I
I
I
Toyota-1985
Manufacturers'
Cup
Challenge
Winner
Ivan
"lronman"
Stewart
and
Steve
Millen
have
done
it
again
in
1985.
For
the
third
year
in
the
history
of
the
Manufacturers'
Cup
Challenge,
Team
Toyota's
champion
drivers
sweptthe
Class
7
Grand
National
Sport
Truck
field.
And
this first-class
win
is
no
small
victory,
either.
Toyota
Trucks
Have
What
It
Takes:
Trucks
that
go
drivin'
with
Ivan
and
Steve
must
be
·
able
to
take
it.
Toyota
Trucks
COULD
ASH
TOYOTA
FOR
ADYTHID&
WW"¥%¾1
fflORE
l1
•w'
E'r
TIW
- '
'7ZZTwC
"C
have
what
it
takes
to
race
againstthe
world's
most
formidable
competition
on
the
world's
most
grueling
courses.
And
Toyota
Trucks
have
what
ittakes
to
win,
time
and
agam.
Toyota
Trucks
Are
Built
Tough:
"While
our
special
trucks
are
built
to
win
races,"
said
Stewart,
"any
Toyota
Truck
you
can
buy
has
got
the
kind
otper-
formance
and
toughness
Steve
and
I
need."
Toyota
Trucks
have
performance
and
durability
built
in
from
the
start.
Every
·
Toyota
Truck-4x2
or
4x4-
will
work
hard
for
you
and
play
hard
with
you.
Toyota
Trucks
Are
First
Class:
When
it
comes
to
small
truck
toughness
and
reliability,
Toyota
is
first
in
class,
and
first atthe
finish
line.
Team
Toyota
is
keeping
h
. I
t e
cup
...
agam.
(Center
)
Le
s
Unger,
Toyota
Motors
ports
Manager
;
(R
i
ght)
Steve
Millen
,
and
(Left)
Ivan
"
lronman
·
Stewart
.
1985
Manu
fa
cturer
s'
Cup
Chall
e
nge
C
ha
mp
io
ns
©
1985
Toyota
M
ot
or
Sa
l
es,
U.S
A., In
c.
I ,
Volume 2 Number
10
Editor-Publisher
Jean Calvin
Associate
Publisher
· Brad
Goodrow
Controller
John Calvin
Contributors
Darlene Bozeman
Leonard Day
Daryl D. Drake
·
Winnie
Essenberg
Homer
Eubanks
Tom
Grimshaw
Dennis Henneberg
Martin
Holmes
Danny McKenzie
Brenda Parker
David Ryskamp
Wayne
Simmons
Judy
Smith
John
Sprovkin
Joe
Stephan
Trackside
Photo
Enterprises
Art
Director
Larry
E.
Worsham
Typesetting
&
Production
Michelle's Typesetting Services
Printing
News Type Service
October 1985
THE
OfflCIAL
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SNAPSHOT
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•••
In
This
Issue
•••
FEATURES
Page
New
Opel
Rally
4 x 4
..
..
..
...
..
.
....
. .
...
. .
.....
. . . 8
HORA
Frontier
500
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
BAS
Macon
County
Fair
...
..
.
...
.....
.
..
.
..........
18
SCORE
Canada
at
Peterborough
.....
. . . . .
.......
.
..
.
19
A.O
.
R.R.A.
Racing
at
Tucson
Speedway
...
..
. . .
......
21
AMSA
Silver
Dollar
6
Hour
. .
........
.
....
..
. . . , . . . .
22
Brush
Run
101
....
..
. .
.......
.
......
.
..
.
..........
24
Dodge
Rally
of
Michigan
..
. . .
....
.
.....
.
.........
·. . .
30
F.O.R.D.A.
at
Hollywood
Speedway
. .
..............
_.
.
31
Muddy
Racing
at
Atlanta,
Georgia
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
33
Pro
CanAm
Horn
Rapids
Sagebrush
Shootout
. . . . . . . . .
34
BAS
Racing
at
Paragon,
Indiana
..
, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
World
Championship
Rally
of
Argentina
..............
37
Great
Western
Points
Series
at
Berthoud,
Colorado
. . . . .
38
Dodge
Colt
Vista
4
WO
............................
39
.
Rolling
Rally
Action
...............................
43
DEPARTMENTS
.
Snapshot
of
the
Month
.....
·
.....................
·. . . . 3
Side
Tracks
by
Judy
Smith
.....
-
......................
4
Trail
Notes
. ,
......................................
4
Soap
Box
· . .
........................................
5
Happenings
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Pony
Express
......................................
8
Good
Stuff
Directory
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
Classified
Ads
.....................................
42
Index
to
Advertisers
.......
-:-
..............
.
.........
42
ON
THE
COVl!R-
The
HORA
Frontier
500
was a tough and dusty
enduro.
Congratulations go
to
Larry Ragland,
of
Phoenix, Arizona,
who
successfully defended his overall victory gained in the 1984,
Frontier
500.
This
year the race was longer
and
tougher,
but
Larry
Ragland and his Porsche 6 cylinder powered Chaparral were more than
equal
to
the
task. Larry drove all the way and
won
overall by 18
minutes, and also
took
Class 1 by an even greater margin, 37 minutes.
Our
second cover boy is.
Rob
Tolleson,
of
Palmdale; California,
who
is
dominating Class
1-2-1600
in
the
desert lately.
Rob
drove
his
Mirage
to
the
.class win by nearly an
hour
margin, and, with a driving
assist from Mirage designer Bill Varnes, the
1600
finished a
smart
14th
overall. Congratulations
to
this pair
of
winners, and
to
all who covered
the course
on
the
toughest event
of
the year.
Color
Photography by
Chris
Haston
ancl
Harold Crawford
of
T rackside
Phot
_o Enterprises.
/\~
DUSTY
TIMES
THE
FASTEST
GROWING
OFF
ROAD
MONTHLY
IN
THE
COUNTRY!!
D 1 year -
$12.00
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$30.00
I
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Take advantage
of
your subscription bonus
•••
Free ·one time classified ad up
to
45
words.
(Form
on
inside
back
page)
"Gee
Dad,
how
many
more
laps are there?"
Off
road
racing is truly a family sport,
but
Julia
Garland
does seem a
bit
too
small
to
drive this Class 4
truck
. Julia, the daughter
of
Seattle driver
Art
Garland, liked the chauffeur's seat in the new rig, which was competing
at
the
Pro
CanAm
Horri.
Rapids
200
Mile
Sagebrush
Shootout
in
Western
Washington.
Photo
by Leonard Day
of
Pro
CanAm
Racing.
DUSTY
TIMES will feature pictures
of
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or
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on
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each
month.
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returned, enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope.
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or
8xl0
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Dusty
Times
October
1985
Page3
Side Tracks •••
By
Judy
Smith
There's
been
so
much
talk
about
insurance
and
expense
lately,
that
it
seemed
interesting
to
go back
into
the
archives
and
have a
look
at
how
it used
to
be. ·
We
became
interested
in
the
contrast
between
then
and
now
in
terms
of
the
entire
entry
fee.
What
you
paid,
and
what
you
got
differed
.
immensely,
even
years
ago,
from
promoter
to
promoter.
For
example,
for
the
1971
Mexican
1000,
put
on
by
NORRA,
the
entry
fee was a
hefty
$350
per
vehicle.
But
that
included
"one
or
two
beds
in
La
Paz
for
the
nights
of
November
3,
4,
and
5,
1971;
gasoline used
by
the
competing
vehicle;
and
contestant
and
third
party
insurance."
Some
of
the
money
went
into
the
purse,
but
we
couldn't
find
the
exact figure.
A
couple
of
months
later
the
AR
VRA
folks held
their
first
Barstow
race,
the
January,
1972
California
400.
This
event
called
for
a
$250
entry
fee, with
50%
going
to
the
purse.
One
also
had
to
belong
to
AR
VRA,
which
cost
$2
annually,
and
the
insurance
for
the
race was
additional,
at
$8
per
person.
In
April
of
'72
·
there
was a
good
race
down
south,
·
the
Borrego
Rough
150,
for
which
entrants
paid
$50
entry,
plus
$4
for
insurance.
They
had
a
novice
race
the
next
day,
and
the
entry
fee was
even
less
for
therri.
Insurance
stayed
the
same.
The
1972
Mint
400
charged
$300
for
its
entry
fee, which
included
the
"awards
dinner
for
two; fuel;
two
racing
jackets
with
insignia indicating driver;
Jim
Beam
commemorative
Mint
"400"
bottles
for
the
years
'70,
'71,
and
'72;
death,
injury
and
third
party . insurance; and
various
souvenir
and
surprise
items."
The
awards
dinner
was
just
that
- a real
prime
rib
dinner,
with
all
the
fixin's.
The
Mint
had
a
$56,000
guaranteed
purse
that
year
and
entry
monies
didn't
get
thrown
into
the
pot.
_ In
February
of
'72
there
was a
·
neat
little race, which
started
at
Jean, Nevada, called
the
"Walt
Before
You
Buy!
Make
Sure
It's
The
USED
FOR
ALL TYPE DIRT
RACING•FIL TERS THE
AIR
•ELIMINATES
DUST•COOLS
THE DRIVER•GIVES YOU
THE ADVANTAGE. THE
DRIVERS SAY
"IT'S
ALMOST
LIKE
CHEATING".
FIND OUT NOW
BY
CALLING ..
714/894-8332
OR
MAILING IN
FOR
LITERATURE.
9371
Kramer,
Unit
#G
-
#H
Westminster, CA 92683
PARKER PUMPER
Page4
Lott
Special"
(does
that
give
you
a
sense
of
Deja Vu?),
for
which
the
entry
was
$120,
with
$5
for
insurance,
and
50%
going
into
the
purse.
And
the
first race
at
Parker,
the
NORRA
Dam
500,
in
February
of
1972,
had
been
relatively expensive
at
$275.
But
this fee
included
"contestant
and
third
party
insurance; gasoline;
and
participation
in
the
awards
ceremonies."
,
Those
were
the
days,
weren't
they?
For
the
sake
of
comparison
we
checked
a few
of
the
entry
fees
for
1985.
SCORE's
Parker
race,
the
first big
event
of
the
year,
got
off
the
ground
with
a
$450
entry
fee,
plus
$38
for
insurance.
Then
$10
of
each
entry
was
to
go
to
the
points
fund,
and
3%
of
each
entry
was
to
go towacd
the
land
use fee.
There
was
then
a
50
%
payback
of
what
was left.
While
bikes,
three
wheelers, Challenger
Class
and
Odysseys
paid
lower
entry
fees, all were
socked
$50
for
a late fee after
January
30.
So
it totaled
$488,
or
$538,
if
you
procrastinated.
And
you
bought
your
own
gas.
The
March
HORA
Desert
Challenge
had
an
entry
fee
of
only
$350,
with
insurance
of
$45;
a late fee
of$25;
a late tech
inspection
fee
of
$25;
and
a
charge
of
$25
each for
extra
drivers.
Membership
in
HORA
is
required,
at
$35
per
annum.
·
SCORE's
membership
is
$35
also.
The
Mint
went
up
to$500
this
year,
plus
$75
insurance,
and
a
fee
of
$40
for
each extra
driver.
The
Mint
does
give
two
"free"
jackets
to
each
entry.
Their
payback
is
described
as
"approximately
60%".
AMSA's
Labor
Day race
had
a
$300
entry
fee,
plus
$100
for
''registration
and
insurance'';
and
$25
for
the
driver's
points
fund.
Late
entries
are
charged
an
additional
$50.
AMSA gives a
payback
of
50%
(
that
is,
50%
of
the
$300).
They
also
require
membership.
This
year,
when
every
promoter
has
found
himself
faced with increased
insurance
premiums,
the
fees
have
escalated
almost
· race-by-race.
For
SCORE's
'85
Baja
1000,
coming
up
in
November,
the
entry
fee will
be
a
stout
$500;
plus
$75
for
insurance;
then
$30
for Baja
municipality
and
state
fees.
There
is a late fee
of
$50;
plus
a
$25
charge for each
extra
driver.
And
each
of
those
extra
drivers
must
buy
a
SCORE
membership,
if
he
hasn't
already.
So,
it's
$605
at
a
minimum
(for
the
four-wheeled
classes;
bikes
and
the
odd-ball
classes
are
a
bit
less).
