...
(I
BFGOODBICII UPDA'l'E#2J:
TWO
NEW ZEALAND
FARM
BOYS
ADD
SOME DASH
TO
AMERICAN
RACING.
STEVE
AND
ROD MILLEN.
THE EARLY YEARS.
Two
good-natur~d
yet
fiercely
competitive
race
drivers
have
been
gaining
recognition
in
many
different
kinds
of
American
motorsports lately.
They
are
Steve
and
Rod
Millen. Both
are
BFGoodrich
team
drivers.
It
all
began
in
New
Zealand
on
their
family
farm
when
their
father,
an
enthusiast, built
them
a
go-kart
when
they
were
only
6
and
7
years
old.
Since
then,
they
have
raced
both
together
and
independently;
but
it
was
years
before
either
began
to
earn
a
living
at
it.
At
one
time,
Rod
worked
in
an
Australian
coal
mine
to
earn
money
for a
dune
buggy
with
a
V-6
Capri
engine.
He
won
so
many
races
and
rallies
in
it
that
the
buggy
was
finally
outlawed.
So
Rod
went
on
to
other
cars,
supporting
himself
as
a
surveyor
in
New
Zealand
and
the
Fiji
Islands
until
racing
began
to
pay
for itself.
Steve
was
in
the
decorating
business
until
racing
supported
him.
"Both
Rod
and
I
have
raced
almost
everything
on
four .
wheels,"
said
Steve, oldest
of
the
two
by
a year.
"For
example,
when
the fuel crisis
hit
New
Zealand
in
1974,
we
just
switched
over
to a
stock
car
on
oval
tracks,
the
only
kind
of
racing
·
permitted:'
They
took
turns
racing
a
Capri
with
a
potent
engine
transplanted
from Rod's
banned
dune
buggy.
Steve
won
the
South Pacific
Championship
and
Rod
won
the
Auckland
Championship.
Rod
Millen/Steve
Millen.
CONQUEST
IN
THE
SOUTH PACIFIC.
Other
successes
followed.
Steve
tried Formula
Ford-
reluctantly;
at
first.
Then
he
won
the
Singapore
Grand
Prix
and
swept
five
New
Zealand
races
in
his
FF
in
his
first year. He later·
graduated
to
a Formula Atlantic
car
in
which
he
raced
to victory
all
over
the Pacific. He
became
the
first
New
Zealander
to
wjn
the
New
Zealand
International
Grand
Prix,
beating
Formula
One
drivers. He
set
new
lap
records
in
Malaysia, Penang,
New
Zealand,
and
at
Riverside
in
California.
In the
meantime,
Rod
was
racing
his
way
to the top
in
New
Zealand
international rallies.
Competing
against
factory-team
cars
in
a
stock
Mazda
RX-3,
he
placed
third
in
his
first full
championship
season.
Rod
learned
to
tweak
more
performancefrom
his
Mazda
,
and
went
on
to
win
the
champ-
\
ionship
three
years
in
a row.
The South Pacific
began
to
,
run
oilt
of
road
for the Millen
brothers,
who
then
began
to look
north.
CALIFORNIA-BOUND.
Rod
was
first
to
settle
in
Orange
County; just south
of
Los
Angeles.
He
soon
rallied
against
no
less
a driver
than
John Buffum,
long-time US. Pro
Rally
Champion.
In
1981,
Rod took the
championship
from Buffum.
In
1982,
Buffum
bested
Rod's two-
wheel-drive
Mazda
RX-7 with a
new
4X4
Audj
Quattro.
Undaunted,
Rod
created
a
4X4
Mazda
RX-7 for
1983.
Both
he
and
Buffum fought it out
on
BFGoodrich T/A® Radials for the
next
two
seasons.
The
very
last
rally
of
1984
saw
Rod slightly
ahead
011 points.
Then
a
mechanical
failure
ended
his
hopes
and
Buffum
went
011 to
win
the
championship.
Rod
rolled
up
his
sleeves
and
prepared
for
1985.
Steve
moved
to
Orange
County
later. But
he
was
quick
to
be
chosen
by
the
Toyota Precision
Preparation
off-road
racing
team,
which
also
races
on
T/A Radials.
Steve
had
never
seen
an
off-road
race
until
he
raced
in
one. But
he
soon
won
races.
Since
then,
Steve
·
has
raced
formula,
IMSA,
showroom
stock;
and
rally
cars-all
with
great
success.
In
1985,
Steve
is
racing
both
short-
course
off-road
events
and
the
Playboy
Endurance
Cup
Series
in
an
SSGT
1985
Corvette. In
addition,
he
tests
many
different
vehicles-including
open
-
wheel
cars,
a favorite
of
his
.
1------------------t
DRIVING,
MILLEN-STYLE.
"Some
drivers
do
well
sliding
and
some
do
well
with
a
smoother
driving
style,"
said
Steve
Millen. 'Tm
comfortable
either
way,
but
I find
that
driving
ground-effects
cars
mandates
a
smooth
style. With
these
cars,
you
-
seem
to
slow
down
to
go
faster-
because
it's
quicker
to
go
forwards
than
sideways
.
You
never
stop
learning,
you
see,
especially
when
you
do
a lot
of
testing. Testing
convinced
me
that
with
today's
high
-
speed
road-
racing
cars,
the
state
of
the
art
is
a
smooth
driving
style-quite
unlike
my
younger
brother's:'
Rod
Millen
could
not
surpress
a
chuckle
at
this
comment,
remembering
how
Steve's
troubles
learning
to
rally
the
4X4
Mazda
had
been
as
great
as
his
own.
Indeed,
anyone
who
rides
a
rally
stage
in
that
car
with
Rod
will
agree
his
style
is
unconventional.
He
pitches
the
car
into
a
corner
in
an
oversteer
attitude-for
which
he
does
not
correct. "You
do
exactly
the
opposite
of
what
seems
right;'
Rod
said
. "
Throw
out
all
the
years
of
Rod
Millen's
special
4X4
Mazda
RX-7.
learning
throttle oversteer.
Because
as
soon
as
you
apply
throttle,
the
car
goes
back
to
understeer.
You
can
even
drop
the
rear
tires
off
the
road,
stick
_
your
foot
in
it,
and
let
the
front
tires
pu11
you
through-thanks
to
the
side-bite
they
develop."
TIRES
,
MILLEN-STYLE.
About
tires,
Rod
Millen
continued:
"I
don't
think
Id
get
quite
the
side-bite I
need
without
Radidl
Mud
-Terrain T/A® tires.
While
I
rally
on
a
number
of
BFGoodrich
tires
depending
on
conditions, it's
the
mudder
I
choose
when
I
really
want
the
tires to
bite
through
gravel
or
mud
or
snow
and
spit
the
stuff
out. It
helps
you
brake
late
and
get
on
the
power
early. That's a
good
thing
because
some
rally
corners
take
you
by
surprise.
You
see,
there's
no
such
thing
as
a
practice
rally."
"For
once
my
brother
and
I
agree,"
Steve
Millen
joked.
"In
off-road
racing
I find it a
tremendous
advantage
to
choose
from
three
T/A Radials. In
short~course
racing
they
usually
wet
down
the
track
to
reduce
dust
on
spectators-often
to
the
point
of
creating
mud.
So
you
might
start
your
day
on
the
Radial
Mud-Terrain T/A,
go
on
to
the
Radial
All-Terrain
T/A™
later,
and
finish
your
day
on
the
Radial
Sport
Truck
T/A~
"I
think
more
than
anything
else, tires
have
shown
the
biggest
advances
in
racing
today,"
Steve
concluded.
"The
special-purpose
racing
tires
we
ran
not
so
long
ago
would
simply
be
blown
away
Steve
Millen's SSGT 1985
Corvette.
by
today's
Comp
T/A®
Radials.
The
steps
BFGoodrich
has
taken
to
keep
up
with
suspension
improvements
are
amazing.
You
take
a
car
like
the
'85
Corvf:tte I
race
in
the
Playboy
Cup
Series;
the
g-forces
and
loadings
that
Comp
T/A tires
can
take-and
the
cornering
speeds
you
can
generate-'are
simply
astounding
for
street
tires.
If
you
want
proof,
just
see
how
well
they
do
when
the
checkered
flag
comes
out:'
our
, ,
he
unbe-
seat buggies
as
,
ff
the
throttle!
talk
to
your
favorite
isitwith
manufacturers
e
off-road
products,
ut
·
how
the
pros
ine$ last. Witness
the
enes c:,ction
as
the
top
y.-ners, drivers
and
.e the
world's
best
machines.
,, ,
~
t T oyotas, Fords,
Jeeps, lsuzus,
tsuns, Chevrolets in
a
Bugs
and
· 2. + 4
production
cars all
y
side
for
the
World
wn
of
Off-Road
ne
of
a kind racing
II
days
of
action
at
a's last
REAL
off-road
·
og
facility!
Grab
your
meras. Bring shorts
'fe & kids, parents &
h.t
Par:king!
~
~
\ "l:1:1'"1:\RIJS
.
7:00
a.
for
all classes.
Championship raci
FREE
Overnight
Pa
SUNDAY
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August
18th
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~f
including
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HEAVY
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and
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I
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(714)
653-1161
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ENTE
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ncluding
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Volume 2 Number 8
August 1985
In
This
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•••
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Contributors
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Flick
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Grimshaw
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McRae
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McKenzie
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Oursler
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Parker
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R
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Schwalm
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Sprovkin
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SNAPSHOT
OF
THE
MONTH •••
I
FEATURES
Page
HDRA
Fireworks 250
.....
..
. .
....
. . .
..
.
....
. . .
....
12
MTEG
at
the
Orange
Show
Fairgrounds .. .
..
. .
....
.
..
..
22
BFGoodrich
Autocross
-
Toronto
...
.
...
.....
_ . . . . .
..
. 28
Toyota
Olympus
Pro
Rally . . . .
..
.
........
.
...
. . .
....
33
World
Championship
Acropolis Rally
.......
. .
..
.
.. ..
37
Pro
CanAm
Little
Rock
300 ; .
..
. .
..
...
.......
. . .
..
..
38
VORRA
Virginia City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
MAA
at
Perris Speedway
.....
.
.....
.
............
.
..
44
Coors
Off
Road
Classic -
Tucson
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Brush
Run
in
Wisconsin
...
.
............
.
..
. .
..
.....
47
GORRA's
Dusty
50 Miles
........
.
.................
49
BAS
Green
Bay Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Score
Canada
at
Rimouski
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
FORDA
in
Hollywood
..
..
...........
·
...
.
..........
53
RMORRA
at
Colorado
Springs
........
.
............
. 56
DEPARTMENTS
Snapshot
of
the
Month
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Soap
Box
by
Barlow Racing
Team
..
:
..........
.
......
'.
6
Trail
Notes
.......
.
................
.
....
."
..........
6
Happenings
..........
.
..................
.
....
, . . . . . 8
Side
Tracks
by
Judy
Smith
..........................
10
Classified
Ads
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Index to-Advertisers
............
.
..................
58
ON
THE
COVER-
Flying high
over
the
photographers'
favorite
cattle
guard
in
Baja
California,
Rodney
Hall
with
Jim
Fricker
co-driving,
has
had
a
remarkable
year
in
the
Class 4
Dodge
pickup.
While
every race has
not
been
a cakewalk,
and
there
have
been
some
problems,
Rod
and
the
big
Dodge
have
won
Class 4 in every
major
desert
race
in
1985,
including
a
seventh
class
victory
at
the
Mint
400:
You
can't
do
any
better
than
that!
Naturally,
Rod
Hall is
the
leader
on
points
in
the
combined
Score
and
High
Desert
points
series,
and
he
is
also
the
leader
by
19
points
in
the
overall
Heavy
Metal
category
in
the
series.
Color
Photography
by
Jim
Ober
of
Trackside
Photo
Enterprises.
. .
