OFF-ROAD
& -
RALLYE
AOI0N
NEWS
Covering the World
of
competition in
~h~
c;lirt.
••
r
Volume
3
Number
11
Editor-Publisher
Jean Calvin
Associate
Publisher
Brad
Goodrow
Associate Editor
Richard
K. Schwalm
Controller
John
Calvin
Circulation
Jerry Lawless
Traffic
Frank
McCombs
Contributors
Darla
Crown
Leonard Day
Daryl D. Drake
Winnie
Essenberg
Homer
Eubanks
Tom
Grimshaw
Dennis Henneberg
Martin
Holmes
Danny McKenzie
Brenda Parker
David Ryskamp
Walt
Schwalbe
Wayne
Simmons
Judy
Smith
John
Sprovkin
Joe Stephan
Darlene
Thackston
3-D
Photography
Trackside
Photo
Enterprises
Art
Director
Larry E.
Worsham
Typesetting
&
Production
Michelle's Typesetting Services
November
1986 .
O
ra
·----
THE
OfflCIAL
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SNAPSHOT
OF
THE
MONTH •••
In
This
Issue
•••
FEATURES
Page
The
17th Annual
SNORE
250
...............
....
.........
. 8
Nissan Pathfinder
......................................
. 13
MTEG
at the Orange
Show
Fairground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
ADRA
Snowflake Buggy Bash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
AMSA
at the Tulare Fair .
......
. . .
..
.
...
.
...............
. 21
General Tire Sprints in Illinois
.....
.
.........
..
.
..
. .
..
.....
22
Pro
CanAm
Horn
Rapids
300
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26
F.O.R.D.A. at Lakeland, Florida
.......
.
.........
. .
....
. .
..
27
Silver
Dust
Nevada
300
...
..
.
.......
.
......
.
.....
..
......
29
Interview - Scott Child . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30
GO
RRA
at Cordele,
GA
...
.
....
....
.
.....
..
....
....
.....
32
Budweiser Sunriser Forest Rally
..............
..
.......
.
...
34
WRC
Rally·of
1000
Lakes
...
.....
..
.. ..
...
..
.
...
.........
36
Toyota
Conquest
4x4
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
DEPARTMENTS
Snapshot
of
the
Month
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Soap Box by
Walt
Schwalbe
...
....
..
...
...
....
..
.......
.
..
4
Trail
Not
es . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Happenings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Off
Ro
adsmen
of
th
e Year Ballot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Side Tracks by Judy Smith
....
.
....
... ...
..
...
......
.
......
7
SCCA
So-Pac Division Rally
Report
..............
. . .
...
.
..
31
California Rally Series
..............
.
...
.......
. .
..
.
......
31
Yokohama
6-50
Club
Report
...
.
...
..
. .
.......
.
.....
.
.....
33
From
the Driver's Seat by Dick
Johnson
........
..
. . . .
..
....
33
Pony Express . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
Pit
Team
Register and Reports
..
.....
.
...
....
.
.........
.
...
39
Christmas Goodies Galore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
Good
Stuff
Directory
........................
...
. .
....
..
.
42
Classified Ads
..........
.. ..
...
...
..
.....
...
..
....
. .
....
46
The
Losers by Judy Smith . . .
......
...
.
......
.. ..
.
...
..
...
47
Index
to
Advertisers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 7
ON
THE
COVER-
Jerry Leighton charged
hard
in his brightly
hued
Raceco, aiming for a
third
consecutive overall victory at the
SNORE
250.
But,
minor
mechanical problems
dropped
him in time. However,
he
still sailed
home
the Class 10 winner
and
fourth
overall.
Color
Photography by Centerline
Photo
. Steve Millen flew his stadium racing
Toyota
truck
quickly all season, and
had
the best
ofluck
on
the 13th
of
September.
He
wrapped
up
the
Mickey
Thompson
Gran
Prix Class 7
Championship
at the Orange Show Fairground for himself
as
a driver,
and,
he
and Ivan Stewart earned enough points
to
give
Toyota
the
Manufacturers' Challenge
Cup
title for the fourth year in a row.
Color
Photography by Trackside
Photo
Enterprises.
/\~
DUSTY
TIMES
.
THE
FASTEST
GROWING
OFF
ROAD
MONTHLY
IN
THE
COUNIRY!!
1 year - $12.00
2 years - $20.00
3 years - $30.00 ·
Take advantage
of
your subscription bonus
•••
Free one time classified
ad
up
to
45
words
Wheel
standing
is
one
thing
common
in
off
road sta
dium
racing,
but
a nose stand is
rare.
At
the
Orange
Show
Fairg
round,
th
e Mickey
Thompson
folks
built
a giant crevice
on
one
of
the straights, and,
if
the speed wasn't just right, the car was stuck, nose first. It
happened
often during
th
e various races,
and
to
Jon
Brockett here during the
afternoon
qualifying sessions.
Photo
by
Trackside
Photo
Ent
erprises.
DUSTY
TIMES
will feature pictures
of
humorous
racing incidents, woes
on
the course,
or
a spectacular
from
short
course
events
on
this page each
month.
Send us
your
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of
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or
anything fitting for consideration.
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DustyTimes
November
1986
Page
3
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Soap Box •••
Walt
Schwalbe
IORRA
International
Off
Road Racing Association
Two
months
ago I
wrote
in this
work
we will
need
numbers
.
publication
of
a rules
mess
and
Mulitutdes
of
members,
enough
spoke
of
a
national
association;
so
promoters
step
back,
and
take
since
that
time
phone
calls have
notice
of
what's
going
on,
and
convinced
me
that
it
has
to
be
may even
be
happy
to
get s
ome
of
international,
as
mem
bersh
ip
the
burdens
the
association can
from
Ca
nad
a will
want
to
be
handle
off
their
backs
and
let
included
, I will
not
expound
on
them
promo
te racers.
the
benefits
of
an
internationa
l
Clark
Altig,
Oreana,
IL long
association as it's already
been
tim
e
worker
and
past
president
done
I'm
sure
you
all
know.
of
the
Lincoln
Trail
OffRoaders
It's
quite
obvious
that
existing
and
race
director
for
the
racing organizations will
not
BFGoodrich
and
General
Tire
form
this
organization for us,
so
sponsored
Macon
County
race,
let's
do
it
for
ourselves. I
mean
has
agreed
to
be a
coordinator
let's
get
the
members
and
then
along
with
myself
to
direct
form
an organization. efforts
of
this
group
until
it is
What?
You
say.
That's
crazy!
rolling.
We
have
signed
a
Yes!
So
crazy,
it
just
might
work.
contract
with
one
another
with
Anyway,
nothing
ventured,
the
money
to
be
banked
in
an
nothing
gained.
IORRA
account.
Now
all we
What
we
are
proposing
is
to
need
is
you
and
we have
the
get
the
membership
and
then
makings
of
an
international
form
the
association.
For
this
to
association
that
can
do
a
multitude
·
of
things for
us
by
coordinating
the
direction
of
off
road
racing's
future
.
Ten
dollars
makes
you
a
charter
member
of
IORRA
and
gives
the
group
the
financing it
needs
to
get the ball rolling. All
business
wil
l
be
handled
according
to
Robert's
Rules
of
Order.
Area
representation
can
be according
to
area
member-
ship.
Remember
this
could
work
with you,
without
you
it will
not.
The
membership
is
open
to
anyone
interested
in
off
road
racing
whether
a
promoter,
driver,
pit
crew, fan,
sponsor,
marketeer,
course
worker,
·
mechanic, etc.
A meeting
of
'representatives
can
be
arranged as
soon
as we
have
the
multitude
of
members.
Volunteers are invited
to
climb on
their "Soap Box"
and
fill this space
with their thoughts about what
is
good
and
what
is
not
so
good about
the state
of
off
road racing.
We
would welcome some discussion on
the state
of
the
Pro
Rally Series as
well.
CallorwriteDUSTYTIMES
with your ideas
for
a Soap Box
column,
and
get
on
the schedule,
r---------------------------------
.
------
,
I
I
I
I
PLEASE
PRINT
NAME:
IORRA - International Off Road Racing Association
Enclosed $10.00
to
help
with
the expense
of
forming IORRA.
I .ADDRESS:
---------------
-----------------
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
CITY:
_________________
STATE
:
________________
_
ZIP:
____________
COUNTRY
:
__________
__
CLASS:
_____
_ _
LOCAL
ORGANIZATIONS
I
AM
A
MEMBER
OF:··
SCORE
SODA
HDRA
HPORRA
POST
SNORE
GORRA
FORDA
4x4
UNLIMITED
SCORE CANADA IOK
CIRCLE
OR
WRITE
IN
CLASSIFICATION:
DRIVER
CO-DRIVER
CREW
COURSE
WORKER
MECHANIC
PROMOTER
ENTHUSIASTIC
FAN
SPONSOR
MARKETING:
DIST. RETAIL
OTHER:
SIGNED:
I
WOULD
BE
WILLING
TO
BE A REPRESENTATIVE
AT
AN
EARLY
MEETING
FOR CLASS
MAIL
TO:
IORRA, WALT SCHWALBE, 1736 SO. 82nd ST., WEST ALLIS, WI 53214
IORRA, CLARK ALTIG,
#1
McCORY RD., OREANA, IL 62554
L
_______________________________________
_
November
1986
Trail Notes
•••
THE SCORE BAJA
1000
will
be
about
to
happen
when
this issue is in
circulation.
At
press time the
total
entry
stood
at
over
200
, including
about
15
hardy
souls going
from
Ensenada
to
La
P
az
in
the
Baja Safari Rally.
The
entry
in
the
car classes is
over
130, very healthy
considering
the
extreme
co
st
in
time
and
logistics
to
com
pe
te
on
this long, long race,
th
e longest ever
non-stop
route
for
the
point
to
point
event
at
1013
miles.
Do
remember
that
the
1000
starts
midweek, with
the
tech
and
contin
gency
inspection
and
th
e
very
important
drivers' meeting
on
Wednesday,
November
5.
The
race
start
s
early
on
Thursday
morning,
and
all
competitors
have
42
hours
to
make
it
to
La
Paz
for
an
official finish.
The
awar
ds
pres
e
ntation
will
be
on
Saturday
in La
Paz,
and
everyone will have Sunday
to
start
the
long
trek
home.
THE ALCAN
5000
RALLY, the longest
such
event in
Nor
th
America,
had
some real suspense
on
the
final day
of
the
rally.
The
big
winner
was
Gene
Henderson
in a
Subaru
RX
navigated by
Mike
Vanloo.
The
Michigan based
team
posted
their
victory by
just
one
second
on
this
demanding
Time-Speed-
Distance
marathon.
Taking
about
as tight a
second
place as
one
could
get was
the
Audi
5000
CS
Quattro
team
headed
by
Californian
Ken Maytag.
One
of
the favorites in
the
Uniroyal
sponsored
event
was
the
Audi
of
John
Buffum
and
Tom
Grimshaw,
running
second
until
60
miles
from
the
finish
when
suspension
breakage
put
them
on
the
end
of
a
tow
rope.
Grimshaw's
report
on
the
Akan
5000
will be
in
the
next
issue.
THE
TOYOTA
TRUE
GRIT A
WARD
lead is still
held
by
Steve Tetrick,
even
though
his
Class
10
O.R.E.
failed
to
finish
the
Frontier
500.
Tetrick
had
a
string
of
wins
and
one
second
in
the
previous
Score/HDRA
Desert
Series
events. His average
speed
to
date,
49.05
mph,
is
more
than
two
mph
faster
than
the
second
place challenger, Rick Hagle,
who
is also fighting
Tetrick
for
the
points
championship
in Class 10, which Hagle leads going
into
the
Baja
1000.
To
win
the
Toyota
True
Grit
Award
a
driver
must
complete
at
least
three
of
the
four
races
from
both
Score
and
HDRA
that
make
up
the
series,
and
post
the
fastest average
speed
in six finishes.
Manny
Esquerra
continues
to
lead
the
Mini
Metal division with
an
average
speed
of
39.89
mph,
and
Manny
has
won
every race
through
the
Frontier
500
this
year
in
his Class 7
Ford.
Steve Kelley leads
the
Heavy
Metal
standings
now
in his Class 8
Chevrolet
with
40.38
mph,
just
barely ahead
of
Dave
Shoppe
at
39.75
mph.
Thirty-seven drivers
out
of
the
197
original
candidates
are
still eligible
for
the
ToyotaT
rue
Grit
Award,
worth
$10,000
at
season's end.
