hartmut
and
Wolfram
Klawitter,
in
their
J
imco
convertible,
about
two
minutes
later while
John
Johnson
ran
third
in
Max
Razo's car. Jeff
Bolha was
fourth
in
the
Bitcon
Bug,
and
Jim
Cocores
ran fifth in
his
ORC
convertible.
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Page
20 ·
Diehl
and
Longley were gone
on
the
second
lap,
and
John
Cooley
and
Mark
Fox,
who'd
won
this class at
the
Mint,
took
over
the
lead, by means
of
the
fastest
second
lap for
the
class, a
zippy
hour
and
48
minutes.
Cocores,
with
a flat as he pulled
in
to
fuel, was
now
second,
and
Christopher
Neil was
third
in his
'
homemade
'67
Karmann
Ghia
Bug.
Stan
Parnell, after
putting
five gallons
of
fuel in their
34
gallon fuel cell,
and
taking
over
for Bolha, _ was still in
fourth
place, antl
the
Klawitters
had
dropped
to
fifth after losing five
or
six minutes.
The
last lap for this class was in
the
dark.
Cooley
and
Fox lost
about
fifteen minutes, while
Dave
Snoddy,
now
in
Cocores'
car, picked
up
a flat
front
at
Lenwood,
about
two
miles from
the end,
and
still finished first.
Bob
Utgard,
in his Dewi-Bug
convertible, after fighting flats
on
laps
one
and
two, came across
the
_
finish line second,
and
Parnell,
having
run
on
a rear flat
through
the
"mud
hills," came
to
the
finish line third. In
fourth
it was
Neil in
the
Ghia,
and
then
Cooley
and
Fox.
But this class was
hard
hit
by
the
penalties for missing
Check
6,
and
the
finish
order
changed
radically.
Both
Cocores'
car
and
Utgard's
were
bumped,
moving
Parnell
and
Bolha
into
the
win.
Cocores
and
Snoddy
fell
to
a
disenchanted
second
place,
Utgard
to
third,~
'86
FIREWORKS
150
CHILI
COOK-OFF
The day before the Fireworks 250
at
Barstow, the second annual Jim
McGullick Memorial Chili
Cook-Off
took place
at
Soutar Motors under
one
of
the famous Nissan circus tents. A host
of
entries showed up
to
compete
in
three categories. Shown here
is
some
of
the activity under
the big top during the cooking
and
tasting segment, and the General
Tire team, in the
Off
Road Racing category,
of
Madeline Bullman, West
Coast Public Relations, and Mike Still, Dealer Training and Motor-
sports. Still, a devoted chili chef, cooked up a keen concoction. General
Tire wori the
Off
Road Racing category
and
placed third overall in the
contest. The team donated their winning check
to
the Barstow Student
Foundation.
August
1986
Dusty
Times
Steve W
olco
tt and
Mi
ke
McCrory
had
a
good
run in the 1600 class.
and
took
fourth
on
time in the
Raceco
.
and
moved
up to
third
officially
.
~
~-
and
Cooley
and
Fox n
ow
placed
fourth.
The
Klawitters
moved
up
to
fifth
spo
t, as
Ne
il
, wi
th
a penalty also,
fe
ll
to
sixth
place.
The
next
class
to
leave
the
line
was
the
biggest
of
all,
the
l/2-
1600s,
with
53
starters.
Th
ey
had an incrediblv close race, as
usual,
and
on
th
e first lap
th
ere
were 21 cars running
at
the front
of
the pack
wit
hin
te
n minutes
of
one
another.
First
in
li
ne was
Larry
Job
in his
In
terceptor,
followed by
Rob
To
ll
eson in his
Mirage.
Then
it was Steve
Wolcott
and
Mike
McCrory
in a
Raceco,
and
in
fourth,
Lance
and
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with Ke
ll
ey
on
ly
two
and a h-alf
minutes back.
Sho
pp
e
drove
, steadily in th
ird
place and Frank
Vessels, in his Chevy,
who'd
had
ignition
pr
oblems,
power
steering
problems
and
a flat
on
the first lap,
now
moved
into
fourth.
They charged
out
into
the
night with Evans sti