Every
promoter
used
to
give
T-shirts,
patches,
dash
plaques
and
/
or
a finishing
souvenir
of
some
sort.
It's
been
years since
those
little
extras
have
been
handed
out
with any regularity.
SCORE
has
had
finisher pins,
and
the
Mint
gives finisher
patches
to
go
on
the
jackets
of
course
-
but
we
can
no
longer
fill
up
your
closets
with
the
free
T-shirts
of
yore.
While
we
were
poking
through
the
dusty
old
records
to
dredge
up
all these figures we
were
surprised
to
note
some
really illustrious
names
on
the
old
NORRA
Mexican
1000
entry
list for
the
1968
event.
Two
·
that
were
not
very
surprising
were Parnelli Jones, in
a
'68
Bronco,
and
James
Garner,
in a
'58
Bronco.
Both
of
them
were very familiar
to
off
roaders
in
those
days.
But
we were
surprised
to
find a 25 year
old
Michael
Nesmith,
driving
a
1600cc
VW
/K
yote ( whatever
that
might
be), alongside a
23
year
old
Sam
Posey in a
1500cc
VW
/ Pecarry (sic).
{Isn't
that
some
kind
of
a pig?)
Then
there
were A.J. Foyt,
and
believe it
or
not,
he
too,
was
to
drive
a
1600cc
Kyote, as was Roger
McCluskey.
Don
Prudhomme
·
drove
a
Porsche
powered
Solar
Mark
II,
and
Bob
Bondurant
was
entered
in a
VW
powered
Meyers
Tow'd.
We
have a partial finishing list
from
the
race,
and
do
not
find
even
one
of
those
illustrious
folks
on
it.
One
wonders
if
it
had
all been a big
publicity
gimmick
to
interest
the
press
in
the
race.
Of
course,
our
list
doesn't
include
non-finishers
.
There
are
some
additional
entrants
on
the
list,
rather
more
prosaic
in
nature,
like
John
Johnson
in a
Corvair
buggy,
Clark
Gillies
(admitting
to
44
years
back
then,
and
still mighty
quick
in Class 1
at
the
Frontier
500
this year) in
another
Corvair
buggy,
Malcolm
Smith
in
an
1800cc
VW
Revmaster
Spider
·
(
that
was a really big
motor
then),
Larry
Minor
in a
'68
Bronco,
Rodney
Hall in a
'69
Kaiser Jeep,
and
Andy
DeVercel-
1 y in a
1500cc
buggy.
Some
of
those
names
do
show
up
on
the
finishing list,
and
in
fact,
did
very well. DeVercelly
won
the
Production
Two
Wheel
Buggy class, getting
to
La
Paz
in a
time
of22
hoursand37
minutes.
Minor
won
Class
V,
for
Production
Four
Wheel
Drive
vehicles, in 21
hours
11
minutes,
and
right
behind
him
was Hall in
22:43.
Johnson
was also a
winner, in
the
Non-Production
Two
Wheel
Drive
class, getting
down
there
- in
23
hours
44
minutes.
But
Gillies
and
Smith
don't
seem
to
have finished.
It's
nice
to
see
that
those
early
successes have
continued,
and
that
those
folks
enjoyed
this
frustrating
sport
so
much
that
they've
kept
coming
back
for
more.
There
are a
lot
of
others,
a
surprisingly big
group,
who
raced
back
then
iQ
'68
and
are
still active
now
.
We're
building a
history,
and
a folklore,
and
a
wonderful
collection
of
stories
to
tell
around
the
campfires.
The
only
one
we
can
remember
from
that
race
(in
which we
did
not
compete)
was
the
story
of
a
team
entered
in
the
Production
Four
Wheel
drive
class, which
wanted
to
win
badly
enough
that
they
airlifted
a
duplicate
race vehicle
to
the
midway
point
on
the
course.
It
was
to
no
avail, as they
ended
up
nearly
the
last place
finishers
of
the
whole
shebang.
All
of
this reminiscing makes
us eager
to
get
back
to
Baja,
and
particularly,
to
La Paz.
Let's
hope
the
entry
fees
don't
get
too
much
higher
by
the
time
the
'86
1000,
scheduled
to
go
to
La Paz, rolls
around,
because
that's
a definite
"must
do"
on
our
list!
October 1985
Trail Notes •••
THE MICKEY THOMPSON OFF
ROAD
CHAMPIONSHIP GRAN
PRIX
series finale
in
mid-September
was
one
of
the
best
evenings
of
stadium
racing yet.
Another
sell
out
crowd
jammed
the
Orange
Show
Fairground
in
San
Bernardino,
CA,
to
watch
the
short
course
racers
for
the last time this
year. In fact,
the
place was
sold
out
a
good
hour
before
the
show
began.
Main
event
winners
were Steve Millen,
Toyota,
in Class 7,
Marty
Tripes,
Funco,
in
Class
1,
Tommy
Croft,
Chenowth,
Class
10,JeffElrod,
Hi
Jumper,
Class
1-2-1600,
and
Vince Tjelmeland,
Ultra
Stock.
The
extra
drama
concerned
who
would
win
the
points
titles,
and
it
was very close in a
couple
of
classes.
It
couldn't
get
any
closer in Class
10
as Bob
Gordon
and
Jerry
Whelchel
ended
up
in a tie
to
the
third
decimal
place; they
are
the
1985
co-champs
in
the
class.
Roger
Mears
and
I van
Stewart
were tied
on
Class
7
points
going
into
the
race,
but
neither
won
the
main
event. Mears was
second
in
the
Nissan,
and
Stewart
was
third,
sans
power
steering in the
Toyota
. Roger Mears
won
the
Class
7
drivers
title,
and
Toyota
won
the
Manufacturers'
Cup
for
the
third
year in a
row,
so
there
were a
pair
of
wins
for
the
trucks
. Jeff
Elrod
took
the
points
in
limited
1600
class,
and
Vince
Tjelmeland
beat
out
Mark
Hansen
for
the
Ultra
Stock
title.
Since
both
use
Pontiac
bodies,
it
is
assumed
that
Pontiac
is
the
manufacturers'
champion.
However,
the
Ultra
Stock
points
series was
sponsored
in
1985
by
Uniroyal
Tires,
and
their
cash
went
to
the highest
placing
driver
using
their
tires.
Both
Tjelmeland
and
Hansen
drive
short
course
on
General
Tires.
So,
third
in
points,
Mike
Goodbody,
who
has
a
VW
Golf
body
on
his
racer,
got
the
five
grand
from
Uniroyal.
Check
the
full
report
and
season
wrap
up
coming
in
the
November
issue.
ROD
HALL, ace
four
wheeler
and
the
only
person
to
win
Class 4
on
the
Frontier
500,
four
in a row,
has
added
another
activity
to
his already
crammed
schedule. Hall is helping
promote
California's
Off
Highway Vehicle
Recreation
Areas
with
a
new
television
public
service
announcement.
The
tape is being
sent
to
TY
stations
throughout
California.
.
The
"winningest"
driver
in
off
road
history
plied his talents
at
the
Hollister
Hills
State
Vehicular
Recreation
Area
for
his segement
of
the
30
and
60
second
spots.
"It
was fun,
and
the
State
is
doing
a
lot
to
promote
the
fun
and
safety aspects
of
off
highway
recreation,"
Hall said after the video tape
session.
"These
spots
show
all
the
various
off
highway uses,
and
we
just
had
one
small
part
in
it,
but
I
wouldn't
have missed
the
opportunity
to
participate,"
Hall
added.
The
public
service
announcement
informs
the
OHV
puplic
of
the
State's
new
Off
Highway Vehicle Areas guide
that
is
now
available.
Write
for
your
copy
to
OHV,
Dept.
of
Parks
and
Recreation,
P.O.
Box
2390,
Sacramento,
CA
95811.
STADIUM
RACING
U.S.A.
has
surfaced
again, as always,
headed
by
Marty
Tripes
,
With
no
southern
California
short
course
events
scheduled
for
the
rest
of
the
year,
Tripes
has
put
together
a
dandy
program
to
keep
i:he
wheel
to
wheel racers
busy
on
October
19.
The
place is
the
Imperial Valley
Fairgrounds
near
El
Centro,
CA.
The
site is right
across
the
highway
from
the
airport.
On
the
schedule
are
Classes 1,
10
and
1-2-1600,
along
with
Classes
23
and
33
for
A
TVs,
who
will race
on
a
shorter
course
than
the
cars
.
The
tech
and
registration
starts
at
seven
Saturday
morning,
at
the
track,
and
it
closes
at
ten
a.m.,
so
get
there
early.
The
rest
of
the
day
will
hold
practice sessions,
and
an
autograph
session
happens
at
five
p.m.,
and
then
the
racing starts.
Get
all
the
info'
from
Marty
Tripes,
(619)
463-0654.
THE
ALCAN
5000,
a
somewhat
romantic
endurance
rally
run
in a
Time-
Speed-Distance
format,
is
happening
right
now.
Starting
in
Bellevue_,
WA
on
September
25,
the
rally is a
5000
mile
trek
through
southwestern
Canada,
the
Yukon
Territory
and
Alaska.
The
first
edition,
covered
by
Dusty
Times
last
year, was a
dandy
with
all
sorts
of
strange
vehicles
and
crews
from
all areas.
of
motorsport
in
the
ranks.
The
rally is
sanctioned
by
both
Sports
Car
Club
of
America
and
the
Canadian
Auto
Sport
Clubs.
While
the
TSD
work
must
be
exact,
the
average·
speeds
are
often
hard
to
make
on
the
gravel
roads
peppered
with
suspension
smashing
frost
heaves.
One
interesting
entry
in
the Alcan
5000
is
the
Subaru
RX
for
long
time
raHy
man
Gene
Henderson
and
his
Pro
Rally
co-driver
Mike
Van
Loo,
both
from
Michigan
.
They
have
won
often
in
the
longer,
endurance
rallies:
BFGOODRICH,
CANADA
performance
team
drivers
cleaned
up
at
the
seventh
annual
Bancroft
(Ontario)
Off
Road
Challenge, winning
four
of
the
.five classes in
the
wheel
to
wheel racing. Bill LeFeuvre
won
the
obstacle
course
run
and
the
Class
10
honors
in
his Berrien.
Then
he
went
on
to
win
the
Challenge
of
Champions
against all
previous
class winners. LeFeuvre, a
polished
veteran
from
Limehouse,
Ontario,
had
an
easy
run
to
the
win after
local favorite Barry
Wannamaker
clipped
the
final
corner
marker
and
rolled
his
truck
several times, luckily
without
injury.
Wannamaker
had
won
his
class
in
the
obstacle
course,
and
said
the
mud
on
his goggles
obscured
his
vision
just
before
the
crash.
Richard
Vaillancourt,
of
Montreal,
Quebec,
inherited
second
place
in
the
Challenge. ·
Joel
Croft,
of
Guelph,
Ontario,
put
his
1-2-1600
into
the
winner's
circle
in
that
class. Local racer
Tim
Burke,
of
Bancroft, delighted the
crowd
of
about
20,000
with
his Class 3 victory. Linda
Lou
Schlamb,
of
Elm vale,
Ontario,
out
powered
six
other
ladies
to
win
both
the
wheel
to
wheel
and
obstacle
course
events.
The
Off
Road
Challenge was
produced
by
the
Bancroft
Tailgators
Off
Road
Club
and
sponsored
by
Ford
of
Canada,
BFGoodrich
Tire
Group,
Esso
and
Labatts
Breweries.
Wouldn't
it
be
nice
if
those
kind
of
heavy
hitters
would
support
off
road
racing
in
the
USA.
1986
RACE DATES.
As
the
1985
season
winds
down
in
most
parts
of
the
country,
the
competition
for
choice
dates
in
the
west is as fierce as ever.
Check
the
"Happenings"
column
for
the
combined
desert
series
dates
and
these
are
firm.
Also
pencil
in a
Mint
400
race
on
May
7-11,
and
what
better
date
could
one
have
for
a Las Vegas race!
While
there
is
no
official
statement
on
a
1986
Mint
400,
the
request
for
the
date
has
been
made,
and
the
request
to
be
included
in
the
HORA-SCORE
series
in.
1986
has also
been
made.