The
series has
run
2,131
miles in six races
to
date,
and
so
far,
only
nine
competitors
have gone
the
entire distance.
CORVA,
the
California
Off
Road
Vehicle Association
spends
a
lot
of
time,
effort
and
money
lobbying
to
keep
the
deserts
open
for
off
road
vehicle use.
Naturally, they are always
on
\I
membership
drive,
and
the
cost
is only
$20
a
year, well
worth
the
support
of
anyoff
roader.
A full
team
from
CORVAwill
be
in contingency
row
at
the
Score Baja
1000,
and
they are offering a
unique
contingency prize
of
$200.
The
money
will
not
go
to
a class
winner,
but
quite
the
reverse.
The
$200
will go
to
the
team
that
has
the
best
hard
luck
story
on
why they lost the race
or
did
not
finish.
All
the
driver
needs
to
do
is
stop
at
the
COR
VA
stand
in
contingency
row
and
sign up, as
Cc:5R
VA
membership
is
required.
The
full
information
will
be
in
the
driver's
kit
at
the
race,
and
also a
post
card
to
mail in with
your
hard
luck
story.
DUSTY
TIMES
columnist
Judy Smith,
who
writes
the
Losers
column
among
other
articles,
is
heading
the
committee
to
judge
the
hard
luck
stories. If
you
are
not
racing in Baja, why
not
support
CORVA
as
they
struggle
with
the
politicians
over
public
land
use.
Send
your
twenty
bucks
to
CORVA,
1210
Sharon
Circle,
Suite
12,
Anaheim,
CA
92804.
JOHN
BUFFUM
NAILED
DOWN
his
tenth
SCCA
Pro
Rally National
Championship
at
the
Ojibwe
Rally in
Minnesota
early in
October.
With
DUSTY
TIMES
rally
expert
Tom
Grimshaw
navigating
the
Audi
Sport
Quattro,
the
team
won
by
minutes
over
Rod
Millen in
the
.
4x4
Mazda
· RX-7.
Although
Doug
Shepherd
and
Ginny
Reese
had
already
won
their
1986
championship
in
Ohio,
they
won
the
GT
Production
class again
in
the
Dodge
Shelby.
Group
A
went
to
Canadian
Walter
Boyce
in
a
VW
GTI,
and
Paul
Choinere
won
Production
class in
an
Audi
4000,
bringing
the
class
championship
down
to
the
wire, based
on
results
from
the
upcoming
Press
On
Regardless Rally.
THE
GOODYEAR
WEATHERMAN
RADIO
RELAY
team
is
providing a safety
net
for
the
bikers
at
the
Score
Baja
1000.
The
team
will
cover
the
course with
two
full facilities,
one
atop
Mount
Diab
lo,
9800
feet up,
which will cover
Ensenada
to
Santa Ines.
The
other
team
will be in
the
sub
for
the
Goodyear
Blimp, a Piper
Aerostar,
which
will fly
at
an
altitude
of
21,000
feet
and
cover
the
course
from
Santa
Ines
to
La
Paz.
Sal Fish
of
Score
International is
obtaining
the
permits
to
fly
at
night.
The
team, as always, will
monitor
the
main
race frequencies,
151.625
and
151.
715.
They
will relay
for
the
Score Medical
Team
as well.
Brand new for this race is
that
the
team will
monitor
a special,
low
power
frequency
for
hand
held radios only.
Any
biker
equipped
with a race
prepped
5
watt
hand
held
can
communicate
directly
to
the
Weatherman
Radio
Relay,
who
can then relay
on
any
150
band
frequency
to
any
pit
or
chase crew
on
the
course. PCI Race
Radios
is
making available
to
bikers
a specially race
prepped
10 channel, 5
watt
hand
held
radio
that
goes
in
a fanny
pack
and
sells
for
only
$395.
Optional
items are extra
and
could
include wiring
the
helmet
into
the
radio
with a
handle
bar
push-to-transmit
switch.
For
more
info'
contact
Bob
"Weatherman"
Steinberger
at
(213)
427-8177,
or
write PCI Radios,
2888
Gundry
Ave., Signal Hill,
CA
90806
. .
THE OJIBWE SCCA PRO RALLY
earned
the
honor
of
the
"Stage
Times
Rally
of
the
Year,"
before
the
season was
over.
The
honor
is well deserved as
the
Ojibwe,
long a
top
Divisional Rally, was
the
best
organized Pro Rally
~e
have
attended
in many years.
The
Stage
Times
award is
more
than
a
trophy,
it
is an expense paid
trip
for
two
of
the organizers
to
the
RAC
Rally in
Great
Britain in November.
The
Ojibwe
was
the
unanimous
choice
of
the selection
committee, with the exceptional organization
and
smooth
operation
of
the
event cited as
primary
reasons
for
the
Stage
Times
award.
DUSTY
TIMES
adds congratulations,
not
only
to
the
chi
ef
organizers,
but
to
all
the
pleasant
and
competent
field workers we
encountered
. chasing stage
photos
in
th
e
Minnesota forests.
Co-chairmen
of
the Ojibwe, Bob Neilsen
and
Brian
Jacobson
, will
be
makin
g
the
trip
to
England
to
enjoy the fabled
Lombard
RAC
World
Championship
Rall
y.
more
TRAIil.
NOTES
on
page
1
1986-1987
HAPPENINGS
•••
A.D.R.A.
Arizona Desert Racing Association
1408 East Granada
Phoenix,
AZ
85006
(602)
252-1900
December
6
Sonoita to Rocky Point
Hare 'n' Hound
Sonoita, Sonora, Mexico
AMSA
American
Motor
Sports Association
P.O.
Box
5473
Fresno, CA 93755
(209)
439-2114
AMERICAN OFF
ROAD
RACING ASSOCIATION
John Ohanesian
P.O.
Box
31811
Phoenix, AZ
85046
(602)
867-4769
CALIFORNIA RALLY SERIES
November
14-16
East
of
Indio V
Indio,
CA
Info: Roger Allison
(714)
736-1442
FORDA
Florida
Off
Roaders
Drivers' Association
5349
Hansel Ave., C-1
Orlando, Florida
32809
(305)
851-6245
FLORIDA OFF
ROAD
RACING
ENTERPRISES
P.
O.
Box
40
Inverness,
FL
32651
(813) 933-794 7
(904)
726-6560
FUD
PUCKER
RACING
TEAM
250
Kennedy,
#6
Chula Vista, CA 92011
(619)
427-5759
August
8,
1987
Superstition
250
IV
Ancient Dry Lake Bed
El
Centro,
CA
October
3,
1987
200 Mile Plaster City Blast
Plaster City,
CA
December
31,
198
7
150 Mile Dunaway Dash
El
Centro, CA
GORRA
Georgia
Off
Road
Racing Association
Box 11093 Station -A
Atlanta,
GA
30310
(
404)
927-6432
November
29
250Miles
Location TBA
December
6
Annual Banquet
Atlanta, GA
Dusty
Times
GREAT WESTERN
POINTS SERIES, INC.
1507 South Lincoln
Loveland,
CO
80537
CORRA
(303)
669-4460
DORRA
(303)
429-1949
RMORRA
(303)
597-8239
WKR
(913) 332-3402
HDRA
High Desert Racing Association
961
West
Dale Ave.
Las Vegas, NV
89124
(702) 361-5404
December
5-7
Budweiser 250
Barstow, CA
January
3,
1987
Desert Series Award Banquet
Anaheim, CA
March
6-8,
1987
Gold Coast 250
Las Vegas, Nevada
May
7-10,
1987
Mint
400
Las Vegas, NV
July
3-5,
1987
Fireworks
250
Barstow,
CA
September
11-13,
1987
Frontier
500
Las
Vegas, NV
December
5,
198
7
Desert Series Awards Banquet
Las Vegas, NV
HIGH PLAINS OFF
ROAD
RACING
ASSOCIATION
GLEN HELEN
OHV
PARK
P.O. Box 2937
San Bernardino, CA
(714)
381-4454
or
(714)
880-1733
IOK
FOUR
WHEELERS
P.
O.
Box
36
Cleves,
Ohio
45002
(All
events staged
at
the
club
grounds
in
Cleves,
Ohio)
M.O.R.E.
3513
North West Loop
820
Fort
Worth,
TX
76106
.
(817)
625-8843
MICKEY
THOMPSON'S
OFF
ROAD
CHAMPIONSHIP
GRAND
PRIX
Mickey Thompson
Entertainme
nt
Group
53
Woodlyn
Lane
Bradbury, CA
91010
(818)
359-5117
January
10,
1987
Anaheim Stadium
Anaheim, CA
January
17,
1987
Jack Murphy Stadium
San Diego, CA
OLYMPUS INTERNATIONAL
RALLY
John Nagel
P.O. Box 4254
Tumwater,
WA
98501
(206) 754-9717
December
3-
7
WRC
Olympus International
Rally
Tumwater,
WA
OFF
ROAD
RACING
ASSOCIATION
OF TEXAS
1421
Lee
Trevino, D-1
El
Paso, TX 79935
(915)
594-8266
December
6-
7
Shadow Mountain Lake 250
Shadow Mountain Lake
Hori
zo
n, TX
O.O.R.R.A.
Oklahoma
Off
Road
Racing Association
Larry Terry
9220
N.E.
23rd
.
Oklahoma City,
OK
73141
(405) 769-5491
(All races located at Freedom,
OK)
Vic Brurnham
Freedom Chapter President
(405) 621-3428
ORSA
Randy Miller
407 G Street, Suite F
Davis,
CA
95616
(916) 756-9938
(916) 756-6399
Short Course & Sand Drags,
all
events at Sacramento
Raceway, Sacramento, CA
November
15-16
POST
Pennsylvania
Off
Road
Short Track
Shark Saxon
RD #3, Box 9
Towanda, PA 18848
(717) 265-3076
All events in Monroeton,
PA
at the
intersection
of
Routes
414
&
220
.
PRO
CAN
AM
SERIES
Pro Can Am Racing Inc.
P.O. Box
323
Seahurst, Washington 98062
(206)
242-1773
(503) 620-0313
SCCA PRO RALLY SERIES
Sports Car Club
of
America
6750
Emporia St.
Englewood,
CO
80112
(303)
779-6625
SCORE
Score International
31356
Via Colinas, Suite 111
Westlake Village,
CA
91362
(818)
889-9216
November
6-9
Baja
1000
Ensenada to
La
Paz,
Mexico
January
3,
1987
Desert Series Award Banquet
Anaheim, CA
January
30
-31,
February
1,
1987
Parker
400
Parker,
AZ
November
1986
April
3-5,
1987
Great Mojave
250
Lucerne Valley,
CA
June
5-7,
1987
Baja
Internacional
Ensenada, B.C., Mexico
August
14-16,
1987
Off
Road
World
Championship
Riverside, CA
November
6-8,
1987
Baja
1000
Ensenada, B.C., Mexico
December
5,
1987
Desert Series Awards Banquet
Las Vegas, NV
SCORE
CANADA
390
Chemin Du
Lac
Lery, Quebec,
J6N 1A3, Canada
(514) 692-6171
SCORE
SHOW
P.O. Box
6819
Burbank, CA
91510
(818) 768-2914
June
26-28,
1987
10th Annual Score Show
Anaheim Convention Center
Anaheim,
CA
SILVER
DUST
RACING
ASSOCIATION
P.O. Box
7380
Las
Vegas, NV
89125
(702) 459-0317
SNORE
Southern Nevada
Off
Road Enthusiasts ·
P.O. Box 4394
Las
Vegas, NV
89106
(702) 452-4522.
November
15
Midnight Special
Las Vegas,
NV
S.O.RR
.
P.
Speedway
Off
Road
Racing Productions
Bernie
Weber
P.O.
Box
402
Temple, Texas 76503
(817)
773-3548
STADIUM
RACING, U .S.A
Marty Tripes
228 Faxon Drive
Spring Valley,
CA
92077
(619) 463-0654
SHORT
TRACK
OFF
ROAD
ENTERPRISES
FORMULA DESERT
DOG
SERIES
S.T.O.R.E. Co-Ordinator:
Gil Parker
7406
So. 12th St.
Kalamazoo,
MI
49009
(616) 375-1233
SUPERIOR OFF
ROAD
DRIVERS ASSOCIATION
Karen Jenkins
2345 Hopkins Crossroad
Minnetonka, MN 55343
(612)
544
-2
370
VORRA
Valley
Off
Road Racing Association
1
833
Los Robles Blvd.
