----
.-
,
l
l
j
I
I
I
I
I
THE
MOST
-
CHALLENGING
TERRAIN
IN
THE
WORLD!
EIGHT
HUNDRED
MILES
OF
TRUE
BAJA
RACING.
EASY
ACCESS
FOR
PIT
SUPPORT
SAN DIEGO
II
7th
Race
in
the
1985
SCORE-
HDRA
Combined
Points Series
NOV. 8th & 9th
Race
Days
NOV.10th
Trophy Presentation
-
•••
AFTER
ALL,
ISN'T
THIS
WHAT
OFF-ROAD
RACING
IS
ALL
ABOUT?
TOYOTA
Official Vehicle
of
'
SCORE
lntcmational
ICIIE""-~
INTIEf:INATIONAI:
~
Champlonahlp
Off-Road
Racing
'--~'-----'
.
31356
VIA
COLINAS,
SUITE
111,
WESTLAKE
VILLAGE,
CA
91362
(818)
889-9216
,.
Volume 2 Number 9
September 198S
In
This
Issue
•••
Editor-Publisher
Jean Calvin
Associate
Publi~her
Brad
Goodrow
Controller
John
Calvin
Contributors
Cindy
Chamb
erlin
Daryl D.
Drake
-
Peggy Ellenburg
Winnie
Essenberg
Homer
Eubanks
Jan Flick
Tom
Grimshaw
Martin
Holmes
Cam
McRae
Danny
McKenzie
Bill
Oursler
Brenda
Pa
rker
David
Ryskamp
Richard
Schwalm
Wa
y
ne
Simmons
Judy
Smith
John
Spro
vkin
Joe
Stephan
Trackside
Photo
Enterpris
es
Art
Director
Larry E.
Wor
s
ham
Ty
pesetting
&
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Mich
e
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SNAPSHOT
OF
THE
MONTH
•••
FEATURES
·
Page
Score
at
Riverside Raceway . . . .
..
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12
World
Champion
s
hip
New Zealand Rally .
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18
SNORE
Midnight
Special
..
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......
:'
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20
VORRA
at Baylands . . : .
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22
Ladies Day
at
Pike's Peak
..
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24
MTEG
in the Los Angeles
Col
i
seum
. .
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26
Score
Canada
.
at
Notre-Dame
du
Nord
.
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30
ADRA
High
Countr
y
150
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: . . . . ·'-
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32
Berrien
Autocross
in Chicago
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34
Superstition
250
II . . . .
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36
FORDA's
Cracker
150
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37
Alabama
Race
Action
....
.
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39
Dartmouth
Highlands National Rally .
..
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.......
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40
Shuswap
400
.......
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.-
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...
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. 41
Twin
Engine
VW
Golf
..
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, : . . -
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42
Short
Course
Racing in Georgia .
..
,
.....
. . . . . . . : . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3
Odysseys
at
Riverside
..
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..
. . ...
47
DEPARTMENTS
Snapshot
of
the
Month
. .
........
· . .
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: . . . 5
Soap
Box
by
David
White
..
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...
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6
Trail
Notes
.....
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:
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...............
. 6
Side
Tracks
by
Judy
Smith
....
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. . . . .
......
7
BFGoodrich
6-50
Club
Report
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Happenings
. .
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.
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10
Good
Stuff
Directory
..
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44
Classified
Ads
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
46
Index
to
Advertisers
.
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,
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46
ON
THE
COVER
-
The
flavor
of
the
Turbo-
Wash
Score
Off
Road
World
Championship
racing
at
Riverside
International
Raceway
is
graphic in this
action
in the
muddy
esses.
Her
e the fences are
annually
lined with
hard
core
enthusiast
s w
ho
cheer every
jump
a
nd
roar
with
gusto
w
hen
the·
driver
s dice in close
combat
. C
olor
Photo
graphy by
Chris
Haston
of
Track
side Pho to Enterprises.
f\~
DUSTY
TIMES
THE
FASTES
T GROWING
OFF
ROAD
MONTHLY
IN
THE
COUNTRY!!
1 year -
$12.00
2 years -
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3 years -
$30.00
Take advantage
of
your subscription bonus •.
Free one time classified ad up
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45
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(Form
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back
page)
Name-~---------------------------
Oops,
I
must
have
missed
a
turn
en
route
to
the peristyle,
might
be
what
Dale
Calhoun
is telling c
ourse
workers
at
the
Los Angeles
Coliseum.
Calhoun,
from
Loveland,
Colorado
,
did
his high
center
act
in
the
Buick
bodied
Ultra
Stock
during
practice
for
the
Mickey
Thompson
Off
Road
Championship
Gran
Prix last July.
He
came
back
from
the
mishap
to
race
that
evening,
and
he
also
raced
at
Riverside in
the
Ultra
Stock
bash.
Photo
.
by
Trackside
Photo
Enterprises._
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I
Dusty
Times
September
1985
Page 5
Soap Box •••
By
David
0.
White
Chief
Steward
High
Desert
Racing
Association
In
the
past
year,
off
road
racing
has
seen
many
changes:
new
classes,
new
racers,
new
and
improved
vehicles
capable
of
very
high
speeds,
and
the
recent
merger
of
the
points
system
for
HORA
and
SCORE.
Without
exception,
we
all
agree
and
welcome
improvements
to
the
sport.
However,
with
increased
entries
which
every
promoter
welcomes,
so
do
his
costs
to
operate
increase.
Most
clearly
visible
to
the
racer
is
the
rising
co
st
o f i n s u r a n c e .
Po
r
the
promoter,
insurance
liability
costs
have
skyrocketed.
The
Mint
Hotel
this
year
paid
$85,0(10
for
total
coverage
...
that
is
$227
per
car.
..
for
only
one
race.
Some
organizations
can
no
longer
obtain
coverage.
Loss
of
just
one
liability
suit
and
a
promoter
would
face
almost
certain
extinction.
With
these
new
changes
and
increased
entries
comes
the
question
of
safety,
a
question
that
also
is
related
to
insurance
costs.
We,
the
officials
of
HORA
who
administer
each
event,
are
very
concerned
with
the
growing
number
of
safety
violations
at
each
race
and
the
growing
number
of
injuries
to
checkpoint
personnel.
This
very
serious
situation
is
not
just
confined
to
our
organization.
Two
years ago,
we
developed
a list
of
procedures
for
all
our
checkpoint
and
road
crossing
personnel,
designed
for
safer
checkpoints
and
road
cross-
ings
and
for
a faster
entry
and
exit
at
each
point
for
the
racer.
These
procedures
are
reviewed
prior
to
every
event.
Also,
we
have
stressed
these
p_
rocedures
and
other
safety
matters
at
each
drivers'
meeting.
Familiar
words
you
may
say, yes
they
are
,
but
many
have
fallen
on
deaf
ears.
Let
me
cite
some
exampies
that
occur
at
each
event
during
staging
:
seat
belts
unfastened,
helmets
not
on,
chin
straps
not
buckled,
crews
making
last
minute
adjustments
to
the
vehicle
and
one
case
recently
where
fire
suits
were
not
on
.
During
the
Fireworks
250
in
Barstow
in
July,
1985,
eighteen
different
safety
violations
were
reported:
one
car
driving
backward
on
the
course,
co-
driver
without
a
helmet,
failure
to
obey
race
officials,
and
failure
to
stop
at
checkpoints.
Each
case
was
reviewed
by
myself
and
other
race
officials
at
the
end
of
the
race,
and
as a
result,
six
penalties
were
imposed
.
Safety
rules
are
not
just
designed
for
the
racer,
but
also
for
his
or
her
supporters,
fans
and
race
personnel.
Obviously
a
promo~er
cannot
afford
the
Coming
Next
Month
...
HORA
FRONTIER
500
BRUSH
RUN
101
AMSA
6
HOURS
OF
CAL CITY
SCORE
CANADA
AT
PETERBOROUGH,
ONTARIO
RALLY
ARGENTINA
BERRIEN
AUTOCROSSIN
INDIANA
AND
ILLINOIS
MICHIGAN
PRO
RALLY
GREAT WESTERN
RACING
IN
COLORADO
Page6
VORRA
300
IN
NEV
ADA
SHORT
COURSE
ACTION
IN
GEORGIA
AND
FLORIDA
...
plus
all
the regular features
luxury
of
concrete
barriers
and
12-foot
high
fences
as
seen
at
Formula
1,
CART
and
NASCAR
races.
Alf
that
separates
a
racer
.
from
other
people
is generally a
string
of
pennants
placed
at
off
road
events.
During
an
;ff
road
race, a
racer
finishes,
.in
most
cases,
at
a
high
rate
of
speed,
but
he
may
fail
to
stop
at
the
Stop
sign.
Ardent
supporters
crowd
onto
the
race
course.
Now
the
officials
have
other
cars
finishing,
must
get
the
violator
back
to
the
finish
line
and
remove
the
crowd
from
the
track.
Where
do
we
draw
the
line?
Do
we
penalize a
driver
who
has
gone
past
a
Stop
sign
by
SO
feet
but
let
a
driver
off
who
has
just
gone
beyond
th
·e
same
sign
by
10 feet?
We
believe
the
rules
are
clear
and
should
not
require
a
detailed
explanation
as
to
what
a
Stop
sign
is.
It
should
be
remembered
that
it
is
the
driver
who
controls
the
vehicle
and
the
safety
of
others
lies
in
his
hands
.
In
recent
months,
this
organi-
zation, as well as
our
competitors,
have
been
brought
to
task
in
the
media,
by
the
media
and
by
some
racers
after
penalties
have
been
imposed.
Many
feel.
that
when
rules
are
broken,
hearings
should
be
held
as
in
the
court
system
in
society.
That
is all well
and
good
but
cost
is logistically
prohibi-
tive.
No
promoter
has
the
resources
to
support
this
idea.
When
it
comes
to
a
safety
violation
where
lives
are
endangered,
no
excuse
is
acceptable
.
The
driver
is
responsible
for
his
actions.
There
will
be
no
arbitration
on
any
penalty
imposed
for
a
safety
violation.
We
expect
further
criticism
on
our
stand,
however
the
safety
of
others
is
our
utmost
concern.
The
officials
of
HORA
and
other
organizations
may
wish
to
rewrite
safety
rules,
but
we
hope
that
common
sense
will
prevail.
Off
road
racing is still
in
its
infancy
and
for
it
to
take
its
place
'
in
the
racing
fraternity,
we
cannot
be
lax
in
our
racing
and
safety
procedures,
but
we
must
continue
to
improve
them.
Our
thanks
to
Dave
White
for
his well
tak
en points on the state
of
off
road racing in the desert.
Dave
is
a most dedicated
man,
and
he does
his
job
well, never outwardly losing
his temper,
and
we appreciate his
quiet
control
over
the
myriad
situations
that
occur
at
a desert
event. However, we still think the
start/finish line
at
Barstow would
have been safer,
and
far easier
to
control,
if
a hay bale chicane
had
been strung
all
the way
down
the
pavement, forcing the cars
to
slow
down prior
to
reaching the finish
line. Perhaps the
HORA
will do
something like that
at
the Frontier
250,
the final multiple lap event
of
the desert series this year, where the
drivers will
be
pushing hard for a
top
finish
position
and
every
valuable point
to
be
gained.
Volunteers are i1wited
to
climb on
their
"Soap
Box"
and
fill this space
with their thoughts about
what
is
good
and
what
is
not
so
good about
the
state
of
off
road racing.
We
u,ould welcome some discussion on
the state
of
the Pro Rally Series as
well.
Call
orwriteDUSTYTIMES
with your ideas for a Soap Box
column,
and
get on the schedule.
September
1985
Trail Notes •••
DUSTY
TIMES
suffered
a
bit
of
a
body
blow
in
the
middle
of
August.
When
we
arrived
at
the
office early
one
Monday
morning,
the
place
had
been
heavily vandalized.
The
perpetrators
sprayed
,several fire extinguishers
through
the
mail
slot
in
such
volume
that
the
entire
front
office was
covered
with
a
half
inch
of
dry
chemical,
including
all
the
work
in
progress
on
this
September
issue.