I\~
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Name~----------------------------
"Kick
that
tire
good
while I get
this
one
loose"
might
be
the
comment
of
Dennis
Lee
to
his
co-driver
Nancy
Lee
.yhen
his
Class 2
had
a
rear
flat
at
the
Fireworks
250. Flats
were very
common
on
the
rugged
course,
with
an
ample
supply
of
"Gotcha"
rocks
hiding
under
the
sand
washes.
This
incident
did
not
stop
Lee's team,
and
they
went
on
to
cover
three
laps
before
a
major
disaster
put
them
out
of
the
race.
DUSTY
TIMES
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or
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on
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Dusty
Times
August
1985
Page
5
Soap Box •••
The Other Side
Of
The
Story
On
The
Barstow
Penalty
Program
I
would
like
to
suggest
that
the
High
Desert
Racing
Association
establish
a grievance
committee
to
hear
both
sides
of
an
issue
when
there
is a
problem
during
a
race.
First
of
all, I
would
like
to
say
that
the
people
at
the
check
points
and
the
officials
do
a
good
job
.
This
ia
not
meant
to
criticize,
but
to
question.
Our
car,
#1215,
started
16th
among
57
in
Class
1-2-1600
on
July
6th
in
the
Fireworks
250
at
Barstow.
As
everyone
knows
it
was
a
hot,
rough
race,
testing
car
and
driver
to
the
limit.
Steven
Barlow,
my
son,
started
the
race.
After
two
laps
of
hard
racing
he
stopped
for
fuel
and
to
change
drivers,
and
he
had
bettered
his
position.
Jim
Moulton
then
got
in
the
car
to
run
the
remaining
two
laps
.
The
race
car
had
already
been
through
some
pretty
hairy
situations,
and
the
course
had
gotten
worse.
Jim
drove
a
great
race
and
the
car
held
up
with
only
one
flat tire.
We
were
in
second
place
when
Jim
came
into
the
finish line.
His
feelings
must
have
been
a
blend
of
excitement,
relief
and
fatigue.
He
pulled
up
to
the
flagman
and
stopped.
The
engine
died
and
Jim
heard
one
of
the
officials yell
to
get
the
car
out
of
the
way,
because
cars
were
coming
in
.
He
started
the
engine
up,
assuming
the
chip
had
already
been
placed
in
the
can,
and
he
moved
forward
to
the
next
official
standing
beside
the
scorekeeper's
motor
-
home
.
The
official yelled
at
him
that
the
clock
was still
running
on
them,
and
to
go
back
through
again.
Jim
believed
the
official
meant
to
go
forward
,
re-enter
the
track,
and
go
through
the
start
/ finish
again.
He
never
considered
going
backwards
on
the
course
because
he
knows
that
is
breaking
the
rules
. Besides
he
could
not
see
if
anyone
was
coming
up
behind
him
.
We
could
not
find
out
from
anyone
what
they
would
have
had
him
do
at
that
point.
Why
was
the
chip
not
put
in
at
the
start
/ finish line?
They
say
Jim
didn't
stop,
yet we
had
witnesses
that
knew
he
did
.
Steve
Barlow,
who
was
standing
there,
had
even
started
forward
to
help
him
push
the
car
when
he
saw
the
lights
on
the
dash
come
on
when
the
engine
stalled,
and
he
heard
someone
yell
"Get
that
car
out
of
here".
We
did
not
find
out
until
Sunday
morning
that
we
had
been
penali
z
ed
30
minutes,
and
it
took
all
morning
to
find
an
official
that
would
tell
us
what
the
penalty
was for!
We
were
penalized
15
minutes
for
not
stopping
at
the
start
/ finish line,
which
we
did,
and
15
minute
s
for
re-entering
the
track,
although
we
were
told
to
go
back
through.
From
the
very
beginning
it
was a
waste
of
time
to
plead
our
case.
We
only
found
officials
on
the
defensive,
even
before
hearing
our
side
of
the
story.
ls
there
such
a
thing
as a fair
hearing
where
the
drivers
are
concerned,
when
there
i
sn't
a
clear
deliberate
breaking
of
the
rules?
We
were
just
following
instructions.
This
was
the
end
of
a long,
hard
race,
and
how
can
drivers
be
expected
to
react
flawlessly
to
confusion
.
Steve
Barlow
and
Jim
Moulton
were
the
second
place finishers.
They
know
it
and
we,
their
family
supporters,
know
it.
The
High
Desert
Racing
Asso-
ciation
needs
an
unbiased
committee
to
hear
both
sides
of
a
situation
when
there
isn't
a clear
and
deliberate
rules
infraction.
We
should
all
pursue
this
idea
for
all
our
benefit
. But, I
am
afraid
that
those
reading
this
statement
will
forget
the
time
we
were
the
victim
and
only
remember
the
times
we
benefited
from
it
.
Bunny
Barlow
This
is
an
open
letter
to
all
interested
off
roaders,
regarding
the
time
penalties
given
by
"officials"
of
the
H .D .R .A .
Please
permit
me
to
explain
my
side
of
what
happened
during
the
Fireworks
250
last
month
at
Barstow,
California.
I
was
driving
car
1215
the
final
two
laps,
and
we were given a
30
minute
penalty
at
the
finish line,
which
moved
us
from
second
as
finished
to
fifth
on
the
official
results
. Fifteen
minutes
was
for
not
stopping
at
the
finish line
and
fifteen
minutes
was
for
going
back
to
get
the
chip,
which is
what
"officials"
said
to
do
.
Coming
to
the
finish line I
did
not
see
the
man
standing
alone
with
the
chip.
I
stopped
where
I
thought
the
finish line was! I
thought
I
had
been
given
my
chip.
Having stalled
the
engine,
someone
yelled
at
me
"get
it
out
of
here,
car
coming
in"
.
After
starting
the
car
I
went
to
the
corner
where
another
"official"
stopped
me
and
said
"clock
is
still
running,
you
don't
have
your
chip,
you
have
to
go
back
to
get
it"
.
Rather
than
go
backwards
on
the
course
I
proceeded
around
the
scoring
trailer
very
calmly
past
the
crowd
to
an
opening,
so
I
could
get
back
on
the
track
to
get
my
chip
. I
then
went
on
,
so
the
can
could
be
removed
and
the
car
put
in
impound
for
the
night.
As
Americans
we
have
rights.
ATTENTION
DESERT
RACERS
DUSTY
TIMES
has
contingency
money
posted
at
all Score
and
HDRA
desert
races. Check
it
out
on
contingency
row
-
Two
different
classes each event.
Page6
If
you
were
stopped
by
a police-
man
and
given
a
ticket,
you
would
have
the
option
to
present
your
case
to
an
impartial
judge,
who
would
listen
to
your
side
of
the
story.
H .
D.R
.A .
officials
decided
this
penalty
solely
by
themselves
with
no
impartial
persons
present.
I
feel
the
H .D.
R.A.
should
have
a griev-
ance
committee
made
up
of
impartial
persons
.
I feel
these
penalties
were very
unfair,
as I
stopped
at
the
finish
line, killing
the
motor,
and
did
what
the
"officials"
said
to
do
. I
also
feel
the
way
the
final
decision
was
made
was
very
unfair.
I
feel
all
"officials"
should
be
wearing
red
vests
or
striped
shirts
so
when
you
come
in
you
can
tell
them
from
the
spectators.
"Officials"
at
the
finish line (
at
Barstow)
did
not
seem
to
know
what
was
even
going
on
.
In
the
past
it
seems
there
have
been
a
lot
of
penalties
decided
by
such
quick
decisions,
and
·
then
not
giving
the
drivers
any
say
at
all.
Anyone
concerned
with
these
procedures
should
write
to
the
H.D.R.A.
or
Score
to
hopefully
get things
changed
. ·
Jim
Moulton
As luck would have it, we were
sitting next
to
the finish tine when
car
1215
arrived, happy for your
good finish
in the huge class,
and
Judy Smith was sitting next
to
us
.
After
seeing the car stop in front
of
the
scoring
trail
er,
we
both
wondered why it went around
and
back through the finish line
at
such
a sedate pace. Check Judy's Side
Tracks column for her observations
on the finish line operation.
What
anyone on the Barlow team
neglected
to
mention was that the
penalty not only dropped them
in
finish position, but dropped their
payoff
from over two grand
to
a few
hundred bucks. Unfortunately we
cannot reproduce the color picture
you sent, showing the car stopped
along side
Walt
Lott
and
an
official
wearing a black
and
white striped
referee
style
shirt,
hig
hly
visible
when coming out
of
the dark desert.
The
pie also shows the
man
holding
the
chip
some yards
up
course,
wearing a plain white shirt
and
pants.
We
heartily concur that time
penalties have
in the past been
handed out
too
severly in some cases
and
not heavy enough in others.
We
have said before that the combined
HORA
/
SCORE
Desert Series
needs a
common set
of
rules on
matters
of
this
nature
,
and
a
grievance committee such as those
used
at
Parker
and
Lucerne.
We
invite comment from all quarters on
the problem
of
checkpoint control
and
time penalties.
We
think a hay
bale chicane
on the pavement run
to
the finish line
at
Barstow similar
to
that used
at
the Speedrome for some
years
at
the
Mint
400,
might have
avoided
the
majority
of
these
penalties
at
the Fireworks
250
.
Volunteers are i1wited
to
climb on
the
ir
"Soap Box" and fill this space
with their thoughts about
what
is
good
and
what
is
not
so
good about
the state
of
off
road racing. W e
would welcome some discussion
on
the state
of
the Pro Rally Series as
we
ll.
Call
or
write
DUSTY
TIMES
·
with your ideas for a Soap Box
column,
and
get on the schedule.
August
1985
Trail Notes •••
DUSTY
TIMES
has
heard
from
a
number
of
subscribers
who
somehow
did
not
receive
their
copy
of
the
July
i~ue
in
the
mail.
There
was a definite
problem
at
the
post
office, because
the
test
copy
mailed
to
the
DUSTY
TIMES'
office
has
yet
to
arrive,
24
days after
it
was mailed.
If
you
are missing
your
July issue,
and
would
like
to
have it, albeit a
month
late,
drop
us a c
ard
and
we will take care
of
it
promptly
.
SNORE, LTD.
of
Las Vegas, Nevada,
had
a
warm
up
club
race recently for
their
end
of
July
Midnight
Special, which starts
and
finishes
in
the
dark
.
While
the
turnout
was light for
the
Twilight
event
late in June,
the
course
was
super,
wandering
around
Goodsprings
on
some
long ago used race trails,
and
the
weather
was beautiful.
As
is
their
custom,
SNORE
combined
Classes 1, 2
and
10
in
a single
unlimited
style category.
Well
on
his way
to
another
SNORE
points
championship,
Ron
Ellenburg
won
the
class
and
overall in his
Class
10
Hi
Jumper.
Tom
Bradley was
second,
Bill Kreitlow was
third
and
Don
Slagle
took
fourth
in
the
Unlimited
group
.
In
Class
1-2-1600
Rob
MacCachren
drove
to
first
in
class, followed
by
Ken
Freeman,
Jr
., Jerry
Heaton,
Brent
Bell
and
Howard
Ringe.
AT PIKE'S PEAK
the
regulars
on
the
hillclimb
circuit
took
a beating
from
the
visitors this year.
Audi
has
been
aiming
for
a
record
on
the
event
for
a
couple
of
years,
and
this year they
got
it!
.
Close
last year, French rally driver
Michele
Mouton
whipped
her
Audi
Quattro
up
the
hill
to
win
the
Open
Rally
Class
by
a
goodly
margin,
and
she
broke
.
the
absolute
record
set
by
Al
Unser,
Jr.
in
1982
.
Mouton
;s
time
this year was 11 :
25.39,
beating
the
old
mark
by
nearly
13
seconds. Naturally she
won
the
Pike's Peak Hill
Climb
overall
too
.