Sacramento, CA
95838
(916) 925-1702
November
1-2
Prairie City
OHV
Park
Sacramento, CA
WHEEL
TO
WHEEL, INC.
P.O.
Box
688, Dept.
4W0R
Ba
ncroft, Ontario, Canada
KOL
IC0
(613) 332-1766
(613) 332-4128
WESTERN OFF
ROAD
RACING ASSOCIATION
19125 -
87A
Ave.
Surrey, British Columbia,
V3S 5X7, Canada
(604) 576-6256
ATTENTION
RACE ORGANlZERS
List your coming events in D
USTY
TIMES
free!. Send your
1987
sc
hedule
as soon as possible
for
listing in this
column.
Mail
your race
or
rally schedule
to:
DUSTY
TIMES
, 5
33
1 Derry
Ave.,
-
Suite 0 , Agoura, CA
9130
1.
Make
DUSTY
TIMES a
Stocking Stuffer for Christmas
ORDER GIFT SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR
YOUR
FAVORITE OFF ROADERS
NOW.
DELIGHT YOUR PIT
CREW
- FAMILY
HELPFUL NEIGHBORS - EVERYONE.
DUSTY
TIMES
IS A
BARGAIN
GIFT
WITH
NO
SHOPPING
HASSLE
$12.00 - 1
year•
$20
- 2
years•
$30
- 3 years
$15 (US) 1 year to Canada
SEND YOUR CHECK AND CHRISTMAS LIST TO:
DUSTY
TIMES
5331 Derry Ave., Suite O Agoura,
CA
91301
P~ge
5
NOMINATE
YOUR CHOICE ...
OFF-ROADSMAN
OF
THE
YEAR
A
WARDS
The
time
draws near
for
the off-road
community
to
recognize its own
people
for
outstanding
performances and
accomplishments
from
this
year's schedule
of
championship
racing.
The 1986 SCORE/HORA Desert Series has again introduced a spirit
of
cameraderie and enthusiasm
to
the sport at not only the
competitor's
level, but among the
list
of
manufacturers and companies
who
involve themselves in our racing
activity
as
contingency
donors as
well.
In past years, the Off-Roadsman Award program had been an ex-
clusive feature
of
SCORE International, who made the decision 3 years
ago
to
streamline the manner
of
awards presentation by concentrating
on recognizing those people who had won
their
individual classes. With
the
combined
points
series for SCORE/HORA,
this
manner
of
recogni-
tion
is
quite
appropriate, because these are all the people who have
campaigned
their
vehicles and who have raced hard all year
to
win
their
class
and, as such, they are the ones who should be recognized and ap-
plauded
for
their
efforts.
This year, the combined gala year-end awards banquet for SCORE
In
-
ternational and High Desert Racing Association
will
be held on Satur-
day, January
3,
1987, and
will
again feature singular recognition for the
awards recipients from the members
of
both associations.
Accordi
ng
to
SCORE President Sal Fish, "
..
. these Off-Roadsman
Awards are indeed a fine way
to
recognize
those
in
our sport who are
dedicated and have lent themselves
to
better the sport." HDRA's Presi-
dent Walt Lott went on
to
say, " .
..
the prestige of being recognized by
one's peers for outstanding
contr
ibution is quite
an
honor."
Your nominees for the various categories
of
Off-Roadsman of the
Year are very important.
This should not be a contest of popularity, but should reflect a selec-
tion
of
candidates who have during the past year best served the sport.
ONLY NOMINATIONS RECEIVED
ON
THE OFFICIAL NOMINATION
BALLOT WILL
BE
ACCEPTED! Any copy
or
facsimile
of
the nomination
ballot
will
not
be accepted or counted. All nomination ballots
must
have your name, SCORE or HDRA membership number and expiration
date filled out. Members
of
the press and SCORE/HORA Contingency
Sponsors
must
fill out their appropriate portions.
All nominations
must
be received
by
SCORE International, 31356 Via
Colinas, Suite 111, Westlake Village, CA 91362 NO LATER THAN
November
14
to
be
included
in
the final ballot, which wi
ll
be
mailed to all
current SCORE and HORA members. This applies to both SCORE
as
well
as
HORA members,
but
ONLY ONE
BAL
LOT
PER
PERSON WILL BE
ACCEPTED.
1986 Off-Road Awards
Nomination Ballot
SCORE/HORA CONTINGENCY
COMPANY OF THE
YEAR
1.
ALL
BALLOTS MUST
BE
RECEIVED
AT
SCORE HEAD-
QUARTERS
BY
NOVEMBER
14,
1986. THIS
IS
THE OF-
FICIAL NOMINATION BALLOT AND THIS
IS
THE ONLY
BALLOT THAT WILL
BE
ACCEPTED.
Any
copy
or
fac-
simile
of
this ballot will NOT
be
accepted. Please print
clearly.
All
information must be filled out completely.
OF~ROADPHOTOGRAPHER
OF THE YEAR
1.
2.
3.
OFF-ROAD JOURNALIST
OF THE YEAR .
2.
3.
MOTORCYCLE MANUFACTURERS
OF THE
YEAR
1.
2.
NAME
__________
_
_________
_
SCORE CONTINGENCY COMPANY
____________
_
1.
2.
3.
3.
SCORE MEMBERSHIP
NO.,
_
__
___________
_
EXPIRATION
DATE
____
___
__
_
_____
~--
ENTRY SPONSOR OF THE YEAR
ORIGINAL
BUGGY
CHASSIS
MANUFACTURER OF THE
YEAR
(Clases 1, ½-1600, 2, 9, 10, Challenger)
1.
OR
PUBLICAJ'ION
____
_
__
_ _ _ _ _ _ _
___
_
1.
2.
3.
l
2.
3.
HORA MEMBERSHIP NO.
_____
_________
_
EXPIRATION DATE
__
_
______________
_
PIT SUPPORT TEAM OF THE YEAR
1.
OFF-ROAD 4-WHEEL DRIVE
MANUFACTURER OF THE
YEAR
(Classes 3 &
4)
1.
2.
3.
OFF-ROAD MINI PICKUP TRUCK
MANUFACTURER OF THE YEAR
(Classes
7,
7S
, & 7-4x4)
1.
2.
3.
ENGINE BUILDER OF THE YEAR
1.
2.
3.
2.
3.
ROOKIE OF THE YEAR
1.
2.
3.
OFF-ROAD SEDAN
MANUFA
CTURER
OF
TH
E
YEAR
(Classes 6 & 6S)
1.
OFF-ROAD PICKUP TRUCK
MANUFACTURER OF THE YEAR
(Class 8)
1.
OVERALL
ME
CHANIC OF THE YEAR
1.
P
ER
SO
N OF THE YEAR
1.
2.
3.
2.
2.
2.
3.
3.
. 3.
MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS TODAY
for the
SCORE/HORA Awards Banquet, January
3,
1987
The Luxurious
ANAHEIM
HILTON & TOWERS
Cocktails Dinner Awards Dancing
HONORING
THE
HORA/SCORE POINTS
CHAMPIONS
and the
WINNERS
OF
THE
OFF
-
RO
ADSMAN
OF
THE
YEAR CATEGORIES
'
--
---
--------
--
----
----
------
---
--
-
-------------------------------~
, I
I FOR BEST SEATING SELECTION MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS TODAY! Mail
To:
SCORE BANQUET 31356 Via Colinas, Suite
111
I
I Westlake Village, CA 91362 I
I
NAME_
____
___
___________________
Please
reserve _
__
_ places at $35.00 each I
I
ADDRESS_
___
________
______________
Please reserve
__
__
tables
at
$350.00 each (
One
Table Seats
10)
I
I CITY
___________
STATE
ZIP_____
PLEASECHECKMETHODOFPAYMENT
O
Check
MoneyOrder
Visa
Mastercar
d
I
I TELEPHONE
------------------------
-
MAKE
CHECKS
PAYABLE
TO
SCORE
BANQUET
I
I
NOTE:
Payment must ac~ompany order to guarantee reservations. Seating
will
be based on· date
of
receipt of paymen
t,
not orde
r!
Fill in
Visa
or Mastercard Number ,
EXPIR.
DATE
I
-----------------------------------------------------,-.----------------
Pa
ge 6
November
198
6
Dus
ty
Times
morc
•••
TRAIL
NOTES
THE
VORRA
OFF
ROAD
RACING
schedule is winding
down
with
the
fmal race
of
1986
November
2
at
Prairie
City
OHV
Park in
Sacramento,
CA.
The
Desert
Senes
from
VORRA
concluded
with
the
Pro
CanAm
Millican
Valley
event
in
Oregon,
late in
September,
so
the
desert
points
champions
have already
been
crowned.
Congratulations
go
to
Sam
Berri
who won
the
desert
series overall
on
points,
and
th
e
combined
Class 2
and
5 title.
Idaho
racer
Mike
Thornton
took
top
honors
in Class 1, as
did
another
Idaho
racer
Chris
Cash
in Class 10.
Don
German
won
the
4x4
title
and
Bill
Landon
wa~
tops
in Class
1-2-1600.
Tone
Jordon
won
the
Sportsman
division.
VORRA
will have a
unique
awards
banquet,
coming
up
fast
on
Saturday,
November
22.
The
banquet
will be
held
on
boa
rd
a Blue &
White
fleet
ship,
departing
from
Pier
39
in
San
Francisco
at
7
:00
p.m.
sharp.
Along
with
a
four
hour
cruise
of
San
Francisco
Bay,
there
will be
dinner
and
the
season's
awards
presentations
on
board
.
The
cost
is
reasonable,
only
$20.00
per
person.
It
sounds
like a
dandy
idea for the year
end
gala.
Contact
VORRA
at
1~33
Los
Robles
Blvd.,
Sacramento,
CA
95838,
(916)
925-1702,
for full
mfo,
or
just
send
your
check along
by
November
10,
1986.
THE
MICKEY
THOMPSON
FINALE
at
Pomona
produced
few
surprises
in
the
points
standings.
The
major
surprise
was
the
track, a maze
of
switchbacks
ala
the
Orange
Show,
but
restricted
to
half
the
space
of
the
earlier
track
layout
at
Pomona.
The
back
side
is
now
flower beds. Steve Millen
won
his
heat
race
and
was
second
in
the
Class 7
main
event,
adding
to
the
championship
points,
although
he
had
already
earned
the
driver's
title
for
himself
and
the
Manufacturers'
Cup
Challenge for
Toyota
at
the
September
r<:1ce.
Points leader
Tommy
Croft
also
added
to
his
total,
winning
the
season's
Class
10
honors,
and
Monte
Crawford
won
the
Ultrastock
points
championship
and
the
main event. His nearest challenger, close
enough
to
take
the
title,
Greg
George
had
multiple
transmission
breakage.
There
were
no
1-2-1600
racers at
Pomona,
and
Wes
Elrod
had
built
an
insurmountable
points
lead at
th
e
Oran
ge
Show
race.
The
full
report
on
Pomona
will
be
in
the
next issue.
SUZUKI
OF
AMERICA
AUTOMOTIVE
CORPORATION
recently
announced
a new,
non-profit
foundation
to
donate
funds
from
the
sale
of
its
vehicles in
the
USA
to
charities
and
organizations helping
the
needy.
The
new
Suzuki
Automotive
Foundation
for Life is expected
to
raise
at
least
$130,000,
and,
depending
on
dealer
participation
, as
much
as
$300,000
the
first year.
The
funds
for
the
Foundation
come
from
the sale
of
the
popular
4x4,
the
Suzuki
Samurai
in this
country.
The
Foundation
will
channel
a
portion
of
Suzuki
's
profits,
based
directly
on
vehicle sales, back
into
the
community,
via
donations
to
designated organizations
and
charities.
,, STEVE MILLEN,
who
commuted
by Lear Jet
between
the
MTEG
Pomona
race
and
the
American
Racing Series
event
at
Laguna Seca
on
October
11,
where
he
was
second,
will have a
Toyota
factory
ride
in
the
World
Champion-
ship
Toyota
Olympus
Rally
the
first
of
December
in
Tumwater,
WA.
The
Olympus
is
America's
first
World
Championship
Rally in
more
than
a
decade,
and
it
offers
another
glimpse
of
Steve's
multi
level racing talen~s.
Millen will
pilot
one
of
three
Toyota
Celica
twin-cam
turbo
rally cars
entered
by
Toyota
Team
Europe.