There
is
no
clue
as
to
who
did
the
job
or
why,
but
it
did
cause a
lot
of
long
hours
trying
to
recover
the
material
that
was
buried
in
the
fine stuff.
Items
such
as
photos,
news releases
and
the
like
in
one
file
drawer,
partially
open,
were
ruined,
some
pictures
.
had
to
be
reprinted,
type
had
to
be
reset,
and
in general
it
was a mess.
Just
as we were getting organized,
sorting
and
cleaning,
the
same
thing
happened
again
on
the
night
of
August
23,
However,
we were
camped
out
in
the
shop
temporarily,
and
DUSTY
TIMES
·
met
the
print
date
right
on
time.
We
shall
eventually
get
back
to
normal
in
what
has
been
weeks
of
a truly
dusty
time
in the editorial office.
THE
DESERT SERIES in
off
road
racing
promoted
by
Score
International
a
nd
the
High
Desert
Racing Associa
tion
took
a giant
step
forward
in
August
.
A
meeting
of
all
interested
manufacturers
involved in
desert
racing was
organized
by
Frank
De
Angelo,
head
of
the
BFGoodrich
Performance
Team,
out
of
Akron,
Ohta.
Both
Sal Fish
and
Walt
Lofr were amazed
at
both
the
quantity
and
quality
of
manufacturers'
reps
that
came
to
Riverside;
the
meeting was
held
there
the
day
after
the
big
Score
short
course
event.
Of
interest
to
racers is
that
the
majority
of
the
manufacturers
who
support
off
road
racing
through
contingency"prize
money,
event
support,
and
in
other
ways, have similar
desires
in
some
quarters
as
the
rank
and
file racers.
One
proposal
that
was
discussed
was
that
in
1986
Score
and
HDRA
should
have
common
tech
and
contingency
teams
. In
other
words
the
same tech
team
would
be
in charge
at
all
the
major
desert
races,
so
that
a
car
legal
at
the
Fireworks
250
would
not
be
illegal
at
the
next
Score
race,
and
this
situation
actually
happened
in
1985.
A single
contingency
team
would
give
the
donors
one
person
with
whom
to
deal
instead
of
two,
and
one
chairman
in charge
of
the
on
site
inspection,
both
before
and
after
the
desert
race.
The
third
desire,
along
the
same
lines, was
to
have
one
and
only
one
scoring
team
.
The
big
butter
and
egg
men
from
back
east
were really
impressed
with
the
instant
and
constant,
lap
by
lap
computer
scoring
results
at
the
Fireworks
250
last July,
and
they
would
like
to
see
something
similar
in
scoring
at
all
the
events
they
will
be
supporting
in
1986
. It
sure
sounds
good;
but
some
outside
money
would
be
needed
to
fund
the
travel
expense
of
key
members
of
a
tech
team,
a
contingency
team,
and
a scoring team.
With
the
soaring
costs
of
liability
insurance,
the
desert
promoters
have
no
extra
income
to
handle
such
a
program.
A
good
.
many
other
subjects,
including
a
reduction
in
the
number
of
classes in
competition
were
bandied
about
in
the
meeting.
Most
of
the
participants
felt a
good
deal
had
been
accomplished
just
by
getting
together
and
talking
about
the
growing
pains
of
desert
off
road
racing as
it
moves
away
from
being
a
weekend
warrior
sport
into
full
professional
racing
recognition
all
over
the
country
.
K.J.
HOWE
rumors
were flying
at
Riverside,
and
the
man
himself
was
on
the
scene,
explaining, as
best
he
could,
the
mystery
surrounding
the
future
of
the
beloved
Mint
400
off
road
race.
Howe
has
left
the
Mint
Hotel
and
has
set
up
his
own
public
relations
business,
which
is
already
going
strong
in
Las Vegas.
It was
obvious
to
all
on
hand
at
the
race last
May
that
the
new
top
management
at
the
Mint
Hotel
&
Casino
did
not
display
the
avid
interest
in
the
event
going
on
around
them
as
had
former
boss
Andrew
M.
Zorne.
Of
course
.
it
is early in
the
game,
and
some
people
have said
that
the
Mint
Hotel
still
has
some
time
left
to
pick
up
the
option
on
the
land
use
permit
from
the
BLM
for
a race
next
May.
Howe
was
of
the
opinion
that
if
the
Mint
Hotel
did
not
exercise
the
option,
no
doubt
other
backers
in
the
Las Vegas
glitter
industry
could
be
found
for
a
desert
race
next
May
.
In
such
case
it
would
probably
be
part
of
the
combined
desert
series,
and
perhaps
run
on
the
old
and
keen
Bonnie
&
Clyde
course
south
of
Las Vegas.
It
is all
rumor
and
conjecture
at
this
point,
but
don't
cancel
your
vacation
for
the
second
weekend
in
May
in Las Vegas
just
yet.
THE
FRONTIER
500
drawing
gala was a
bit
lost
in
the
middle
of
the
Riverside
race
week
.
Consequently
the
entry
numbers
on
August
15,
three
weeks
before
the
race, were a
bit
slimmer
than
expected
with
a little
over
100
cars
in
the
hopper,
and
a
total
of
137
starting
numbers
were
drawn,
including
the
motortycles
and
3 wheelers.
The
starting
order
will see Class
10
first
off
the
line, with Bill
Herrick
and
Marty
Reider
on
thy
front
row
for
the
two
at
a
time
start.
The
starting
order
was
determined
by
the
overall finishing
positions
of
the
classes
at
the
HDRA
Fireworks
250
last July.
The
over
650
mile
course
opened
for
pre-running
after
the
drawing,
and
it
is going
to
be
a real
enduro
on
September
7
for
the
hardy
desert
racers.
Some
classes
may
have a
tough
time
covering
the
entire
route
in
the
24
hour
time
allowance.
Word
is
the
new
trails
out
of
Gabbs
are real Nevada
rough
stuff,
not
the
sort
of
running
that
produces
high average speeds.
It
should
be
a
great
race,
with
the
winners
truly
earning
their
honors.
Of
course,
with
the
extra
length,
the
Frontier
500
is a
double
points
race, as is
the
Baja
1000,
for
the
combined
desert
series.
THE
PRO
LIGHT
TOUCH
CAR CAR
PRODUCTS
folks have
announced
the
winners
in
their
"Oh
What
a
Finish"
Sweepstakes.
The
drawing
was
held
at
the
MTEG
race
at
the
Los
Angeles
Coliseum,
and
Pro
Light
Touch
spokesman
Ivan
Stewart
drew
the
lucky
ticket
for
Brad Mitchell,
of
Fountain
Valley,
CA.
The
Grand
Prize was a
brand
new
1985
Toyota
4
x4
Ivan
Stewart
Edition
Xtra
Cab
pickup
truck,
and
Mitchell
was thrilled with
his
new
truck
.
He
got
his
winning
ticket
at
a
Pep
Boys
store,
and
he
is
an
off
road
racing
enthuiast
and
attends
all
the
Mickey
Thompson
stadium
events.
Other
prizes in
the
Sweepstakes
were
keen
things like television sets,
portable
stereos,
orbital
polishing buffers,
"Pro"
racing jackets,
and
Pro
Light
Touch
car
detail kits.
The
Sweepstakes .was geared
to
the
off
road
racing
community,
and
the
company
is a
sponsor
of
the
MTEG
series.
We
can
personally
attest
to
the
fact
that
their
car
polish
really
works
.
We
lathered
it
on
our
1972
Blazer's
original
red
paint,
and
the
truck
shone
like a
new
one,
and
it
is still
shining
after
being
washed
after
the
dust
exposure
at
Riverside.
( continued on page
8)
Dusty Times
Side Tracks •••
By
Judy
Smith
Last
year
the
main
topic
of
conversation
at
the
Riverside
event
was
whether
or
not
there
would
ever
be
another
off
road
event
there.
This
year
the
same
topic
was
being
bandied
a,boui: .
again.
With
the
Corona
site
for
the
new
race facility
scrapped
due
to
environmental
pressures,
the
Riverside
International
Raceway
is still
looking
fm:
a
new
home.
One
area
which
has
caught
the
eye
of
the
group
is
Alberhill,
a
community
near
Lake
Elsinore.
They
are
also
considering
Glen
Helen
Regional
Park,
near
San
Bernardino
,
and
an
undisclosed
site
in
Riverside
County.
According
to
the
Lake
Elsinore
Valley
Sun-Tribune,
the
Elsinore
Downtown
Business
As
so
ciation
was
told
by
Dan
Greenwood,
the
·
president
of
the
Raceway,
that
"Alberhill
is
up
at
the
top
of
the
list."
The
paper
went
on
to
say
that
if
the
race facility is
relocated
in
Alberhill
it
should
open
early in
1987.
To
quote
the
Sun-
Tribune,
"In
an
effort
to
allay
, fears
of
local
residents,
Green-
wood
said
that
large
raceway
crowds
would
be
handled
by
private
_
security
personnel,
air
pollution
would
be
slight,
and
there
would
be
no
dust
since,
unlike
the
Edgemont
location
(the
current
race
track),
no
off
road
racing
would
be
held
there.''
An
oral
agreement
on
one
of
the
sites is
expected
to
be
reached
by
the
end
of
September,
according
to
Greenwood.
While
the
Downtown
Business
Associ-
ation
board
and
the
Lake
Elsinore
Recreation
and
Park
District
Director,
Everett
Wood,
arid
City
Councilman,
Larry
Knight
have
all
come
out
in
favor
of
-
the
relocation
to
Alber
hill,
there
have
been
petitions
pre-
sented
with
signatures opposl.ng
_
the
relocation
of
the
raceway
in
Alberhill.
Off
roaders
who
will
miss
the
annual
Riverside
type
event
had
better
keep
their
fingers
crossed
that
Alberhill
doesn't
get
the
facility.
Perhaps
Glen
Helen,
which
already
houses
an
Off
Highway
Vehicle
area,
would
be
more
welcoming.
,
Every
year, since
about
1974,
there
has
been
similar
conjecture
about
the
Mint
400.
"Will
they
do
it
again
next
year?", always
seems
to
be
the
question,
and
so
far,
except
for
'74
itself,
they
,have always
come
through
with
the
biggest,
and
the
roughest,
and
the
richest
off
road
event.
But
now
there
is
serious
doubt
about
a
1986
Mint.
K:J.
Howe,
long
the
major
mover
for
the
Mint
400,
is
no
longer
working
for
the
Mint
Hotel.
The
new
regime
at
the
hotel
has
displayed
noticeably
· less
enthµsiasm
for
the
race
than
in
the
past. K.J. has
embarked
on
his
own
enterprise,
doing
essentially
what
he's
done
so
well
for
the
Mint
Hotel
for
so
long,
but
now
spreading
his
talents
around
the
city
of
Las
Vegas.
We
wish
him
all
kinds
of
success
in
his
new
endeavor,
but
we'll
surely
miss
him
come
May.
There
is
another
new
endeavor
brewing
-
the
Baja
1000
Endurance
Safari. A
brainchild
of
Steve
Kassanyi,
the
new
Director
of
Special
Promotions
for
SCORE,
this
event
is
planned
to
introdu
ce
the
newcomer
to
-
off
road
racing
at
an
economical
and
uncomplicated
level.
Scheduled
to
run
concurrently
with
the
November
iOOO,
this
event,
for
folks
who
have
never
competed
in
ah
off
.
road
race
before,
will
start
in
Ensenada
and
will utilize a
small
portion
of
the
1985
1000
race
cou
rse.
The
neophyte
racers
will follow
the
·
professional
racers
up
the
trail
to
and
through
Ojos
Negros
,
up
to
El
Reyo,
and
down
to
Nuevo
Junction
and
Valle
Trinidad.
Frbm
there
they
go
up
to
Mike's
and
down
the
back
side
to
Camalu.
At
Camalu
they
leave
the
race
course
and
travel
back
up
the
pavement
.
to
.