The
double
triumph
must
have
been
hard
to
swallow for
some
of
the
old
timers
... a full
bodied
car,
four
wheel drive, a foreign
made
car
at
that
and,
a
woman
driver! ·
Rod
Millen
was
second
in
Open
Rally Class
in
his Mazda RX-7 4 x
4,
and
Jochi
Kleint
was
third
in
a
twin
engined
VW
Golf
.
Dodge
swept
the
Production
Rally Class as
John
Crawford
won
in a Shelby
Turbo,
followed
by
Larry
Huff,
Daytona
Turbo
Z,
and
Doug
Shepherd,
Omni
GLH
. Roger Mears
won
by
a
bunch
in
the
Stock
Car
Division driving a
Camaro
.
Bobby
Regester
won
the
open
wheel category, while
off
road
champ
Don
Adams
was
fourth
in
a
Wells
Coyote.
Watch
for
the
full feature
on
Pike's
Peak
in
the
September
issue
of
DUSTY
TIMES
.
SIMPSON SAFETY has a new
public
relations
man,
Bill
Hanyon.
Bill
attended
the
Fireworks
250,
and
he is a real race enthusiast.
Off
roaders
will
see
more
of
Hanyon
at
the
major
events
too.
Any
questions
concerning
Simpson
Safety
Equipment
should
be
directed
to
Bill
Hanyon
at
Simpson,
(213)
320-7231.
THE
FRONTIER
500
is
making
history
in Nevada.
For
the
first time a
major
race is teaming
up
with a well
known
charity
to
"Drive
Out
Dystrophy"
.
The
race,
of
course, is
the
Frontier
500,
and
the
charity is
the
Muscular
Dystrophy
Association.
There
are several
methods
of
joining
the
"Drive
Out
Dystrophy"
program
.
One
can
sponsor
a vehicle
in
the
Frontier
500
by
the
mile.
Should
you
pledge
50
cents a mile
for
a certain race car,
and
if
it
covers
500
miles,
you
would
pay
Muscular
Dystrophy
$250.
The
minimum
pledge is
25
cents
per
mile.
Another
method
is
by
making
a flat
donation
to
the
charity
in
the
name
of
the
vehicle
you
sponsor
.
Or
one
can
raise
money
via
a special
event
for
Muscular
Dystrophy.
Get
the
full
details
on
the
program
by
writing
to
the
Frontier
500
"Drive
Out
Dystrophy",
Muscular
Dystrophy
Association,
1785
East Sahara Ave.,
Suite
480,
Las Vegas,
NV
89104.
CONGRATULATIONS
TO
VOYLES
VW
on
their
grand
opening
last
month.
The
place
stocks
all
manner
of
performance
parts
and
accessories for
anything
from
a race car
to
a
pre-runner
or
a
sand
buggy.
The
new facility is
justoff
the210
Freeway in
Temple
City,
CA
,
so
check
them
out
when
you
are
in
the
neighborhood
at
10934
Grand
Ave.
THE FIREWORKS
250
is
amply
covered elsewhere in this issue.
But
a
couple
matters
not
already
belabored
are
worth
mentioning.
Apparently
the
effort
to
make
the
twi-
night
classic a
four
day affair were less
than
successful.
We
understand
that
the
chili
cook
off, while a
lot
of
fun
for
those
involved,
didn't
draw
much
interest
other
than
that.
Congrats
go
to
Rosie
Orozco's
checkpoint
crew,
who
came in
third
in
the
chili tasting contest,
but
they
won
the award for
the
best
appearing chili
cooking
team.
The
effort
to
again
make
tech
and
registration
a
two
day
operation
reportedly
fizzled like a
spent
firecracker
too
.
Although
a
number
of
racers
did
get
the
registration
over
with
on
Friday,
about
half
a dozen cars came
through
the
contingency
and
tech
inspect
i
on
area
on
Fr
iday.
Of
course
only
a
few contingency
donors
showed
up
early also.
Many
veterans
of
the
two
day
ritual
at
the
Frontier
500,
which also
produced
few
to
no
cars
on
the
first day,
set
up
shop
early
Saturday
morning
.
Beyond
the
need
to
standardize time penalties
throughout
the
desert
points
series, which is well
explored
elsewhere, the
only
complaint
we
heard
was
that
the
course
was
poorly
marked
in
many
areas, a
problem
that
is fairly
common
in
July
on
the
Barstow course,
when
some
onlookers
think
it
is a
game
to
remove
the
markers.
Drivers
from
the
seasoned veterans
to
the
rookie
racers
reported
losing
the
course, especially
in
the
dark
when
the
featureless
terrain
all
looks
alike.
If
there
is a
cure
short
of
painting
rocks
for
keeping a
course
marked
in the
summer
at
Barstow, it hasn't
been
found
yet.
TRICK ENTERPRISES have
announced
an
increase in
their
Contingency
awards
for
competitors
using
Trick
fue!
at
the
Frontier
500.
The
awards
of
gasoline
now
total
$4
770
in
value, with
the
gas going
to
first
and
second
place
fini:
,hers
in all car classes except 6 .
Trick
Vice President Kevin
Reno
said,
"the
marked
improvement
by
off
road
organizations in
their
planning
and
scheduling
has led
to
an
increased
number
of
entries
in
recent
events.
We
are
committed
to
the
sport
of
off
road
racing,
and
are
happy
to
expand
our
program
to
support
the
growth
of
the
sport."
This
is
another
example
of
the
benefits gained
from
the
combination
of
Score
and
High
Desert
events
into
one,
genuine
championship
desert
series.
Dusty Times
THE SCORE RIVERSIDE gathering
is
shaping
up
to
be one
of
the biggest
yet
at
the famous racing facility. This
is
the 13th
round
of
the prestigious
closed course race. Score wisely moved the whole program back
into
the
middle
of
August, when school
is
closed, and they also returned
to
scheduling
all day practice
on
Friday. Both Saturday and
Sunday
will have a full program
of
racing. This year all Score classes are listed for Riverside, including a
return
of
the desert unlimited class along with an unlimited class for the stadium
racers.
The
entry fee for car classes is
down
to
$300
and that factor alone
should
bring a
bunch
of
desert denizens
to
the longer and
more
open
style
short
course track
at
Riverside.
The
1985 event
sponsor
is
Turbo
Wash,
and
what
better
sponsor
could
the Riverside races have. Every
entrant
will wash
his car a half dozen times during the weekend.
RODNEY
HALL
is
one
of
the busiest
men
in
off
road racing, and he has a
new and exciting project in the works. Called
"Ram
Weekend"
Rod
is
putting together a real
old
fashioned four wheeling trip in the High Sierras for
late September. Sparked by the organizational capabilities
of
Mark
Smith,
master
of
the
Rubicon
and
the Jeepers Jamboree, the long weekend will be
packed with activity.
Owners
of
Dodge
Ram
Chargers and
Ram
Tough trucks
will be invited
to
participate in the trail rides
through
scenic back
country
roads, and also fish and swim in the Rubicon River.
The
base camp will be
at
Rubicon
Springs,
but
camp
is a definite understatement for the place.
The
evenings will feature steak frys and barbecues, with
Western
style entertain-
ment
. All meals will be catered.
So
participants need
to
bring only their
sleeping bags
or
shelter,
and
get ready
to
do
a
lot
of
four wheeling.
Get
the full
details
from
Rod
Hall Racing,
2150
Hunter
Lake Drive, Reno, Nevada
89509.
AMSA has changed the
formarof
the Labor Day weekend event
at
Cahfornia
City. Jim
Webb
:
announced
tecentl:y-
that
~
due
to :a
.:s
trorig
arnounfofiintet
est '
exhibited by potential major sponsors and suppor.ters_for
AMSA's
24
Hour
Desert
Endurfoce
Championship, and the
shoft
"
ain0unt
of
time t
.o'.
ptdpedy
stage sucl:i a
major
event,
AMSA
'.
has changedtHe-
ta
·ce·
datMorcthiir
firs~-24
Hour
Desert Endµrance
Champienship
'
to
the
1
1986
Labor
Day
' ·Weeker\:'d.
Plan ahead, it should be a keen eve'nt.
Replacing the
24
hour
event
on
Sunday, September 1,
1985,
isa6
Hour
Endurance Race
at
California City and
Rand
Mountain
. Registration and tech
inspection will start
on
Saturday, August 31
at
four in the afternoon, allowing
competitors
to
pre-run
on
Saturday, race
on
· Sunday, and still have the
Monday holiday
at
home.
AMSA has started a competition committee for its events.
The
new
committee will make recommendations
to
AMSA
on
procedures and rules
interpretations for formal action. Any driver entered in the event may
volunteer
to
serve
on
the
committee.
THE
SCORE
SHOW
management has announced the 1986 dates for
gathering
of
goodies at the Anaheim
Convention
Center,
The
9th
Annual
Score
Show
will be mid year in
1986
on
June 19,
20,
21 and 22.
Show
Director Alex X ydias has been able
to
secure two halls
in
the complex, with
200,000
square feet available for exhibits. Although it is late in the season for
trade sales, it
should
prove
to
be
a good time for the
consumer
hours
of
operation.
THE
HEART
RACING
TEAM
out
of
Reno, Nevada
is
a great idea that
deserves support.
The
off
road racing team is made
up
of
handicapped
and
disabled people, and the
HEART
stands for Handicapped Enthusiasts Ability
. Rehabilitation
and
Training.
The
idea is
to
show the capabilities
of
handicapped people in the sport,
and
to
show they can be competitive too.
HEART
is headed by former racer
and
15 year amputee Jim
Maddox.The
race car will be built, maintained and rac5d by handicapped
and
disabled
persons.
Maddox
said
of
the project,
"l
was in racing before, so consequently I
know
how
enjoyable
it
is.
We
want
to
take handicapped and disabled people
out
on
the race course, give
them
a ride,
and
show
them
what
it
is
all about.
It
is
the
only
thing like it in
the
country
. Although
we
are
not
in racing
to
be the
first
or
the only, we just want
to
have people aware
we
are
out
there."
Maddox
displayed a
donated
rolling
VW
chassis
and
body
atVORRA's
Day/
Night250
race. He said they have a donated engine that will really get the
Class
5-1600
Baja Bug
off
the
ground
. He remarked that many major
companies supporting
off
road
racing have promised parts and help. Still,
more
supporting
members are needed, and
"normies"
are
more
than
welcome
to
the
non-profit
organization. A tax deductible
ten
dollar
membership
donation
(or
any help
or
resources) will bring the team's bi-
monthly
newsletter and the National Handicapped
Sports
Report
to
the
donor,
Contact
HEART
at P.O. Box
74,
Reno,
NV
89504.
MAJOR
AUTOMOTIVE
ATTRACTIONS,
who
recently moved the
short
course series
to
Perris Speedway
south
of
Riverside,
CA,
,may
be in
trouble.
The
reports
were circulating
at
the
LAColiseum
race
that
they
had
not
paid the purse
at
the event
reported
in
this issue.
It
would be
tough
to
draw
the drivers back
to
a race
when
the purse
is
missing
from
the previous
one.
Those
planning
on
competing
at
Perris should check with the
promoter
or
the Speedway before setting
out
for the coming events.
THEWS
ANGELES MEMORIAL COLISEUM was the site
of
the fourth
race
in
the
MTEG
serfes this year, and many features invoked memories
of
earlier races here in
1979
and
1980
that
started the stadium racing syndrome.
The
good news is that over
40
thousand people came
to
watch the antics
of
the
off
road
cars, celebrities in Nissan 4 x 4s, Odysseys and and 3
and
4 wheel
A TVs.
The
bad
news
is
that
the program, starting
at
7 p.m., dragged
on
,until
well after 11 p.m.
Many
spectators
had
departed
before the bang
em
up
main
events even began.
It
was
show
biz all the way with a fireworks display signaling the start
of
each heat, and leaders pictures flashed
on
the electronic screen.
Unfortu-
nately the score
board
displayed constant commercial messages
about
sponsors, organizers,
and
lot, and failed to
run
the results
c>f
each event.