His
mates
on
the
Toyota
team
in
Washington
will
be
regulars
Bjorn
Waldegard
and
Lars-Erik
Torph.
STADIUM
MOTOCROSS
CORP.,
aka
Mike
Goodwin,
will
be
producing
the
1987
events
under
a
new
name,
Supercross,
Inc., a
new
investor
financed
entertainme
nt
firm.
Of
interest
in
the
multi-page
press
release is
that
the
new
Supercross,
Inc. will
carry
on
all
the
plans
made
by
Stadium
Motocross
Corp.
for
1987.
Supercross,
Inc. will
devote
its
time
and
energy
to
the
expansion
of
Supercross
and
to
the
integration
of
an
Autocross
Series
for
off
road
cars
into
the
motors
ports
weekends
.
Autocross
has
been
a
part
of
SM
C's
original
business
plan
since
1983,
and
Supercross,
Inc.
intends
to
continue
that
commitment.
Spokesman
Leon
Jones
says
that
Supercross
and
Autocross
staged
together
is
logical,
and
makes
financial sense, taking
advantage
of
dirt
already in
the
stadium
and
advertising
commonly
aired.
Included
in
the
release was a
schedule
for
Supercross,
but
there
was
no
indication which events,
almost
all in
the
southwest,
would
include
the
Autocrnss
for cars. Stay
tuned
for
more
date
conflicts in
1987,
although
we
hope
that
will
not
come
to
pass.
THE
DIRE STRAITS
OF
MACKINAC
SCCA
Divisional
Pro
Rally was
held
September
2 7,
and
was a
good
tune
up
for
the
Press
On
Regardless
Pro
Rally.
An
enthusiastic
25
teams
turned
out
for
the
rally
held
in
the
Michigan
upper
peninsula
city
of
Trout
Lake.
The
event
covered
about
53
miles
of
some
of
the
most
challenging rally
roads
to
be
found
anywhere.
Chairperson
Ginny
Reese
and
national
competitors
like
Doug
Shepherd,
Joe
Andreini,
John
Crawford,
Zach
Thompson
and
others
stepped
out
of
their
cars
to
help
organize
the
rally.
The
stages were never
more
than
15
miles
from
Trout
Lake,
and
the
Central
Division
Championship
was
on
the
line,
open
to
a
number
of
the
competitors.
First
on
the
road
was
the
Nissan
200
SX
of
Steve
Nowicki
and
Cathee
Light.
They
led all
the
way
without
looking
back,
and
even
with
a
one
minute
road
penalty,
they
won
overall
by
nearly
three
minutes.
Series
contender
Ray
Hoeper
and
Dave
Knaack rolled
their
Datsun
510
on
the
first
of
eight stages,
and
were
out
of
the
running.
Jim
and
Jennifer
Warren
put
on
a fine
show
in
their
Olds
Firenza,
and
ran
second
all night
to
Nowicki.
Gail
Hoult
and
Paul
Truess
took
home
a
solid
third
in
an
Olds
Omega.
But,
fourth
overall
turned
out
to
be
the
winning
number
for
Carl
Keiranen
and
Diane
Sargent in
their
Mazda
RX-
7.
The
team
clinched
the
1986
Central
Division
Championship
with
this
finish,
and
earned
an
expense
paid
trip
to
the
Press
On
Regardless
for
the
series
runoffs.
Catching
our
eye
on
the
results
was
the
seventh
place
finish
of
Scott
Harvey, Jr.
and
Douglas Harvey, in a Dodge.
Scott
Harvey
Sr.
was a
pioneer
in
the
Pro
Rally
concept
some
years
back,
and
won
many,
many
of
the
earlv events
outright,
including
the
famed Shell
4000
Rally
from
coast
to
coast
in
Canada.
His
offspring
may
well
develop
into
future
stars in
the
Pro
rally game.
DON'T
FORGET
TO
VOTE
this
November,
twice at that.
Be
sure
to
use
the
ballot
on
page 6
to
nominate
your
favorites for
the
1986
Score
/HDRA
OffRoadsmen
of
the
Year in a variety
of
categories,
and
send
it
off
before
you
go
to
Baja.
Even
more
important
is
to
vote
November
4 in
the
national
elections.
We
plan
to
get
an
absentee ballot,
so
we
won't
forget
before
we go
to
Baja.
Californians
should
rememb
er
that
Alan
Cranston
is
up
for re-
election,
and
the
Senator
is
the
man
behind
the
Wilderness
Bill
that
aims
to
close
the
vast
majority
of
the
eastern
Mojave
Desert
to
all vehicles
and
most
people.
Whoever
is
your
choice,
do
remember
to
vote!
Dusty
Times
Side Tracks •••
By
Judy
Smit~
In Class 1, Ivan Stewart
doesn't
look
too
good with
53
and
49
and
his physical curve
low, intellectural curve midway,
and his emotional
cm
ve falling.
Mark
McMiilin came
out
even
lower, with 22
and
20,
and all
three curves
on
the
downside ..
Ron
Brant looks like
the
one
to
beat in this class, with totals at 77
and
85,
he
had
the
highest
numerical
levels
of
all we
checked, and his curves are all
up
high. It
should
be a good race for
Ron.
With
the
Baja
1000
almost
upon
us
as
we write this, and
about
to
happen as
you
read it,
we got
to
wondering
who
might
be the winners this year.
The
1000, a race like
no
other,
does
not
fall
into
the
statistical
norm.
It's almost impossible
to
guess
the
winner in any given year.
Who
would
have predicted
that
Mickey
Thompson
and
Terry
Smith, in a
borrowed
car,
would
win in
'82,
the last
time
the
race
went
to
La
Paz?
And
the time
before that, in .'79,
the
overall
winner was
Walker
Evans, in his
Class 8 truck, another surprise.
We
decided
that
for lack
of
anything better,
we
might try
to
use
biorhythms
to
predict which
racers would
do
well in the 1000.
These
charts claim
to
predict
on
which days a
person's
physical,
emotional
and
intellectual
energies are high, and
presum-
ably are
most
favorable for all
sorts
of
endeavors. Numerical
values are placed
on
each day,
the
numbers
going
up
as
the
biorhythms
climb.
They
also
predict
when
those
energies are
low,
and
at times, when they hit
some
mysterious point, the days
are considered
"critical".
If
a day
gets
really
critical,
our
biorhythm
prognosticator,
which lives in
the
bowels
of
our
computer,
suggests staying in
bed.
We
ran a handful
of
racers,
whose
birth
dates are
known
to
us,
through
our
machine, and
came
up
with
some
very loose
predictions. In Class 8 we
found
that
Steve Kelley had
the
highest
numbers, with
65
for
both
days
of
the
race,
and
his emotional
curve near the
bottom,
while his
intellectual level will be very high
both
days. Dave
Shoppe,
on
the
other
hand, falls
at
45,
40
for
the
two race days, with his physical
and intellectual levels low, and
his
emotional
level midway
up
the high side.
But
Walker
Evans,
John
Gable
and
Frank
Vessels are
all faced with critical days
on
the
·
5th,
the
first day
of
the
race.
Their
numbers
range
from
47
to
50,
and
Evans
is
physically low,
Gable
is
intellectually low, and
Vessels finds his emotional level
at the
bottom.
The
second
day
of
the
race
doesn't
get high
numbers
for any
of
them.
On
the basis
of
this
"information",
we'll pick
Kelley
to
make
the
best showing
at
the
1000.
We're
not
really
sure
what
a
"critical"
day means. Perhaps
those are days when all three
elements
of
a personality are
somehow
at
odds,
and
a
person
is
incapable
of
making
sound
decisions.
We
should
know
after
the 1000.
In Class 7 we see
that
Roger
Mears falls at
48,
48,
with his
emotional and intellectual levels
low,
but
his physical curve very
high for
the
dates
of
the
race.
Larry Ragland has even lower
numbers
, at 42, 38, with his
physical curve at
the
bottom,
his
intellect low, and his emotional
curve very high.
And
Manny
Esquerra, with all
three
curves
hovering near the middle, comes
up
with a slightly higher total at
48,
50,
but
Friday
the
6th
will be
a critical day for him.
On
the
basis
of
these
numbers
( and
November
1986
some
small reference
to
past
history) we'll pick Esquerra.
Willie Valdez looks like a good
shot
in Class 7S,
with
high
numbers,
64
and
64,
and
his
emotional
and
intellectual levels
at
mid
range while his physical
curve sits very high.
He
has a
critical day
on
the
6th,
but
if
Willie
can't
cope,
no
one
can.
Malcolm Vinje,
on
the
other
hand, has a big
68,
65,
with his
emotional level low, and his
intellectual level high,
topped
by
a still higher fhysical curve.
He
has
no
critica day, so we would
guess
he'd
be a safer bet than
Willie, except
that
Vinje had a
co-driver,
Mark
Hansen, and we
didn't
have his birth date. Also in
7S, and
not
having a good year,
is
Chuck
Johnson,
who
shows
up
here with a
36,
4 7 and all his
curves in
the
midrange.
Not
only
that,
but
the
5th,
the
first day
of
the
race,
is
a critical
one
for him.
And,
as if
that
all
doesn't
sound
ominous
enough,
the
day after
the
race is
marked
"very
critical", and
our
computer
warns him
to
"really watch
out!"
We
had the birth date
of
only
one
1-2-1600racer,
Rob
Tolleson
but
since
he
was last year's class
winner, we were really interested
to
see how he
stood
on
the
dates
-
of
the
1000
.
As
it
turns
out,
his
numbers
show
up
at
the
lowest
level
of
all
our
test cases, way
down
at 9 and 8 for
the
two race
days,
and
his
emotional,
intellectual
and
physical curves
have all
lumped
at the
bottom
for
those
two
days.
We'll
have
to
watch
Rob
closely
to
see
how
he
does. ·
In Class 10
we
looked up Steve
Sourapas and Russel1 Welch, and
found they
both
have critical
days
on
the
sixth,
but
Sourapas
has
quite
high totals, at 77 and
68,
so
we'd
guess
he'd
be
a good
choice.
Rodney
Hall's totals are in the
mid
to
low range, with his
intellectual and emotional curve
low
on
race days,
but
Hall can
race the
1000
in his sleep, so it
shouldn't
matter.
We
could
find only
one
Class
5 birthdate,
and
that
was Jim
Cocores,
who
shows
up
at quite
high levels, with a
69
for
both
days, and only his intellectual
curve
on
the
low side.
Cocores
should
be a
sure
bet
for a good
finish.
As
investigative reporters, we
are curious
to
know
which facet
has
more
bearing
on
a race
driver's success.
Should
he be at
the
top
physically,
to
cope
with a
grueling drive?
Or
should
his
intellect
be
foremost,
to
help him
make
appropriate
judgements?
Or
perhaps
his emotional level
is
important,
to
keep him steady
and
prevent rash acts
or
self
destruction.
Incidentally, we ran
our
own
birthdate
through
the
computer,
along with
that
of
our
co-driver
for the
1000,
John
Howard,
and
were
not
impressed at the levels
predicted for either
of
us.
We'll
have a chance
to
see, in first
person,
whether
those numbe'rs
meant
a thing.
If
it's already
the
1000,
the
year
must
be almost over, and
that
must
mean
that
Christmas
is
coming.
We've
been working
on
our
Christmas
list and came
up
with a few things for
some
of
our
racing friends.
For
Rob
MacCachren
we'd
like
to
find
some
indestructible
c.v.
boots
and
c.v.s
(they'd
make
good stocking-stuff ers for almost
anyone).
For
Jim Cocores, a
robot,
to
automatically
prep
his
Class 5 car.
For
Chuck
Johnson
,
a
commuter
plane,
to
make his
trips from Illinois
to
the races
easier.
For
Steve Mize!, self-stick
or
magnetic body panels; for
Rodney
Hall, some wings so his
Dodge
would
fly
OVER
those
big rocks; for Dave Kreisler, a
paint
job
and
a new cushion.
For
Larry Schwacofer, a new
mustache (
with
no
grey); for
Tudy
Esquerra,
a
design
engineer,
who
specializes in
"down
bars";
for
Tom
Koch, a
tape
recorder
to
send
to
the
drivers' meeting with a friend;
and for
Rob
Tolleson, a chance
to
start
1986
over again.
As
a last
thought,
we'd
like
Santa
to
bring
our
good friend, publisher Jean
Calvin, a brand, spanking new
race car.