Ensenada,
covering a
total
of
about
272
miles
of
Baja
terrain.
The
entrants
may
run
in
stock
or
modified
divisions
of
two
or
four-wheel
drive
classes. Basic-
ally,
SCORE
expects
streedegal
vehicles,
with
some
simple
safety
mods
like
roll
bars
and
fire ex-
ti
ngu
is
hers.
Of
course,
added
shocks,
off
road
tires,
and
the
like
would
also
be
permitted.
There
will
be
seminars
and
guided
pre-runs
for
those
who
are
interested,
but
perhaps
a
little
dubious
about
whether
or
not
to
try
it.
Each
vehicle will
carry
a
driver
and
a
navigator,
who
will
be
clad
in
fire
suits
and
helmets,
and
will
be
securely
buckled
into
their
seats. - \
It
sounds
like a
lot
of
fun.
There
will
be
prizes
at
the
end
of
the
road,
though
it
will
not
be
a
timed
race
like
the
1000
itself,
but
more
of
an
enduro,
wherein
Subscribe·
to
DUSTY
TIMES
Dusty
Times
See
Form
on
Page
5.
p~int~ will
be
ded~"cted
fo;
being
too
early as well as
loo
late.
The
object
is
to
encourage
a safe,
steady
pace
through
the
Baja
countryside.
The
big
payoff
at
the
end
of
the
Safari
is a
brand
new
Toyota
truck
for
the
winner!
SCORE
hopes
to
entice
a
whole
new
generation
of
racers
into
the
wilds
of
Baja
with
this
even
_t,
and
it
sounds
as
if
they've
got
a
good
idea going.
Another
good
idea was·
the
combined
manufacturers
and
promoters
meeting
held
on
the
Monday
immediately
following
the
Riverside
bash.
SCORE
and
HDRA
met
with
all
the
big
money
folks
(mostly
tire
and
truck
.
companies)
to
talk
about
what
the
promoters
could
do
for
the
contingency
folks,
and
vice
versa.
Topics
that
came
under
discussion
were
plans
to
create
one
single
tech
team
to
work
for
both
promoters,
methods
of
improvi
_ng
the
contingency
setup
to
the
satisfaction
of
racers
and
donors
alike,
and
a
plan
to
create
a
uniform
timing
association,
which
would
work
both
SCORE
and
HDRA
events.
They
did
also
discuss class
rules,
a messy bag
of
·
worms,
with
no
real
meeting
of
the
minds
yet
-
but
at
least
there
was
open
discussion.
It
all
sounds
like real
progress
to
us.
One
area'where
there
has be~n
no
progress
was
at
the
end
of
each
event
at
-
Riverside.
As
the
lead
cars
come
around
Turn
Six
they
are
given
the
checkered
flag
and
then
they
slide
down
the
pavement
and
generally
pull
in
to
the
infield
to
sit
for
a
few
moments.
Most
of
them
are
·
understandably
eager
to
get
back
up
to
the
winner's
circle,
or
their
home
pit,
to
bask
in
the
glory
of
their
accomplishments.
So,
after
sitting
a while,
they
begin
to
pull
out
on
to
the
track,
at
the
end
of
Thompson's
Ridge,
to
slide
·
around
the
turn
,
into
the
winner's
circle
or
down
to
the
paved
road
that
leads
to
the
pits.
This
would
all
be
well
and
good,
but
in
every
case
there
are
racers
who
are still racing
out
on
that
track.
We
stood
in
the
press
area
for
most
ofthe
events
this
year
,
and
as
each
event
ended
we
saw
the
same
dumb
thing
happen.
The
winners,
runners
up
and
those
injured
vehicles
that
had
been
parked
for
most
of
the
race
(with
flat tires, missing gears
and
·
bent
suspensions)
would
decide
they'd
waited
long
enough
and
would
pull
on
to
the
Ridge
(
the
fastest
part
of
the
track)
and
head
for
wherever
it
was
they
wanted
to
go. In
many
cases
they
pulled
out
in
front
of
vehicles
that
were
still racing.
Now,
we
understand
that
the
lead
racers
couldn't
be
expected
to
keep
track
of
that
fact.
And
we
also
know
that
the
back
markers
weren't
in
the
position
of
racing
for
money
or
awards
in
some
cases,
but
nevertheless,
they
should
have
been
entitled
to
finish
their
races
without
having
to
dodge
slow
moving,
sometimes
incapacitated,
traffic
.
Also,
in
several cases,
when
more
than
one
class
had
raced,
it
meant
that
slow
moving,
non-racing
_ traffic
got
back
on
the
track
in
front
of
cars
that
were
still
competing
for
first place
in
their
own
class.
It
was
an
inexcusable
condition,
and
luckily
·
no
accidents
occurred.
·
It
would
have
been
a
simple
matter
to
move
one
flagman
from
the
wall
and
down
to
the
infield, give
him
a
radio,
and
tell
him
to
hold
all
returning
traffic
until
the
last racing vehicle
had
been
given
the
checkered
flag.
Every
racer
expects
to
get
his
chance
to
finish,
and
deserves
better
than
picking
his
way
through
a traffic
jam
of
disabled
cars
with
unhelmeted,
unbuckled
drivers.
Let's
hope
that that
particular
screwup
gets
straight-
ened
out
before
the
next
Riverside
-
if
there
is
one.
THE
ORIGINAL
GAS PRESSURE
SHOCK
ABSORBER
WINNERS
ON BILSTEIN
SPEAK FOR
THEMSELVES
Ivan Stewar,t
1st Place, Class 7
Mint 400
"Never before. have I
had
so much con-
fidence
in
a shock. After
extensive testing and
numerous races on the
same set
of
Bi/steins, I
am very pleased by
. their excellent perfor-
mance and reliability"
September 1985
Ray
Aragon
1st Place, Cl.ass 10
Laughlin Desert
Challenge 1984
"We
finished 2nd at the
Cal City 12-hour
in
1983,
1st
in
Class
10
at the
Parker 400
1984,
and 1st
in
Class
10
at
the
laugh/in
Desert Challenge
1984
all on the same set of
Bi/steins with no failures."
Jerry Leighton
1st Place, Class
10
Fireworks 250 1984
"The shocks worked
super; no such thing
as
broken
or
leaking .
shocks with Bi/stein."
Jim Wright
1st Place, Class 2
M_int 400
"By
far the most impor-
tant parts on any off-
road vehicle are the
shocks. Using Bi/steins
is like cheating."
For further information and
special off-road applications
contact
Tom
Hoke
at
BILSTEIN Corporation of
America,
11760
Sorrento
Valley Road, San Diego:
CA
92121. 619/453-7723.
Page 7
BFGOODRICH
6·50
CLUB
REPORT
officially
sixth
in
the
hard
fought
Class
10
battle,
and
Corky
McMillin
nailed
sixth
in
the
equally
tight
Class 2
contest.
Heading
into
the
final
third
of
the
season,
Corky
McMiJlin has
regained
the
6-50
points
lead,
and
Corky
has
only
one
DNf,
competing
in all six
events
to
date. His
points
total
is 246.
Despite
not
finishing
the
last lap
at
Barstow,
in
Class
5-1600,
Henry
Arras
is
second
on
total
points,
with
213
;
having
also
started
all
six
races.
Vern
Roberts
has
started
and
finished
all six
points
races in 1985,
and
he
is
third
on
points
with 205.
With
four
starts,
Jack
Irvine
is
fourth
with
198
points,
followed
by
Jim
Temple,
Class 2,
with
six
starts
and
168
points.
There
-
are
three
more
big
desert
races
on
tap
in
the
1985
6-50
club
points
series,
and
contention
for
top
honors,
and
the
beautiful
gold,
silver
and
bronze
medals
pictured
above,
has
turned
into
an
extremely
tight
contest.
Of
course,
a
driver's
best
six races
count
out
of
the
nine
events
on
the
calendar
that
are
counted
at
year's
end,
and
that
factor
can
make
a
big
difference
in
the
final
count,
regardless
of
who
looks
to
have
the
biggest lead
at
this
point.
The
Fireworks
250
had
an
enormous
turnout
of
268
starting
cars
last
July,
and
in
the
ranks
were
21
registered 6-50
Club
drivers
.
Sad
to
say
only
eight
of
them
finished
the
rugged
four
laps
in
the
hot
and
dusty
desert
enduro,
a 38.1
percent
ratio,
which
compares
favorably
to
the
event's
overall
finishing
ratio
of
35.4
percent.
In
the
ranks
of
the
6-50
dubbers
were
one
class
winner,
a
pair
of
third
place finishers,
one
fourth,
one
fifth
and
three
sixth
place
finishers, all
covering
four
laps.
The
over
50,
just
barely,
hero
at
the
Fireworks
was
Dave
Girdner
who,
with
Roy
Perfect
co-driving,
took
his
home
built
in
Barstow
single
seater
to
the
Challenge
Class
victory,
and
this
was a
tough
and
tight
running
class.
Dave
.also
won
the
class
at
the
Mint
400
and
the
two
big
wins
have
moved
him
into
seventh
in 6-50
points.
Vern
Roberts,
with
Bill
Donahoe
co-
driving,
hauled
the
Jeep
Honcho
around
to
a
third
in
Class
4,
putting
Vern
third
in
current
points.
Andy
Devercelly
and
his
son
Andy,
who
won
Class
5-
1600
at
the
Mint
400,
had
to
settle
for
tli.ird
in
class
at
the
Fireworks
250,
and
Andy
now
-
stands
sixth
in
points.
Taking
a fine
fourth
in
Class
8
was Bill
Howard
in
his
Chevy,
and
Stan
Gilbert,
back
wheeling a
Ford
pickup,
finished
four
laps
for
sixth
i:n
the
class.
Del
Shoemaker
covered
all
four
rounds
for
fifth
in
the
Score
Challenge
Class.
Jack
Irvine
was
Rounding
out
the
top
ten
in
points
are
Andy
Devercelly
with
161
for
three
events,
Dave
Girdner
with
153
earned
in
four
races,
and
Frank
Snook
has
128
points
doing
'five races in Class 1.
Gene
Hightower
is
eighth,
running
his
Class 3 Jeep,
with
114
points
for
five series races.
Next
is
Stan
Parnell
with
100
points
earned
in
three
races
in
Class 5. A
number
of
others,
among
the
more
than
50
drivers
on
the
list,
are
close
eno
ugh
to
move
into
the
top
ten.
At
the
present
time
a
combined
Score
and
High
Desert
awards
banquet
is
planned
for
early
January
in
Las
Vegas.
The
BFGoodrich
6-50
awards
will
also
be
prese9red
at
that
time,
or
where
ever
the
awards
happen.
If
yciu
would
like
to
know
where
you
stand
in
6-50
points,
or
if
yo
u
are
on
the
list,
drop
a
card
to
Jean
Calvin,
5331
Derry
Ave.,
Suite
0,
Agoura,
CA
91301.
Any
driver
of
record
in
the
Score/High
Desert
series
that
is
over
50 years
of
age is eligible.
We
do
need
to
know
that
you
are
eligible,
and
we
do
the
rest.
The
top
three
at
year's
end
will
receive
the
beautiful
Olympic
sytle
medallions
provided
by
the
generous
folks
at
BFGoodrich.
~:::;;;;;;;:::::;;;;;;;::~::;;;;;;;;;;;;;~,AND
FOR
VOU
OESERf
RACERS,
\JE
WILL
OPEN
1HE
SOV1lt
GA'fE
'FOR
THE
LA~T
LAP,
RACE
00\JtJ
1"0
GUA1-EMALA,
AND
..-i::J___________
F\N\Sl-4
UP
BACK
HERc
Page 8
*
RACE
OF C.HAM
Pl
C.
'J.
ON
WEDNESDAY!
--
...........
p t(I
~~
____,.__
I
September 1985
••• More Trail Notes
RIVERSIDE RAMBLINGS.
Most
racers
and
pit
people
have a love/
hate
feeling
about
the
annual
Score
bash
at
Riverside
International
Raceway,
and
this year
that
was again
the
mood
of
many
participants.