Apparently they figured the majority
of
the audience
didn't
know
who
the
drivers were anyhow. Sad
to
say, the after race fisticuffs again occured
at
the
Coliseum too, as drivers continued their individual contests aftet the
checkered flag
had
fallen.
Stadium
racing seems
to
bring
on
the fist fights like
no
other
site.
It
could be
the
close quarters the competitors endure
both
in the
pits and
on
the race track
that
fires tempers, along with the
midJuly
heat. Ivan
Stewart won the truck main by inches, Frank Arciero
took
Clas·s 1 and Greg
George won Class
10.
The
full
report
comes next
month.
Dusty
Times
~t{~
s\\
~~~~~
·
New
Baja
1000
Route····
The Frontier
500
is the Frontier
500
Right
at
press
time
Score
Inter-
national
announced
a
drastic
change
for
the
format
and
the
route
of
the
1985
Baja
1000.
Gone,
happily,
is
the
overnight
stop,
gone
too
are
the
logistics
of
a
Mexicali
start
and
an
Ensenada
finish.
Score
now
·
plans
to
run
the
Baja
1000
non-stop,
which
most
competitors
prefer.
The
route
will
once
again
start
and
finish
in
Ensenada,
and
basically
follow
the
course
used
in
1981.
If
your
memory
fails
on
the
1981
1000
'
route,
it
went
from
Ensenada
to
El
Rayo,
Valley
de
Trinidad,
Mike's
Sky
Rancho,
· ,
c:;
JW
-~ ~h
s!n
,
Qll!n
ti9
£,~
nlfrc!
paS
t
die
_
Sauzahto
Mmes
en
rnute
t9
$~ntq
lhez
~µ.cl
.
Punta
f :ri~qi.
:Ev
_
ery
1
ft
9 r
't
'.
f{
being
macleJo
·
\l-'7
oid:tlje
'
fam
'c5
us
.
silt
··
beds
~
befb
te
·
Pu
'
Jta
:tl
rn
¥
'.
'
th
.f n -
rh
t 'c
:C
~frr~(l g
oi
·s
·
north
through
El
Crucero
toward
Gonzaga
Bay,
into
Puertocitos
after
the
famous
Sisters,
and
to
San
Felipe.
Northwest
across
Diablo
Dry
Lake,
bade
through
Valle
de
Trinidad,
Santa
Catar-
ina,
El
Rayo
and
Ojos
Negros,
the
course
will
take
the
survivors
back
into
Ensenada.
The
mileage
listed
on
the
1981
map
is
805,
and
the
common
route
is
from
Ensenada
to
Valle
de
Trinidad
and
return
:
For
those
who
really
plan
ahead,
the
1986
Baja
1000
will
once
again
make
the
traditional
and
romantic
.
trek
from
Ensen-
ada
to
La
Paz,
and
that
should
be
a
dandy
race
to
think
about
doing.
Mid
summer
gave
birth
to
many
varied
and
wild
rumors
;1bgut.
the
futur~
a_
nd
fortune;;
of
.
the
HDRA
,.
Frnntier
,
500
.-,'.J;he
stQr.ies .ral,}ged
,J
i;9m
-
the
,
lG.,s
,s,
pf
?POflSOr:sh,ip
...,
.
~rgo
_,
no
cfl).Ce
at,a_!L,
to
tro4ble& ·
in
Las
:~ egiis
betw~I)
the
'
organizers
and
-
the
.
Frontier
Hotel
and
Casino,
who
have
sponsored
HORA
events
for
over
three
years.
Well
gang,
long
dis-
tance
racers
should
keep
the
Sep~
tember
7
date
open
for
the
Frontier
500,
which
will
be
closer
to
700
miles
this
year
.
The
draw-
ing
for
starting
numbers
is
sche-
duled
for
August
15,
at
the
Frontier
Hotel
of
course.
As
ofJuly
27
Walt
Lott
con-
firmed
that
the
race
would
indeed
be
called
the
Frontier
500,
s_
pon-
sored
by
the
Hotel
of
the
same
name.
He
also
said
the
route
was
in
fact
the
one
announced
in
July,
from
Sloan
to
Gabbs
and
return
to
Sloan.
The
route
out
·
of
Gabbs
features
a
lot
of
new
terrain
and
more
keen
little
towns
as
check-
points.
The
route
will
join
the
outbound
course
around
Beatty
and
return
v_
ia
Lathrop
Wells,
-Johnnie
-
and
-
finish
,
inSloan
.
:,
--
51:)
r
alL
y:ou
-;
desert
-
types
who
like
:
tbe
lqng
endurance
style
races
haye
@-
pair
of
-
them
coming
up.
There
is a
couple
of
months
in
between,
time
to
lick
the
w.
ounds
from
Nevada
and
get
ready
for
800
miles
of
Baja
run-
n
in
g
the
second
week
in
November.
THE
ORIGINAL
GAS PRESSURE
SHOCK
ABSORBER
WINNERS
ON BILSTEIN
SPEAK FOR
THEMSELVES
Ivan Stewart
1st
Place, Class 7
Mint 400 -
"Never before
have
I
had so much con-
fidence
in
a shock. After
extensive testing and
numerous races
on
the
same set
of
Bi/steins, I
am
very pleased by
their excellent perfor-
mance and reliability."
August 1985 .
Ray
Aragon
1st
Place, Class
10
Laughlin Desert
Challenge 1984
"We
finished 2nd at the
Cal City 12-hour
in
1983,
1st
in
Class
10
at the
Parker 400
1984,
and
1st
in
Class
10
at
the
Laughlin
Desert Challenge
1984
all
on
the same set
of
Bi/steins with no failures."
Jerry Leighton
1st
Place, Class
10
Fireworks 250 1984
"The shocks worked
super; no such thing as
broken
or
leaking
shocks with
Bi/stein_"
-
Jim Wright
1st
Place, Class 2
Mint 400
"By far the most impor-
tant parts
on
any off-
road vehicle are the
shocks. Usirig Bi/steins
is like cheating."
For further information and
special off-road applications
contact
Tom
Hoke at
BILSTEIN Corporation of
America,
11760
Sorrento
Valley Road, San Diego, CA
92121.
619/453-7723.
Page
7
1985
HAPPENINGS
•••
A.D.R.A.
Arizona Desert Racing Association
1408
East Granada
Phoenix, AZ
85006
(602)
252-1900
August
31
8th
Annual Giant
Off
' Road Centers
Snowflake Buggy Bash
Snowflake,
AZ
October
19
9th
Annual Penasco 150 ·
Rocky Point, Mexico
December
7,
1985
9th
Annual Sonoita
to
Rocky Point
Hare 'n
Hound
Sonoita, Mexico
Janua~y
11,
.
1986
Annual Awards Banquet
Phoenix,
AZ
AMSA
American
Motor
Sports Association
P.O. Box
5473
Fresno,
CA
93755
(209)
439-2114
August
31-
September
1
6
Hour
Desert
Endurance Race
California City,
CA
October
26
California
500
Palm Springs, CA
AMERICAN
OFF
ROAD
RACING
ASSOCIATION
John Ohanesian
P.O. Box 31811
Phoenix,
AZ
85046
(602)
867-4769
BAJA
IN
WISCONSIN
OFF
ROAD
SERIES
Kevin Dawson
Rt
. 3,
Box
895
Lake Geneva,
WI
53147
(414)
248-8566
August
10
Lake Geneva Raceway
August
24
Lake Geneva Raceway
BANZAI
OFF
ROAD
CENTER
Bryan Christensen
2729
No.
62nd
Omaha, NE
68104
(a)l events
at
Riv
erfront
Motorsports Park)
August
18
Sportsman - Odysseys - 3 Wheelers
September 8
Sportsman - Odysseys - 3 Wheelers
,,..
October 6
Flanders Day -
Sportsrnan Season Finale
BERRIEN
AUTO
CROSS SERIES
Coordinator - Gil Parker
7406
S.
12th St.
Kalamazoo,
MI
49009
(616)
375-1233
August
4
Parragon Raceway
Parragon, IN
August
17
Red Bud Trail
Buchanan,
MI
August
24
Motorsports Challenge
Casey, IL
August
31-September
1
Brush Run 101
Crandon,
WI
September
21-22
Dixie Autocross
Birch Run, MI
L<la.l..,
WE"~
\<.NOW
Wl-lA,
li,.,,,..i.l'lll.ir1-v1
'(OU
1
\Jf:.
C.ON\E
Foe
...
LvAAr
'\'OU'VE:'
WAITED
l
'Z.
MO~nl$
1b
45£.£"
l¼AIN !
...
NOW
GE,
~EAl>'l'
As
THE
Fl'R~T
CAR
,A~E
S
1HE
sr.,...,
..
...
~rw,
u,11..-·
'C),
~
Pages
COBRA
RACING
P.O. Box 19407
Oklahoma City,
OK
73119
(
405)
232-4231 - (
405)
685-3450
(All
off
road ;aces will be held at the
59th
& Dougl
as
track, Oklahoma
City.)
FORDA
-Florida
Off
Roaders
Drivers' Association
5349
Hansel Ave., C-1
Orlando, Florida
32809
(305)
851-6245
August
11
Hollywood Speedway
Hollywood,
FL
September 1
Tallahassee 150
Crowder Pits
Tallahassee,
FL
October 13
Hollywood Speedway
Hollywood, FL . ,
Nove~ber
3
Brevard Co.
Off
Road
Par.l<
Sharpes,
FL
•'"";.:
December
1
Brevard Co.
Off
Road Park
Sharpes, FL
January
5,
1968
Florida State
Fairgrounds Speedway
Tampa,
FL
February 2,
1986
Citrus Co. Speedway
Inverness, FL
March
21-23,
1986
Florida
400
Crowder Pitts
Tallahassee,
FL
FUD
PUCKER
RACING
TEAM
250
Kennedy,
#6
Chula Vista, CA 92011
(619)
427-
5759
August
10
Superstition
250
II
Night Race
El
Centro,
CA
August
1985
' '
GORRA
Georgia
Off
Road
Racing Association
Box 11093 Station -A
Atlanta,
GA
30310
(
404)
927-6432
August
25
50
Mile Race
Atlant;,
GA
September 8
100 Mile Race
.Montgomery, AL
September
22
50
Mile Race
Atlanta, GA
October
27
100 Mile Race
Atlanta,
GA
.,,,
.i,,
,,
GREAT WESTERN
POINTS
SERIES,
INC.
1507 South Lincoln
Lov"eland,
CO
8053
7
CORRA
(3d3
r669
-4460
DORRA
(303) 429-19
49
RMDRRA
(303)
597-8239
WKR.(913)
332-3402-
August
4
CORRA/DORRA
Berthoud,
CO
August
25
CORRA/DORRA
Berthoud,
CO
September 8
CORRA/DORRA
Berthoud,
CO
September
22
RMORRA
Colorado Springs,
CO
October
5-6
WKR
Championship Race
St. Francis,
KS
HDRA
High Desert Racing Association
961
West
Dale Ave.
Las Vegas, NV
89124
(702)
361-
5404
September
6-8
Frontier
500
Las Vegas to Reno, NV
December
6-8
Frontier
250
Las Vegas,
NV
HODAG50
Information
(715)
362-6550
August
3-4
Hodag 50
Rhinelander,
WI
IOK
FOUR
WHEELERS
P.O. Box
36
Cleves,
Ohio
45002
(All
events staged
at
the
club
grounds in
Cleves,
Ohio)
August
23-26
Gravelrama XV
October 6
Kiss Point Series Drags
MAJOR
AUTOMOTIVE
ATTRACTION
P.O. Box 3741
Orange, CA 92665
(714)
997-224 7
August
25
Perris Raceway
Perris,
CA
September
22
Perris Raceway
Perris,
CA
October
20
Perris Raceway
Perris,
CA
MANUFACTURERS'
CUP
SERIES
Angus Motorsports
Number One Main St.