Also
listed is
the
Mickey
Thompson
Stadium
Series, planning
nine
dates,
some
still
tentative.
There
may
also
be
a
date
in
early
January
somewhere
in
the
southwest
to
kick
off
the
new
MTEG
season.
So,
don't
tear
your
short
course
car
apart
over
the
Christmas
Ho_lidays unless
you
plan
to
put
it
together
fast.
Also
in
the
planning
stage is a full series
of
races
from
Stadium
Racing
U.S.A.,
but
no
firm
1986
dates
as yet.
Dusty
Times
FRONTIER
500
FALLOUT.
The
fourth
annual
Frontier
500
will
be
the
subject
of
bench
racing
for
years
to
come.
While
the
loop
concept
sounded
like a
good
idea going in,
most
who
voted
for
the
scheme
might
have changed
their
minds
after
competing
over
endless miles
of
silt last
month.
Almost
every
driver,
winners,
just
finishers,
and
DNFs
had
similar
comments.
To
put
it mildly, they claimed
it
was
the
·roughest, toughest,
and
one
of
the
dirtiest
desert
races ever. A
good
deal
of
the
charm
of
going
somewhere
was
lost
in
the
loop
concept.
The
thought
of
clearing
the
silt after
the
first
200
miles, as in
the
past
three
years, was gone as
the
course
turned
right
back
into
the
soft
stuff
on
its way
south
to
the
finish line
at
Beatty.
Despite
the
rugged
conditions,
it
was
an
excellent race
and
a safe race,
with close
to
a
35
percent
finishing
ratio
among
the
car classes.
Of
the
18
classes
on
four
wheels,
six
of
them,
or
one
third,
had
no
finishers
at
all,
and
three
more
classes
had
but
one
entry
that
finished
the
course
in
20
hours
or
less.
That
says a little
something
about
the
rough
going
on
this
extra
long, well
over
500
mile
course
.
One
of
the
best
comments
on
the
route
we
heard
came
from
Roger
Mears,
who
overcame
myriad
problems
to
finish
second
in
Class
7
in
his Nisssan.
Mears
remarked
that
driving
the
1985
Frontier
500
felt like
driving
four
laps
of
the
Mint
400
and
the
Baja
1000
from
Ensenada
to
La Paz,
all in
the
same day period!
Comqiunications
were vastly
improved
this year
between
checkpoints,
thanks
ih
part
to
the
good
folks
at
Goodyear
who
donated
the
use
of
their
radio
net
to
any
and
all racers
who
needed
information
from
the
far reaches
of
the race course.
Aided
by
the
expertise
of
Bob
"Weatherman"
Steinberger,
who
was
aloft
with his relays
during
most
of
the
race,
the
radio
net
worked
well for folks searching
for
lost
cars
and
crews.
There
was
only
one
glitch
in
the
scoring
procedure,
probably
due
to
the
fact
that
HDRA
is
unaccustomed
to
scoring
thr.ough
checkpoints
on
a
one
way
course.
The
computer
program
called
out
official timing
at
Check
4,
Beatty,
Check
7,
Gabbs,
and
the
finish line,
and
the
print
outs
popped
out
regularly all day
and
into
the
night
on
race day.
What
was
apparently
not
considered
was
that
some
classes
would
have
no
finishers.
With
two
·
checks
between
Beatty
and
Gabbs,
and
two
checks
between
Gabbs
and
the
finish line,
the
winner
in
some
classes
could
be
determined
by
who
went
the
greater distance
through
the
checkpoints
without
official timing.
For
example,
in
Class 7 4 x 4
the
early
Sunday
results
listed
Curtis
Chritensen
as
the
class winner, having reached
Check
4 in less
time
than
Fred
Wright
.
However,
Christensen
was
not
reported
again
but
the
Wright
Toyota
did
pass-Check 6
before
retiring.
In
the
end
it
was straightened
out
and
Wright
got
his win, with
Christensen
second.
Also, G .
T.
Gowland
was originally listed as fifth in this class, with
no
laps
(sic)
completed.
But
Gowland
had
gone
past
Check
3,
so
he
then
moved
up
to
fourth
in
the
class.
The
reason
given
for
not
having these
records
on
the
radio
was
that
there
were
no
clocks
or
timing
crews
at
the
checkpoin
,ts.
In
the
future
HDRA
might
use
the
Score
system
where
each
checkpoint
keeps
a
time
of
day
log, a passage
control
if
you
will,
on
each
vehicle
through
the
check.
It
certainly
helps
locate
downed
racers as well as
helping
out
the
results.
Usually
it is little
more
than
wrist watch time
at
the
check,
but
Score
runs
their
races
on
time
of
day,
so
it
all dovetails.
HDRA
prefers
zero time scoring,
but
Time-Of-Day
allows
interim
scoring using
clocks
kept
honest
by
signals
from
WWV.
The
Frontier
500
seems
to
bring
out
the
party
spirit among
sponsors,
maybe feeling
it
proper
to
party
in Las Vegas.
The
pre-race
Goodyear
reception
is a
tradition
for
the
event
now
.
Thi
_s year
the
tables were groaning·
under
the
weight
of
the
nifty
food
and
in
the
middle
was
an
ice
sculpture
of
a
Dodge
pickup
truck.
Ano
t
her
tradition
is
the
Friday
afternoon
pool
party
hosted
by
Petersen
Publishing
Co.
and
their
4
Wheel
and
Off
Road
magazine
staff.
This
gathering features picnic style
lunch
with
hot
dogs
and
hamburgers
and
a variety
of
salads. Nissan, as always,
hosted
the
reception
before
the
drivers'
meeting
on
Friday
night,
open
to
all
comers.
The
other
galas were
by
invitation
only.
Also
visible
at
the
Frontier
500
were
a
bunch
of
people
from
Ford
Motorsports
in
Detroit.
They
had
a nice
hospitality
room
and
a
lot
of
interest
in
the
race.
They
should
have
liked
what
they
saw,
with
Manny
Esquerra
and
Dave
Shoppe,
· along
with
Steve Mize!, all winning
their
classes
in
Ford
products.
Hopefully
Ford
Motorsports
will take a
keener
and
more
supportive
interest
in
off
road
racing
next
seas'on.
However
the
party
spirit
didn't
carry
over
to
the
awards
ceremony,
through
no
fault
of
the
HDRA.
While
the
awards
took
place in
the
very
plush
showroom
at
the
Frontier
Hotel,
it
actually
got
started
right
on
time!
Walt
Lott
asked
folks
to
hold
down
their
speeches because
the
time allocated
in
the
showroom
was
quite
limited.
Although
the
room
was well filled,
many
award
winners
were
not
on
hand.
They
were
probably
still sleeping
off
the
effects
of
the
grueling
day
into
night
race
effort
.
There
were
no
snacks
available
at
the
awards
presentation,
only
booze,
so
it
went
rapidly
and
the
herd
cleared
the
room
with time
to
spare.
ROD
HALL
had
a successfui
trip
"down
under"
late
in
July
and
came away
the
winner
in
Australia's
Macleay
1000
race. Driving
his
1979
Dodge
4 x 4
pickup,
taken
out
of
retirement
for
the
occasion,
Rodney
led his class
by
30
minutes
and
finished fifth overall.
It
was
the
highest overall finish ever
by
a
truck
in
Australia's
premier
off
road
race.
The
course
runs
out
of
Kempsey
on
the
coast
of
Australia,
300
miles
north
of
Sidney. ·
The
1000
kilometer
route
took
the
160
starters
into
rugged
mountain
terrain, along
the
Macleay River,
and
through
the
eucalyptus forest.
Rod
Hall's
long
time
co-driver
Jim
Fricker
proved
a vital factor
in
the
forest,
keeping
an
eye
on
the
unfa,miliar trails as Hall
"slalomed"
the
truck
through
the
trees.
Rod
said
the
course
was as rugged as
some
parts
of
Baja California.
·
Two
four
wheel
drive
Lada
Nivas were
entered
by
the
Russians. A
master
rally
team
from
behind
the
Soviet
Iron
Curtain
raced
in
one
rig
and
an
Aussie
team
were
in
the
other
Lada.
They
finished
third
and
fourth,
and
both
were
lapped
by
Hall.
Rod
credited]
im
Fricker
with
an
important
diplomatic
assist.
Fricker
avoided
an
international
incident
by
making
sure
the
Dodge
did
not
·
nudge
the
Soviets
while
making
the
passes.
Hall
left
his
'79
truck
in
Australia,
and
he
will
return
there
later this fall
to
compete
in
the
W aikerie
and
Korralbyn
Valley
Races
this fall.
THE
TIRE
WARS
in
off
road
racing are
truly
competitive
these
days
.
Gone,
apparently
forever,
are
the
days
when
one
or
two
tire
manufacturers
dominated
the
winner's
circle
in
a wide
spread
of
classes.
The
Frontier
500
results
graphically
show
the
mounting
interest
by
U .S.
and
Japanese tire
companies
in
off
road
racing.
While
we are missing
the
brand
of
tire
on
the
Class 2
and
Class
11
winners,
the
other
sixteen
car
classes
split
up
the
rubber
money
fairly evenly.
Goodrich
took
three
wins,
Classes4,6and
7 4
x4,a.sdid
Goodyear,
Cll!sses
7S,
8
and
14,
and
Yokohama,
Classes
1-2-1600,
9
and
Challenger. A
pair
of
wins
went
to
General
Tire,
Classes 3
and
5-1600,
and
to
Bridgestone, Classes 5
and
12
. Scoring single victories were Firestone, Class
7, Tectira, Class
10,
and
Mickey
Thompson
Tires,
the
overall victory
and
Class 1 with Larry Ragland.
Dusty
Times
Soap Box •••
CHECKPOINT
SAFETY
The
"CAR
CARD"
Alternative
With
the
recent
injuries
suffered
by
checkpoint
workers,
we
would
like
to
·
off
er
the
Arizona
Desert
Racing Associa-
tion's
checkpoint
procedures
as
an
alternative
to
the
antiquated
"Chit
Can"
system
still
"in
use.
When
off
road
racing got its
start,
and
times
were
measured
in
days
not
seconds,
the
bit
of
playing
card
in a
beer
can
made
for
fun, easy scoring.
But
today,
with
the
higher
speeds
(and
rewards),
seconds
lost
at
a
checkpoint
can
cost
a lot,
maybe
even a life.
We
suggest ·
that
each
entry
affix a
5x6
inch
(approx
.)
«CAR
CARD"
to
the
cowl
ahead
of
the
driver.
This
card
would
be
taped
face
down
and
list
the
vehicle
number,
class, driver{s)
and
maybe
even
sponsors.
.
At
each
checkpoint
a
different
color
marker
is
used
to
"check"
the
card
.
This
is
much
quicker,
safer
and
more
foolproof
than
the
"Chit
Can"
method
.
After
the
race
the
card
is
removed
and
the
checks
counted
.
A
refinement
of
this
might
be
to
mount
t_
he
marker
on
a
pole
so
that
the
check
workers
would
not
need
to
get inside
of
the
rear
wheel
track
as
is
now
necessary.·
For
cross-checking,
another
check
worker
can
record
the
vehicle's
number
and
time.
A.D.R.A.
also
advocates
the
use
of
large, florescent
color
signs warning
of
a
stop
check
ahead, well
before
the
no
passing
zone.
And
to
slow
down
the
·
racers
before
the
check
when
a
natural
obstacle (
ditch,
sharp
turn,
etc.)
is
not
available, traffic
cones
in
a .
serpentine
do
wonders
. Assess racers a
ten
second
penalty
for
each
one
overturned,
and
they'll
soon
get
the
message. Besides,
you
feel
like a
neophyte
taking his first
parallel
parking
test
when
you
knock
one
over. Fans certainly
don't
call it spectacular.
If a
racer
hits
a
checkpoint
sign
or
barrier
it's
an
automatic
five
minute
penalty,
and
if
a racer
hits
a
check
point
worker
or
another
vehicle
it's
automatic
disqualifi-
cation. Even
though
checkpoints
can
come
as a
surprise
at
A.D
.R .
A.
events
since
no
pre-
running
is allowed,
this
method
has
been
used
without
incident
for
over
a
decade
since
A.D.R
.
A.
's
inception.
Lest
anyone
.
think
that
A.D.R
.