The
weather
was
the
best
in
memory
for
the
event,
but
the
audience
qid
not
visibly increase
over
, last
year's
rather
slim showing.
Those
in
the
spectator
areas seemed
to
be
the
hard
core
enthusiasts,
camped
out
by
the
fences
on
Friday,
and
there
for
the
duration.
As
mentioned
in
the
coverage,
the
schedule
of
which classes
ran
when
was
odd
this
year,
aimed
at
promoting
the
extra
sponsored
events
on
Sunday,
Most
of
the
glamour
classes
of
open
wheel race
cars
were relegated
to
a
Saturday
run,
while
some
of
the
iess interesting
and
less
competitive
classes
of
motorcvcle
stvle devices
ran
on
Sunday.
lt
was
neat
of
Bilstein
to
jump
in
and
support
the
desert
Class 1, 2
and
10
race,
the
Bilstein
Challenge.
All
enthusiasts
extend
a
hearty
thank
you
to
Bilstein
for
lending
their
help
to
the
hard
rock
classes in
off
road
racing,
the
desert
runners.
lt
was a
good
race
too,
by
the
way.
As
usual
at
Riverside,
a
couple
of
sour
situations
surfaced
during
the
weekend
of
racing.
For
inexplicable
reasons
the
track
was heavily
over
watered
all weekend.
Surely
even
the
sponsoring
Turbo
Wash
people
would
have liked
to
have
seen
the
cars
.
at
least
for
a lap
before
they were
covered
in
the
mud
generated
by
the
zeal
of
the
water
truck
drivers
.
Also,
with
the
continual
watering
before
almost
every
car
race,
the
audience
spent
as
much
time
looking
at
the
water
trucks
and
back
hoes
as
they
did
looking
at
the
races ...
not
the
sort
of
action
·
that
would
encourage
race fans
to
pay
the
high
buck
ticket
price again
next
year.
An
unfortunate
byproduct
of
the
excessive
track
maintenance
activity
was
the
crash
of
Marty
Tripes
in
the
first race
on
Saturday
.
The
track
was
changed
a
good
.deal
after
the
Friday practice,
and
one
section
was
tamed
down
to
avoid,
perhaps,
others
doing
the
endos
that
happened
in
the
area
on
Friday.
Saturday
morning
all
the
classes·racing
on
Saturd:i.y
had
practice
sessions,
but,
unknown
to
the
drivers,
at
noon
the
back
hoes
and
blades
were
at
it again, along with
the
water
trucks.
The
Stadium
Class 1 cars were in
the
first actual race
event
for
cars.
The
drivers
were
not
told
that
the
track
had
been
changed
since
the
morning
practice,
nor
were
they
given a
parade
lap. Always
competitive,
Marty
Tripes
shot
into
the
switchbacks
on
the
first
lap
and
did
a
triple
endo,
landing
on
the
wheels.
Marty
was
not
really
conscious,
and
he
started
weaving
around
the
course,
finally
coming
to
hi
·s senses
and
pulling
off
the
track,
his
Funco
a
wreck.
Score
President
Sal Fish
drove
up,
and
words
were exchanged. Even
Tripes
admits
he
was
hot
under
the
collar
and
shouted
abusive
language
at
,Fish, saying
he
would
never
enter
another
Score
race. Fish
subsequently
disqualified
Tripes
from
the
event,
and
his
name
did
not
appear
on
th
e results.
However,
a
man
who
is
already
DNF
is
not
really
punished
by
a
disqualification
in a
non-points
race.
Incidentally,
all
subseq
uent
classes in
competition
were given a
parade
lap,
but
the
water
trucks
were as
busy
as ever,
so
the
cars
were filthy
before
the
actual
race
ever
began.
The
next
move
by
the
organizers was
to
announce
to
the
press
at
Riverside
that
Tripes
was
suspended
for
the
rest
of
the
year
from
both
Score
International
events
and
the
Mickey
Thompson
Entertainment
Group
events.
Heretofore
Sal Fish
and
Mickey
Thompson
have
gone
to
great lengths
to
inform
the
world
that
there
is
no
connection
between
the
two
organizations,
but
this
action
certainly
demonstrates
-
that
Thompson's
ownership
of
both
race
promotion
groups
transcends
such
statements.
At
any
,
rate,
Marty
Tripes
is leading
the
MTEG
points
in Class 1,
and
the
suspension
denies
him
the
opportunity
to
compete
at
the
final series
event
at
the
Orange
Show
Fairgrounds
on
September
14,
thus
costing
him
the
opportunity
to
win
the
championship
on
points.
A f~w
days
iater
the
Los
Angeies
Times
motorsport
coiumnist
quoted
Mickey
Thompson
as saying
that
he
could
sympathize
with
Tripes
because
he
knew
the
feelings
of
a race
driver
at-
the
time
of
a
crash,
the
anger
and
frustration
felt.
Thompson
also
said
that
he
had
not
yet
talked
with
the
principals
in
the
incident,
but
he
was
sure
the
situation
could
be
resolved
so
that
Tripes
can
race
for
the
championship
points,
r
ather
than
lose
the
title
by
default
.
THE
GREAT AMERICAN RACE,
for
vintage
cars
is
quite
an
event,
with
$100,000.
going
to
the
overall
winner
who
not
only
gets
the
old
car
from
Los
Angeles
to
New
York,
but
also
handles
the
Time-Speed-Distance
part
of
the
run
with
accuracy.
This
year
Marv
Schmidt,
of
Sylmar,
CA,
drove
his
modified
1936
Dodge
all
the
way
to
finish
51st
with
a
total
of
just
38.36
minutes
off
the
perfect
time.
Schmidt,
the
owner
of
a
Chevy
salvage yard, was
a
top
off
road
racer
until
a race
accident
in
1974
near
Santa
Thomas
in Baja
California
left
him
with
a paralyzed
right
arm
and
Jeg, received special
consideration
from
the
organizers in
modifying
his
car
for
the
race.
Mucho
congra_tulations, Marv!
THE
ANNUAL
MICHIGAN RALLY,
part
of
the
Bridgestone
SCCA
Pro
Rally Series,
has
acquired
a
serious
sponsor
this year in Dodge.
Dodge
itself,
the
factory,
is
helping
with
the
high
cost
of
putting
on
any
event
these
days,
and
their
participation
is
encouraging
to
the
sport.
The
rally,
running
over
the
Labor
Day
holiday
near
Battle
Creek,
Michigan, will
be
over
by
the
time
most
folks
_
read
this issue,
but
we
do
think
it
is
important
that
a
major
U.S
.
auto
company
is joining in
the
~upport
of
the
Pro
Rally Series.
THE SNORE
250
is
acquiring
strong
support
this
year
from
some
new
sponsors
.
The
race,
on
September
28,
is
sponsored
by
the
Holiday
Inn,
Center
Stri
p in Las Vegas,
and
the
entire
SNORE
points
series is
sponsored
by
Yokohama
Tires
.
Not
rell'ting
on
their
laurels,
SNORE
has
just
picked
up
another
spons
or
for
the
250
this year in Bud Light,
the
Budweiser brew:
The
word
from
SNORE
President
Roger
Gaskill is.
that
Bud Light will
be
involved
in
the
entire
1986
SNORE
points
race
schedule
as well.
Another
fe
a
ther
in
SNORE's
hat
is
the
support
being given
to
the
1985
SNORE
250
by
Ge
neral
Tire
.
General
Tire
Motorsports
Division
is
posting
some
hefty
contingency
money
for
the
race in Classes
3,
4,
7,
7S
, 8 ,
12
and
14,
-
where
drivers
on
their
tires
will get a
cool
$1000.00
for
a class win,
or
$500
for
the
first
finisher
in class
on
General
Tires
. In all classes
the
vehicle
must
finish
the
race
to
earn
the
contingency
money.
Th~
letter
going
out
to
the
drivers
from
Dave
Erickson
of
General
Tire
states
tl'iat
the
SNORE
250
is a
fun
race
with
a
good
payback,
60
percent
plus
bonus
money,
and
a
strong
turnout
by
General
Tire
drivers
in
the
truck
classes
would
be
great.
( continued on
pag
e r r J
Dusty
Times
WALKER
EVANS
CASHES-IN
ON
THE
HEAVY
METAL
CHALLENGE.
It's called the "Off-Road World Championship."
And the course of this year's
13th
Annual event
at
-
Riverside
Raceway
was
more like the Baja California than
it
has ever been.
Thick desert
si
lt
,
mud
baths
an
d slick
cl
ay moguls brought
out the best off-road driving skills.
Some trucks
never
made
it.
Some rolled over and bit
the dust.
But in the Stroh's Heavy Metal Challenge, Walker Evans
ran
away
with
the
win.
It
was
a grand performance
by
Walker.
,
Credit goes
not
only
to
Walker's.driving talent. But
to
his
truck. His
crew.
And the
tin~s
that got him through.
Goodyear Wrangler radials-the very same tires
you
can
buy
for
your
truck.
Congratulations
to
-Walker and his team
for
proving once
again
how
Goodyear Wrangler radials
are
engineered
to
take
on
the
toughe
st terrain, the toughest .
conditions. ·
No
matter what kind of truck
you
own, get Goodyear Wrangler radials.
Because when
you
have
to get . ·
through, Wrangler delivers perform-
ance
you
can bank
on.
WRANGLER
RADIAL.
WE
RACE
THE
TIRES
YOU
BUY.
GOOD;fYEAII
1985
HAPPENINGS
•••
FORDA
Florida
Off
Roaders
Drivers' Association
5349
Hansel Ave., C-1
Orlando, Florida
32809
(
305)
851-6245
October
13
Hollywood Speedway
Hollywood, FL
A.D.R.A.
Arizona Desert Racing Association
1408 East Granada
Phoenix,
AZ
85006
(602)
252-1900
October
19
9th
Annual Penasco 150
Rocky Point, Mexico
December
7,
1985
9th
Annual Sonoita
to
Rocky Point
Hare
'ri
Hound
Sonoita, Mexico
January
11,
1986
Annual Awards Banquet
Phoenix, AZ
AMSA
American
Motor
Sports
Association
P.O. Box
5473
·
Fresno,
CA
93755
(209)
439-2114
October
26
· California
500
Palm Springs, CA
AMERICAN
OFF
ROAD
RACING
ASSOCIATION
John
Ohanesian
P.
O.
Box 31811
Phoenix, AZ
85046
(602)
867--4769
October
13
Deer Valley Cycle Park
Phoenix,
AZ
October
27
Tucson International Raceway
Tucson, AZ
BAJA
IN
WISCONSIN
_ OFF
ROAD
SERIES
Kevin Dawson
Rt. 3,
Box
895
Lake Geneva,
WI
53147
(
414)
248--8566
BANZAI
OFF
ROAD
CENTER
Bryan Christensen
2729
No.
62nd
Omaha, NE
68104
(all events
at
Riverfront
Motorsports Park)
September 8
Sportsman - Odysseys -.3 Wheelers
October 6
Flanders Day -
Sportsman Season Finale
BERRIEN
AUTO
CROSS SERIES
Coordinator - ·Gil Parker
7406
S. 12th St.
Kalamazoo,
MI
49009
(616)
375-1233
September
21-22
Dixie Autocross
Birch Run, MI
COBRA
RACING
P.O. Box 19407
Oklahoma City,
OK
73119
(405)
232--4231
-(405)
685-3450
(All
off
road races will be held at the
59th
& Douglas track, Oklahoma
City.)
November
3
Brevard
Co
.
Off
Road Park
Sharpes,
FL
December
1
Brevard Co.
Off
Road Park
Sharpes, FL
January
5,
1986
. · Florida State
Fairgrounds Speedway
Tampa, FL
February
2,
1986
Citrus Co. Speedway
Inverness, FL
March
21-23,
1986
Florida
400
Crowder Pits
Tallahassee, FL
FUDPUCKER
RACING
TEAM
250 Kennedy,
#6
Chula Vista, CA 92011
(619)
427-
5759
GORRA
·
Georgia
Off
Road
Racing Association
Box 11093 Station -A
Atlanta,
GA
30310
(
404)
927-6432
September 8
100 Mile Race
Montgomery, AL
September
22
50 Mile Race
Atlanta, GA
NEW
KC
HiliTES
''ROCKS
OFF''
Chro
Rock
Shield
I
Page
10
Protect
your
KC Daylighters against
flying rocks &
dirt
clods,
with
this
new
KC
Chrome
Rock Shield (Part No.