Las
Vegas, NV 89101
(702)
386
-2110
September
7-8
Sierra Nevada Rally
Sonora, CA
December
21-22
United States Rally
Las Vegas, NV
MICKEY
THOMPSON'S
OFF
ROAD
CHAMPIONSHIP
GRAND
PRIX
Mickey Thompson
Entertainment
Group
53
Woodlyn
Lane
Bradbury, CA
91010
(818)
359-5117
September
14
Orange Show Fairgrounds
San Bernardino, CA
MORE
Midwest
Off
Road
Racing Enthusiasts
P.O. Box 181021
Fort
Worth,
TX 76118
(817)
577-1102
August
2-3
Cowtown Speedway
Fort
Worth,
TX
September
6-
7
Cowtown Speedway
Fort
Worth,
TX
October
4-5
Cowtown Speedway
Fort
Worth,
TX
ORS.A
1920 Crown Ave.
West
Sacramento,
CA
95691
(916)
372-4257
August
17-18
Twilight Invitational Race
Marysville River Front Park
Marysville, CA
September
28-29
(Rain Date October 26-27)
ORSA Championship Race
Marysville River Front Park
Marusville,
CA
October
5-6
ORSA/NSCA
National
Championship Points Race
Marsyville River Front Park
Marysville, CA
PRO
CAN
AM
SERIES
Pro Can Am Racing Inc.
P.O.
Box
323
Seahurst, Washington 98062
(206)
242-1773
( 503 ) 620-0313
August
16-18
200 Mile Horn Rapids
Shootout
Richland,
WA
September
20-22
Millican Valley
400
Bend,
OR
Dusty
Times
SCCA
PRO
RALLY SERIES
Sports Car Club
of
America
6750
Emporia St.
Englewood,
CO
80112
(303)
779-6625
August
3
I-September
1
Ralle Michigan Pro Rally
Battle Creek,
MI
September
21-22
Budweiser Forest Pro Rally
Chillicothe,
OH
October
25-27
Budweiser Press
On
R
ega
rdless Pro Rally
Houghton,
MI
November
16-17
Oregon Trail Pro Rally
Beaverton,
OR
December
6-8
Carson City
International Pro Rally
Carson City, NV
SCIDA
Vince Tjelmeland
5226
Norris Lane
Yorba Linda,
CA
92686
(714)
779-6889
October
19
Ascot Speedway
Gardena,
CA
SCORE
Score International
31356
Via Colinas, Suite 111
Westlake Village,
CA
91362
(818)
889-9216
August
16-18
Off
Road
World
Championship
Riverside International Raceway
Riverside,
CA
November
8-9
Baja 1000
Ensenada, B.C., Mexico
SCORE
CANADA
390
Chemin Du Lac
Lery, Quebec,
J6N 1A3, Canada
(514)
692-6171
September
7-8
Thetford Mines, Quebec
September
28-29
Middletown, New York
SILVER
DUST
RACING
ASSOCIATION
P.O. Box
7380
Las Vegas, NV
89125
(702)
459-0317
August
17
Nevada
300
Pioche,
NV
November
16
Silver Dust
400
Henderson, NV
SNORE
Southern Nevada
Off
Road Enthusiasts
P.O. Box
4394
Las Vegas, NV
89106
(702)
452-4522
September
27-29
Holiday Casino & KC
Hilites Snore
250
Jean,
NV
November
23
Points Race
Las Vegas, NV
Dusty Times
SUPERIO
R
OFF
ROAD
DRIVERS
ASSOCIATION
460
No. Beaumont Ave.
Brookfield, WI
53005
(715)
272-1489
August
3-4
Hodag 50
Rhinelander,
WI
TRIPLE
CROWN
POINTS
SERIES
Brush Run 101
P.
O.
Box 101
Crandon,
WI
54520
(715)
478-2430
August
31-September
1
Brush
Run
101
Crandon,
WI
VORRA
September
20-22
VORRA
Bonus Points Race
Millican Valley
400
Bend,
OR
October
13
Championship
Off
Road Race
Prairie City
OHV
Park
Sacramento,
CA
August
25
Mt
. Cheam Raceways
Rosedale, B.C.
September
15
Mt. Cheam Raceways
Rosedale, B.C.
October 13
Mt. Cheam Raceways
Rosedale, B.C.
August
31-Septemb~r
1
Brush Run 101
Crandon,
WI
September
21-22
Colorama 100
Sugar Camp, WI
Valley
Off
Road Racing Association
1833 Los R
ob
les Blvd.
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WESTERN
OFF
ROAD
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ASSOCIATION
19125 -
87
A Ave.
Surrey, British Columbia,
V3S 5X7, Canada
(604)
576-6256
August
22
Labatt's Supercross
Stampede Park
Calgary, Alberta
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August 1985
Page9
Side Tracks ••• ,
By
Judy
Smith
on
the
pavement
apparently.
didn't
work
that
way,
and
at
least
While
we
stood
at
the
finish
one
veteran
racer
admitted
line we
overheard
the
forwarding
coming
into
that
one
faster
than
of
a
radio
message
from
the
he
had
anticipated,
and
sliding in
checkpoint
people
at
Check
1.
rather
hard.
He
felt
concern
They
were
reporting
to
the
about
the
incident,
and
thought
officials
at
the
start
line
that
two
that
a
more
carefully
planned
vehicles
(
which
will
remain
location
would
have prevented,
unidentified
here)
had
come
into
racers
from
coming
in
to
the
the
check
"too
fast".
The
.
checktoofast.Hewasnotoneof
message was given
to
an
official
the
drivers
we
heard
mentioned
for
his
attention.
in the
radio
report
.
As
the
first ·several cars
wfre
We
continued
to
stay in
the
.
due
to
finish,
the
flagman,
Andy
area
of
the
start/finish
until
Dishong,
stood
clutching
a list
approximately
1
a.m.;
although
made
up
by
the
scoring
team, we
didn't
stand
right
at
the
finish
which
told
him
the
numbers
of
line
for
most
of
that
time
.
We
the
first
few
cars
that
were
could
see vehicles coining
up
to
expected
to
come
in.
Andy
had
the
line,
but
the
flagman himself,
nootherwaytoknowwhowasto
the
stub
man
and
any
other
get
the
checkered
flag.
He
also officials were
obscured
from
our
The
Sourapas
/
Aichardson
Class 10
Aaceco
makes
a
clean
stop
at
Check
1, the
had
no
way
to
know
which
car
·view
by
spectators
and
finished
one
stop
check
with
a fast
approach
that
caused
penalties
for
some
drivers
. was
which
until
it
was practically cars
parked
in
the
impound
area.
The
HORA
Fireworks
250
about
50 feet
before
the
scoring
at
the
lin.e,
and
then
he'd
whip
While
we
were
there
we saw
was a
huge
success
this
year,
trailer,
which
was
also
the
out
·
the
checkered
flag
and
wave
two
vehicles pass
other
vehicles
attracting
a
starting
field
of
268
location
of
the
start/finish
line.
it
at
the
car.
It
was
pretty
easy
for
within
the
last
100 feet
or
so
of
vehicles
to
hot
and
dusty
The
official
with
·
the
stubs
'
for
the
; a while,
because
Andy
h~c;l
bten
;,
the
c9urse
before,
the
startlfipish
Barstow.
The
drivers'
meeting-,"
cahs
was
ai:
tRe finish line; as was "'·
there
all day\
and
in general
could
Line.
We
SJlW
several. who
were
.
was
held
just
an
hour
before
the
4 ·
the
flagman
with
the
checkered
· ideQtify
the
lead cars in
the
front
.
obviously
coming
in very
hot,
p.m
.
start,
and
Walt
Lott,
the
flag wheri
if
got
near
the
end
of
classes~ · -
..
_.
- ·-
and
would
have
to
slide
through
HORA
president,
is
reported
to
the
race.
Later
in
the
evening
itgotto
be
~he
-
"line".
c
There
was
one
w_
ho
have
emphasized
the
importance
There
were
no
pits
in
this
area a
lot
harder,
and
most
finishers
got
his
chit,
then
circled
around
of
stopping
at
the
checkpoints.
this
year,
which
was
a
big
didn't
get
a
checkered
flag,
the
scoring
trailer,
through
the
We
are
told
that
he
"suggested
improvement
in
that
it
kept
the
because,
until
they
got
to
where
impound,andranbackoutsome-
there
would
be
serious
penalties
are
a c 1
ear
of
crowds
and
the
scoring
team
could
see
them,
where
to
his
pit
crew,
apparently.
for
missing
checkpoints
or
eliminated
the
danger
of
cars
no
one
knew
who
they were,
and
Minutes
later
he
went
back
driving recklessly
near
them."
pulling
in
and
out.
It also
kept
the
finish
line
officials
could
through
the
start
/ finish line,
and
E I
th
Ch.
f
confusion
down
to
a
minimum
certainly
not
be
expected
to
keep
out
on
the
course
again.
Another
a r Y
1
n e
r_
ace,
1
e
for
the
scorers.
track
in
their
heads.
Most
times
racer, losing
track
of
where
the
st
ek~
rd
Dahe
Whir•
·
11\<:>
w~s
We
stood
and
watched
the the
driver
was
the
one
who
bore
finish line was, missed
the
man
w-:dr
tnhg
at
t e
st
artd
lhms
me, is activities
at
the
finish line
for
the
responsibility
of
knowing
with
his
chit(he'd
finally
become
sa1
to
ave
reporte
t
at
"all
the
. h'l . . r h h
th
h f' · h d d f · b k d
fo
th
to
drivers
were
following
Walt
s?me
time
w 1
~
-:va1tmg
ror
t e w e
er
e was mis e
or
not.
ire o
movmg
ac
an
r
Lott
's ge tl . d
first
couple
of
fm1shers
to
come
This
caused
some
confusion,
as it
put
chits in
the
cans,
apparently)
· n e
remm
er
to
stop
· I
11
d k h r · h
and
he
told
he
d d t t
safely
at
the
s/f
."
m.
t a
seeme
to
wor
i::retty as 1or years,
mt
at
many
racers w n nee e o ge
wel
1.
We
were
especial!
y
look
for
the
checkered
flag
to
tell
his
stub,
the
racer
pulled
around
This
year
the
star
t/
finish was
again
situated
at
the
end
of
the
pavement
strip
that
runs
across
the
back
of
the
Community
College.
Racers
came
onto
this
pavement
through
a
narrow
slot
between
two
tall
berms,
and
a
flagman,
with
a
red
flag, was
very
close
to
the
beginning
of
the
pavement,
waving
his
flag
in
warning.
There
was
another
flagman,
also
with
a
red
flag,
Page
10
interested
to
see
that
the
them
where
the
finish line is.
the
scoring
trailer,
through
the
gentleman
with
the
stubs
for
the
Without
it
they're
uncertain,
and
impound
to
a clear.
spot,
and
cans
was
so
cooperative
about
in
their
tired
and
not
too
bright
came
in
to
the
start/finish-again,
moving
forward
or
backward,
as
condition,
they
don't
know
in
a
forward
direction,
to
get
his
much
as
30
feet
or
so,
to
put
a
where
to
stop
0r
what
to
do
next.
ticket.
stub
in
a can,
wherever
the
driver
We
were
told
by
some
racers
Now,
if
you've
been
able
to
finally
managed
to
stop
his
that
the
outlying
checks were
keep
track
through
all
this
vehicle.
Some
drivers,
of
course,
almost
all
situated
in
places
verbiage,
you
will
have
noted
yelled
that
their
brakes
weren't
where
the
car
was already
slowed
that
in
every case
where
we
noted
working,
as
they
slid
across.
downbythelayoutofthecourse.
or
heard
of
an
incident
there
Others
just
misjudged
the
They
told
us
that
only
one
wereatleasttwocarsguiltyofthe
distance
needed
to
slow
or
stop
checkpoint
had
a
location
that
same
type
of
behavior.
·
August
1985
We
are
in
full
agreement
with
the
promoters
of
off
road
races
these days
that
the
safety rules
must
be
obeyed,
and
accidents
and
hazardous
situations
must
be
avoided
if
the
insurance
costs
are
.to
be
kept
at
tolerable
levels.