A.
checkpoints
don't
see
high
numbers
of
cars, let
me
point
out
that,
for
instance,
Check
# 1
at
last
year's
"Cinder
Lake
150"
recorded
225
vehicles
through.
Please
contact
us
at
(602)
252-
1900
if
you
have
further
questions
or
comments.
But
A.D.R.A.
Strongly urges
the
abandonment
of
the
"Chit
Can"
method
before
further
injuries
result.
----------
Volunteers are i1wited to climb on
their "Soap Box'; and fill this space
with the
ir
thoughts about what
is
good
and
what
is
not
so
good about
the
state
of
off
road racing.
We
would welcome some discussion on
the state
of
the
Pro
Rally Series as
well. Call
or
write
DUSTY
TIMES
with your ideas for a Soap Box
column,
and
get on the schedute.
THE
ORIGINAL
GAS PRESSURE
SHOCK
ABSORBER
WINNERS
ON BILSTEIN
SPEAK FOR
THEMSELVES
Ivan Stewart
1st
Place, Class 7
Mint 400
"Never before have I
had
so much con-
fidence
in
a shock. After
extensive testing and
numerous races on the
same set
of
Bi/steins, I
am very pleased by
their excellent perfor-
mance· and reliability."
October 1985
Ray
Aragon
1st
Place, Class
10
Laughlin Desert
Challenge 1984
''We finished 2nd at the
Cal City
12
-hour
in
1983,
1st
in
Class
10
at the
Parker 400
1984,
and 1st
in
Class
10
at the Laughlin
Desert Challenge
1984
all on the same set
of
Bi/steins with no failures."
, Jerry Leighton
1st
Place, Class
10
Fireworks 250 1984
"The shocks worked
super; no such thing as
broken
or
leaking
shocks with Bi/stein."
Jim Wright
1st
Place, Class 2
Mint 400
"By far the most "
Jmpor-
·
tant parts on any off-
road vehicle are the
shocks. Using Bi/steins
is like cheating."
For further information and
special off-road applications
contact
Tom
Hoke at
BllSTEIN
Corporation of
America,
11760
Sorrento
Valley Road, San Diego,
CA
92121.
619
/ 453-7723.
0
~2000
.
=~
-,cucTS
Pages
1985
·
-1986
HAPPENINGS •••
January
5,
1986
Florida State
Fairgrounds Speedway
Tampa,
FL
February
2,
1986
Citrus Co. Speedway
Inverness, FL
A.D.R.A.
Arizona Desert Racing Association
1408
East Granada
Phoenix, AZ
85006
(602)
252-1900
October
19
9th
Annual Penasco 150
Rocky Point, Mexico
December
7,
1985
9th
Annual Sonoita
to
Rocky Point
Hare
'n
Hound
Sonoita, Mexico
January
11,
1986
Annual Awards Banquet
Phoenix,
AZ
AMSA
American
Motor
Sports
Association
P.O. Box 5473
Fresno,
CA
93755
(209)
439-2114
October
26
California
SOOK
California City,
CA
AMERICAN
OFF
ROAD
RACING
ASSOCIATION
John
Ohanesian
P.O. Box
31811
Phoenix, AZ
85046
(
602)
867
-4
769
October
13
Deer Valley Cycle Park
Phoenix, AZ
October
27
Tucson
International Raceway
Tucson,
AZ
-
Page
6
BANZAI
OFF
ROAD
CENTER
Bryan Christensen
2729
No.
62nd
Omaha, NE
68104
(all events
at
Riverfro
nt
Motorsports Park)
October 6
Flanders Day -
Sportsman Season Fina
le
BERRIEN
AUTO
CROSS SERIES
Co
ordinator - Gil Parker
7406
S. 12th
St
.
Kalamazoo, MI
49009
(616)
375-1233
COBRA
RACING
P.O. Box 19407
Oklahoma City,
OK
73119
(405)
232-4231 -
(405)
685-3450
(All off road races will be held at the
59th
& Douglas track, Oklahoma
City.)
FORDA
Florida
Off
Readers
Drivers' Association
5349
Hansel Ave., C-1
Orlando, Florida
32809
(305)
851-6245
October
13
Hollywoo_d Speedway
Hollywood, FL
November
3.
Brevard Co.
Off
Road Park
Sharpes, FL
December
1
Brevard Co.
Off
Road Park
March
21-23,
1986
Florida
400
Crowder Pits
Tallahassee, FL
FUD
PUCKER
RACING
TEAM
250
Kennedy, #6
Chula Vista, CA 92011
(619)
427-5759
August
9,
1986
Superstition 250 III
GORRA
Georgia
Off
Road
Racing Association
Box 11093 Station -A
Atlanta,
GA
30310
(404)
927-6432
October
27
100 Mile Race
Atlanta, GA
GREAT
WESTERN
POINTS
SERIES,
INC.
1507
South
Lincoln
Loveland,
CO
80537
CORRA
(303)
669-4460
DORRA
(303)
429-1949
RMORRA
(303)
597-8239
WKR
(913)
332-3402
October
5-6
WKR
Championship Race
St. Francis,
KS
HORA
High Desert Racing Association
961
West
Dale Ave.
Las Vegas,
NV
89124
(702)
361-5404
Sharpes, FL
.-------------,
-
yo,
BARNEYIH
you
RASCALH
0E'EN
SHORf
COURSIN'
AGAIN,
cH
??!
October1985
December
6-8
Frontier
250
Las Vegas, NV
March 7-9,
1986
Laµghlin Desert Challenge
· Laughlin, NV
July
4-6,
1986
Fireworks 250
Barstow,
CA
September
5-
7,
1986
· Frontier
500
Las Vegas,, NV
December
5-
7,
1986
Frontier
250
Las Vegas, NV
HODAG50
Information
(715)
362-6550
IOK
FOUR
WHEELERS
P.O.
Box
36
Cleves,
Ohio
45002
,
(All
even
ts
sta
ge
d at
th
e
club
gro
und
s
in
Cleves,
Ohio)
October 6
, Kiss Point Series Drags
MANUFACTURERS'
CUP
SERIES
Angus Motorsports .
Number
One
Main
St
.
Las Vegas, NV 89101
(702)
386-2110
December
21-22
United States Rally
Las Vegas, NV
MICKEY
THOMPSON'S
OFF
ROAD
CHAMPIONSHIP
GRAND
PRIX
Mickey
Thompson
Enterta-inment
Group
53
Woodlyn
Lane
Bradbury,
CA
91010
(818)
359-5117
January
1986
Southwest area
Location TBA
January
25,
1986
Hoosier Dome
Indianapolis, IN
February
8,
1986
Silver Dome
Pontiac, MI
February
22,
1986
Jack
Murphy
Stadium
San Diego,
CA
March
1986
Texas event
Location TBA
April
1986
King Dome
Seattle,
WA
July
19,
1986
L.A.
Coliseum
Los Angeles,
CA
Additional dates
in
California TBA
MORE
Midwest
Off
Road
Racing Enthusiasts
P.
O.
Box 181021
Fort
Worth,
TX 76118
(817)
577-1102
October
4-5
Cowtown Speedway
Fort
Worth,
TX
ORSA
1920 Crown Ave.
West
Sacramento,
CA
95691
'(916)"372-4257
, October
5-6
ORSA
/ NSCA National
Championship Points Race
Marsyville River Front Park
Mary!,ville,
CA
··
POST
.Pennsylvania
Off
Roa.cl
Short Track
Shark Saxon
RD
#3, Box 9
Towanda, PA 18848
(717)
265-3076
'October
12-13
Monroeton, PA
PRO
CAN
AM
SERIES
Pro
Can
Am
, Racing Inc:
P.O. Box 323
Seahurst, Washington
98062
(206)
2,42-1773
(
503)
620-0313
SCCA
PRO
RALLY SERIES
Sports Car Club
of
America
_
6750
Emporia
St
.
Englewood,
CO
80112
(303)
779-6625
October
25-27
Budweiser Press
On
Regardless Pro Rally
Houghton, MI
November
16-1 7
Oregon Trail Pro Rally
Beaverton,
OR
,
December
6-8
·
Carson City_ _
International
P~o
Rally
Carson City; NV
SCIDA
Vince Tjelmeland
5226
Norris Lane ,
Yorba Linda,
CA
92686
(714)
779-6889
October
19
·
Ascot Speedway ,
Gardena,
CA
SCORE
Score International
31356
Via Colinas, Suite 111
Westlake Village,
CA
91362
(818)
889-9216
November
8-9
i
Baja 1000
' Ensenada, B.G., Mexico
January
11,
1986
Awards Banquet'
January
31,
"
February 1-2,
1986
,
·,
Parker 400
Parker,
AZ
April
4-6,
1986
Great Mojave
250
Lucerne Valley, CA
June
6-8,
1986
Baja Internacional :
:Ensenada, BC, Mexico
1
November
6-9,
1986
· Baja
1000
Ensenada
to
La
Paz, Mexico
SCORE
CANADA
390
Chemin
Du
[ac
Lery, Quebec,
J6N
1 A3, Canada
(514)
692-6171
Dusty
Times
·
-
THE
DAVE
SHOPPE
MUSCLES
TO
VICTORY
IN
HIS
BIG
FORD
F-150.
Barely skirting the Nevada Nuclear Test Site,
the new route
of
the 4th Annual Frontier 500 was
the toughest it has ever been.
It
to_
ok
drivers over the murderous Bull Frog
Hills at the gateway to Death Valley, across the
sharp rocks
of
the Petrified Summit, down
through the rugged Volcano Canyon.
And
it twisted through the ruts, dust, and
deep
silt
near the old gold and ghost towns where
Wyatt Earp once. maintained law and order
among the prospectors and gamblers.
But _the winning drivers in Class 8, Class 7-S,
and Class 14, didn't gamble
on
their tires. They
raced
on
Ooodyear Wrangler radials-the very
same tires you can buy for your truck.
Congratulations to Dave Shoppe, Spencer
Low and Steve Mizel.
And
thanks for proving once again how
Goodyear Wrangler radials are engineered to
take on the very toughest terrain. ·
ER
IER.
SPENCER
LOW
TAKES
CLASS
7-5
CROWN
IN
HIS
NISSAN
KING
CAB.
STEVE
MIZEL
AND
HIS
MODIFIED
BRONCO
RUSTLE-UP
CLASS
14
WIN.
Goodyear Wrangler radials.
Get
a set for your truck, and
conquer your new frontiers.
WRANGLER
RADIAL.
WE
RACE
THE
TIRES
YOU
BUY.
Special thanks
to
the drivers, workers, sponsors
and
fans who supported HDRA's "Drive Out Dystrophy"
campaign to help conquer neuromuscular disorders.
GOOD1i'EAII
NEW
RALLY
CAR
FROM
GENERAL
MOTORS
obviate
the
need
for
the
elaborate
aerodynamic
_
work
on
which
Peugeot,
Audi,
Lancia
and
Austin-Rover
have
been
engaged, as
the
car
must
follow
exactly
the
ouline
of
the
production
Kadett.
Why
Kadett?
According
to
the
team's
The Opel Kadett
Rallye4x4
Text
& Photos: Martin Holmes
development
manager Karlheinz
--------------------------
Goldstein,
"this
was
the
smaflest
car
into
which we
could
fit
the
Opel
has
chose~
the
newly
announced
international
rally
group
S
formula
for
the
four
wheel
driver
supercar
replacing
the
rear-drive
Manta
400.
A
prototype
of
the
future
rally
car
will
compete
on
the
Paris-Dakar
marathon
in
January
1986.
The
new
4x4
represents
two
years
of
planning.
This
is
the
first
car
designed
for
the
1988
formula,
and
it
indicates
that
Opel
has
decided
to
opt out
of
the
current
''second-evolution''
design
altogether.
Unlike
the
latest
rally
car
designs,
and
in
keeping
with
the
group
S
"Silhouette"
proposals,
the
exterior
of
the
Kadett
Rallye
4x4
very closely
resembles
a
mass-production
car.
Opel
is
using
the
Martin
Schanche
Xtrac
transmission
system, which gives
greater
control
than
the
widely
used
Ferguson
viscous
coupling
central
differential
at
the
crucial
moment
of
entry
into
corners.