7203). Installs easily in the
outer
rim
of
all
6"
KC Daylighters manufactured
since
1970. Special ''low-profile'
configuration
allows
KC
soft
covers
to
slip
over
for
maximum
protection
during
the
day.
See
your
local KC
HiliTES
dealer
for
the
new KC Rock Shield and
the
complete
line
of
RACE READY OUT OF THE
BOX
KC
HiliTES products.
New
full line catalog, ·
just
$3.00.
September 1985
October
27
100 Mile Race
Atlanta, GA
GREAT
WESTERN
POINTS
SERIES,
INC.
1507 South Lincoln
Loveland,
CO
80537
CORRA
(303)
669--4460
DORRA
(303) 429-1949
RMORRA
(303)
597--8239
WKR
(913)
332-3402
September 8
CORRA
/ DOR.RA
Berthoud,
CO
September
22
RMORRA
Colorado Springs,
CO
October
5-6
WK-R
Championship Race
St. Francis,
KS
HDRA
High Desert Racing Association
961
West
Dale Ave.
Las Vegas, NV
89124
(702) 361-5404
September
6-8
Frontier
500
Las Vegas to Reno, NV
December
6-8
Frontier 250
Las V
eg~s,
NV
IOK
FOUR
WHEELERS
P.O.
Box
36
Cleves,
Ohio
45002
(All
events staged
at
the club grounds in
Cleves,
Ohio)
July
14
Kiss Point Series Drags
October 6
Kiss Point Series Drags
MANUFACTURERS'
CUP
SERIES
Angus Motorsports
Number
One
Main St.
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702)
386-2110
September
7-8
Sierra Nevada
R,.ally
Sonora, CA
December
21-22
United States Rally
Las Vegas,
NV
MICKEY
THOMPSON'S
OFF
ROAD
CHAMPIONSHIP
GRAND
PRIX
Mickey
Thompson
Entertainment ·
Group
53
Woodlyn
Lane
Bradbury,
CA
91010
(818)
359-5117
September
14
Orange Show Fairgrounds
San Bernardino,
CA
MORE
Midwest
Off
Ro
ad
Racing Enthusiasts
P.O.
Box
181021
Fort
Worth,
TX 76118
(817)
577-1102
September
6-
7
Cowtown Speedway
Fort
Worth,
TX
October 4-5
Cowtown Speedway
Fort
Worth,
TX
ORSA
1920 Crown Ave.
- West Sacramento,
CA
95691
(916)
372--4257
September
28-29
(Rain Date October 26-27)
ORSA Championship Race
Marysville River Front Park
Marysville, CA
October
5-6
ORSA
/ NSCA National
Championship Points Race
Marsyville River Front Park
Marysville, CA
POST
Pennsylvania
Off
Road
Short
Track
Shark Saxon
RD #3, Box 9'
Towanda, PA 18848
(717)
265-
3076
September
28-29
Middletovin, New .York
October 12-13
Monroeton, PA
PRO
CAN
AM
SERIES
Pro Can Am Racing Inc.
P.O. Box 323
Seahurst, Washington 98062
(206)
242-1773
(
503)
620--0313
September
20-22
Millican Valley
400
Bend,
OR
SCCA
PRO
RALLY SERIES
Sports Car Club
of
America
6750
Emporia
St
.
Englewood,
CO
80112
(
303)
779-6625
September
21-22
Budweiser Forest Pro Rally
Chillicothe,
OH
October
25-27
Budweiser Press
On
Regardless' Pro Rally
Houghton, MI
November
16-17
Oregon Trail Pro Rally
Beaverton,
OR
December
6-8
Carson City
International Pro Rally
Carson City, NV
SCIDA
Vince Tjelmeland
5226 Norris Lane
Yorba Linda,
CA
92686
(714)
779-6889
October
1.9
Ascot Speedway
Gardena,
CA
SCORE
Score International
31356
Via Colinas, Suite 111
Westlake Village, CA
91362
(818) 889-9216
November
8-9
. Baja 1000
Ensenada, B.C., Mexico
SCORE
CANADA
390
Chemin Du Lac
Lery, Quebec,
J6N 1A3, Canada
(514)
692-6171
. September 7-8
Thetford Mines, Quebec
Dusty
Times
September
28-29
Middletown,
New
York
SILVER
DUSTRACING
ASSOCIATION
P.
O.
Box
7380
Las Vegas,
NV
89125
(702)
459-0317
November
16
Silver
Dust
400
Henderson,
NV
SNORE
Southern
Nevada
Off
Road
Enthusiasts
P.O.
Box
4394
Las Vegas,
NV
89106
(702)
452-4522
September
27-29
· Holiday
Casino
&
KC
Hilites
Snore
250
Jean,
NV
November
23
Points
Race
Las Vegas,
NV
SUPERIOR
OFF
ROAD
DRIVERS
ASSOCIATION
460
No.
Beaumont
Ave.
Brookfield,
WI
53005
(715)
272-1489
September
21-22
Colorama
100
Sugar C
amp,
WI
VORRA
Valley
Off
Road
Racing
Association
1833
Los
Robles Blvd.
Sacramento,
CA
95838
(916)
925-1702
September
1-2
Dayton
/
VORRA
300
Dayton,
NV
September
28-29
VORRA
Bonus
Points
Race
Millican
Valley
400
Bend,
OR
October
13
Championship
Off
Road
Race
Prairie City
OHV
Park
Sacramento,
CA
WESTERN OFF
ROAD
RACING
ASSOCIATION
19125
- 87 A Ave.
Surr
ey, British
Columbia
,
V3S
5X7 ,
Can
a
da
(6
0
4)
576-6256
September· 15
Mt.
Che
am Raceways
Rosed
a
le,
B.
C.
October
13
Mt
.
Cheam
Raceways
Rosedale
, B.C.
ATTENTION
RACE
ORGANIZERS
List
yo
ur coming events in
DUSTY
TIMES
fr
e
e!.
Send
your 1985 schedule.
as
soon as possible fbr listing in this
co
lumn.
Mail
your race or rall y schedule
to:
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TIMES
, 533 1 Derry
Av
e.,
Suite
0 , Agoura, CA
91
30
1.
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Out
the
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TIME$
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write
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91301
Dusty
Times
•••
More Trail Notes -
THE
MICKEY
THOMPSON
ENTERTAINMENT
GROUP
has
an
ambitious
schedule
next
year, in
the
formative stages right
now
. Already
set
and
firm
are
dates
for
mid-winter
in
the
mid
west.
Stadium
racers
can
plan
on
going
to
the
Hoosier
Dome
in Indianapolis, Indiana
next
year
on
January
25,
and
two
weeks later
the
series will
move
to
the Silverdome in Pontiac,
Michigan, near
Detroit,
and
that
date
is February
8,
1986.
More
dates are in
the
final stages right
now,
and
a late winter
event
will
probably
happen
at
the
Jack
Murphy
football
stadium
in San Diego. In all
about
nine races are
planned
for
1986
by
the
energetic
MTEG
crew.
One
thing is
sure
at
this
moment,
the
Mickey
Thompson
stadium
series will have a
national flavor
next
season,
and
it will
not
be
confined
to
southern
California.
In fact,
if
the
schedule
works
out
·as
planned
,
only
half
of
the
series will take
place
in
the
Golden
State.
GOING
INTO
THE
FRONTIER
500,
which is a
double
points
race, the
battle for
points
championships
in the
combined
Score
and
High Desert series
is
tight
in
some
classes.
Of
course,
the
actual
points
count
can change
drastically with
just
three
events
left
on
.
the
calendar.
Remember,
the
best
six
out
of
eight races
count
for a
driver's
total
at
year's end.
The
catch is
that
three
of
the races
must
be
Score ev.ents,
and
three
must
be
HORA
evehts. As
the
season moves
into
the final stages there are
two
HORA
races left
on
the
calendar,
and
only
the
Baja
1000
left
for
Score.
Right now, after the Fireworks 25Q, Larry Noel has a slim lead in Class 1,
with 12
points
over
Mark
McMillin.
Corky
McMillin leads Jerry Penhall
in
Class 2
by
23
points,
and
Rob
Tolleson
has the
1-2-1600
lead
over
Richard
Binder
by
15
points,and
Bobby
Neth
is
only
another
11
points
out.
In
Class 3
Gene
Hightower
leads Ken Nance
by
31
points,
and
Rod
Hall,
undefeated
on
the
desert
this season, leads
John
Randall in Class 4
by
118
points,
with
Vern
Roberts
only
14
points
behind
Randall.
In Class 5
Malcolm
Vinje leads Greg-Diehl
by
a hefty
92
points
. But, in
Class
5-1600
Mark
Steele has a slim lead
of
just
six
points
over
Mike
Lesle.
The
leaders,
Arne
Gunnarsson
and
Larry Schwacofer, in
the
pair
of
Class
6s
each have
over
100
points
in
hand.
In Class 7
Manny
Esquerra has
35
points
on
Mario
Alesi,
and
in Class 7 4 x 4
G.T.
Gowland
leads
by
more
than
150
points.
In
7S
it is close with
Willie
Valdez holding
44
points
on
Spencer
Low,
and
it
is close in Class 8
too
as Michael
Nesmith
has
22
points
on
Steve Kelley.
Jim
Dizney has
over
100
points
lead in Class
9,
and
Bob Savage has a similar
margin
in
the
Challenger class. Class
10
is tight with
Marty
Reider
out
front
by
nine
points
over
Steve
Sourapas.
In Classes 11, 12
and
14, leaµers
Ramon
Castro,
Jason Myers
and
Rock
Bradford all have
husky
leads.
Join
in
the
••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
~l~TZe
MAIL COUPON
TODAYI
Experience
the
Excitement
of
the
MINT"400
without
the dust
Above photo is prototype.
Actual game may differ slightl
y.
ERIKSSON INDUSTRIES, INC.
326W.
KATELLAAVE.,
SUITE4·HDT
ORANGE, CALIFORNIA
92667
(714)
538-5878
YES
! D Send
me
_ _ . copy
of
the new
and
exciting
"MINT
400
OFF-ROAD GAME" for
$24.95
(Plus
$2.50
each shipping & handling).
My
check
or
money order for$, _ _ _ _ enclosed.
.
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MASTERCARD
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(California
residents
add
6%
tax)
Please
allow
4
to
6
weeks
for
delivery.
.
Septemt>er1985
./
Page
11
THE
TURBO-WASH
SCORE
OFF-ROAD
WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP
If
It's August,
It
Must Be Riverside
By
Jean Calvin
Greg
George
got
a
great
hole
shot
on
the
muddy
curtain
riser
for
Stadium
Class
1,
and
George
put
his
Funco
home
the winner,
leading
wire
to wire.
Al
Arciero
came
from
a
bad
start
to
challenge
for
second
place
in
Stadium
Class
1,
but
Al
ended
up
third,
by
no
morre
than a
second
.
Larry
Noel
deserted
his
open
wheeler
to
drive
in Class 5
at
Riverside,
and
the
swift
driver
from
Arizona
was
second
in the
exciting
contest.
Tony
Kujala
led
the
waning
laps
of
the
Class
5
battle,
but
lost
it
all
just
yards
from
glory
and
was
credited
with
an
official
fourth.
Page
12
Photos: Trackside Photo Enterprises
Bob
Gordon
had
to
fight
off
both
Arciero
brothers
to
gain
his
second
place
finish in
Stadium
Class
1,
driving
his
neat
Chenowth
Magnum.
A
surprised
Wayne
Demonja
took
the
checkered
flag
first
.in
Colorado
Springs
driver
got
the
lead
just
yards
from
the
finish
line
on
the last
lap.