ATTENTION
DESERT
RACERS
t>l.JSTY
TIMES
has
contingency
money
posted
at
all Score
and
HDRA
desert races. Check
it
out
on
contingency
row
- Two
different
classes each event.
CALIFORNIA
FF-ROAD
R.E.
·
RACING
USIASTS
C.O.R.E. PIT
TEA_M
__
C.O.R.E. offers unique pit services at western
desert races, a family oriented
club
with
social
activities and much more
for
its members. Get
all the information on C.O.R.E. Karen Clark,
Race Director, (818) 345-3833, 17045 Roscoe
Blvd., #11, Northridge,
CA
91325.
Page
7
THE
17th ANNUAL
SNORE
150
The Racers' Race is Back
on Track
By
Jean
Calvin
Photos: Centerline Photo
Rob MacCachren
had
his
Chenowth
Magnum
wired
for this race, and despite Class 1
starting
third
off
the line,
Rob
turned
consistent fast times, fast lap
of
the day,
and
won the race overall
by
more than eleven minutes.
The
SNORE
250
is
the
longest,
consecutive
running
off
road
race
in
the
desert,
and
the
September
happening
out
of
Las
Vegas,
Nevada
is a
tradition
with
many
competitors.
The
first
SNORE
250
in
1970
ran
a
total
of
two
125
mile
loops
south
from
Spring
Mountain
Road
to
state
line
and
on
through
Sandy
Valley.
That
start/finish
gravel
pit
is
now
a full
blown
housing
development.
Most
of
the
SNORE
250s
were
staged
out
of
Jean
over
the
years,
but
this
round
SNORE
went
to
the
Las
Vegas
Speedrome
for
the
start
and
finish
of
the
race;
the
site
not
used
for
an
off
road
event
since
the
1985
Mint
400.
Despite
midsummer
difficult-
ies
with
insurance
companies,
SNORE
got
the
problems
handled,
and
the
SNORE
250
came
off
on
schedule
as
the
biggest
event
in
the
Yokohama
Tire
points
series.
The
major
sponsor
for
the
race is
the
host
hotel,
the
Holiday
Inn
and
Casino
on
the
Las Vegas
Strip.
This
year
the
usual
site
of
tech
and
contingency
row
at
the
front
of
the
hotel
was
not
available -
they
are
building
new
rooms
right
out
to
the
sidewalk.
This
action
put
contingency
row
in an
alley
behind
the
hotel.
It was a
bit
congested,
but
it
worked
well
with
not
too
many
big rigs
on
hand.
The
activity
stretched
from
mid-afternoon
until
midnight,
a longer
than
necessary
stint
since
most
of
the
entry
had
been
through
the
line
much
earlier.
The
race
route
wound
its way
out
of
the
Speedrome
on
a
course
in
the
reverse
direction
of
the
most
recent
Mint
races
there.
Last
September
SNORE
shared
Page
8
the
Speedrome
facility
with
an
SCCA
regional race
on
Saturday,
so
the
start/finish,
entry
and
exit
to
the
facility were all
different
and
initially a
bit
confusing.
The
way
in
and
out
was
not
marked
until
just
before
the
start
on
Saturday
morning.
Once
over
the
railroad
tracks
the
roads
were
familiar
to
regular
desert
racers,
albeit
in
reverse.
SNORE
avoided
all
the
infamous
silt
beds,
substituting
some
keen
gravel washes
that
got
rougher
with
each
of
the
six laps
of
the
45
mile
course.
Parts
of
the
route
were
well
marked,
and
other
parts
were really confidence legs,
but
by
race
morning
the
pit
teams
on
course
gave
the
drivers
a sense
of
direction
in these
parts
in
the
early laps.
SNORE
officers
can
be
a
bit
laid
back
and
the
drivers'
. meeting was a
good
20
minutes
late in starting,
although
all
the
drivers
were
there
promptly
at
eight
in
the
morning.
The
only
major
points
from
the
meeting
were general stuff,
the
need
to
stay
on
the
marked
course
or
be
disqualified
and
the
info'
that
one
railroad
underpass
had
been
eliminated;
the
route
now
led
around
this
spot
and
onto
pavement
for
about
50
yards.
The
weather
turned
from
really
hot
early
in
the
week
to
cloudy,
cool
and
then
deep
overcast
race
morning.
It
was
perfect
for
the
competitors,
except
the
· breeze
was
too
light
to
help
with
the
dust
problem.
The
cars
started
one
every 15
seconds,
and
Class
10
was first
off
the
line.
Dick
Weyhrich
was
first away
followed
by
14
other
wild
running
Class
10
drivers,
including
defending
overall
champ
Jerry
Leighton. Nearly
90
cars
in
nine
classes
took
the
green
flag, a healthy
jump
in
entry
from
last year.
Although
Weyhrich
was first
around
at
57.49,
it
was
third
fastest
time
for
the
lap.
Jerry Leighton
did
a
56.57
to
lead
on
time, with
Tom
Bradley Jr.
just
ten
seconds
behind
him.
Then
came
the
mob,
led
by
Bill
Sallenbach,
Mike
Zupanovich,
and
Jack Irvine
and
his
son
Scott,
all
in
about
a
three
minute
blanket
with Leighton.
After
two
laps
the
Weyhrich
Raceco
broke
a
nose
cone,
had
only
second
and
fourth
gear
and
they retired. Bradley
rolled
on
lap 3
and
was
done
for
the
day,
and
three
starters
had
not
completed
a
round.
Midway
eight
were
still
running
well.
After
the
first
two
laps Jerry
Leighton
was
also
leading
overall,
but
he
dropped
back
on
the
next
go
with
engine misfiring,
still
holding
the
Class
10
lead.
Just
over
six
minutes
back
were
the
Irvines,
who
lost
a fan
belt
also.
About
thr
ee
minutes
further
back
came
Sallenbach
followed in less
than
a
minute
by
Zupanovich.
Las
Vegan
Ron
Ellenberg was
on
the
comeback
trail after a
fast
lap disaster.
Although
Leighton
slowed a
couple
minutes
a lap
on
the
final
two
rounds
he
won
Class
10
easily in
5:57.27,
and
he
was
fourth
overall.
Charging
hard
and
turning
fast lap for
the
class
on
the
final lap,
54.07,
Ron
Ellenberg
had
a great
second
half
and
took
second
in class
and
fifth
overall in
6:00.01.
Fighting a lack
of
power
steering for
two
laps,
Jack
and
Scott
Irvine nailed
third
in
class,
seventh
overall
in
6:05.53,
followed by
Mike
and
Jim
Zupanovich
at
6:05.58,
eighth overall
and
fourth
in
class
by
a slim five seconds.
Rounding
out
the
finishers
were
Greg
November
1986
Tom and Steve Martin fought
so
hard all day for the Class 2 victory, that they
hustled their Raceco over the six laps fast enough to take second overall
as
well.
Hibbs
in
fifth,
and
Mike
Rusnak/John
McDowell.
Class 2 was
next
to
start
with
16
strong
entries
on
the
line.
The
fastest car
on
the
first
round
was
driven
by Brian Collins, with
dad
Marty
Collins, a
former
Mint
400
winner,
. riding
shotgun,
at
57.22.
In
at
58.27
was young
Eddy
Herbst,
closely followed
at
58.40
by
Tom
and
Steve Martin.
Terry
Bell
did
a
59.09,
but
it was
his
only
lap.
Out
of
action
on
the
first lap were Roger Roderick,
Tom
Lawson,
who
came
from
Oklahoma
only
to
have
his
new
car
fail early,
Jim
Bunty,
and
Tommy
Ford
who
broke
a
torsion
bar.
Tom
Koch
lost
about
35
minutes
with
a
broken
axle,
but
got
back
and
running
fast,
but
more
troubles
eventually
put
him
out
on
lap 5.
After
two
rounds
the
Martin
Brothers
led
Eddy
Herbst
by
two
minutes.
Troy
Herbst
was
just
seconds ahead
of
Gregg Symonds,
and
James
Mahan
/
Rob
Wicker
were
mere
seconds ahead
of
them
both
in
third
spot.
Many
had
some
troubles,
and
the
race
for
the
win
developed
between
Eddy
Herbst
and
the Martins. Midway
Martin
held
minutes
on
the
young
Las Vegas driver,
and
the
·
pair
turned
nearly identical times
on
the
fourth
go. Back in
the
pack
Brian
Collins
did
a
56.54
to
move
up
in
the
field after losing
more
than
20
minutes
on
lap 2,
but
Collins was
out
after
four
laps.
The
Martins
and
Herbst
were
nearly even
on
time
the
final
two
laps,
but
Tom
and
Steve
Martin
got
the
checkered
flag first in
their
Raceco, winning Class 2 by
3.04
minutes
and
placing
second
overall.
Eddy
Herbst
was close
enough
to
take
third
overall,
second
in
class.
Turning
up
the
wick late in
the
race,
the
Raceco
of
Gregg
Symonds/Warren
Miller was a
strong
third
,
another
seven
minut
es
down,
but
39
minutes
ahead
of
James
Mahan
/
Rob
Wicker.
Also
finishing in
Class 2 were Les
Fulkerson/Craig
Marshall,
ten
more
minutes
back, followed
in
over
an
hour
by Larry Ellis.
Class 1 was
third
off
the
line,
and
the
nine
starters
took
off
fast.
As
expected,
Rob
Mac-
Cach
ren
got
his
Chenowth
Magnum
around
the
quickest,
at
56.31,
and
only
James Barbeau,
at
58.53,
was close.
MacCachren
got
a little faster
on
lap 2,
and
a
lot
faster
on
lap
3,
turning
fast lap
of
the day
at
51.42.
He
took
the
overall lead
at
that
point.
With
two
laps
done
Barbeau
dropped
to
third
by
just
six
seconds
as
Kenny
Krumme
moved
just
ahead
into
second.
With
Mac-
Cachren
15
minutes
down
the
road,
Barbeau regained
second
midway
in
the
race,
about
a
minute
ahead
of
Krumme.
Missing after
one
lap was Jeff
Wright
in his
rotary
powered
car,
Don
Slagle
got
in
two
rounds
before falling
down,
and
Floridan
Danny
Hahn
had
<!,
third
lap
disaster
and
retired.
Roger
Lord
/
Jim
Coco?es
were
also
among
the
.missing.
Up
front
Rob
MacCachren
never
looked
·
back
in his Valley Performance
prepped
Chenowth,
and
he
took
a
resounding
win
and
first overall
in the great time
of
5:38.34.
The
fight for
second
went
on
as
Krumme
gained a few
minutes
on
Barbeau
on
the
fourth
lap,
but
Krume
lost
the
trans
on
the
next
round,
and
that
was
the
race.
Barbeau
took
a
well
earned
second
in Class 1
at
6:36.06,
losing
20
minutes
on
the
final
lap.
Third,
and
the last Class 1
finisher, was the
team
of
Sandy
Howe
and
Joe Boggio,
home
in
8:02.14
in
the
race
that
had
a
ten
hour
time allowance.
Class
1-2-1600
was
the
biggest,
as
always,
with
26
starters.
Five
were
listed
as
having
no
time.
One,
Bob
Stockton
/Do
n
Chase,
actually
came in
fourth
on
total
time
but
Jerry
Leighton
looked
to repeat for his
third
overall victory,
but
troubles
dropped
him to fourth
0/A,
but he
still
won Class
10
honors in the Raceco.
DustyTimes
Gregg
Symonds
and
Warren
Miller
won
Class 2 in 1985,
but
small
glitches
held
the Raceco
to
third
in Class 2 at the 1986
SNORE
250 race.
James
Barbeau
had
a
good
day in his Raceco,
staying
close to
the
overall
leader
for
several laps, and,
after
trouble, he finished
second
in Class
1.
Sandy
Howe
and
Joe
Boggio
had
some
serious
breakage
mid-
race,
but
they
got
back
in
action
to finish the six laps,
third
in
Class
1.
Ron
Ellenberg
had
troubles
with
his
new
Raceco in the
early
going,
but
he
had
a
strong
second
half
and
ended
up
a
close
second
in Class
10.
Jack
and
Scott
Irvine
had
power
steering
and
fan belt woes with
their
Raceco,
but
the father
and
son team
still
took
3rd
in Class
10.
Eddy
Herbst
and
company
ran
hard
all
day in the
new
Chenowth,
came very close,
but
had
to settle
for
second
in Class 2
and
a
strong
third
overall.
were disqualified
for
going
under
the
railroad
tunnel
on
two
laps.
. Five
more
only
managed
one
lap
on
the
rugged
route.