The
whole
sport
is
doomed
to
die
if
we carelessly allow
spectators
or
checkpoint
personnel
to
be
injured
due
to
the
poor
judge-
ment
of
a racer.
We
think
that
penalties
and
disqualifications,
such
as
have
been
handed
out
at
several
races
this
season
(by
SCORE,
HORA,
and
AMSA)
are
the
only
method
the
promoter
has
to
enforce
the
safety
regulations.
But
we feel
strongly
that
the
penalties
should
be
handed
out
evenly,
and
that
all
those
who
break
the
rules
should
be
penalized. .
At
the
Fireworks
250 we
heard
a
radio
report
about
two
well
known
racers
coming
in
to
Check
1
"too
fast"
.
Only
one
of
those
racers was penalized,
but
it
didn't
lose
him
a
position.
We
saw
two
racers pass
other
race
vehicles
within
the
"no
passing
zone"
near
the
~
start
finish, yet
only
one
of
those
racers was
penalized.
We
saw
two
racers
take
a careful side
trip
through
the
impound
area
in
order
to
get
back
to
the
course,
and
only
one
of
those
drivers
was penalized.
And
we
saw
more
than
two
racers slide
through
the
finish
line,
but
penalties were assessed
on
only
two.
The
rules
make
sense,
and
so
do
the
penalties.
But
to
the
racer
who
has
been
penalized
it
sometimes
seems
unjust
that
he
has
no
voice
in
the
matter.
For
this race
there
was
never
a
time
announced
when
unofficial
results
would
be
posted,
or
when
official results
would
go
up.
It has
generally
been
assumed
that
once
the
official
results
are
posted
there
is
an
hour
in
which
to
make
official
protests,
and
appeal any
penalties assessed.
The
HORA
folks
never
posted
any official
results.
The
unofficial
results
were
on
the
wall
at
Rosita's
and
on
the
boards
at
the
start
/ finish
line,
where
they'd
been
during
the
race.
Three
of
the
racers
who'd
been
penalized
could
see
it
on
the
boards
..
One
of
them
knew
what
he'c;I
done,
and
(ully
expected
the
penalty
and
had
no
quarrel
with
it.
One
other
was
unsure
of
the
reasons
for
the
penalty
and
w"ished
to
discuss it with officials.
He
and
his
crew
could
find
no
notice
that
told
him
which
official
to
see,
where
the
official
results
would
be
up,
or
how
long
he
had
to
present
an
appeal.
There
seemed
to
be
no
individual
who
could
give
them
the
information
either.
He
finally
tracked
down
a
gaggle
of
officials
at
Rosita's,
and
after
some
discussion
with
them
he
wrote
an
appeal
and
handed
it
in,
whereupon
he
was
told
that
they'd
get
to
it
"right
away".
Nothing
came
of
it.
One
other
racer,
whose
penalty
was
not
noted
on
the
unofficial
results
posted
at
Rositas
or
at
the
finish
line,
found
out
about
it
only
when
he
was given
the
trophy
and
check
for
a
position
lower
than
he
knew
he'd
won
.
He
asked
about
making
an
appeal
and
was
told
it
"was
final"
and
that
was all
there
was
to
it.
We
feel
that
the
HORA
folks
are
working
in
the
right
direction
when
they
try
to
toughen
up
their
rules
to
prevent
injury
to
the
hard
working
checkpoint
people
and
spectators.
But
we
contend
that
their
rules
must
be
the
same
for
all racers,
or
they will never
have
the
desired effect.
If
a well
known,
popular
racer
can
get
away
with
charging a
checkpoint,
the
less well
known
driver
is
going
to
do
it
too
.
He
will figure
he
can
argue
about
it later.
.
We
also feel
that
the
institution
of
the
"Grievance
Committee"
which
has
been
used earlier this
year
in
this same
HORA
/
SCORE
series·, is a
good
one
and
should
not
be
overlooked.
There
was
apparently
no
such
animal
this
time,
or
if
there
was
it
was very
well
hidden
.
Such
a
committee
can
take
a
lot
of
work
and
anguish
off
the
shoulders
of
the
hard
working
officials.
The
officials
could
still
get
a
few
h0
urs
sleep,
and
the
committee
can
listen
to
the
appeals
and
protests.
Of
course,
before
that
can
happen,
the
officials
must
discipline
themselves
to
the
point
that
they
post
first,
unofficial results,
then
official
results,
and
allow
at
least
that
,
traditional
hour
for
the
negotiat-
ing
and
discussions.
Dusty Times
H
Fl
WALKER
EVANS
BLAZES
HIS
DODGE
RAM
TO
HIS
FIFTH
FIREWORKS
VICTORY
IN
CLASS
8.
The fireworks were brilliant. The temperature
was hot:
108
degrees. The chili was even hotter.
But the hottest spectacle
of
the weekend was
the competition
on
the 6()-mile course
of
the
Barstow Fireworks 250 off-road race.
The course cut through the Great Mojave,
which dished out its usual, unforgiving treachery:
Dust. Silt. Cracked volcanic rock.
And
virtually
unbearable heat.
But when the Goodyear drivers (Walker Evans
in
Class 8,
Jim
Conner
in
Class 7, and J.M. Bragg
in Class 3) crossed the finish line after four laps
apiece, victory belonged to them.
And
the tires that took them to victory are the
very same tires that you can buy for your truck:
Goodyear Wrangler radials.
Congratulations to Walker,
Jim
and
IM.
for
proving once again how Goodyear Wrangler
radials are engineered to take
on
the toughest
terrain, the toughest conditions. ,
GLER
ITHE
JIM
CONNER
TAKES
HIS
NISSAN
KING
CAB
TO
THE
CLASS
7
CROWN.
J.M.
·
BRAGG
RACES
HIS
CLASS
3
JEEP
TO
HIS
SECOND
CONSECUTIVE
FIREWORKS
WIN.
So no matter what kind
of
truck you own, get
Goodyear Wrangler radials.
· Because when the heat is on,
you need a tire that will keep
its cool.
WRANGLER
RADIAL.
WE
RACE
THE
TIRES
YOU
BUY.
Congratulations also to
J.
W.
Edwin Spear
an
d Bill
Krueger, winners
of
the Fireworks Chili Cook
-Off
GOOD;riEAR
Tom
Koch
put
his
Raceco in
front
on
the
second
lap, increased his lead in the
next
two
rounds,
survived
near
disaster when the
fuel
gave
out
on
the last
lap,
and
Koch
won
the
big
race
overall
by
a
good
three minutes,
driving
alone to the
well
deserved rewards.
THE
HDRA
FIREWORKS
150
By
Jean
Calvin
· All year
the
entry
numbers
in
the
HORA
/ Score
desert
series
races have
been
growing, with
each
event
to
date
pulling ·near
record
entries. Still,
no
one
was
prepared,
. including
the
HORA,
for the
onslaught
of
entry
for
the
14th
annual
Fireworks
250
on
the familiar Barstow course. It
was
an
all
time
record
high
for
a
· race
on
this course!
There
were
280
entries,
and
268
of
them
started
the
race.
While
the
starting
entry
was
indeed
a
record,
the sizzling
temperatures
on
the
high desert
were mercifully less
than
a
record.
When
the
race
started
at
four
in
·
the
afternoon,
the
ambient
_
temp
was hovering
around
108°F
., several degrees
under
last year. A
handy
cloud
cover, while
intermittent,
did
Tom Koch Tops a Record Entry
at
the
Barstow Sizzler
help
the
stiffling
heat
problems,
and
the
predicted
rain
did
not
materialize.
The
familiar course, starting
and
finishing
at
the
Barstow
Community
College parking lot,
had
a new dog leg in
the
early
section
that
brought
the
total
miles
per
lap
into
the
60
mile
area.
This
year
HORA
reverted
to
the practice
of
requiring
the
slower classes
to
cover
less
distance for
an
official finish.
While
the majority
of
the
entry
were
to
cover
four
laps
in
the
ten
hour
time allowance, several
had
to
cover
only
three
rounds.
Three
lap classes
included
both
Class 6s, 11, 12
and
7 4 x 4.
The
Score Challenger class
had
been
·
scheduled
for
three laps,
but
at
the
drivers'
meeting
the
18
entries
voted
to
go the
four
laps,
and
six
of
them
did
.
The
entire race
program
took
place
on
the
Saturday, with
tech
and
registration starting
at
8
a.m., as
did
the contingency
inspection. A
host
of
manufac-
turers
came
out
for
the
occasion,
mostly
huddling
under
portable
tents
to
keep
from
frying· their
hides.
Tech
shut
down
around
2:00
p.m.,
giving
the
workers
a
much
needed
two
hour
breather
before
the race began. Because
of
the heavy entry,
the
cars were
scheduled
to
start
one
every 15
seconds
in
order
to
get
them
off
the line
before
the
first
of
the
hot
dogs finished the initial lap. As
it
·
turned
out,
they
all
got
away with
about
a
ten
minute
gap
before
the
first car
returned.
Class 2 was first away with a
pack
of
thirty
massive
two
seaters waiting in
the
hot
sun
for
the green flag.
Dust
was a real
problem
in
the heavy traffic,
but
there was a
good
breeze
on
some
parts
of
the
course,
although
visibility
in
the canyons never
did
get
better
until
sundown.
The
· heavy
hitters
hauled
off
toward
the Slash X
Ranch
in
one
giant
herd,
stretching
out
in
the
rocks
beyond.
First
to
complete the first lap,
with
an
apparent
dust
free
run,
first
on
the
road
advantage, was
the Raceco
of
Rob
Richey
and
Jon
Fredregill, setting fast
time
of
the day
at
1:
14
.51.
It
was several
minutes
before
another
car
appeared, the Raceco
of
.
Mint
400
winner Jim
Temple
and
his
son
Mark,
who
turned
a
1:18.50.
They
we·re closely tagged
by
Danny
Letner,
at
1:19.57,
in
the
Photos: Trackside Photo Enterprises
Porsche
powered
Raceco,
and
a
whole
herd
were in the early
l:20s.
The
Temples
put
down
another
1:18.50
-lap,
and
at
mid
distance
the
Richey Raceco led
Class 2
over
the
Temples
by
a
mere
eight
seconds.
Some
contenders
were missing
at
this
point,
including Letner. Dave
Kreisler
had
grenaded
an
engine
in
his Raceco pickup, Frank
Arciero, Jr.
had
a
spark
plug
break
in the overheated head
on
the
Toyota
pickup,
and
the tales
of
woe were legion. Vic Vanella,
who
had
a
good
1:22.29
first lap,
stopped
to
put
his secret weapon
in
the
Raceco for
the
remaining
three,
the
team
of
Jim
and
Billy
Wright;
they were moving
up
in
the
ranks.
The
competition
tightened
Class 2 was a Raceco sweep. Las Vegas
youngsters
Ed
and
Tim
Herbst
a rove to a fine
second
in class
with
no
problems,
and
they
were
eighth
overall.
Whee/stands
brought
Vic Vanella
and
Jim
Wright
home
with
second
fastest time in Class
2,
and
their
Raceco was an
official
third
in th~ class.
Jerry
and
Bob
Leighton
had
no
troubles,
except
dust,
and
they
finished
quickly,
taking
second
in Class
10
and
a very fine
fourth
overall.
Page
12
August
1985
Dusty
Times
win last year by
mere
seconds,
was close, his Raceco
doing
a
1:
16.33.
Mark
McMillin
had
the
Chenowth/Porsche
just
over
a
minute
slower
on
the
first
round,
-
followed
in
1 ½
minutes
by
Ivan
Stewart
in
the
Toyota
pickup.
Bob
Richey
and
John
Fredregill
enjoyed
a
dust
free
first
lap,
and
fast lap
of
the
race, en route to a keen
first
in Class 2
and
third
overall in the Raceco.