One
of
several leaders in the Class 5
12
tapper, Pete
Sohren
had
mechanical
woes
and
faded
to
fourth
spot
at
the flag.
On
home
ground,
Eric
·
Arras
drove
his
desert
bred
5-1600 to an ·easy
vi_c;tory,
le~ding
all
the way,
and
Eric
has a
habit
of
winning
this class
at
Riverside.
September 1985
The
13th
annual
edition
of
the
Score
Off-Road
World
Champ-
ionship
races,
sponsored
this
year
by
Turbo-Wash,
returned
to
the
traditional
mid
August
date
at
Riverside
International
Raceway
in
the
southern
California
desert
..
But,
you
couldn't
tell by
th
e
weather
that
it
was Riverside in August! Fog
shrouded
the
morning
practice
s~ssions,
cool
breezes
came
in
the
late
afternoon,
arid it was never
oppressively
hot
as in years past,
nor
was
one
alternately
hot
and
dusty,
then
wet
and
muddy
.
There
was
no
rain
_ this year
to
mess
up
the
race
course
either. In
short,
it
was ideal
weather
for
the
off
road
races
at
Riverside,
where
the Raceway
opened
30
years
ago,
and
it is
now
getting a
bit
seedy as plans
to
close
the
place
for
development
by
1987
proceed.
Score
International
returned
to
a
fou
r day
format
in
1985,
getting
all
the
tech
and
contingency
business
over
with
on
the
Thursday
afternoon.
The
move
provided
all
day
practice
sessions,
two
·
per
class,
on
Friday.
The
full
complement
of
Score's
desert
classes,
plus
some
stadium
classes,
brought
the
number
of
groups
in
competition
to
a fat
thirty.
The
entry
was
split
fairly e.venly
between
motorcycle
engined classes ai'id
proper
car
classes.
However,
only
a few
groups
produced
an
entry
large
enough
to
provide
wire
to
wire
competition.
Many
of
the car
classes
had
more
entry
from
out
of
state
than
they
did
from
California,
making
the
Riverside
meet
again a
truly
national
competition,
if
not
a
World
/
Championship
event.
Dick
Dahn
and
his
course
construction
crew
had
·carved a ·
familiar,
but
slightly longer
route
out
of
the
dirt
at
Riverside this
year.
Trying
to
make
the
desert
cars
more
competitlve,
they
put
some
real nasty
jump
series
in
the
"esses".
While
some
drivers
did
complain,
and
the
jumps
were
eventually
tarried by blade
and
bulldozer
before
the
actual
racing
began,
many
came
to
serious
grief in
the
motocross
style
ruts
and
·
jumps
on
Friday
during
practice.
The
most
spectacular
of
these
incidents
that
we saw was
done
by
Larry
Minor,
out
in
a
high tech
brand
new
Olds
bodied
race .car with
the
front
engine bay
holding
an alloy
block
V-8
of
General
Motors
origin.
After
testing
the
track
a
round
or
two,
Minor
laid
on
the
gas across these
glitches
and
climbed
to
the
sky,
bouncing
a
number
of
times,
nailing all
four
corners
of
the
fancy Class 2,
and
doing
in his
knee
to
the
tune
of
a few stitches.
His passenger was
Walker
Evans'
son
Evan,
-.;vho
came
out
of
it.
unscathed,
but
shaken.
The
car
was
done
for
the
weekend.
This
was
one
area
on
course
that
got
a
'
manicure
before
the
Saturday
racing
commenced.
After
short
morning
practice
for.
classes
competing
that
day,
the
Saturday
program
got
under
Dusty Times
way
with
the
feature
race
for·
Class
1
Stadium
style cars,
which
drew
a 1 7 car
entry
that
dwindled
to
13
off
the
line.
After
the
drag
race
down
the
dirt
to
the
first
turn,
Greg
George
g<it
his
Fu~co
out
front,
with
Bob
Go
rdon
close,
but
he
got
boxed
up
in
the
esses.
The
track
had
been
heavily
watered,
and
Geo
rge
had
the
first
on
the
r
oa
d
advantage
of
good
· vision;
he
stretched
a
comfort-
able
lead in
the
ear
ly laps.
Bob
Gordon
and
Frank
Arciero,
both
in
Chenowth
'
Magnums,
had
a
real dice going by
the
secon
d lap
for
runner
up
spot,
joined
on
the
next
ro
und
by
Jim
Fishback,
Jr.,
Chenmvth.
.Contender
Marty
Tripes
flipped
ea
rly in t
_he
game
and
knocked
himselt
a bit.
cookoo
.
Midway
George
had
about
seven
se
conds
in
hand
over
Frank
Arciero,
who
was
being
challenged
by G
ordon
.
Then
Al
Arciero
came
from
the
back
to
threaten
Gordon,
while
brother
Frank
parked
with
a s
moking
engine
with
just
three
laps
to
go.
On
the
ninth
of
ten
laps
Greg
George's
engine
stalled
on
Turn
6,
and
Gordon,
with
Al
Arciero
glued
to
his rear cage,
moved
in.
However,
despite
another
gurgle
in
the
same
spot
on
th
e last lap,
Greg
George
·
hung
on
to
win
the
Stadium
Class
1
battle.
After
a
keen
,
dice
Bob
Gordon
held
Al
Arciero
off,
just
barely,
at
the
flag.
Larry
Ragland
and
Joe
Bean
followed
them
home
,
the
la
'
st
of
the
t
en
lap
finishers.
The
next
event
for
race
cars
brought
out
some
of
the
best
contests
of
the
entire
weekend
a
mong
the
nine
Class
5 cars.
They
were
joined
on
the
grid by
nine
5-1600 racers, a
4uartet
of
Challenger
cars,
and
a
pair
of
C l
ass
9s,
which
made
.
the
poten
tial
speed
differential
a
bit
ha
iry
when
the
unlimited
Bugs
began
lapping
in
bunches
early in ·
the 12 lap event.
C lass 5
held
a
covey
of
the
fast
and
famous
Arizona
built
Bugs, a
sleeper
from
Colorado,
and
only
thr
ee
from
Ca
lifornia
.
Jeff
Elrod
got
th
e
jump
off
the
Class
5
start,
tightly followed by
Pete
Sohren,
and
not
far
back
was
Wayne
Demonja,
Larry
Noel,
Tony
Kujala, Ed
Mailo
and
Larr
y
Ragland.
E
lrod
and
Sohren
were
side
by
side
and
pulled
away
from
the
flock,
but
midway
Elrod
was
parked
with
no
rear
wheel, as
the
center
tore
out
of
the
hub.
Now
Demonja
moved
in
tight
to
challenge
Sohren's
lead,
with
Kujala
right
on
his tailpipe,
and
the
race
was
on.
Larry
Noel
kept
the
trio
in
his
sights,
but
the
leaders
were
too
close
to
call
at
this
point.
The
trio
stayed
in
formation
until
lap 8
when
Kujala
got
by
Demonja.
On
the
tenth
lap
Sohren
was
slowing
and
faded
from
the
action.
In
the
lead,
Kujala
held
off
Demonja
as
they
came
into
the
final
dog
leg
section
to
complete
the
final
lap
.
.
As
Kujala was
just
yards
.from
victory,
attempting
to
lap
Bobby
Garner,
Garner's
car
swerved
.
toward
Kujala,
who
was
knocked
into
the
concrete
divider
barrier,
then
climbed
it again.
Wayne
Demonja,
from
Colorado
Springs,
went
by
for
the
victory
as Kujala
finished
second
on
the
road,
backwards
across
the
finish
line,
followed
in by
Larry
Noel.
1ony
Kujala
was
r;r
[;llr
~
Dusty
Times
Mike
Lesle
tried
hard
in his 5-1600 Bug,
but
he
couldn
't
catch
the leader
and
was second,
with
a
full
lap on the rest
of
the field.
-Riverside was really
tough
on
the
Challenger
cars. Dave
Girdner
covered
more
laps than the
others
in his
homebuilt
chassis.
Colorado
driver
Mitch
Mustard
kept
his
Chenowth
in
second
in the first Class
1Q
heat
most
of
the
distance
,
but
he
finished
third
:
Late
in the race
Mike
Lund
moved
his
desert
Chenowth
Magnum
into
first
spot
in Class
1,
and
Lund
also
finished
second
overall in the Bi/stein Challenge.
Mark
Lundell
took
second
p/ace
in Class 2 in his
Dirtri
x
powered
by
a Mazda
rotary
engine
that
made
some
of
the
best
sounds
heard
all
week
at
Riverside.
September 1985
Bob
Savage
had
an easy time
of
it
in Class 9 in his
Funco
. His
only
competition
was over a lap
behind
when the
checkered
flag fell.
Jerry
Whelchel
led
most
of
the way to
win
the first Class 10
Stadium
heat
in his
Chenowth
,
and
he was a close
second
in the
Bosch
Bash
main
event.
The desert cars
looked
great
on the Riverside course. Tim
Kennedy
led the
final laps
of
the Bi/stein
Challenge
,
and
he won
overall
and
the Class 2 honors.
Ron
Carter
had
a keen
debut
in hjs
new
desert
Chenowth
Class
10.
Ron
won
the class in the Bi/stein
Challenge
and
finished
third
overall
on
a flat tire.
Dwight
Lundell
flew
the esses
gracefully
in his
new
Dirtri
x,
desert
style
Class
10,
and
he was
second
in class in the Bi/stein Challenge.
Page
13
gr, gr,
gr,
!Jr'
docked
two
positions
by
the
rough
driving
committee
for
the
incident
that
looked
like he was
the
victim
from
our
viewing angle in victory
circle.
Larry
Noel
moved
up
to
second,
officially,
and
Pete
Sohren
salvaged an official
third
.
Meanwhile,
after
the
initial
scuffling,
the
5-1600s
had
a
sedate
race. Eric
Arras
led
Mike
Lesle
from
flag
to
flag.
Although
they
were
close at times,
Arras
was
never
seriously
threatened
en
route
tc)
victory.
After
a race
long struggle
for
position,
Gre_gg
Tuttle
bested
Eric Lightle
tor
third
place. ·
The
Class
9
pair
were
never
close
to
each
other.
Bob
Savage
got
his
Funco
in
front
off
the
line
and
he
gained a full lap
on
Roger
Mortenson's
Funco
at
the
flag.
The
Challenger
cars
had
a
·
tough
time
in
the
faster traffic,
and
after
two
laps
only
two
·
of
them
\Vere still moving.
Russ
Winkler
got
his
Sandhawk
in
the
.
lead
on
the
first lap,
and
he
.
stayed
there
all
the
way until
the
final
round,
when
he
vanished.
This
gave
the
win
and
the
victory
circle
trophy
to
Dave
Girdner
in
his
homebuilt
single seater,
the
only
Challengercar
that
covered
ten laps.
However,
the
computer
driven
results
show
Russ
Winkler's
nine
laps as
the
Scott
Taylor
came
from
Illinois
to race
his
own
chassis, the
Eliminator,
and
Taylor
led
the
second
Class 10
qualifyi(!g
heat
from
wire
to
wire,
took
fifth in
the main.
Geoff
Dorr
surprised
a
lot
of
folks when he
passed
Don
Adams
and
ran
away
with
Class 3
and
the
overall
in the
combined
race.
Dorr's
Jeep
CJ
8
performed
flawlessly.
winner,
ahead
of
Girdner's
ten
laps,
so
perhaps
there
was a
problem
in
post
race tech.
~
Doug
Robinson
came
from
northern
California
to race his Jeep CJ 7,
and
Doug
kept
out
of
trouble
to finish
third
in Class
3.
The
Bosch Bash Class
10
Stadium
entry,
some
35
strong,
was divided
into
a pair
of
qualifying heats. In
the
first
round,
Bob
Gordon
cleared
the
starting
dust
first,
but
into
the
switchbacks
he
_was passed by
Jerry
Whelchel,
then
Mitch
Mustard
,
from
Colorado,
and
all
three
were
driving
Chenowths.