The
first lap leader was
Mike
Spina
at
59.18.
Larry
Job
led
the
pursuing
herd
with
a 1
:02.48,
followed
by
Jack
Short,
1:03.26,
and
Alan
Hensley,
1:04.55,
but
Alan
lost
his
trans
on
the
next
lap.
In
the
1 :05 area were
Brent
Bell, Kenny
Freeman
and
Paul
Kline, all
too
elose
to
call.
With
one
third
distante
done,
Mike
Spina
had
a
good
lead
of
six
minutes
over
Larry
Job.
Bell was
back
less
than
three
more
minutes,
with
Short
following in
two
minutes.
A
pack
of
six were
fighting
hard
for
the
next
positons.
Midway
Spina
still led,
but
Job
had
gained a
minute.
Short
was
now
third,
down
six minutes,
but
four
minutes
ahead
of
Bell.
Only
eleven cars
went
any
farther
on
the
charts.
Lap
4 tightened things
up.
Spina
held
the
lead
by
4.24
over
Job,
who
had
4.22
on
Short,
who
was
2.11
ahead
of
Bell.
Several
more
were a few
minutes
more
off
pace in a very
good
dice.
The
picture changed drastically
on
the
final
two
laps.
On
lap 5
Spina
lost
about
55
minutes
and
the
race. Heading
into
the
final
lap Larry
Job
had
the
lead
by
3.39
over
Brent
Bell,
who
held a
skinny
27
second
margin
over
Jack
Short.
But, Larry
Job
broke
Stan
Parnell
and
Jeff
Botha
took
the Class 5
lead
on
the
second
lap,
and
overcame
a
serious
challenge
to
win
the class in
qreat
time.
Class 1-2-1600
had
a variety
of
leaders,
but
Brent
Beil
and
family
took
the
lead
on
the
sixth
lap
and
won
the
26
car
class
by
over
four
minutes
in the
two
seat
Bunderson.
Dusty
Times
an
axle
and
CV
on
the
last lap,
and
he
was
down
and
out.
Brent
Bell
picked
up
3.46
minutes
on
the
last
tour
and
won
Class
1-2-1600
in
his
Bunderson
with
his sister riding along. His
time
of
6:19.49
was
good
for
ninth
overall. Right
in
his
dust
Jack
Short
was second,
tenth
overall
with
total
time
of
6:23.37
in
an
exciting finish.
Former
Baja
Bug driver Barry
McDermott
had
a
good
day,
consistent
lap times,
and
despite
doing
a triple roll
on
the
first lap,
he
brought
his new
November
1986
1600
home
third
in
class
at
6:41.50.
Carrying
on,
Mike
Spina
was
fourth
at
7:08.15,
followed
by
Howard
Ringe
at
7:16.15.
Bryan
Rogers was close with a
7:23.10
followed
by
Paul
Kline
at
7:30.25.
Ray
Cummins
was
ninth
at
8:15.21,
and
Kenny
Freeman
was
close,
the
last
finisher
in
Class
1-2-1600
at
8:16.11.
It
was decided
at
the
drivers'
meeting
that
Classes 5,
5-1600,
9
and
Challenge
would
do
five laps
for
an official finish.
Only
a
trio
of
Class 5 cars
started,
but
it
began as a
dandy
race.
Richard
Llewellyn led
the
first
round
by
a
tiny.
four
seconds
over
Stan
Parnell/Jeff
Bolha, while Blain
McDonald
had
a
30
minute
problem.
After
two
rounds
Parnell
had
the
lead
by
just
10
seconds
and
it
couldn't
get
much
tighter.
With
three
laps
done
Parnell
now
had
a 15
minute
lead
over
Llewellyn,
who
had
his
woes.
The
two
Bugs
had
nearly
identical~
KC
HAS
SHINED
THE
WAY
TO
MORE
OFF-ROAD
RACING
VICTORIES
THAN
ALL
OTHER
BRANDS
COMBINED!
At
KC
HiLiTES, we're serious about
competition lighting. So why take a
chance with anything else?
_,-,:,-
~---,,._
Jack
Short
was within seconds
of
the lead in Class 1-2-1600 on
some)aps,
and
at the flag
Short
took
a close
2nd
in the
huge
class.
Barry
McDermott
had
a fi're
debut
with
his
new
racer
,
surviving
a
roll
over
in the early
goihg
to take a
good
third
place
in Class
1-2-1600.
Tom Bo/ha ran
strong
most
of
the day,
but
a three
hour
middle
lap
dropped
his Baja
Bug
to an
official
second
at
the flag in Class
5-1600.
ll@i"'
fourth
laps,
and
McDonald
was
on
the
comeback
trail,
only
to
lose
over
two
hours
on
lap 4. Llewellyn
had
a
2:23
on
the
fifth lap,
and
Stan
Parnell/
Jeff
Bolha
had
no
trouble,
and
won
Class 5
in
5:53.56.
Over
two
hours
back,
Richard
Llewellyn was
second,
about
35
minutes
ahead
of
Blain
McDon-
ald as Class 5
had
a
100
percent
finish ratio.
There
were
seven
listed
in
Class
5-1600,
but
Doug
Smith
did
not
start
and
Port
Campbell
didn't
cover
a lap.
Tom
Walker
Jr.
had
the
quick
first lap, a
1
:08.32,
and
did
another
1
:08
to
hold
the
lead after
two
laps.
Tom
Bolha
was
solid
in
second,
only
1.25
minutes
behind,
and
both
Brian
Parkhouse
and
Keith
Bawden were missing. Bolha
had
a
three
hour
middle
lap,
and
Walker
added
in
an
extra
25
minutes,
while
Leonard
Jones
carried
on.
Tom
Walker
contin-
ued
running
strong
on
the
last
two
rounds
to
win Class
5-1600
with a
total
time
of
6:27.34.
Leonard
Jones
took
second,
38
minutes
later,
and
Bolha salvaged
a finish,
another
1 ½
hours
back
in
third.
It
was
announced
at
the
Sunday
morning
awards
brunch
that
Tom
Walker
Jr
.
had
been
penalized a lap for rough driving,
which
dropped
him
to
third,
behind
Bolha,
and
Leonard
Jones
became
the
5-1600
winner
.
The
five
truck
entry
was split
into
big
and
small.
Three
started
the
four
lap
dash
in
combined
Class
7S/7
4x4
.
Willie
Valdez
in
his
General
Tire
sponsored
Ranger led all
the
way. In fact
Willie
had
his
co-driver,
Joe
Alvarado,
drive
the
second
two
laps,
and
he
did
good
times
and
they
won
by
over
three
hours.
Randy
Ward
also finished
the
four
laps,
and
David
Shrum
covered
three
rounds.
A
pair
of
yellow
Chevrolets
made
up
Class
8.
Greg
Holman
led this
dual
all
four
laps.
Ron
Fiedler
did
three
laps for
second
place.
Only
six
of
the
seven Challenge
cars
started,~
A
Performance
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More off-road races are won
on
Bilstein than any other shock absorber.
Our record speaks for itself!
Winning Heritage
Bilstein gas pressure shocks first
appeared
in
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the famed Baja 1000
in
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Since that
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been the choice of serious off-roaders
who not only want
to
start the race -
but finish it as well.
Many
Applications
Today,
Bilstein offers a variety of off-
road shock applications for racing or
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on
the street. From single
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For additional technical . information and a complete catalog, send $2.50.
Page
10
November
1986
Swinging
tight
on
a
hilly
curve,
Leonard
Jones finished
second
on the road,
but
he
ended
up
the
winner
of
the
pack
in Class 5-1600.
Willie Valdez
and
Joe
Alvarado
had
a fun day in the desert,
and
also won the
combined
Class
7S
and
7 4x4 w
it
h
no
strain in the
Ford
Ranger.
Greg
Holman
ran steady times
for
the four laps
required
of
the Heavy Metal,
and
he was the
only
finisher, the Class 8
winner
at the SNORE 250.
Jea_n
Calvin
and
J_udy
Smith
had
their
fun in the
old
Funco,
and
ended
up
taking the
honors
,n
Class
9,
the
only
1200 at the race this year.
DustyTimes
SNO
Where
It
Pays
To
Race
THE MIDNIGHT SPECIAL
Sponsored
by
KC
HiLiTES
Noventber 15, 1986 - Las_Vegas, Nevada
The 16th Annual SNORE Midnight Special
is a Twilight Race and a Double Points Race
Yokohama Tires West
er
n Barb
eq
ue
at
the
Tr
ac
k -
Saturday, November
15
The
Final Event
in
-the 1986
SNORE/Yokoham
a Points Series
DRIVING LIGH
TS
REQUIRE
D!
Entry Fee - $250.00 plus Insurance - $75.00
. .
_ Registration
and
Tech
Inspection
~~
10
a.~.
-
12_
Noon
-
Saturday
- Start/Finish Area
~
YOKOHAMA
Dnvers
Meeting - 12:30 p.m. Race
Start
- 1:00 p.m.
For
5eriDUS
Performers
Race
Course
-5 laps - 35 mile
course
-
South
of Boulder City off Highway 95
with
no
silt -
Near
th
e
El
Do
rad
o Sub-station
AWARDSBRUNCH-SUNDAY,NOVEMBER16
10:00
·
A.M.
-
SNEAKERS
-
FREE
DRINKS
For further
in
formation
and
entry
packet
contact:
SNORE, P.O.
Box
4534, Las Vegas, NV 89106 or call the Hot Line - _
~,
702-452-4522 , l)Q
~••>-~
-
It Pays
to
Race
with SNORE
~~r"'1""."'\=
O
Tom
Wa
l
ker
Jr.,
who
always
seems to lose
the
nose
piece,
led
the
5-1600 p
ack
to t
he
flag,
but'
lost
a lap to
pe
n
alties
and
was
Mike
Zupano
v
ich
pu
t VW
power
-
back
into his
Raceco
this
round,
and
he
scored
his
first
finish in a
long
time, f
ourth
in Class 10.
Mike
Spina
led
the
herd
in Class 1-2-1600 for f
our
laps,
but
his
B
un
d
erson
su
ff
er
ed
big
tr
oub
l
e,
and
Mike
en
ded
up
4th
in class.
officia
ll
y third.
~
along
with
the
single
Class 9
of
Jean
Calvin
and
Judy
Smith.
The
Challenge
guys
had
a
good
dice
going
on
lap
1, as
Danny
Oliver
/Dan
Hook
led
John
Ken
n
edy
by
jus
t
minutes.
Tim
Crain
was
next,
another
seven
minutes
back,
and
both
Robert
Christensen
and
Stan
Potter
were
just
minutes
more
behind.
Oliver
/Hook
got
a
stout
hit
which
slammed
them
into
a
huge
rock,
and
finished
their
day
on
lap 2.
Kennedy
now
had
a
husky
lead,
but
Crain
was
_
second,
just
ten
minutes
ahead
of
Tim
Sims,
but
Sims
was
seen
no
_
more.
Kennedy
lost
an
hour
on
the
middle
lap,
but
still
led
over
Crain
by
34
minutes.
Now
both
Potter
and
Christensen
were
running
strong
after
second
lap
disasters.
The
ranks
soon
dwindled
as
Christensen
was
out
on
lap
4
and
Potter
vanished
on
lap
5.
John
Kennedy
led
all
the
way
to
victory,
a
neat
day
for
the
youngster
who
finished
in
8:04.55.
Plugging
on
to
finish
second
was
Tim
Crain,
almost
an
even
hour
behind.
The
old
Funco
of
Calvin
and
Smith
came
through
shifter
and
suspension
·•
SNORE
President
Roger
Gaskill,
left
,
congratulates
Rob
MacCachren
on
his
overall
win
and
winning
the
wheelbarrow
full
of
2000
silver
dollars, the
Holiday
Inn
bonus
prize.
problems
to
cover
all five laps
in
7:17.00,
.
winning
a
huge
trophy
and
some
cash for
the
effort.
The
race
was
over
around
seven
in
the
evening,
the
pits
came
in
and
everyone
loaded
up
in
the
fading daylight, still
with
plenty
of
time
left
to
enjoy
the
pleasures
of
Las
Vegas.
The
SNORE
250
awards
brunch
is as
much
of
a legend as
the
race,
and
this year was
no
exception.
Co
J
hosted
by
the
Holiday
Inn
and
General
Tires,
the
feast
was
complete
with
an ice
sculpture,
and
everything
from
breakfast
items
to
prime
rib,
all
you
could
eat
and
three
free tickets
went
to
each entry.