John
and
Rick
Hagle have been close,
and
last
July
they
scored
their
first Class
10 win,
a
dandy
second
overall as
well
in
the
handsome
Raceco-ORE.
Midway
Noel
lost
about
20
minutes,
and
he
was
to
lose gobs
more
time
before
finishing eighth
and
last in class. Koch laid
down
a 1: 17.01
to
take
over
top
spot
overall with a
total
time
of
2:33.35.
Nearest
to
him
in Class
1
at
this
point
was
Al
Arciero,
with a time
of
2:43.09
in the
family
Funco
Hustler.
Coming
on
strong,
solo
Raceco driver
Ron
Brant
was
next
with
2:4
7 .05,
and
Stewart
was less
than
40
seconds
behind
him.
But
Sumners
faded
to
11th
on
the last lap with
trans
trouble.
Indeed,
the
fourth
lap
did
damage
to
several
top
runners.
John
and
Rick
Hagle
had
no
problems
on
the
course,
and
they
scored
their
first
victory
in
four
years
of
off
road
racing.
They
had
no
flats,
nothing
but
a fuel
stop
and
driver
change
en
route
to
victory.
Their
total time
of
5:18.42
not
only
gave
them
the
Class
10
win,
but
a
keen
second
,
overall.
Rob
Tolleson
likes the
Barstow
course,
and
he
led
from wire to wire in the
57
car
1-2-1600 bash,
reporting
no
trouble
at
a/1
in the
Bill
Varnes
built
Mirage
SS.
Arriving
about
12
minutes
later, Kit
Trenholm
was
the
Class
10
driver
involved with the
Vanella car
at
the
finish line. In
fact,
Trenholm
passed
the
Class
2
on
the
pavement
run
to
the
checkered,
and
flew
past
the
finish line.
The
car
was penalized
30
minutes
and
dropped
from
·
second
to
sixth in class.
With
a
total
road
time
only
ten
seconds
longer
than
Irvine's, Jerry
and
Bob
Leighton
zoomed
into
second
in class,
fourth
overall,
also
reporting
no
real
troubles
except
for
heavy
dust
in the
daylight.
more
atter
three
laps,- as the
Temples
stopped
to
change
an
axle.
Richey/Fredregill
held
the
lead
at
4:03.42
total
time, the
Temples
had
4:08.30,
just
barely
ahead
of
the
Wrights
at4:08.51,
and
the
ranks
were thinning.
Strange things
happened
in
the
dark
last lap.
Mark
Temple
landed
on
a giant
rock
just
a few
miles
from
pay
dirt
and
broke
a
trailing
arm,
and
that
entry
was .
done.
The
Richey Raceco was
still first
on
the
road
among
the
Class 2s,
and
it
was
the
third
car
of
the
entire
entry
to
finish. Bob
Richey
and
Jon
Fredregill
not
only
won
Class 2 cleanly, leading
all
the
way
on
time as well,
but
they placed
third
overall, in
5:31.42!
The
next
two seater
home
was
the Vanella Raceco,
but
Jim
Wright
raced.all
the
way
to
the
line with a Class
10
and
overshot
the finish. His time
of
5:36.47
was
enhanced
by
a 15
minute
penalty,
dropping
the
entry
from
second
to
third
in class. Arriving
third
on
elapsed time, officially
second, with a
consistent
quartet
of
lap times were Ed
and
Tim
Herbst
in
another
Raceco,
about
18
minutes
behind
the
class
winner.
Also
turning
consistent
times,
the
team
of
Gary
Schnekenburger
and
Gary
Rodders
were
fourth,
followed
in
by
Tom
and
Steve
Martin.
All
of
the first five
drove
Racecos.
With
troubles
almost
all the
way,
Corky
and
Scott
McMillin
got the
Chenowth/Porsche
in
sixth, followed
by
a similarly
troubled
Jerry
Penhall/Dennis
Sigalos in
another
Chenowth.
Running
w,ell until .
the
last lap,
Bob
Gordon
and
Tim
Crabtree
were
tenth,
the
final Class 2
finisher.
Class
10
was
second
off
the
line,
and
all
the
34
starters
intended
to
win
the
-big purse.
Local
driver
and
former
winner
here, Larry Bolin
came
from
his
last starting
position
to
set
fast
Dusty
Times
time
for
the
class
on
the
first lap,
a
1:16.42,
but
Larry was seen
no
.
more.
Bolin's
Redwood
Racing
teammate
Mark
Broneau
was
next
on
time
at
1:18.29,
but
he
lost
50
minutes
on
the
next
lap,
had
a
good
third
round,
but
failed
to
finish.
The
only
othe
·r
car in
the
teens was
the
Raceco
of
eventual
winners
John
and
Rick
Hagle,
who
did
a
1:19.46.
Bags
more
were
in
the
early 1
:20s
on
the first lap. ·
Midway
a
half
dozen
1650cc
cars
were well
up
among
the
two
seaters
on
the
road,
including the
Jack
Irvine/Kit
Trenholm
Raceco, which
had
started
first.
But,
with
a
1:19.10
second
lap,
the
handsome
Hagle
O.R.E.
built
car was leading
on
time
at
a
total
_
of
2:38.56.
Jerry
and
Bob
Leighton were
next
with
2:41.04,
but
Jim
Sumners,
going
solo
in
the
two
seat Raceco, was tight
at
2:41.39.
A pack
more
10s
were
just
a coup1e
minutes
back
on
time.
The
Hagles
put
down
a
1:
17 .07
third
lap
to
take a firm
grip
on
the class lead,
and
become
a · real challenge
for
overall
honors.
'Summers
moved
into
second,
about
seven
minutes
back,
with
Irvine/Trenholm
only
three
minutes
behind
him.
Marty
Reider
did
the
solo
act
in his Raceco, finishing
another
seven
minutes
back
for
a solid
third,
about
18
minutes
ahead
of
the
Rabbit
powered
Raceco
of
Greg
Aronson
and
Craig
Watkins.
James
Ward
and
Terry
Jeffers
were
another
three
minutes
back
in fifth, followed in
11
minutes
by
Steve
Sourapas/
Dave
Richardson,
Raceco,
and
most
of
the
13 Class
10
finishers
were
home
in
good
time.
Next
off
the
line,
and
accepting
their
status
as
third
fastest class a
bit
more
these days, were the
19
Class 1
stormers,
with a dozen
potential
winners
in
the
bunch.
Facing
the
unaccumstomed
heavy traffic
of
64
cars ahead
of
them
did
not
slow
the
swift
ones
much.
Larry
Noel
zinged
off
a
1:14.56
lap,
just
shy
of
overall
fast time,
to
lead
the
class
on
the
first
round
in his Chaparral.
Flying
two
tons
plus
of
Dodge
truck
is
a Walker Evans habit,
and
the
many
time
·
champion
led
all
the way
at
Barstow
to win Class 8
by
a
good
16
minutes.
August
1985
There
were
reports
that
Jack
Johnson
had
his
Chenowth
up
among
the
leaders
before
losing a
ring
and
pinion
at
Check
7; Jack
joined
his
teammate
Rob
MacCachren
in
retirement,
as
Rob's
Class
10
Bunderson
suffered a similar fate after
one
lap. ·
Tom
Koch,
who
missed the
This
is
the system
run
by
most
off
road race
winners
Tom
Koch,
who
stopped
only
once
for
fuel, was
not
going
to
be
denied
this victory. He
whipped
off
a
1:16.50
third
lap,
and
whistled in the first
of
any
class
to
finish.
Tom
reported
no
trouble
at
all,
except
in
the
final
ten miles, where
he
felt
he
was
running
r;.,.. r;.,..
r;r
r;.,.. r;.,..
TRl•MIL
BOBCAT•
CHROME
DUAL
CAN BOBTAIL
FOR
BAJA BUGS
2740
COMPTON
AVENUE
LOS
ANGELES,
CALIF.
90011
(213)
234-9014
WHOLESALE
ONLY
DEALER
INQUIRIES
INVITED
Page
13
Going
solo
at
Barstow
,
Marty
Reider flew his Raceco
nicely
into
·
Using
Rabbit
out
of
FAT
power
in
their
Raceco, Greg
Aronson
Despite the loss
of
power
steering
, Ron
Brant
drove his Raceco
fast
and
steady
and
Brant
ended
up
a keen
second
in Class 1,
sixth
overall.
third
in Class
10
,
and
Marty
put
the
single
seater
home
fifth
and
Craig
Watkins ran close
all
day
in Class
10
and
finished
overall
too
.
fourth
in class.
Although
minor
mechanical
woes
stopped
him
a
couple
of
times,
Ivan
Stewart
herded
the Toyota
pickup
into
a close
third
.
Mark
and
Monica
Barnes
kept
their
two
seat Raceco close the
whole
way,
and
they
ended
up
a
great
second
in the
huge
Class
1-2-1600.
Larry
Smit
_h
and
Jon
Kennedy
have
had
a
tough
year
in
their
two
seat Raceco,
but
at
Barstow
they
got
a
good
finish,
officially
third
.
John
and
Rick
Lind
came
back
from
serious
trouble
midway
in
the
race
to
catch
up
to the
herd
and
finish
a fine
fourth
in
1-2-1600 in the ORC.
Steve
Kelley
had
some
steering
troubles
with
the
GMC
,
but
he
trucked
on
to finish very well,
second
in the
hard
fought
Class 8
battle.
The
GMC
of
Mike
Nesmith
and
Randy
Salmont
zooms
out
of
a
dusty
ditch
at
the
Fireworks
250, en route to
third
in class
and
the
points
lead.
r;a-- r;a--out
of
gas.
He
nursed
the
coughing
Raceco along, losing
only
about
six
minutes
off
his
other
lap times.
He
finished clean
in 5:
15
.22
for
the
overall victory,
first
on
the
road
and
in
Class 1.
Ron
Brant
kept
up
his steady,
swift
pace
to
sail in
second
in
class.
Ron
admitted
that
a
solo
·
drive
on
the Barstow
course
with
failed
power
steering
can
be
tiring.
Most
drivers
reported
the
course
was
rougher
than
normal,
and
harder
on
both
the
-
equipment
and
the bodies. Ivan
Stewart
had
a few
minor
woes,
but
arrived
just
four
minutes
ISuMMERn
.
MEl
~
FUN
·t
~
-
~
8
;
SUPERSTITION
I_
I
250
lil
!
II
~
SATURDAY
NIGHT
~
;
AUGUST
10,
1985
j
I
INFO
:
~
~
DAYS:
JEFF
WRIGHT
;
-~
(619)
56
1
-4810
j
!
EVENINGS
:
FUD
,.
u~~~:~~
Page
14
behind
Brant
for
a fine
third.
After
early
problems
Chet
and
Lloyd
Huffman
nailed
fourth,
merely
four
minutes
ahead
of
Mark
McMillin,
who
was
only
two
minutes
ahead
of
Darryl
Woody
in
an
A
Arm
Func6.
An
incredible
57
starters
showed
up
in Class
1-2-1600,
and
they
stretched
out
of
sight
in
the
staging area.
They
ended
up
running
so
close together, in
giant
packs
of
eight
or
more
on
the
trail,
that
it
was impossible
to
tell
who
was
who,
let
alone
what
position
they
held. A
former
winner
on
this
course,
young
Rob
Tolleson
had
his Mirage
single seater
around
with
quick
time
on
the
first lap, 1:
25.05,
only
about
45
seconds
faster
than
Mark
and
Monica
Barnes in
a
two
seat
Raceco.
In
the
next
2½
minutes
,
no
less
than
a dozen
entries
recorded
times
under
1 :29,
so
it
was a wide
open
race
with
only
six
missing
on
the
first
lap.
At
half
distance
Tolleson
still
held
his lead,
now
a
margin
of
one
minute
seven
seconds.
Absolutely
tied
on
time
for
second
were
the
Barnes,
and
Lance
and
Glenn
Tidwell, also in
a Raceco.
Right
in
their
dust
at
2:57
.