At
the
end
of
tw() ·
of
the
eight
laps,
Whelchel,
Mustard
and
Gordon
were
nos
e
i:o
tail.
After
a
slight gap it was
John
Swift
,
Frank
Arciero,
Jr.,
and
Jim
Fishback,
Jr.
doing
the
. sarne
Rick
Jones
flew
his
Funco
into
second
spot
in the
second
Class· 10 heat,
and
Jones
finished
eighth
in the
Bosch
Bash.
The
early
leader
in the bash,
Don
Adams
brought
his Jeep
CJ
8
out
of
retirement,
but
he
ended
up
second
in Class
3.
_Class 7S was
hard
fought,
and
when the
12
laps ran
out
Jeff
Huber
had
his
slightly
battered
Ford
Ranger
out
front
in the class
and
second
overall in the
combined
event.
close
quarters
act in a
most
exciting race,
and
Tommy
Croft,
Marty
Coyne
and
Bryan
Decker
were also locked in close
combat.
Glenn
Harris
led
Class 7S
most
of
the race in his Mazda,
but~
late
breaking
collision
put
him
second
in class
at
the flag. ·
Sherman
Balch
took
the
overall
lead
in the
combo
race in his Class 7 Nissan in
the
early
laps, then a fa'iling
gearbox
dropped
him
back,
but
he
still
won Class
7.
With" five laps
done
Whelchel
was still fighting
off
Mustard
and
Gordon,
but
the
rest
of
the
pack
had
strung
out
some.
Mustard
bobbled
in
the
switchbacks
and
Gordon
slid
past.Jerry
Whelchel
led every lap
to
the
victory,
and
Bob
Gordon
finished second,
followed by
Mitch
Mustard.
Frank
Arciero,
with
Toyota
power
in the· tail, was fourttI
followed by
Tommy
Croft
and
John
Swift.
The
Bilstein Challenge . race
included
desert
style Classes 1, 2
and
10, a
total
of
18
starters
going for
the
Bilstein gold.
Desert
star
Jack
Johnson,
who
had
no
practice in
the
. car, was a last
minute
replacement
dr'iver
in
Jack
Wayre's
V-8
powered
monster
: Jack
and
Tim
Kennedy
came
around
the
first
turn
first,
but
Jack
spun
out
in the esses
and
lost a
lot
of
spots.
Larry Ragland
and
Al
Arciero
got
by
Kennedy
in
this
area,
and
Ragland was
looking
good
at
the
end
of
the
first
of
12
laps, his
Porsche
six
booming
nicely
in
the
Chaparral.
After
two
rounds
Arciero
had
his
Funco
SS
right
on
Ragland's
tail,
but
late(
on
Arciero
lost a rear
wheel, which
put
Kennedy
into
r-----------~---------,
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Page
14
Spence
Low
had
a
rough
weekend,
banging
1,1p
the
body
work
in practice,
but
his Nissan was
third
in the Class 7S
competition.
September 1985
Dusty
Times
·
surprised
him
in
the
switchbacks,
and
Balch
's
Nissan
had
the
overall
lead
on
the
first lap.
After
two
rounds
Adams
held
second
behind
Balch,
trailed
by
Don
Coffland,
CJ
8,
and
Glenn
Harris,
7S
Mazda,
who
had
Jerry
McDonald,
Chevy
S-10,
on
his
tail.
G.
T.
Gow/and
was the sole
survivor
of
the
pair
that
started
in Class 7 4 x
4,
adding
another
win
for
his desert Toyota.
Bob
Gordon
took
his
first
win in ten years
of
trying
, in the Bosch Bash, leading
more
than
half
distance in the
Chenowth
Magnum
,
and
his son Rob
won
a
Class 20 bike
moto
at
Riverside.
Balch
had
gearbox
trouble
and
dropped
to
fourth
on
the
road
on
lap
3.
Adams
led, with
Harris
right
on
his
tail,
and
Coffland
was close, being dogged
by
Geoff
Dorr,
CJ
8,
who
had
emerged
from
the
pack.
Midway
Adams
still led,
but
Dorr
was
up
to
second,
ahead
of
Harris
who
was
now
being
pressured
by
Jeff
Huber
·,
7S
Ford
Ranger.
Mc-
Donald
was
out
as was
Brent
Smith,
Ranger,
Manny
Esquerra,
Ranger,
and
Keith
Robb,
Scout
.
The Bosch Bash early leader,
Jim
Fishback, Jr., fell to
second
later
on
in the
Chenowth,
and
eventually finished third.
The-final race
on
Saturday
was
the
second
Class
10
Stadium
sty
le
heat
race, with a new cast
from
the
fir
st
round.
Scott
Taylor,
driving -his
own,
Illinois
built
chassis,
the
Eliminator, got
the
hole
shot
in
the
first
turn
and
Ta
y
lor
never
looked
back,
opening
a
wide
margin in
the
early laps.
To
the
rear
Rick Jones,
Funco,
and
Al
Arciero,
Chenowth,
had
a real dogfight
for second, and
Ru
ss
Welch
had
his s
hort
Funco
in
fourth.
There
was a big
smash-up
.in the _ first
turn
after
the
drag race
that
caught
Greg
George,
Lee
Wuesthoff
and
a
couple
of
others,
who
spent
the
rest
of
the
race catching
up
.
Tommy
Croft
did
well
in
his
Chenowth
in
Stadium
Class
10,
taking
over
fourth
in
the
main
event late in the race.
Frank
Arciero
nabbed
a wall
early in
the
game, as did
Rod
Attig,
and
both
drivers
retired
with flats.
Taylor
·held his lead
while Al
Arciero
passed
Jones
for
second
and
Mike
Withers
got
by
Russ
Welch.
Al
closed
the
gap
some
on
Scott
Taylor,
but
on
the
last lap
he
dropped
to
·
fourth
with
drive
train
woes.
Taylor
kept
his lead for
the
win
and
Rick
Jones
stayed
put
in second,
followed
by
Withers
.
Russ
Welch
was fifth
among
the
ten
who
covered
the
eight
laps
. .
Sunday
dawned
with
more
fog,
and
it
was
heavenly
cool
for
second
overall. Ragland
opened
up
a
husky
lead
over
Kenned
y,
and
Ron
Carte
r
had
his br
and
new
Chenow
th
Class
10
sing
le
seater in
third
on
the
road.
Next
came
Arciero,
Ike
Bruckman,
Jimco
Porsche,
Vince
Tjelme-
land,
lnticer,
and
Mike
Lund,
Chenowth.
Jack
Johnson
was
up
to
eighth,
and
freighting right
along.
Ragland
stopped
on
the
eighth
lap,
with
reported
fuel
pump
problems,
and
fellow Arizonan
Tim
Kennedy
put
his
two
seater
in
the
overall lead.
Well
back,
Ron
Carter
was next with
Tjelmeland
right with
him,
but.
Vince
vanished
in a
cloud
of
smoke
on
the
next lap.
By
lap
11
Tim
Kennedy
had
a
good
lead,
and
Mike
Lund
passed
Carter,
who
was
running
on
a
front
flat,
and
Jack
Johnson
was close
behind
now.
At
the
flag
Tim
Kennedy
won
the
Bilstein
Cup
overall
and
in ·
Class 2.
Mike
Lund
was
second
0/
A
and
the
Class 1 winner.
Ron
Carter
won
Class
10
with
his
third
overall. Jack
Johnson
was next,
second
in Class
1,
followed
by
Mark
·
Lund
ell,
Dirtrix-Mazda, se
cond
in Class 2,
Rick
Munyon,
third
in C lass 1,
Dwight
Lundell
, Dirtrix,
second
in Class 10,
and
eleven were all
on
the
lead lap in a fine bash.
Dusty
Times
Ivan
Stewart
took
the lead
on
the
second
lap
of
the Nissan
Mini
Metal
Challenge
and
the
lronman
never
looked
back
en
route
to
his
third
consecutive
victory
at
Riverside.
Frank
Arciero,
Jr.
did
a fine
job
with
the desert
length
Toyota,
staying
with
the
train
and
taking
second
in the
Mini
Metal ranks.
September
1985
the
morning
practice sessions.
But,
the
sun
was
out
when
the
first
car
racers
took
to
the
track
after
lunch.
The
combo
of
Classes 7, 7S, 7 4 x 4
and
-3
turned
out
to
be
a
good
grouping
with
20
assorted
trucks
taking
the
green flag.
Don
Adams
won
the
drag race
in
his high
powered
Jeep
CJ
8,
but
Sherman
Balch
This
is the system
run
by
most
off
road race
winners
After
eight
of
12
laps,
Don
Adams
had
a
slim
lead
over
Geoff
Dorr,
Harris
was next, first
7S
, tagged
by
Huber
and
Spence
Low,
w
hose
7S
Nissan
was
battered
from
a
practice
roll
over.
Balch was
i;.,.. i;.,..
·
i;.,..-
i;_,..
TRl•MIL
BOBCAT·
CHROME
DUAL
CAN
BOBTAIL
FOR
BAJA
BUGS
GO
FOR
2740
COMPTON
AVENUE
LOS
ANGELES,
CALIF.
90011
(213)
234-9014
WHOLESALE
ONLY
DEALER
INQUIRIES
INVITED
Page
15
~ ~ ~
next,
with
only
a
pair
ot
gears
kft,
but
leading
Class
7.
On
lap
8
Geoff
Dorr
thrilled
the
crowd
with
a
one
wheel
pass
on
Adams
to
take
the
overall
lead.
Just
behind
the
two
Jeeps,
Harris
was
holding
Huber
at
bay.
At
the
checkered
flag
Geoff
Dorr
had
a
bit
of
air
between
him
and
Don
Adams,
as
the
Rock-
ford,
Illinois
driver
won
the
race
overall
in
a
Jeep
he
built
himself.
Late
in
the
11th
lap
Harris
and
Huber
collided,
and
the
result
was
that
Huber
and
Ford
were
second
overall
and
won
Class 7S.
Don
Adams
got
third
overall,
and
Glenn
Harris
fourth,
and
both
were
second
in
their
class.
Next
came
Spence
Low, followed
by
an
ailing
Sherman
Balch,
who
-
did
win
Class
7
in
the
· Nissan.
Covering
nine
laps,
G.
T .
Gowland
took
the
7 4 x 4
trophy.
John
Baker
had
a
good
day
at
the races in the
Mitsubishi,
and
Baker
nailed
Young
Brent
Smith
drove
his
rent-a-Mazda
cleanly
in the Nissan
Mini
Metal
Challenge
and
he
finished
well
in
fourth
place.
third
place
in the
Mini
Metal
Challenge. ·
The
main
event
for
the
· Bosch
Bash was
only
ten
laps,
with
over
30
snorting
Class
10s
on
the
starting
grid
in
two
rows.
There
Was
a
monumental
mess
on
the
first
turn
which
took
out
several
cars,
including
contender
Ron
Carter
who
rolled
a
couple
of
times.
Jim
Fishback,
Jr. cleared
the
debris
first,
and
at
the
end
of
two
laps.
Fishback
had
a close
knit
train
of
Bob
Gordon,
Jerry
Whelchel
and
Scott
Taylor
in
his
rear
view
mirror.
On
the
next
round
Gordo11
got
past
Fishback
to
lead,
but
the
four
were
still
tight
with
Whelchel
and
Taylor
quite
close.
Midway
Bob
Gordon
had
opened
a slight
gap,
and
Fishback
had
Jerry
Mark
Hansen
really
flew in
his
Pontiac
Fiero
in the
Ultra
Stock
class,
and
Hansen
finished
a
strong
second
in the race.
Mike
Goodbody
's VW
Golf
bodied
Ultra
Stock
was a favorite
with
the
crowd
,
and
Mike
nailed
third
in class
at
Riverside,
Leading
from
the start,
Rob
Tolleson
fell
to
second
in Class 1-2-1600
at
the
finish
in the
Coliseum
winning
Mirage.
Page
16
Whelchel
tied
to
his
bumper.
Taylor
was
back
a
bit
in
fourth,
with
no
·
power
steering
or
third
gear.