After
most
everyone
had
truly
overeaten,
the
awards
began,
going
through
the
class
winners
first ..
SNORE
President
Roger
Gaskill
thanked
all
the
sponsors
of
SNORE,
particularly
Yoko-
hama,
who
put
$5000
in
the
points
fund,
and
the
Holiday
Inn,
who
added
$3500
to
the
race
tas
NEVADA
Vegas
·OFF-ROAD
The first lap
leader
in Class 5,
Richard
Llewellyn
had
a
major
disaster
on
the
last lap,
but
hung
on
to finish five laps,
second
in class.
purse.
Bob
Steinberger
was
thanked
heartily
for
providing
the
Goodyear
Weatherman
Radio
Relay service
on
his
own
at
,
the
SNORE
250,
and
many
more
earned
the
praise
of
the
organ-
izers.
After
all
the
class
winners
had
their
giant
trophies
and
checks,
the
fun
really began.
On
stage
was
the
now
traditional
wheel-
barrow
holding
2000
silver
dollars,
part
of
the
Holiday
Inn
cash
bonus
for
overall winners.
Rob
MacCachren
was
joyful
as
he
accepted
the
wheelbarrow
and
the
silver dollars,
and
Rob
won
the
first
wheelbarrow
full
of
money
just
a few years
back
when
he
was a teenager.
Rob
also
received
the
Russ
Job
Memorial
Trophy
from
Jerry
Leightot:1,
the
award
going
to
the
overall
winner
for
the
year. Originally
donated
by
the
Leighton
family,
Jerry
has
totaling
$500.
Neat
trophies
along with
the
cash are
part
of
the
SNORE
style,
and
Bud
Light
donates
all
the
class
trophies
to
SNORE.
The
final act
at
the
awards
brunch
is
the
drawing
for
the
door
prize,
which
this
year
numbered
two
instead
of
one.
General
Tire
provided
$500
worth
of
tires in a drawing
among
truck
class
competitors.
Each
starting
driver
has
an
equal
chance
in
this
action.
The
tires
went
to
Ron
Fiedler,
who
was
second
in Class
8.
The
other
classes
draw
for
a crisp
$500
bill
from
SNORE,
but
you
had
to
be
there
to
get
the
prize. Larry Ellis,
who
finished sixth
in
Class 2
went
home
with
the
extra
$500.
it's ... BUGGY
'
had
custody
of
the
trophy
for
the
It
is
the
extras
like
the
additional
money
for
top
finishers,
the
drawing
for
prize
money
among
all starting drivers,
the
generous payback,
and
of
course
the
dandy
brunch,
that
brings
truth
to
the
slogan,
"It
pays
to
race with
SNORE."
The
final
event
in
the
SNORE/
Yokohama
Series is coming
up
fast
on
November
15, a
neat
and
no
silt
course
near
Henderson.
It
is
the
revised
Midnight
Special
which
will
now
be a twilight race.
This
one
is
for
double
points
and
should
garner a·
good
entry
for
the
SNORE
season finale.
·N
3
i,.,J
:;;,
;
<'
;.,
Street
-
Stock
- Baja
Race
or
Sand
Whatever
Your
Pleasure
Play
or
Pay
We've
Got
Your
VW
Parts
See
Brian
See
Dave
SAHAK
A
X
2
N
'1
A'-i'ITKN
',!Hit
'
',
Locations
fX
z
to
<t.-
~
0
I-
-~
::
(!)
~
'->PK!'\(,
MT:--1
Serve
You
{.,()
:c
·4. rJ)
Better!
01'
~
1s,
WEST
NORTH
··
3054
Valley View
1541 N. Eastern
871-4911 871-5604
642-2402 642-1664
NOW
2
LOCATIONS
.
' - -
Page
12
November
1986
N
1
past
two
years,
and
now
it
was
back
in
Las Vegas.
For
second
overall,
Tom
and
Steve
Martin
received a small
plaque,
but
deep
under
the
plastic
cover
was a
one
thousand
dollar
bill,
their
extra prize
from
the
Holiday
Inn.
For
third
overall
Eddy
Herbst
received
a
table
sized
checkered
flag plaque, with
50
dollar
bills
making
up
the
white
spots
of
the
checkerboard,
Tim
Crai
n d
ro
ve his
tid
y l
oo
ki
ng
Chall
enge
r
car
thro
ugh
all
man
ner
of
problem
s
to
finish
all
fi
ve laps for second
in
Ch
allenge
Class.
Dustynmes
P,-r
A
45SI
GIJ
MEN"f'G:
'BA:J'A
\ODO
l96{o
OKAY,
LISTEN
lJP!{
1308SY,
YDU
-Pt'(
\'1"E.'RI:
\v=
S1:IZ.ED
11-fE
~CtlNE
lkl
'7~.
LARRY,
yov
'E>E
\"HE"RE"
\
E
l:ROKE
11\E
r"\<Oktr END
I~
'77.
CARL,
YOO
BE'
\~HERE
WE
ROl.lE'D
IN
.'76.
-:0J-HJ,
~OU
13£
\vHERE
\v'ECALtH,
flRE
\U
1
7'l,
C.L"t'DE,
~00
BE.
••.
! .
Nissan Pathfinder Sports
Utility
The
brand
new
Nissan
Pathfinder
made
its
debut
in the
showrooms
late last
month.
The
new
sports
utility
rig
joins
a
growing
group
of
such
popular
,
all
purpose
transportation
trucks
/
station
wagons.
Powered
by
the V-6 engine,
available
only
with
four
wheel
drive, the Nissan can be a
full
blown
, five
passenger
luxury
wagon
with
all
the extras,
or
a
two
seat
working
truck
for
the
budget
minded. With
independent
front
suspension
and
coil
springs
in the
rear, the
Pathfinder
has a
dandy
ride
factor.
It
was
designed
in
California
to
meet
American
tastes,
and
it is
all
new
from
the wheels up,
not
just
a
rework
on
the
pickup
truck
.
Unique
among
the
smaller
bobtails
on
the U.S.
market
, the
Pathfinder
's
rear
passenger
vent
windows
actually
open
for
fre
.
sh
air
ventilation.
Fully
equipped
the
Pathfinder
is
priced
in the $15,000 range.
,
-l
BUDWEISER/SOUTAR
MOTORS
250 DESERT RACE
December 5-7, 1986 -'"-
BOSCH
Official
Vehicle
of
the
1986
HORA
Series
Dusty
Times
November
1986
Barstow, California
Drawing for
Starting Positions
Monday, Nov. 17,
HDRA Office - Las Vegas
For
information and
en
t
ry
forms contact:
High Desert Racing Association
961
West Dale
Las Vegas,
NV
89124
(702) 361-5404
....
~
VALVDUNE
®
-''IL
HORA
HIGH
DESERT
RACING
ASSOCIATION
Page
13
MTEG
-
THE
ORANGE
SHOW
FAIRGROUNDS
Steve Millen Sews Up
the
Grand
National
Points Championship
By
Homer Eubanks
Photos:
Trackside
Photo
Enterprises
It
was a
near
perfect
evening
for
Steve
Millen
as he was fast
qualifier
in Class
7,
won
the
trophy
dash. was
second
in
his
heat
race,
and
won
the
main
event,
and
won
the
driving
championship
for
himself
and
the
Manufacturer
's
Cup
for
Toyo
ta.
The
next
to
last
round
of
Mickey
Thompson
's
Off
Road
Championship
Gran Prix was
held
on
the
half
asphalt and
dirt
track in San Bernardino. A
reported
12,133
tickets were
sold for
the
event
but
since
everyone
had
some
elbow
room
I
don't
think a couple
of
thousand
of
the ticket holders showed.
Along
with
the attendance were
some
noticeable
competitors
that
failed Jo show,
but
the
show
provided
all in attendance
some
enjoyable
entertainment.
As the season draws
to
an
end
many individual
championships
are still
up
for grabs.
The
closest
battle
is
between
Tommy
Croft
and
Larry Ragland in
the
Super
1600
class with only two
points
separating the pair. In the
Grand
National class, a win for Steve
Millen tonight will
put
Glenn
Harris,
who
is
currently in
second,
out
of
contention
,
and
he will have
to
battle
to
keep
his
second
place
position
from Ivan
Stewart
who
is, going
into
this
event,
just
one
point
behind
Harris.
Toyota
is the leader in
the
Manufacturers'
Cup
Challenge
with
Team
Mazda its closest
competition,
but
a win for
Toyota
tonight will sew
up
that
championship.
Monte
Crawford
is leading the
UltraStock
class
but
has Greg George
and
Jeff
E
lrod
both
within
striking
distance.
Wes
Elrod has a good
chance
at
winning the
1-2-1600
class as
Todd
Attig is
36
points
behind.
In
the
Odyssey classes it
is
Johnny
Custom
in charge
of
the
suspended
class and Mike
Lovelle is nearly
80
points
ahead
of
his closest
competitor
in the
unsuspended
class.
The
battle
is
Page
14
tight in
both
the
three and four ,
wheel A
TV
classes · as Jimmy
White
has a
narrow
lead over
Roger Burman. Greg Clark
is
28
points ahead
of]
ohn
Neary in the
four wheel class.
In
the
opening
trophy
dash for
pickups
it
was Steve Millen that
won
it after all
four
drivers flew
into
turn
-
one
together
and
power
slid all
the
way
around
until
Millen exited first. Jeff
Hub
er
was second and
that's
how
both
of
these
front
runners
qualified.
Third
place was being fought
over by
third
place qualifier Ivan
Stewart
and
Roger Mears. These
two tangled going
down
the
back
straight
and
Stewart
ended
up
rolling over. This was the extent
of
the action
as
Millen went
on
to
win with the
others
finishing in
the
order
they exited
turn
one
.
In
the
Super
1600
trophy
dash
Tommy
Croft
grabbed
the
lead
at
the
start
and
Brad Castle slipped
into
second until he
did
a slow
roll over
putting
him
out.
This
gave second place
to
the second
fastest qualifier
Rob
Gordon.
Rob
is the 1 7 year old
son
of
many time winner Bob
Gordon
who
was
not
running in tonight's
competition. Dave Bonner was
now
in third, and he
too
was
the
third fastest qualifier.
The
three
finished in this
order
and
Castle
got going again, as
the
white flag
came
out,
to
finish
fourth.
When
the Odysseys came
out
to
battle there
must
of
been a
hundred
of
them
, well there was
a btmch. Actually there were 22
in the suspended class and 7 in
the unsuspended class.
When
the
flag flew it was Frank Chavez
that
took
the
lead with Eddie Morris
in
hot
pursuit. Morris
made
his
way
around
Chavez when Chavez
was held
up
by slower traffic.
Rory
Holladay came charging
through the pack
to
battle with
Chavez. Holladay managed
to
get
by
but
had
to
settle for second as
Morris finished with an easy
Vince
Tjelmeland
had
his
Pontiac
bodied,
VW
powered
UltraStock
,n
good
form, the fast
qualifier,
taking
second
in the
heat
and
first in the
main
event.
November
1986
Teenage
Rob
Gordon
made
a
spectacular
stadium
racing
debut,
taking
his
Chenowth
to
second
in
the
trophy
dash
and
in his
heat
race,
and
he was a
most
excited
winner
of
the Class 10
main
event,
just
one
week
after
winning
overall
at the
Frontier
500.
victory. Chavez was third and
Johnny
Custom
finished
fourth
ahead
of
John
Shultz.
The
1-2-1600
class ran with
the
UltraStocks
again
but
instead
of
the usual
ten
or
so
of
them
there were only
two
running.
Once
the
race was
under
way,
everyone
got
off
to
a clean
start
with Craig Durfee jumping
out
early
but
Monte
Crawford
took
over and
didn't
look back. Vince
Tjelmeland grabbed second
but
was overtaken by Greg George
over the big
dirt
jump. Durfee
settled
into
fourth ahead
of
the
first
1-2-1600
car
of
Wes
Elrod.
Crawford
was
about
to
lap Jeff
Elrod when
he
stalled going into
the
sharp
left
hander
after the
back straight and Greg George
took
the lead. Tjelmeland closed
in
on
George
but
had
to
settle for
second when all was said and
done.
Crawford
ended
up
third
ahead
of
Durfee.
Wes
Elrod was
the first
1-2-1600
car across the
line with
Rob
Tolleson settling
for second in class
and
seventh
overall.