The
choice
of
four
wheel
drive
follows
the
desire
of
Tony
Fall,
Opel's
Sports
Relations
Manager,
to
have
an
Opel
as a
world
championship
front
runner.
Although
the
rear
drive
Manta
400
and
Lancia Rallye are
still
competitive
on
the
asphalt
and
in
national
competitions,
the
predominantly
gravel
road
world
championship
events
demand
a
total
traction
design.
The
"Silhouette"
formula
will
parts
essential
for
a
500
bhp
car.
Actually it
is
a deceptive car.
The
Kadett
has
a slightly longer
wheelbase
than
the
Manta,
and
when
we fitted everything
into
the
Kadett,
we
found
we
had
more,
not
less
room
inside.
The
Kadett
does
not
have
the
big
body
overhang
of
the
Manta".
The
Kadett
Rallye
4x4
will
initially feature a six
speed
gearbox,
an
out\vard
indication
that
a change
of
axle
ratios
on
four
wheel
drive
designs
is
not
simple. In
the
end
Goldstein
hopes
the
engine will deliver
enough
torque
to
revert
to
five
speed
transmissions,
or
alterna-
tively
an
automatic
system
might
become
practical.
With
FISA's
·
proposals
on
wheel sizes,
it
is.
assumed
the
car
will
have
nine
inch
wide
and
sixteen inch
diameter
wheels.
Wishbone
suspension
is
used
all
round,
with
arms
as
long as possible,
and
brakes
as big as
314
mm
diameter
discs
can
be
fitted.
Currently
only
Rauno
·
Aaltonen
and
Erwin
Weber
have
dr
_
iven
the
prototypes,
but
Aaltonen
has
proved
to
be
the
source
of
considerable
original
thought.
It is
he
whom
Opel
credited
with
the
job
of
converting
the
staid
Ascona
400
into
the
car
which
won
both
the
Monte
Carlo
and
the
Safari
Rallies,
as
well
as
powering
Walter
Rohd
to
his
second
world
title
in
1982.
NEW
IIC
HiliTES
''RDCIIS .
OFF''
Chro
Roell
Shield
Pagel
Protect your
KC
Daylighters against
flying rocks
& dirt clods,
with
this new
KC
Chrome Rock Shield (Part No.
7203).
Installs easily in the outer rim
of
all
6"
KC
Daylighters manufactured
_ since
1970.
Special 'low-profile'
configuration allows
KC
soft
covers to
slip over
for
maximum protection
during the day.
See your local
KC
HiliTES
dealer for the
new
KC
Rock Shield and
the complete line
of
RACE READY OUT OF THE
BOX
KC
HiliTES products.
New full line catalog,
just
$3.00.
KC
HiliTES,
Inc.•
Williams,
Arizona
86046
602/635-2607
October1985
Pony
Express
•••
Although
the
Riverside
"World
Championship"
was
overall a
good
race
on
an
excellent
course,
it still
had
serious
problems.
First
was
the
·
problem
with
Marty
Tripes'
roll
over
and
eventual disqualification.
From
my
view in
the
pit
area it · was
obvious
to
myself
and
the
fellow
Checkers
that
the
course
was
rebuilt
after
the
practice session.
It
appeared
to
us
that
some
of
the
jumps
were raised
quite
a
bit
higher
than
they were originally.
If, as
Score
says, all th-at was
done
was
to
return
the
dirt
back
to
its
original
configuration,
why
didn't
they
return
the
dirt
back
on
Sunday
after
each
practice
and
each
main
event?
Second,
and
most
important
is
the
poor
job
provided
by
the
course
workers.
The
flagman
did
not
start
flagging
the
cars
immediately after an incident,
and
often
they were
not
in a very
good
position
to
wave cars away
from
the
problem.
When
a car
would
roll over,
the
workers
seemed
to
take
their
time
putting
the
car
right
side
up.
The
safety
personnel
at
the
last
"S"
turn
were
terrible.
John
Gable's
truck
rolled
onto
its
side
there
in practice
on
Sunday.
The
truck
had
a small fire in
the
engine area
and
fuel was
pouring
out
of
the
rear
of
the
truck.
None
of
the
·safety
workers
had
a fire
extinguisher
in
hand.
Two
people
had
to
jump
back
over
the
barrier
and
grab
the
extinguisher.
Then,
it
appeared
that
either
the
extinguisher
didn't
work
or
that
no
one
knew
how
to
use it.
In
any
event,
the
fire
went
out
on
its
own,
luckily! Later,
behind
the
same
tum,
a
Jeep
pulled
off
Thompson's
Ridge
onto
the
Additional
HAPPENINGS
SIL VER
DUST
RACING
ASSOCIATION
P.O. Box 7380
Las Vegas,
NV
89125
(702)
459-D317
November
16
Silver Dust 400
Henderson, NV
SNORE
- Southern Nevada
Off
Road Enthusiasts
P.
O.
Box 4394
Las Vegas, NV 89106
. (702) 452-4522
N
overnber
23
Points Race
Las
Vegas, NV
STADIUM
RACING,
U.S.A
Marty Tripes
228
Faxon Drive
Spring Valley,
CA
92077
(619)
463-D654
October
19,
1985
Imperial Valley Fairgrounds
El
Centro,
CA
pavement
and
stopped.
Fuel was
pouring
out
of
the
back
of
the
Jeep.
None
of
the
course
workers
who
came
over
to
check it
out
had
a fire extinguisher in hand.
Any
time a
car
has any
kind
of
problem,
especially a roll over,
or
is
spilling fuel,
some
worker
should
be ready with a fire
extinguisher,
and
know
how
to
use it, quick!
Cars
that
have
broken
down
or
rolled
over
should
be
righted
and
pushed
off
the track as
soon
as possible.
Off
road
racing is trying
to
become
a
more
professional
sport.
Incidents such as this
do
not
set
a very
good
exa_
mple
to
the
large
groups
of
major
manufacturers
that
were
in
attendance
at
Riverside.
"Big"
John
Files
Pit
Co-ordinator
Checkers
Off
Road
We
agree, John, that course
workers at Rit•erside hat•e always
been a mixed group. Some are well
trained -
and
dedicated, others
obviously green,
and
still others
spend the race time taking pictures.
Seldom
is
there a consistent pattem
for displaying the yellow fiag from
comer
to
corner as well.
DUSTY
TIMES
welcomes
letters from all comers
of
off
road
actitJity.
The
Pcmy
Express column
will feature all the mail that fits
in
the space. Please keep your
u'OTds
fairly brief. Because
of
space
limitations your pearls
of
prose may
be edited, but
DUSTY
TIMES will
print your gripes as well as your
praises. Letters for publication
should be
at
the
DUSTY
TIMES
office
by
the 15th
of
the month
in
order
to
appear in the next issue.
SUPERIOR OFF
ROAD
DRIVERS ASSOCIATION
460
No. Beaumont Ave.
Brookfield,
WI
53005
(715)
272-1489
VORRA
Valley
Off
Road Racing Association
· 1833 Los Robles Blvd.
Sacramento,
CA
95838
(916)
925-1702
October
13
Championship
Off
Road Race
Prairie City
OHV
Park
Sacramento,
CA
WESTERN OFF
ROAD
RACING
ASSOCIATION
19125 - 87 A Ave.
Surrey, British Columbia,
V3S 5X7, Canada
(604)
576-6256
October
13
Mt. Cheam Raceways
Rosedale, B.C.
ATTENTION
RACE ORGANIZERS
List your coming events in
DUSTY
_ TIMES fr
ee!.
Send your r986 schedule
as
soon as possible for listing in this
column.
Mail
your race
or
rally schedule
to:
DUSTY
TIMES,
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Ave.,
Suite
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_
Dusty
Times
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. over
Sid•
. .
THE
HDRA
FRONTIER
500
Larry Ragland Triumphs Overall
·
for
the
Second Year in a Row
By
Jean
Calvin
Photos: T rackside Photo Enterprises
In a rare
moment
of
clear
air,
Larry
Ragland
sets
up
for
a
turn
in
his
Porsche
6
powered
Chaparral
.
Ragland
drove
alone
to
his
second
consecutive
victory
in
the
Frontier
500, this
one
was the toughest. ·
The
fourth
annual
HORA
Frontier
500
was
a
true
endurance
race,
and
it was
no
surprise
to
see class winners
come
from
the
ranks
of
the
desert
veterans.
Since
its
inception,
the
Frontier
500
has
offered
a
somewhat
different
course
each year,
and
a different
finish line as well.
The
highly
ballyhooed
first
round
ended
near
Weeks,
Nevada
with
the
awards
ceremony
in
Reno
.
The
next year
the
course
went
into
Virginia
City
for
the
finish. Last
year
the
race
ended
in
the
tiny
northern
Nevada
town
of
Dayton,
probably
the
most
popular
of
the
finish areas.
Prior
to
1985
the
race always
started
in
Sloan,
just
south
of
Las Vegas.
Last
September
HORA
Jefe
Walt
Lott
brought
out
a new
concept
for
the
race
that
had
been
generically
known
as
"Vegas
to
Reno".
The
event
became a long single
loop
race,
with
all
pre
and
post
race activity
in
the
Frontier
Hotel
in Las
Vegas.
In
order
to
keep
the
mileage
under
control,
the
race
started
30
miles
south
of
glitter
gulch
at
Jean,
and
the
original
schedule was
to
return
to
Jean
within
24
hours
or
less elapsed
time
.
Two
weeks
before
race day
the
course
was
shortened
by
155
miles.
Now
the
route
went
north
to
Gabbs
via
.
Beatty
and
T
onopah,
as usual,
then
turned
west
and
south
to
the
finish line
in
the
river
bed
at
Beatty.
Not
,
Ofl.e
entry
was
unhappy
about
eliminating
the
return
route
to
Jean
through
the
infamous silt
beds
of
southern
Nevada.
At
a
listed
536
miles,
some
said
it
was
longer,
the
course
was plenty
long
enough
and
rough
enough
to
do
in
two
thirds
of
the
starters.
Only
51
of
the
148
starting cars
made
it
to
the
finish line within
the
20
hour
time
allo,vance.
Tech
and
conting
-
ency
inspection
went
on
all day Friday
in
the
front
parking
lot
of
the
Frontier
Hotel,
and
the
weather
looked
promising
for race day,
not
too
hot
for
September
in Las
Vegas. A
brief
rain squall
on
Friday
sent
exhibitors
scramb-
ling for cover,
and
it
had
rained
the
night
before
as well,
but
not
enough
to
soak
the
silt
on
the
race
course
.
This
year
there
was
no
impound
after tech
and
the
competitors
had
to
find their
own
way
to
Jean
for
the
Saturday
morning
start.
Some
missed their
starting time
in
the
confusion,
some
by
just
a few
minutes
and
one
car
by
hours.
Class
10
started
first in
the
car
section
of
the
event,
and
the
start
was
two
at
a time every 15
seconds,
oddly
enough
.
The
officials
must
have
been
in a
hurry
to
close
down
the
start
line
and
pound
up
the
road
to
Beatty,
because
the
entry
size certainly
didn't
warrant
such
clos·e racing
quarters
right
out
of
the
chute
.
However,
the
first five miles
of
the
route
went
over
the
old
paved
road
south
out
of
Jean
before
diving
under
the
freeway arid
off
into
the
dusty
desert.
The
pavement
run
did
in
one
buggy
engine
that
we
know
of
and
a
couple
of
Jeep
V
~s,
so
three
starters
didn't
even: get their cars
dirty.
Our
first
observation
point
was
about
SO
silt
laden
miles
into
the
course
at
the
first Highway
160
crossing.
Here
Jim
Stiles was
first
on
the
road
in his Class
10
Rabbit
powered
Raceco, having
started
fourth. But, right in
Stiles'
dust,
in
the
same
minute,
was
Marty
Reider, Raceco. Jack
Irvine was a
couple
more
minutes
back followed
by
Jim
Zupano•
vich, in
the
same
minute
as Steve
Sourapas.
Bill
Herrick/Mike
McDonnell
had
their racer back
in
the
dust
,
as
was
Jim
Hammer
/
Don
Lee.
John
Hagle
was
more
than
half
an
hour
off
the
pace with fan
belt
woes,
which
put
him
on
the
trailer
soon
after
that
point.