Gordon
continued
to
lead,
Fishback
and
Whelchel
contin-
ued
their
battle
until
lap
9,
when
Jerry
made
the
pass
into
second.
Tommy
Croft
edged
by
Scott
Taylor
on
the
same
lap,
and
Pancho
Weaver
was
coming
out
of
the
traffic in
his
Charger.
At
the
flag
the
order
held
as
Bob
Gordon
took
his long
desired
victory
at
Riverside in
the
Bosch
Bash.
Jerry
Whelchel
held
onto
second,
followed
by
Fishback,
Croft,
Taylor
and
Weaver,
and
a
dozen
covered
the ten
laps.
The
Nissan
Mini
Metal
Challenge was
the
feature
for
the
modified
mini
trucks
.
While
only
a
dozen
appeared,
it
was a
hefty
horsepower
dozen.
Glenn
Harris
got
the
hole
shot
in his
Mazda
rotary
powered
racer,
but
Roger
Mears,
Nissan, was
right
on
top
of
him
into
the
esses.
On
the
banking
on
the
first
lap
Harris
lost
a
drive
shaft,
and
Mears
came
around
first,
followed
by
the
Toyotas
of
Ivan
Stewart,
Steve
Millen
and
Frank
Vince Tjelmeland
took
the lead in his Pontiac
Firebird
on
the
2nd
lap
of
the Ultra
Stock
clash,
and
Vince was never headed in the
10
lap combine·d class race.
Arciero.
Early
in
the
second
lap
Mears
·
hit
a
jump
hard
and
came
down
withma
power
steering,
and
that
was
that.
The
Toyotas
stayed
in
close
formation,
followed
by
Jeff
Huber,
Ford
Ranger;
John
Baker,
Mitsubishi,
and
John
Swift,
Ford
Ranger, were having
the
best
dice
of
the
race,
but
it
didn't
last
long
as Swift
got
a flat tire
and
pitted
for
fresh
rubber:
Up
front
Ivan
Stewart
pulled
With
one
lap
to
go
Jack
Johnson
made
a
daring
pass
into
the
lead
,
and
he
held
it
to the flag in
tight
quarters
driving
a
borrowed
car
in the
huge
Class 1-2-1600.
In
contention
all
the way,
northern
Caldornia
driver
Jeff
Elrod
had
to
settle
for
third
in
his
1-1600
Hi
Jumper
at
Riverside.
September 1985
away
from
Millen
on
lap
4,
and
by
lap
6 Steve Millen was
parked
with
ignition
trouble
.
Now
Arciero
was a lop.g
second,
and
he
stayed
a
comfortable
distance
ahead
of
Baker.
Jeff
Huber
collected a flat tire, ·
ending
that
threat
as well.
When
the
ten
laps -
ran
_
out
on
the
parade,
Ivan
Stewart
had
a
34
second
lead,
winning
for
.
the
third
year
in
a
row
in
a
Toyota.
Frank Arciero,
missing
the
rear
body
oA
his
longer
desert
Toyota,
was a long
second,
John
Baker was a long
third.
Still
on
the
same
lap,
but
well back, was
young
Brent
Smith,
,vho
rented
a
Harris
Mazda
for
the
occasion
and
kept
out
of
trouble
to
finish
fourth
.
One
of
the
biggest fields
of
the
meet
included
over
20
1-2-1600
cars
and
seven
Ultra
Stockers,
who
started
first.
There
was a
delay
start
between
classes,
and
the
race,
oddly
enough,
was
only
ten
laps. A
number
of
the
buggies
that
_
came
to
grief
on
the
first lap
were
not
even
listed
on
the
official results,
so
apparently
the
reason
this
race was
on
Sunday
was
because
of
the
Ultra
Stocks;
Class 1 buggies
with
a glass
body.
Craig
Durfee
led
the
Ultra
Stocks
off
the
line,
with
Vince
Tjelmeland
and
Mike
Goodbody
in
hot
pursuit.
After
two
laps
Tjelmeland
had
his
Firebird
in
the
lead
for
good.
Mark
Hansen,
Fiero,
gave
it
a
good
chase, as
did
Craig
Durfee,
Fiero,
and
Mike
Goodbody,
VW
Golf.
But,
Vince
Tjelmeland
was
never
headed
,
en
route
to
victory.
Mark
Hansen
finished
second,
making
it
ne-two
for
the
General
team.
Goodbody
was
third,
followed
by
Tony
Sielski, Buick,
and
Dale
Calhoun,
Buick. Rich
Prouty
and
Durfee
both
faded after seven
laps.
The
1-2-1600
tussle
provided
more
excitement, with infighting
all
down
the
ranks.
Taking
the
Dusty
Times
won
the
Nissan
Mini
Metal_
Challenge,
but
that's
racing.
The
_
other
truck
class
victories
were
nicely
strung
out
between
Jeep,
Nissan,
Toyota,
Ford,
and
Dodge.
All
the
major
tire
companies
got
a piece
of
the
pie
too,
which
helps
their
support
efforts
for
off
road
racing.
As
in
past
years,
the
heavy
emphasis
on
Sunday
was
on
trucks
. All
the
truck
classes were
on
the
prime
time
card,
while
the
Nevada
driver
Steve Hansen
had
a
good
run
in his
Sandhawk
,
running
with
the
leaders
ail
the way,
and
he
finished
fourth
in
1600s.
Three laps
from
the finish Walker Evans
put
his
mighty
Dodge
in the
Stroh
's
Heavy
Metal
Challenge
lead,
and
Evans
returned
to
victory
at his
home
track
at
Riverside
with
a
new
truck.
. usually
starring
Class 1 cars
were
relegated,
both
classes,
to
the
Saturday
curtain
risers.
Of
course
the
buggies
and
Bugs still
constituted
the
bulk
of
the
car
entry.
·
But
the
slimmer
classes
of
3 wheelers,
Quadrunners,
and
Odysseys
also
got
the
prime
time
on
Sunday.
Still,
the
Sunday
crowd
didn't
look
to
be
any
larger
than
last year,
before
the
rain.
So,
the
shift
in
class
visibility
didn't
do
the
gate
much
good.
But,
those
who
attended
saw
some
great
racing
and
some
parades,
as usual.
The
good
news
is
that
they
can
all
come
back
to
watch
the
14th
edition
of
the
cl~ssic
off
road
gathering
next
year
at
Riverside
in
mid
August.
rear
fenders,
was fifth
ahead
of
Kelley, while
John
Randall
was
fighting valiantly
to
hold
the
next
spot
in
his
Jeep
over
Stan
Gilbert,
Class 8
Ford
.
On
the
ninth
lap
Walker
Evans
got
along side
Curt
LeDuc
and
made
the
pass
which
must
of
been
a
thrill
for
Walker's
pas-
senger, his wife Phyllis.
Vessels
and
Hall
held
position.
On
the
next
lap
LeDuc
did
a triple_
endo,
and
said
later
he
was
just
going .
too
fast.
This
moved
Frank
Vessels
into
second
overall.
Frank Vessels
raised
a
lot
of
eyebrows
with
his
new
,
sleek
Chevy
,
and
it
went
fast
too
as Vessels
took
second
overall
in the Heavy
Metal
.
At
the
flag
Walker
Evans
had
a
good
lead
in
his
Dodge
to
win
the
Stroh's
Heavy
Metal
Challenge.
Frank
Vessels was
second,
and
Rodney
Hall was
third,
closing
the
gap,
and
he
was
the
Class
4
winner
with
the
wisps
of
smoke
·
coming
from
the
engine
bay.
Steve Kelley was
fourth
overall
in
,
the
GMC,
followed
home
by
Stan
Gilbert
and
John
Randall,
whose
Jeep
was
the
last rig
to
cover
12
laps;
Randall
was
second
in
Class
4.
The
sole
survivor
in Class
14
was
Wes
Banks
in
his
single
seat
Jeep,
covering
ten
laps
and
finishing
with
a
rear
flat.
Wes
Moser
beat
lead
on
the
first
turn
was
Rob
Tolleson,
Mirage,
pursued
by
the
herd
.
It
sorted
out
on
the
second
lap
to
be
Tolleson,
Todd
Attig,
Eliminator,
Jeff
Elrod,
Hi
Jumper,
Steve
Hansen,
Sand-
hawk,
and
Jack
Johnson,
Hi
Jumper.
The
pack
stayed
tight
for
five laps,
then
Tolleson
stretched
his
lead.
But
Elrod,
second
with
Attig's
retirement,
and
Johnson
were
side
by
side
in
the
turns
. .
Hansen
held
fourth
followed
by
Jesse Rodriguez.
On
the
sixth
lap
Johnson
got
by
Elrod
and
set
out
after
Tolleson.
Jack
caught
up
on
the
ninth
lap
and
made
the
pass
in
what
he
later
described
as
an
"awesome
line"
in
the
switch-
backs.
Jack
Johnson
won
the
class
and
the
Las Vegas cheering
section
in
the
stands
went
wild.
Jack
seemed
happier
than
most
of
the
winners
in
victofy
circle.
Tolleson
stayed
close,
but
was
second,
and
Jeff
Elrod
was
third
followed
by
Steve
Hansen
.
The
Grand
Finale
at
Riverside
this
year was
the
Stroh's
Heavy
Metal
Challenge
for
Classes
4,
8,
14
and
6B,
24
starters
in
all
and
the
ground
shook
as
they
left
the
·
line.
The
expected
battle
between
Walker
Evans,
Class
8
Dodge,
and
Curt
LeDuc,
Class
14
Ford,
developed
right
off
the
line,
and
the
Massachusetts
built
special
won
the
drag
race.
LeDuc
led
the
first
round
with
Evans
close,
followed
by
Frank
Vessels
in
his
new
and
quite
controversial
Class
8
Chevy,
Dave
Shoppe,
Class
8
Ford,
Steve Kelley, Class
8
GMC,
and
defending
overall
winner
Rod
Hall, Class 4
Dodge
.
After
three
of
the
12
laps,
LeDuc
had
several
car
lengths
on
Evans,
Vessels
was
lonely
in
third,
and
Hall
was
right
on
top
of
Shoppe.
Back
in
the
pack
the
Ford
Ranchero
of
Wes
Moser
had
the
Class
6
lead
over
Larry
Schwacofer,
Chevy.
Don
Adams
Dusty Times
lost
the
front
drive
in
his
Jeep
and
didn't
finish a lap,
and
Tom
Morris
spun
his
GMC
close
to
the
fence
in
the
esses
and
parked.
John
Gable
only
did
two
laps
in
his
Ford,
having
rolled
in
practice,
and
Jerry
Daugherty
stopped
to
fix
the
distributor
in
his
Class
14
Chevy
Blazer.
Midway
LeDuc
held
the
lead,
but
Evans
was
getting
closer,
Vessels
was
third,
Hall
was
fourth,
and
Shoppe,
shedding
Curt
LeDuc
put
his
modified
Ford
Ranger
in the Heavy
Metal
lead
from
the
green
but
he
rolled
it
out
of
contention
laJer on.
Wes
Moser
drove
his
ancient
,
Arras-style
Ford
Ranchero
hard
at Riverside,
and
he won Class 6 honors.
Check
the
neat
push
bar
on
the
front
of
the race rig!
September
1985
out
a fast closing
Larry
Schwa-
cofer
for
Class
6
honors,
and
both
of
them
finished
ahead
of
Banks.
The
curtain
rang
down
on
Riverside
'85
early
enough
for
the
crowd
to
depart
in
the
daylight.
There
were
some
puzzling
rulings
by
various
·
officials,
but
those
that
question
the
end
result
need
only
read
page
108
of
the
1985
Score
Rule
Book.
Ironically; a
Toyota
again
Defending
champion
in Heavy Metal,
Rod
Hall
ran a
small
engine
this year,
and
he
won
the Class 4
honors
handily,
but
had
to be
content
with
third
overall
in
the
combo
race.
Wes
Banks
came
from
the
north
to
contest
the Class
14
honors
,
and
he
ended
up
the class
winner
in
_the
Heavy
Metal
bash,