In
the
first 3 wheeler event it
was
Mike
Olmsted
that
capitalized when early leader
Charlie Shepard fell in the first
lap.
Olmsted
then
had
to
earn the
eventual win as Sean Finley,
who
had
started dead last, made his
way rapidly through
the
crowd
and challenged
Olmsted.
While
Finley was busy trying
to
find a
way
around
Olmsted,
Jimmy
White
slipped by
q.im
and
pressured
Olmsted.
Olmsted
went
on
to
win with
White
second and Finley
third
ahead
of
Roger Burman and
then
Donnie
Luce.
In the 4-wheel heat race it was
Ray
Cook
that
was credited with
the win
a..nd
John
Savinski was
second ahead
of
Bruce Kennedy.
Robert
Caruso
ended
up
fourth
and
Jim Putman was fifth.
In the first
Super
1600
heat
there were only eight racers
to
compete.
On
the
front
row
was
Jeff Elrod and next
to
him was
Mike Withers. Elrod went into
the first
corner
first
but
the
other
front row starter ended
up
with
the lead when they exited turn
one.
Tommy
Croft
slipped
into
second
for
a
moment
but
couldn't
find a gear and
Rob
Gordon
managed
third
and
began applying pressure for
second
.
Elrod
got
sideways
before the
front
straight and
Gordon
took
second. Elrod
found
Croft
on
his tail
on
the
next lap
and
Elrod.lo f
his
spot
at
the same
turn
he
0
~ as passed by
Gordon.
Withers
began running
away with the event
but
Gordon
was having his hands full with a
hard
charging
Croft.
Gordon
was attempting
to
catch
Withers
and was really
Wes
Elrod
nailed
down
his
series
title
in Class 1-2-1600
by
winning
both
the
heat
and
the
main
event
,
and
he
placed
second
overall
among
the UltraStocks.
·
Danny
Thompson
led
his
Class 7
heat
race from
wire
to
wire
in
great
style,
but
got
caught
in
traffi
c in the
main
and
dropped
to fifth
on
the road.
DustyTimes
applying the gas causing
him
to
stand his C
hen
owth up, dragging
his engine cage over every jump.
On
the next to
la
st
la
p
Gordo
n
closed in within striking distance
but
Withers
read
Gordon's
move
down
the back straight
and
held
onto
his lead.
Gordon
earned the second
spot
as he
stayed ahead
of
Croft. Elrod
finished
fourth
ahead
of
Rick
Jones.
When
the second
Super
1600
heat race came
into
the track
it
was
another
set
of
eight
competitors.
At
the
start
Brad
Ca
stle moved fr
om
the
se
cond
ro
w into se
cond
p
la
ce
behind
Jimmy Nichols.
Third
spot
went
to
the
other
front
row
starter
Gary Dillon. Going · into the
second lap Castle powered his
way
into
t
he
inside
of
Nichols for
the lead. Going into the
third
lap
it was all Castle's race with a
10
car lead over the early leader
Nichols.
Th
e real battle
now
is
for t
hird
between Dillon
and
Dan
Bentley, with David Bonner right
on
his tail.
Dillon and Bonner tangled
at
the left hand switch-back
but
things seemed
to
remain the same
until Dillon got loose
and
shot
up
on
top
of
the
hydro
barrier. This
race
is
all Castle's
at
this
point,
he
was running aHalone a quarter
of
a lap ahead
of
Nichols. A battle
for
second
had
developed
between Nichols
and
Bonner.
Bonner held
on
the gas over the
front
jumps
and
slipped inside
for the second
spot
just as the
white flag came
out.
Castle
enjoyed
an
easy victory
and
Bonner finished a distant second
ahead
of
Nichols.
Dan
Bentley
beat Larry Noel across for
fourth.
When
t
he
Grand
National
trucks lined
up
for their first heat
race everyone was assured
of
an
interesting race.
Danny
Thomp-
son
who won
the
L.A. Coliseum
main event
and
Roger Mears who
has had a bad year
but
has
shown
promise with his new
"Hard-
body"
shared the
front
row, with
Steve Millen, the
current
points
leader, sitting
behind
Mears.
Glenn Harris,
who
going
into
this
race is second
for
the
points
battle,
is
sitting behind Jeff
Huber
on
the last
row
next
to
Walker
Evans. Since the heat
race is
for
starting positions in
the main event
one
is assured
of
an exciting race.
When
the green flag flew for
the six trucks it was
Thompson
taking the lead
on
the inside.
Huber
slipped
into
second after
the first switch-back
and
Millen
was
fourth
behind
Mears. Millen
slipped inside Mears
over
the
front
j
ump
and
then Mears
broke
a steering
arm
and
left the track.
Tommy
Croft
led
hi
s Class 7 heat race from wire to wire in great style,
but
troubles
dropped
him
out
of
the
main
event contention.
Mike
Withers
fought
off
a late challenge from Rob
Gordon
and led the first Class
10
heat race from flag to flag,
but
his Chenowth came to
grief
in the main event.
At
this
point
the Chevy
of
Thompson
was sitting in the lead
with several lengths margin.
Millen had
to
bide his time in
third
as
Huber
was
after
Thompson.
It was Evans in
fourth ahead
of
Harris.
Thompson
still had three
lengths lead with
Huber
feeling
Millen
on
his tail. Harris slipped
inside Evans
at
the switch-back
and
Evans
broke
his steering.
Millen grabbed second
at
the
switch-back after
he
held
on
the
gas
and
slid inside
of
Huber.
Thompson
was in
no
position
to
relax as Millen was closing in
on
him
with
Huber
still within
striking distance. Harris was
making
up
a little with each lap
but
had
to
settle for fourth.
Thompson
took
first, Millen
second
and
Huber
was third.
Walker
Evans finished last with
his left
front
wheel headed east.
In
the
second
heat
race
Sherman
Balch grabbed the lead
but
got sideways
at
the fi
rst
switch-back giving the lead
to
John
Swift in the Ranger. Bobby
Ferro
took
second in his Maz
da
.
The
Iron
Man, Ivan Stewart,
too
k advantage
of
Ferro's
rusty
dr
iving skills
on
the third lap
and
powered
aro
u
nd
Ferro. Swift,
you
might~
Ivan
Stewart
tangled
with
Roger
Mears in the
trophy
dash
and
rolled
,
but
he
came
back
to take
second
in
both
his heat race
and
the main.
Dustynmes
November
1986
Showing
great
promise
as
a
trucker
,
John
Swift
flew
hi
s
Ford
to his heat race
v
ictory
,
but
went
out
of
the
main
event when the rear suspension failed.
Greg
George
drives the
most
handsome
Toyota
UltraStock
,
and
he won the
heat race handily,
but
retired early from the main event competition.
Page
15
Nur
sing an
injured
knee,
Rob
Tolleson
ran a
close
seco
nd in
both
the h
eat
race
and
the
main
event
in Class 1-2-1600
action
.
Jeff
Elrod
showed
off
his
new
Class
10
Mir
age,
and
took a fine
third
in the heat race,
but
had serious mechanical
troubl
e later o
n.
Displaying
fine form in his Che
nowt
h, Dan
Bentley
got
fourth in
the
second
Class
10
heat
, and went
on
to
anoth
er
fourth in the
main event.
~
remember
too
k ·
way
for
their
main
event.
Holladay
got
up
on
his nose
over
the
front
jump
but
held
on,
going
into
the
second
lap.
The
unsuspended
class
started
getting
lapped
as
the
leader
now
Eddie
Morris
went
into
the
third
lap.
second
at
the
Coliseum
event
and
while
doing
so gained
some
respectability
as
a
Grand
National
driver
. Swift
had
a
comfortable
lead
but
had
the
Toyota
of
Stewart
running
in
second
and
gaining
precious
inches with every
turn.
Swift
had
his
hands
full keeping
Stewart
back.
At
this
point
Swift was really
feeling
thejressure
of
the
more
experience driver
behind
him.
Swift still
had
three
truck
lengths
lead
but
Ivan
at
times
would
find
enough
power
to
come
alongside
to
challenge,
but
Swift
wanted
to
know
how
it
felt
to
be
in
the
winner's
circle. Swift
held
off
the
charge
of
one
very
persistent
Stewart
and
went
on
to
win with
Stewart
taking second.
Third
place
had
been Bobby
Ferro
until
he
rolled
the
Mazda
on
lap 6.
Sherman
Balch was
third
after
being
turned
back
over
and
extingushing a small fire
on
the
first lap. Bobby
Ferro
ended
up
fourth
with
Joey
Moore
dropping
out.
It was
Rory
Holladay charging
hardest
for
the
lead
with
Eddie
Morris
second
and
Bob
Curtis
settled in
third
well ahead
of
fourth
place
Johnny
Custom
when
the
. Odysseys
got
under
Eddie
Brown
laid back
and
watched all
the
leaders have their
trouble
and
then
he
capitalized
on
their
misfortune
to
end
up
taking
the
lead
and
the
win
on
the
last lap.
Johnny
Custom
brought
his buggy
around
for
second
as
Frank
Chavez
came
limping in
third
ahead
of
Don
Archibald
and
Elmer
Woolard.
·
In
the
unsuspended
Odyssey
class it was Mitch Kurtela coming
across first with
Mike
Lovelle
second
ahead
of
Dennis
Elliott.
Steve
Grier
finished ·
fourth
in
front
of
Frank
Odom
.
The
UltraStock
main
event
turned
into
a real
mad
house
as
mechanical woes
and
crashes
kept
one
wondering
if
anyone
would still
be
running
to
win.
Vince Tjelmeland
came
from
the
second
row
to
take
second
from
Craig Durfee going
into
turn
one.
Durfee
got
sideways
down
the
back straight
and
had
to
wait for
the field
to
pass
before
getting
started.
Monte
Crawford
took
the lead after starting
on
the
front
row. Greg George
moved
in right
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Coast
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fOR
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91605
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DEALER
INO.UIRIES
INVIT
ED
on
Tjelmeland's tail and was
wanting second. But before he
could
make his move
Crawford
had
some
problems
getting
around
the switch-back
and
befor~ he
could
get straightened
out
Tjelmeland
took
the lead
with George getting
the
second
spot.
Crawford
found
himself in a
distant
third
place
just
ahead
of
Tim
Maples. Durfee tried
to
slip
inside the Mazda
of
Maples
and
flipped
up
on
the
wall and came
down
hard going
into
turn
one
but
was rolled
over
and
returned
to
the
battle. Greg George pulled
out
with
engine
trouble
on
the
last lap. Tjelmeland
went
on
for
Jeff
Huber's
tidy
Ford
started
strong,
second
in the
trophy
dash
and
qualifying
,
third
in the heat.
and
he
took
an
official
third
in the
truck
main
event.
Monte
Crawford
took
a
huge
points
lead
with
his
third
in
UltraStock
qualifying
and
the heat race,
but
was
dropped
to seventh in the
main
by
officials
.
Tim
Maples
has his
Mazda
UltraStock
sorted
out
this season,
and
Maples flew
to a fine fourth in the wreckage
strewn
main
event.
N
:'
ssan 's anch
or
man
this season
Sherman
Baich
roll
ed
in his heat race
and
sit/I
took
third,
but
had
big
troubles
in the Class 7
main
even
t.
November 1986
the win and second place
Monte
Crawford lost power
just
before
the big
jump
and nosed
off
into
the crevice
of
the big double
jump.
Second overall and first for the
1-2-1600 field was
Wes
Elrod
and the
other
1600
car
of
Rob
Tolleson
was
third
overall.
Second in the UltraStock class
was
Tim
Mao
les 'a
nd
.
third
was
Craig
Durf
ee.
The
thr
ee
wheel main event be-
longed
to
Jimmy
White
and he
showed the others right from the
start.
Chris
White
ended
up
second after chasing the
other
White
around
the entire race
but
never was a threat.
Rober
Bur-
man finished third ahead
of
Sean
Finley and then Charlie Shepherd.
The four wheel A
TV
main
event was a battle between Gary
Denton
and
Mike Coe. These
two ran away
from
the field while
Coe
made several
attempts
on
Denton
but
Denton
held
on
for
. the win.
Third
place went
to
Brian Fry while Jeff
Watts
finished fourth.
At
the
start
of
the Super 1600
main event
it
was
Rob
Gordon
that
jumped
out
front.
Gordon
out
powered Dave Bonner for
the lead and quickly
put
a couple
of
car lengths ahead
on
him
.
Brad Castle grabbed third ahead
of
Tommy
Croft
and
then
came