At
Check
3,
the
intersection
of
Highways
160
and
95,
Stiles
and
Reider were in a dead heat
on
elapsed time,
and
the
Jack
Irvine/
Kit
Trenholm
Raceco was
a
couple
minutes
back. Dave
Richardson,
in
the
Steve
Sourapas
Raceco,
stopped
to
fix
a flooding
problem
in
the
engine
and
carried
on
.
Official times were
recorded
at
Beatty,
Check
4
and
155 miles
into
the
race.
Here
the
team
of
Mark
Broneau
and
Jim
Stiles
lost
the
overall lead
to
Larry Ragland,
but
they held their Class
10
lead
by
over
two
minutes
on
Marty
Reider/ Jake Fogg. ·lrvine/
Tren-
holm
were less than
two
more
minutes
back, followed in four
minutes
by
·
Sourapas
/ Richard-
son.
This
was a real race!
Three
more
10
car's failed
before
Gabbs,
the
next time
control
and
Check
7;
about
336
miles were
now
behind
the
drivers. Broneau
and
Stiles still
led going
into
the
rain
out
of
Gabbs,
but
now
merely by
te11
seconds
over
Irvine/
Trenholm
.
Sourapas
/
Richardson
were
about
four minutes back in
third,
and
Reider
and
Fogg were
collecting flats, as
did
almost
everyone,
and
they were back
another
six minutes. It was still
anyone's
race with
200
miles
of
nasty desert left
to
go.
Stiles/ Broneau
had
trouble
out
of
Gabbs,
and
were
running
with
no
rear brakes. Broneau
had
to
cover
25
miles
on
a flat tire,
getting
to
his pit,
and
it
cost
the
race. Dave
Richardson
caught
and
passed
the
leaders
some-
where in
the
dark, then Jack
Irvine's Raceco ran
out
of
gas
only a few miles
out
of
Beatty.
Dashing
under
the
bridge
to
the finish line in Beatty, Dave
Richardson
drove
the
second
car
of
;my class across
the
finish line,
arriving
just
18 minutes after
the
overall winner. Dave
and
Steve
Sourapas
not
only
won
Class 10,
but
they were
second
overall.
Now
with four
good
tires,
Broneau
and
Stiles were making
up
time,
but
they fell
short
of
the
victory
by
just
six
minutes
.
Broneau arrived
second
in Class
10,
third
on
the
road
and
a fine
third
overall. Plagued with flats,
Jake
Fogg
brought
Marty
Reider's
Raceco in
third
in Class
10,
and
Irvine arrived
about
SO
minutes
later, solid in
fourth,
the
final Class . 10 finisher
out
of
a
· dozen starters.
The
Bunderson
of
Buddy Yates
and
Sandy
Stewart
was fifth,
scored
through
Silver
Peak,
but
collapsed someplace in
the
last
90
miles.
Class 1
had
a
husky
19
starters,
and
the
pack
held
plenty
of
potential winners. In
just
SO
miles
Tim
Kennedy,
Chaparral,
was fifth
on
the
road
and
first in
class,
but
Jack
Johnson,
Chenowth
Magnum, was right
on
his
bumper
. Larry Ragland
was
three
minutes
back, followed
in
about
four
minutes by
Tom
Koch, Gregg
Symonds
and
the
Funco
of
Ron
Gardner
/ Bud
Feldkamp, which was
on
three
wheels
and
soon
to
retire with
terminal
front
end
breakage.
Next
and
close was Jerry Finney,
whose
Chaparral
stalled
out
at
the
crossing,
and
the
Ron
Brant/
Clark
Gillies Raceco was
tight in
formation
also.
At
Check
3 Kennedy was
leading ori time
by
about
three
minutes
over
Larry Ragland in
the Porsche.
powered
Chaparral.
At
Beatty
the
official times show·
Ragland in the lead and overall
leader as well, holding seven
minutes
on
Kennedy.
Mark
McMillin was next, nine minutes
later in his
brand
new Porsche
powered
Chenowth,
and Jack
Johnson
was
another
three
minutes
back. Ivan
Stewart
was
parked
with engine failure in
the
Toyota.
While
13 cars made it
through
Gabbs,
the
Class
ls
were well
spread
at
that
check. Ragland led
Johnson
by
about
half
an
hour,
and
Brant/ Gillies
moved
smartly
into
third,
just
three
more
minutes back. Jack
Johnson
had
terminal clutch
trouble
and
retired
at
Coaldale,
about
100
miles
from
the
finish. Larry
Ragland was getting tired in his
solo
drive,
and
he
borrowed
some
extra gas
from
a
Walker
Evans pit. Ragland
pushed
on
over
the
last rugged miles
to
arrive first
on
the road, first in
Class 1,
and
first overall
among
cars for
the
second
year running.
This
was Larry's
best
finish since
he
installed
the
big Porsche 6 in
his Chaparral.
While
he
looked
tired, Larry
bounced
back
soon
,
saying he
had
only
one
flat
to
slow him
en
route
to
his great
victory,
Ron
Brant
and
Clark
Gillies
reported
no
big
troubles
either,
arid they arrived a solid second in
Class 1 in
the
Raceco, a keen
fourth
overall,
about
40
minutes
back.
Tim
Kennedy,
who
had big
trouble
en
route
to
Gabbs
, came
back
strong
to
take
third,
only
eight minutes
behind
Brant
and
fifth overall.
Al
Arciero
drove
his
Funco
Hustler sol~
on
the
tough
run,
had
some
close
encounters
with
some
stout
yucca trees,
but
he
came in
fourth
in class, just six minutes
ahead
of
Bob
Renz
and
Dick
Clark
in a Raceco.
In
all,
ten
Class J s finished,
including
Jerry
Finney
/
Dan
Foddrill,
Chaparral,
·
Tom
Koch/
Tom
Martin,
Raceco,
who
had
severe electrical failure,
Larry Noel,
Chaparral,
Mark
McMillin/ Ralph Paxton,
Cheno-
wth,
and
Larry
Webster
/
Shelton
Lowery, Raceco.
Class 2 left
third,
a fine band
of
15. First
on
the
road
in
SO
miles
were Ed
and
Tim
Herbst
in a
Raceco,
just
ahead
of
Beny
Canela,
Dave
Lewis
/
Dave
Simpson,
Raceco,
and
Bob
Gordon,
Chenowth
as here the
two
seaters were all in a tight
pack.
At
Check
3
the
Herbst
kids
were still first
on
the
road
with
Lewis/ Siru'ps
on
right
on
their
tail.
The
official times at Check 4
Mark
Broneau
and
Jim
Stiles
held
the
early
lead in Class
10,
but
their
Raceco
collected
some
flats,
and
they
finished
very
close
in
second
place
.
The
mid
-season Class 10
points
leader,
Marty
Reider,
with
Jake
Fogg
co-driving
the
long
enduro
,
arrived
a
close
third
in
the
tidy
Raceco.
Right
with
the leaders
all
the way in
Cl
ass 10, the
Jack
Irvine/ Kit
Trenholm
Raceco ran
out
of
gas j
ust
shor
t
of
the finish line,
and
came
in
fourth
.
Page
10
October 1985
Dusty
Ti
m
es
Going
very
well
this
year
Ron Brant,
with
Clark
Gillies
co-driving
the Raceco, drove a keen race, finished
second
in Class 1
and
fourth overall.
In
contention
all
the way Tim Kennedy drove the Chaparral, ·
Al
Arciero
went
solo
in his Funco Hustler,
collected
some flora
laden
with
a
pair
of
spares, to
third
in Class
1,
probably
using
the
along
the way
and
finished very well, fourth in the competitive
tires en route. Class 1 ranks.
course.
Art
Peterson
and
Bob
their effort.
The
Klawitters
now
Scott
slid
past
the
Neths
led,
but
on
the
very last leg they ·
somewhere
in
the
dark
to
nab
too
dropped
a
ton
of
time,
second
place
money
by
just
three finishing
fourth
and
last in Class
minutes
over Bobby
and
Tom
5.
An
incredulous
Malcolm
Neth.
The
Linds were
fourth,
Vinje,
who
drove
the
latter
part
another
skinny
five minutes
of
the
. race,
came
·
tn
-
the
winner,
back. .
...
------~...:..----
greet~d
by
a
joyous
Hansen
clan,
Others
·
among
the
nine
while his wife Michie
Vinje
was
finishers in
1-2-1600
competi-
stuck in
Gabbs
with
the
engine
tion were Morley
and
Mike
gone in
the
chase
truck.
Vinje
Williams,
Chenowth,
Larry
said
the
lasi:
30
miles, particularly
Smith
and
Jon
Kennedy, Raceco, the
part
on
the
common
route,
Michael
and
Doug
McFadden, was awful, with deep silt
and
no
Raceco,
C.
W.
and
Sam
Dunnam,
· · ··
Bunderson,
and
Ray Maxey
and
Don
Long, Raceco.
visibility in
the
dark.
Steve
Brown
and
Jeff
Hibbard
were
40
minutes
back
in second, while
Greg
Diehl
and
Brad
Person
salvaged
third
'Y.i!:h_the
--fastesf
_time
-fronr-Ga6bs
to
the finish
line in
the
class.
· First
of
the
water
pumpers
to
start, Class 8 fielded a dozen
strong
trucks,
and
half
of
them
finished.
··
However, all
had
some
down
time. In
the
first
50
miles
Walker
Evans
had
his
Dodge
way
up
front, r;..- IJlr
i;.-
i;.-
Steve Sourapas
and
Dave
Richardson
had
early woes with the Raceco,
but
they came
back
strong
to win Class 10
handily
and
take a fine
second
overall.
Every
one
of
the
nine Class
5s
was
strong
enough
to
win
the
race,
and
they all played
bumper
tag
for
a time. Starting first,
Hartmut
Klawitter. led the Bugs·
on
the
road
at
50
miles, Greg
Diehl was a
minute
back,
and
in
the
dust
was Max Razo, with a
flat rear tire, Malcolm
Vinje/
Mark
Hansen,
Stan
Parnell,·
and
Jim Cocores, this pack in a seven
minute
blanket!
Then
Jim
Cocores
had
problems
and
never
made
it
to
Check
3,
but
the rest
plo
,
wed
·
on
through
the
show
the
Raceco
of
Bob Richey
and
Tom
Baker
in
front
on
time
by
about
three
minutes
over
the
Herbsts,
who
only got
to
Check
6
before
terminal
troubles
struck.
At
Beatty
Vi:c
VanEUa
and
Jim
Wright
were third,
just
two
more
minutes
back, followed in mere
seconds by Lewis
and
Simpson.
. Moving
on
to
Gabbs,
Richey
and
Baker
had
a
firm
grip
on
the
lead,
holding
,~
24
minliltes ·
on
VanElla/W
rignt,
who
got
all
the
way
to
the
check
at
Mina
before
parking. Missing
at
Gabbs
was
Malcolm
Smith,
whose
car
builder
Greg Lewin
started
the
race.
Smith's
Renault
powered
ORE
. lost
the
clutch.
Frank
Arciero
had
•·
recovered from
early
down
time,
and
was
up
to
third in
the
Class 2
Toyota,
just
a
few . minutes ahead
of
Lewis/
Simpson.
The
Bunderson
of
Len
Newman
and
Mike
Gaughan
was
up
to
fifth at
Gabbs.
·
On
the
long
and
rugged last
legs
Bob
Richey
and
Tom
Baker
kept
it all together
to
win Class 2
at
the
flag
and
their
Raceco was
seventh overall. Richey also
won
Class 2
at
the
massive Fireworks
250,
and
he
should
now
be
a
factor in
the
points
race.
Frank
Arciero
finished
second
in class,
the
Toyota
well
over
an
hour
back. Flats slowed
the
Len
Newman/Mike
Gaughan
Bund-
erson,
but
Gaughan
brought
it in
third
in class, well ahead
of
Bob
Gordon
and
Tim
Crabtree.
Rounding
out
the
finishers in
Class 2 were
Corky
and
Scott
McMillin, whose
Chenowth
had
major
trouble
early in
the
game,
Dave
Lewis/Dave
Simpson,
whose
woes with
the
Mazda
powered
Raceco
were
late
breaking,
and
Beny
Canela/Stan
Houghton,
Raceco.
Usually
much
stronger
in
numbers,
there
were
but
18 cars
in Class
1-2-1600,
and,
as in
Class 10,
the
single seaters
took
most
of
the
glory. Starting first,
Ray Maxey was first
on
the
road
in
50
miles.