06
were
Tom
Malloy
and
John
Basso,
but
they
went
no
farther.
Another
half
minute
back
were Steve Barlow
and
Jim
Moulton
in a Hi
Jumper,
and
a
half
dozen
more
were
in
the
next
couple
of
minutes
.
The
Tidwells
lost
about
50
minutes
on
lap
3
and
sank
to
Older
cars do
just
fine in Class 9. Ted
Armstrong
and
Tom Moessner
took
their
Funco
SS 2
around
four
times to the 1200
cc
class
victory
.
August
1985
15th
at
the
flag.
Up
front
Tolleson,
on
home
ground
from
years
of
bike
racing,
did
a 1
:28
third
lap
to
gain
his
biggest lead
so far,
four
minutes
over
Mark
Barnes,
who
in
turn
had
four
minutes
on
Barlow/
Moulton,
and
nobody
else was within
ten
minutes
of
the
three
leaders.
Slowing
only
a few
minutes
on
the final 1ap,
Rob
Tolleson
led
from
flag
to
flag
to
not
only
win
the biggest
purse
of
the
race in
Class
1-2-1600
,
but
he
also
finished
an
incredible
tenth
overall, incredible considering
that
close
to
90
unlimited
racers
started
in
front
of
him.
Jim
Moulton
turned
the fastest last
lap,
1:29.53,
the Barnes
had
some
problem
,
and
Barlow/
Moulton
came in
just
four
·
and
a
half
minutes
behind
Tolleson
in
a
strong
·
second
. However, the
Barlow
Hi
Jumper
stopped
in the
wrong place, apparently, as the
engine stalled
at
the
finish line,
so
it
made a
loop
around
the
scoring
trailer
to
stop
in
the right place.
The
team
found
out
the
next
day
the
episode
cost
them
a
30
minute
penalty
and
a
drop
to
fifth place.
Mark
Barnes arrived
about
11
minutes
behind
Moulton,
and
was the official
second
place in
class, 11
minutes
ahead
of
Larry
Smith
and
Jon
Kennedy
in
a
Raceco.
After
a
strong
start,
troubles
midway,
John
and
Rick
Lind
got
their
O.R.C.
home
in
fourth
another
three
minutes
out.
Bob
Da
vidson
/
Kory
Vasques
were
sixth
in
a
Las Vegans Greg
Heinrich
and
Jim
Pope
scored
a
long
sought
victory
in Class
5.
The
pair
led
all
the way in a
tight
contest
and
won
by
a mere ten minutes.
Dusty Times
Usually
a Class 9 winner,
Jim
Dizney
and
Mike
McCrory
had
to
repair
collision
damage before
bringing
the
Chenowth
·
in
for
second
place.
Still
working
out
new
car
glitches,
Malcolm
Vinje
and
Mark
Hansen
hung
tough
at
Barstow
and
ended
up
second
in the close
Class
5 contest.
.
Roger
Mears'
new
desert
Nissan
had
a
check
list
full
of
troubles,
but
Roger
kept
going
well
into
the
night
to
finish
second
in Class
Bunderson,
and
behind
them
the
next
eight
were
about
two
minutes
each
apart.
In all,
22
of
the
1600s
finished
four
laps.
·
The
first
of
the
"heavies"
off
the
line were
the
Class 8
pickups
.
The
beautiful
new
Frank
Vessels
truck
was a
non
starter,
due
to
suspension
problems
found
while testing
that
very
morning.
With
his
newest
truck
being
in
a
"rethink"
mode
at
home,
Walker
Evans
took
off
fast
in
his
older,
desert
proven
Dodge. In
top
form,
Evans
set
fast lap for
the class
on
the
first
round,
a
quick
1:25.49
. Exactly eight
minutes
back
was Dave
Shoppe,
Ford,
and
a
brace
of
trucks
were
four
to
eight
more
minutes
back.
Evans
slowed
a
tad
on
his
next
'
lap,
holding
a
nine
minute
lead
midway
over
Steve
Kelley,
GMC,
who
had
a
skinny
15
seconds
on
Shoppe,
who
was
to
have
serious
delays
on
the
next
two
laps.
Walker
Evans
kept
up
his
pace,
returning
to
the
winner's
laurels after a
spring
dry
spell,
and
Walker
was a
happy
man
at
the flag. Kelley,
who
broke
a
pitman
arm
and
had
a flat
on
the
last lap, still
came
in
second
in
class,
about
16
minutes
down,
but
an
hour
ahead
of
Mike
Nesmith
and
Randy
Salmont,
whose
GMC
nailed
down
third,
Bill
Howard
and
Richard
Nelson,
Chevy,
were
fourth,
followed
by
Shoppe,
and
Stan
Gilbert,
Ford.
Class 9
numbered
nine
at
Barstow,
but
only
three
went
four,
laps.
W.J.
Bradbury
and
Steve Banning
got
out
front
with
a
quick
1
:30.33
first lap,
and
they followed
with
1:34.40
to
hold
a hefty lead midway. But,
their
car
didn't
cover
another
lap.
Barstow's
own
Jeff
Watson
and
Butch
Darling were lying
second
here,
only
four
minutes
back,
but
they
also
vanished
on
the
third
round.
Up
front
the
team
of
Ted
Armstrong
and
Tom
Moessner
took
the
lead after
three
turns,
in
a
Funco
SS 2; they
enlarged
their
margin
of
time
at
the
checkered
flag
to
win
by
over
half
an
hour.
Jim
Dizney
and
Mike
McCrory,
who
got
hit
on
lap
2, losing a
front
tire, tie
rod,
shock
and
about
30
minutes,
got
their
Chenowth
home
second,
only
eight
minutes
ahead
of
Andy
Blue
in
a
Funco
.
The
unlimited
Baja Bugs
came
out
with
eleven
starters,
and
they
had
a close
contest
.
The
Las
Vegas
team
of
Greg
Heinrich
and
Jim
Pope,
who
have
been
close all
season,
whipped
off
the
fast first
lap
in
their
convertible,
1:27.
46,
but,
Hartmut
and
Wolfram
Klawitter were
just
three
seconds
slower.
On
the
first
lap,
no
other
car
was
even
close.
Heinrich/Pope
stretched
their
Dusty
Times
lead
midway
to
over
eight
minutes
back
but
well
ahead
of'
minutes
on
the
Klawitters,
and
the
herd.
the
new
Jimco
built
Bug
of
Heading
into
the
last Jap
Malcolm
Vinje/Mark
Hansen
Heinrich/Pope
led
by
more
than
was
now
-
third,
another
ten
eleven
minutes,
and
in
second
now
were Greg
Diehl
and
Doug
Person,
just
three
minutes
ahead
of
Vinje/Hansen,
while
the
Klawitters
dropped
to
fourth
with
down
time.
At
the
flag
it
was
Greg
Heinrich
and
Jim
Pope
home
first
and
first
in
Class 5
with
a
total
time
of
6:
18.35,
and
it
was
their
first
major
Class 5
victory. Hauling
i;r i;r
l:r
MORE
OFF
ROAD
RACERS
RAN
KC
HiLiTES
AT
THE
MINT4DD
&
BAJA
500
August 1985
THAN
ALLDTHER
BRANDS
COMBINED*
* According t6 official SCORE and MINT
400
contingency forms, 72%
of
the entries in the
MINT
400
and 55% of the Baja
500
entries
were KC-equipped! See your
KC
HiliTES
dealer
for winning deals on the winning light ...
RACE
READY
OUT
OF
THE
BOX
..\.«,~
KC
Chrome Rock Shield protects against flying
~
rocks and dirt clods. Fits in the outer rim and
won't fall off! Made for ail
6"
KC
Daylighters
manufactured since
1970.
KC
soft covers fit
without modifications. Part
No.
7203
Page
15
Charging
hard
on the
familiar
course,
Andy
Devercelly
and
his
son
Andy
had
troubles midway,
but
they came
back
strong
to
take
third
in 5-1600 class.
John
Randall
had
some
woes
with
his Jeep Honcho, but, despite
a time penalty, he
kept
moving
to easily take
second
place
in
Class
4.
Class
7S
points
leader Willie Valdez
had
a few
problems
at
Barstow,
but
he
held
the
points
lead with a
good
second
in the
7S
Ford
Ranger
.
Chuck
Johnson
and
Mike
Poppie
came from the
midwest
to race
the
Ford
Ranger
and
Chuck
drove the desert to finish
third
in
Class
7S
wars.
Eric
Heiden
and
Peter
Colaci
stayed
close in Class 3
all
day
in
their
new
Jeep Scrambler,
but
at
the flag
they
had
to settle
for
second.
It
is
getting
to be a
habit
for
Jason Myers
and
Don
Adams
to win
the
two
Jeep Class
12
,
and
they drove the Cherokee to
victory
once
again.
Durability
and
experience
paid
off
for
Jim
Conner
and
Jim
Wolfe
who
were the
surprise
winners
in Class 7,
driving
the Nissan
at
a steady
and
winning
pace.
Mike
Les le
and
his
qrew
had
their
ups
and
downs
on
the
rough
course,
but
they
stayed.with the
program-to
finish
second
among
the 5-1600s.
r;.,.. r;.,..
IJlr
r;.,..
into
second
were Vinje
and
Hansen,
only
ten
minutes
back,
and
a
half
hour
ahead
of
the
Klawitter Bug,
which
had
more
trouble
on
the
last lap.
Never
quite
getting
on
song,
the
team
of
Jim
Cocores
and
Doug
White
were fifth,
followed
by
Max
Razo
and
·
Johnnie
Robison
.
Class 7 was
up
to
four
starters
and
the
anticipated
shoot
out
between
Manny
Esquerra,
Ford
Ranger,
and
Roger
Mears,
Nissan,
developed
on
the
first
lap.
Manny
had
a slim
two
minute
lead
after
one
round,
with
1:32
.
23,
on
Mears
.
Well
back
were
Jim
Conner,
Nissan,
Dusty Times
and
David
Ramsay
/
Al
Logari,
Toyota.
However,
the
race is
not
always
to
the
swiftest ...
On
the
second
lap
Esquerra
broke
bolts
in
the
steering
box,
lost
a
drive
line,
and
the
air
cleaner
came
off
and
a washer
got
sucked
into
the
engine, which
broke
a
spark
plug.
The
result
was a
4:09
lap.
Mears
went
through
Check
1
on
the
second
lap
with
serious
steering
trouble,
reported
to
be
the
power
steering pulley,
and
he
did
a
3:
1 7
lap
. Meanwhile,
Jim
Conner
had
the lead
midway
by
23
minutes
over
Ramsay
/ Logan.
Conner,
with
Jim
Wolf
driving
relief,
kept
up
a
consistent
pace
and
he
won
Class 7
for
Nissan
in
Andy
Devercelly
and
his
son
Andy
whose
Coronado
'Racing
T earn Bug
came
back
strong
from
a
disasterous
third
lap.
Massingham
nabbed
fourth
followed
by
Johnnie
Robison
in
another
Razo Bug.
Just
three
more
minutes
back
were Kathy
and
Stacy Fay,
the
girls trying a
desert
race instead
of
Ascot
for
a
change.
Allen
and
Brian Bursey
were eighth,
the
final finisher
in
class.
It was
tough
and
tight
in Class 5-1600,
but
at the flag
and
most
of
the distance
the
Bug
of
Mark
Steele
and
John
Johnson
led the
23
1600 cc
Limited
Bajas.
Class 4
came
up
with
nine
starters
at
Barstow,
but
only
four
went
the
distance.
As
usual
Rod
Hall
and
Jim
Fricker
put
the
Dodge
out
front
on
the
first lap
with,
quick
time
of
1:37.39
for
the
class. But,
they
stopped
to
replace a
front
drive
shaft
on
the
second
go,
and
midway
Hall
had
just
seven
minutes
in
hand
over
John
Randall, Jeep
Honcho.
Healthy
again, Hall
and
Frick_e
_r
sailed
on
to
r;r
r;.,.. r;.,..
i;w·
his