But
close
behind
were
Rob
Tolleson
,
Jim
Dusty
Times
Greenway,
Bobby
Neth,
Art
Peterson,
John
Lind,
Ri-hard
Binder,
Morley
Williams
and
Scott
Zimmerman,
all in a
ten
rnil;mte
time
warp
and
these guys
were racing
not
pacing.
All
but
one
made
it
to
Beatty,
where
Rob
Tolleson
had
his
Mirage
in
the
lead
by
a slim four
minutes
over
Bobby
and
Tom
Neth,
Chenowth
Magnum.
The
Greemvays were thfrd,
only
,a
minute
back, first
two
seater;
while
Peterson
was next,
about
four
more
minutes
out
and
Binder was
just
another
.
two
minutes
behind
in
a real
horse
race.
The
Greenways retired after
Check
6,
and
the
rest
of
the
herd
passed
through
Gabbs
in
good
formation. Tolleson,
who
had
Bill
Varnes
drive
relief, was
leading
Richard
Binder/Rodney
Goodsell
by
just
four
minutes,
but
then
Binder was seen
no
more.
Art
Peterson/Bob
Scott
had
their
ORC
third
at
Check
7,
the
Neths
were next, followed by ·
John
and
Rick
Lind,
ORC.
Rob
Tolleson
poured
on
the
1600
suds
on
the
final
third
of
the race,
and
his was the
14th
car
home
to
Beatty,
the
class winner
by
nearly an
hour,
and
14th
overall is
not
too
shabby
for a
restricted
1600
car, especially
on
this
horsepower
demanding
deepefling silt. ·
·
At
Beatty Greg
Diehl/Brad
Person
had
a decent, 17
minute
lead
on
Max
Razo/John
Robison,
who
were
just
20
seconds ahead
of
Hartmut
and
Wolfram
Klawitter.
V
inje/
Hansen
had
dropped
time,
but
held
foqrth
over
Stan
Parnell,
whose car
did
not
go
much
farther.
Charging
through
Gabbs,
Diehl/Person
dropped
more
than
an
hour
off
the
pace
.
Razo/Robison
had
the
lead by
just
five
minutes
over
the
Klawitters in a close dice for
the
first
336
miles.
Vinje/Hansen
were
now
third
and
making back
time,
and
Steve
Brown/Jeff
Hibbard
were
up
to
fourth.
It was
still a good race.
En
route
to
the
finish,
just
30
miles
out,
the
Razo Bug
broke
down
in
the
terrible silt
that
had
claimed
others
as well, ending
Bob
Richey
and
Tom
Baker
had
no
real trouble,
winning
Class 2
by
more
than
an
hour
in the Raceco.
It
was Richey's
second
straight
victory in the desert.
October 1985
This is the system
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road race
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Page
11
Frank
Arciero,
Jr
.,
with
Cal
Wells,
Jr
.
riding
all
the way,
did
well
again in the Toyota,
finishing
second
in the
busy
Class 2 contest.
Len
Newman
and
Mike
Gaughan
had
their
share
of
trouble
with
Bob Gordon and Tim Crabtree
did
a great job in the new design, two
the sleek Bunderson,
but
the Las Vegas
pair
came in a fine
third
seat Chenowth,
and
they carried on to place 4th in Class 2 ranks.
in Class
2.
Rob
Tolleson
and
Bill
Varnes
had
a
great
day
in the Mirage,
winning
1-2-1600
honors,
and
the
win
gives Tolleson a
solid
lead in series
points
.
Charging
hard
with
Jeff
Yocum
riding
in the Ford, Dave Shoppe
kept
it
in one
piece
and
won his
first
Class 8
victory
on the
Frontier
500 race.
IJlr' IJlr' running with
the
leading
1600s
. Steve Kelley was
just
four minutes back, followed
in two
minutes
by
Stan
Gilbert,
then
John
Gable and Dave
1st 3rd
Shoppe,
who was dicing with
Jerry
McDonald
and
Steve
McEachern.
Walker
stopped
for
a quick
pit
service
at
Check
2,
keeping
the
lead,
and
most
of
the
5th
8th
placings
at
the
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Page
11
Taking the lead in the last 50 miles,
Malcolm
Vinje
and
Mark
Hansen won Class
5,_and
it
w11s
their
third
Class 5
victory
on
the Frontier 500.
trucks were doing the tire
trans,;,,
a couple
of
miles later.
changing act in this area.
Norm
Shaw
and
Manny Cortez
but
the
damage eventually
put
the entry
out
after Gabbs, and
they were credited with
fourth
place.
Meanwhile Lesle and-Schneck-
enburger held
onto
the lead
through
Gabbs
, with 45 minutes
in
hand
over
Shaw/Cortez
. Jeff
and
Tom
Bolha also cleared the
Gabbs
control,
but
were
not
heard from again, and they
took
third place.
Out
in front all the
way
Mike
Lesle scored his first
victory in two years
of
desert
racing. Lesle
and
Schnecken-
burger
took
the
win with over 45
minutes lead
on
Norm
Shaw/
Manny
Cortez. Lesle, with
18
½
hours
on
the
road
was happier
than
the
overall winner
at
the
finish line.
Next away was Class 7S, with
Spence
Low
and
his Nissan in
command
in
the
first
50
miles.
The
twelve
truck
field strung
out
fast,
and
- here Willie Valdez,
Ford,
had
already
lost
12
minutes while lying second,
and
Jim Venable's colorful Datsun
was third. Officially
at
Beatty,
Spence Low
and
Paul Delang had
a hefty lead
of
almost an
hour
over Valdez.
The
John
Cabe
/
Tom
Ebberts Toyota, having
been stuck
on
a silt hill
at
the first
highway crossing, was thi:rd,
almost another
hour
back.
Only
five trucks made
the
first 155
At
Beatty Evans
had
a fair lead,
had
the
Circus
Circus
pink
Bug
12 minutes, over
Stan
Gilbert/ in third, another
20
minutes
Charlotte
Coral,
Ford
.
Shoppe
back,
and
eight made it
thmugh
was
up
to
third
in his
Fo{'.d,
the rough
stuff
to
Beatty.
another
five
minutes
_
back,
Among
the
favorites,
Mark
followed in four minutes by Steele
and
John
Johnson
were
Steve Kelley,
GMC.
Shortly after well back
at
Check 4,
due
to
leaving Beatty Evans
met
a rocks
Johnson's
altercation .
with
a
that
took
out
a
portion
of
the truck. Extensive · welding was
brake
system,
and
·
he
was ·
down
required
on
the
front
and
rear
25
min~tes.
At
Gabbs, Dave suspension,
the
motor
mounting
Shoppe
/Jeff
Yocum
led, Gilbert studs were gone,
so
the
engine
lost a drive shaft
en
route
and
was located via a come~a-long
dropped
to
fifth behind Kelley with a rachet in
the
cockpit
.
and McEachern. McDonald was
Nonetheless,Johnson
was
just
an
in
trouble
getting
to
Gabbs, got
hour
behind
the leader
at
Beatty,
cured
and
made it
to
Check
9
------'----------------------
before falling
out
of
the
race.
Frank Vessels got his new Chevy
into
Check
6,
and
not
much
farther,
and
John
Gable vanished
after Beatty too.
Dave
Shoppe
minded the
ro
.ck
and the silt ~arefully, as he
headed for pay dirt.
Shoppe
took
the big victory in his Class 8
Ford.
Walker
Evans was
content
with second
spot
after all his
troubles,
and
he finished
about
50
minutes back in second,
happy
to
be
out
of
the
truck
after
more
than 14
hours
of
hard
driving. Steve Kelley
and
Jon
Nelson
put
the
GMC
in third,
followed by
Stan
Gilbert/
Char-
lotte
Corral.
Ron
Clyborne, who
had
a year's
worth
of
flats in
the
first legs,
and
Glenn
Harris drove
their
Ford
to
fifth, while Mike
Nesmith
and
Randy
Salmont
were
just
twelve seconds back in
sixth in their
GMC.
Only
nine
5-1600s
were brave
enough
to
tackle the silt beds,
rocks
and
stout
cactus
on
the
Frontier
500
couse,
and
only a
pair
of
them saw the finish line ·
under
the
20
hours
time limit.
Young
-Mike Lesle, with .Gary
Schneckenburger co-driving, led
the
group
after
50
miles
on
the
road, and
he
was still in
the
lead
at Check
4.
About
27 minutes
back in second
at
Beatty were last
year's winners Bob Knight and
LeRoy Hansen,
but
they lost
the
October 1985
Mike Lesle
and
Gary
Schneckenburger
led
Class 5-1600
all
the way,
and
it
was .
the first
off
road
victory
for
Leste in two years
of
racing. -
Spence
Low
and
Paul
Delang
had
the Nissan
up
_tr
ont
despite troubles
all
the
way.
Low
won Class 7S
and
was, in fact,
the_
onl
y finish
er
in the class.
Dusty
Times
miles before
the
checkpoint
closed.
Cabe's
Toyota
and
the
Ford
Ranger
of
Paul
and
Dave
Simon
were
both
apparently
stuck
too
long
on
the silt hill
out
of
Beatty,
and neither
one
cleared Check 5
at
Goldfield. Both Low and
Valdez were also stuck in this
area. Low lost his battery and
borrowed
one
from a spectator
to
get through
the
mess. Valdez
had
clutch
trouble
with silt
seeping
into
the
working parts,
but
he finally got in motion,
clearing
Gabbs
about
two
hours
after Low. Spence Low got stuck
in
the
same area
on
the
trail back
to
Beatty,
but
he got
out
of
the
silt early' enough
to
win Class 7S,
the only finisher. Willie Valdez,
with Jose Alvarado riding,
broke
a steering
box
on
the
Ford
Ranger somewhere
out
of
Gabbs
·
and
they retired in second place.
Making it through
Check
5,
Jim
Venable
and
Carl Jackson were
third.
Rod
Hall
and
Jim
Fricker
kept
their
record
intact,
winning
all
four
Frontier500s
in the Class 4 Dodge,
but
this
round
they
had
plenty
of
problems.
Points leaders in Class
9,
Jim
Dizney
and
Mike
McCrory
teamed
up
in the
Chenowth
to lead Class 9
from
flag to flag,
and
put
Oizney in the
points
lead.
Althol!gh eight started in Class
·
4,
Rod
Hall had
the
Dodge
out
front
early. His
two
chief rivals
were
out
early
too,
John
Randall
with engine failure in
the
Jeep,
and
Tim
Casey with a
broken
spring
and
more
in his Jeep. Hall
had
over an
hour
lead
at
Beatty
on
the
Vern
Roberts/Bill
Donahoe
Jeep
Honcho.
At
Gabbs, only these
two
were still
running,
both
having plenty
of
troubles.
Roberts
was over two
hours
back~
at
this
point,
and
was
not
seen again.
Rod
Hall
and
Jim
Fricker
had
plenty
of
problems
too. They replaced a fuel
pump,
air cleaner
and
more,
then
broke
the windshield
and
ran
out
of
gas.
In
motion
again they
stopped
to
replace a
front
drive line,
and
finally, near
the
finish line they
had
to
rebuild
the
front
end
with
the help
of
the
chasing Bill
Stroppe
crew. However,
Rod
Hall
and
Jim
Fricker crossed
the
finish line in
the
Dodge in good
time,
and
they won their
fourth
straight Frontier
500
title.
This
year,
Rod
said, was
the
toughest
and
most
tiring course
of
all.
Class 9
had
four
starters,
and
amazing
as
it seems,
two
of
them
finished.
The
Wood
Hi
Jumper
was
out
early,
and
at
Beatty Jim
Dizney /
Mike
McCrory,
Cheno,
wth, had an eleven
minute
lead
over Jeff
Watson/Butch
Darling, .
with
Mike
Baker
/Bob
Scott
not
.
far behind.
All
three sailed
through
Gabbs
with Dizney's
1200
still leading, here by two
hours
over Baker's
Chenowth.
Baker
did
not
see another ,
checkpoint,
so
Jim
Dizney and
Mike
McCrory
had
clear sailing
on
the
route
that
had
to
be tough
for
just
1200
ccs
to
power
thro~gh.
The
~earn,
_stai:iding
one,
two m
the
pomts
race m Class
9,
·
won handily, giving Dizney
the
big
points
lead
over
McCrory.
Fighting
hard
to
finish,
Watson
and
Darling
took
second with'
just
17 . minutes left
on
the
time
allowance.
Three
Nissans and a
Ford
started in Class
7,
and
Mario
Alesi
had
the early lead in his
Nissan. Manny Esquerra was
just
four minutes back in his
Ford
Ranger,
and
both
Sherman
Balch
and
Roger
Mears
were well back
on
time. Balch
got
through
Check
3 with multiple woes,
and
he
and
Chuck
Johnson
finally
parked
with an incurable trans /
problem. Mears was· in trouble
early, near
[Jr [Jr
[Jr [Jr
Dusty
Times
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Octobcr1985
Page
13
Art
Peterson
and
Bob
Scott
moved
into
second
in Class 1-2-1600
late
in
the race,
and
they
kept
it
together
to
finish
second
in the
_
ORC
chassis.
Always
in
contention,
the
Chenowth
Magnum
of
Bobby
and
Tom
John
and
Rick
Lind
stayed close
all
day in 1-2-1600 class,
and
at
·
Neth
had
late
breaking
troubles
and
the
brothers
finished
third
in the flag
their
ORC
was the
first
two
seater
home
and
4th
in class.
Class 1-2-1600.
~
~
Goodsprings, with a
rock
through a cooler, then came
overheat, steering
trouble
arid
the
big fix
at
Check
2
'.
Later ,
Roger lost an oil
pump,
and
the
final blow was a
broken
torsion
ba:r,
but
he
kept
on
in
the
race.
At
Beatty
Manny
and
Tudy
Joe
Esquerra
had
a good, half
hour
lead
over
.
Mario
Alesi,
who
was
having alternator trouble.
The
deep
silt
and
resulting
dust
killed
a
lot
of
components
on
all the
-race cats. Esquerra led
through
Gabbs,
'
and
· Mears was
now
!iecond by 11 minutes
over
Alesi.
Manny
Esquerra carried
on
to
win Class · 7 in
the
Ford
by
well·
over
two
hours,
and
for Manny it
was · also his
fourth
straight
victory in
the
Frontier
500
in -
Class 7.
Both
his
Ford
and
Hall's
Dodge
are built by Bill
Stroppe
and
company,
who
know
a little
something
about
prepping a
truck
for a long
and
tough desert
enduro.
Roger Mears, with Brent
Foes . riding along,
ended
up
second in
the
-Nissan, .
about
1 ½
hours
back, and
another
half
hour
or
.
so
back,
Mario
ALesi
and
Jim
Conner
finished third in
their
Nissan, for a
75
percent
finish ratio in Class 7.
Just
five showed lip in Class
3,
and
both
Ken
Correia
and
Don
Coffland
had
engine
trouble
on
the
pavement
and
were parked in
less
than
five
miles.
Bob
Chamberlin
had
the
big earlv
Manny
and
Tudy
Esquerra are the sole
owners
of
the Class 7 title in this race,
doing
the
job
cleanly
again
this
year in the
Ford
Ranger.
Although
they
finished
th'e
course
a
bit
over
time, Gene
and
Kirby
Hightower
were
clear
winners in
Cl
ass 3
driving
the Jeep
CJ
7.
Leading Class 5
out
of
Gabbs, the
new
Bug
of
Max Razo Walker Evans
hadhis
Class B_
Dodge
up
front
at
Beatty
by
and
John
Robison
vanished in the
silt
just
a few miles from 12 minutes,
but
the course
took
its toll,
and
Evans came in
pay
dirt,
and
they
did
not
finish. .
second
this round. · · -
lead
iri
his Chevy powerecf Scout.
But, by
Check
2
the
nose design
on
the
Scout
resulted in lots
of
rocks
in
the
radiator,
and
Chamberlin
stopped
often
for
water
and
sealants.
At
Beatty
Chamberlin arrived after the
checkpoint 'closed, and
both
he
and
Jim
Yacksyzn and
Mark
Hutchins, Bronco, were wavea
off
course
at
Beatty in deference
to
the
bike traffic expected
southbound
to
the finish line: '
Y acksyzn was
credited
with
second place;
and
Bob Chamber-
lin was third.
Meanwhile
Gene
and Kirby
· Hightower were way
out
front
,
having their
own
problems
but
still moving, clearing
Gabbs
in
14½ hours.
Their
Jeep
CJ
7
finished
the
. cours~, and they
won first place,
but
they were
20
minutes overtime
at
the
flag,
and
only
.
credited
with
reaching
Check
9,
which does
make
a
difference
on
the
points
schedule.
The
modified four wheel drive
Class
14
had
a field
of
two, the
zippy Bronco driven' by Steve
Mizel
and
David Bryan
and
the
veteran
Ford
powered
rear
engined special
of
Carl
Cook
and
Glen
Emery.
The
Mizel rig
took
an early lead and, while
not
without trouble, cleared the
Beatty check with
over
two
hours
margin.
Cook
and Emery were in
the
late afternoon
group
that
were waved aside
at
Beatty
because
the
check was closed for
Steve Mize/
and
David
Bryan won the survival exercise in Class
14
,
doing
well
over 400 miles in the Ford before retiring as the winners.
northbound
traffic
due
to
ten
or
so miles
of
common
route.
Mizel
aJ:1.d
Bryan carried
on
through Gabbs, and, in fact, got
all
the
way
to
Coaldale. There,
. with
100
plus miles left
to
run
and a sickly Ford, they packed it
onto
the
trailer,
·
the
class
winners.
It was the usual pair in Class 12 ·
Sports
..
Wagons
with
Jason
Myers/Don
Adams
and
i
om
Peltier/Dave
Mendrin
in their
Jeep Cherokees.
The
Adams Jeep
carrie
to
grief
very
ea:rly
and
vanished. Peltier and
Mendrin
fought
the
good fight through
Check
4,
carried
on
but
failed
to
make it
to
Gabbs. They were the
easy class winner anyhow.
The
faithful
trio
of
Larry
Schwacofer/Sid Spradling,
'55
Chevy,
Dale
Draves
/
David
Hutchins,
AMC
Hornet
, and
Garson
and Greg Moser,
Ford
Ranchero, showed
up
to
battle
for Class 6 sedan honors,
but
it
turned
out
to
be
no
contest. Both
the Ranchero and
the
Hornet
succumbed in the silt beds in the
Pahrump
. Valley.
Schwacofer
cleared
Check
4 in good time,
carried
on
through
Gabbs
in
just
over 15 hours, went a
bit
farther,
and
decided enough was enough,
taking the winner's . points in
Class 6.
The
Challenger cars started
next, six strong,
and
they really
deserve
to
start further
up
the
field by
th_eir
~
·~
~ ~
Moving
up
rapidly
in the
waning
stages
of
the race, Steve
Brown
·
and
Jeff
Hibbard
claimed
2nd
in Class 5,
surviving
the
rugged
terrain. . . . .
Greg
Diehl
and
Brad
Person
had
the Class 5 lead
at
C/1eck 4,
but
they
had
big
troubles
later
on the route,
and
salvaged
third
place
at
th/'! flag.
First
on
the
road
in the
early
laps,
Hartmut
and
Wolfram Klawitter
were
challenging
for
the lead
when
they
got
stuck
,
and
finished
fourth in Class
5. ·
Page
14
Octobe~1985
Dusty
Times
TO
ALL
THOSE
WHO
DIDN'T
WIN
HERE
IS
THE
TREAD
YOU
FOLLOWED
TD
THE
FINISH
LINE
Up front, our incredible
STONEWALL™
tires.
Nobody
beats
the
cut-
proof
tread
and
sidewalls.
And
in
back,
the
top-rated
BAJA
BELTED
TM
tires.
Extra
height
for more
ground
clearance, Sidebiters
TM
for sidewall .
protection plus extra traction,
and
a polyester/fiberglass sondwich ply
construction
made
for just
one
thing
. Durability.
MICKEY
THOMPSON
TIRES
ARE
WINNERS
1985 FRONTIER 500 - Larry Ragland
1st
Place - Overall*
1st
Place - Class 1 *
*
2nd Year
in
a Row!
Larry
'Ragland
and
Mickey
Thompson
Baja Belteds™ pushed
their
way
to
a Class 1 and Overall
victory
of
the
1985
Frontier
500 in an
outstanding
sub-12
hour
performance.
This
is the
second year in a
row
Larry and
Mickey
Thompson
Tires have
been overall
winners
...
congratulations!
1985 SCORE OFF ROAD
CHAMPIONSHIP
- Tim Kennedy
1st Place - Class 2
Tim Kennedy,
driving
T.R. Stump's car, showed SCORE
Riverside participants that
Mickey
Thompson
Tires are
key performers in
short
course,
as
he arrived first in
Class 2
competition
. Congratulations, Tim,
for
an
outstanding
performance.
CONGRATULATIONS
FOR A FINE PERFORMANCE!
For
complete
catalog & decal, send just
$1
;
for
the name
of
the
dealer nearest you,
contact
the factory direct.
Mic/fey
Thompson_
PERFORMANCE TIRES
P.O.
Box
227
Cuyahoga
Falls,
OH
44222 Inside
Ohio·
216
928-9092
OUTSIDE
OHIO - 800
222-9092
i;w- i;w- i;w-
leg times.
Usual
winner
Bob
Savage
had
his
T -
Mag
out
front
by
about
25
minutes
at
Check
3.
Chuck
Guy
and
Rhonda
Walsh
were
second,
only
four
minutes
ahead
of
Dave
Girdner
/
Roy
Perfect,
and
the
Russ
Winkler/Mark
Schriner
car was
two
hours
back
at
this
point
and
missing
at
Check
#4
as
were
Brock
and
Scot
Jones.
At
Beatty Savage
held
the
same
lead
over
Guy/Walsh.
Girdner
was in
third,
having
some
trouble,
and
Rick
Johnson
/
Gary
Watson
were
fourth
in
their
Hi
Jumper.
Girdner's
. car disap-
peared
after
Check
6,
leaving
three
in
motion.
Savage
had
big
trouble
and
was
third
into
Gabbs
and
seen
no
more.
Johnson
/
Watson
had
the
lead
at
Gabbs
by
25
minutes
over
Guy
/
Walsh,
but
they fell
down
somewhere
in
the
night
and
ended
second
in
class
without
a finish. It was
Chuck
Guy
and
Rhonda
Walsh
in
the
T-Mag
who
crossed
the
line
with
just
seconds
left
on
the
time allowance, last overall
but
a
finisher.
. ;
HDRA
Class 7 4 x 4
had
its biggest
entry
yet, five rigs,
but
none
of
them
finished.
Curtis
Christen-
FRONTIER
500
September 6-8, 1985 - Final Results
POS
.
POS.CAR
DRIVER(S)
VEHICLE
TIME
0/A
CLASS
1 -
UNLIMITED
SINGLE
SEAT
-
19
START
10
FINISH
1.
109
Larry
Ragland
(solo)
Chaparral
11:54
.
16
1
2.
113
Ron
Brant/Clark
Gillies
Race
co
12:33
.
26
·
4
3.
102
Tim
Kennedy
Chaparral
12:41.08
5
4.
101
Albert
Arciero
(solo)
Funco
Hustler
13:20.50
8
5.
103
Bob
Renz
/
Dick
Clark
Raceco
13
:
27
.
43
9
CLASS
2 -
UNLIMITED
TWO
SEAT
-
16
START
- 7
FINISH
1.
214
Bob
Richey
/Tom
Baker
Raceco
13
:
18.43
7
2.
203
Frank
Arciero.
Jr./Cal
Wells.
Jr.
Toyota
14:34.30
16
3.
213
Len
Newmen/Mike
Gaughan
Bunderson
15:17
.
50
22
4.
215
Bob
Gordon/Tim
Crabtree
Chenowth
15
:
59.11
26
5.
206
Corky
&
Scott
McMillin
Chenowth
17
:1
4.
30
34
CLASS
1-2-1600 -
1600
CC
RESTRICTED
-
18
START
- 9
FINISH
1.
1205
Rob
Tolleson/Bill
Varnes
Mirage
14
:
00
.
01
14
2.
1207
Art
Peterson
/Bob
Scott
ORC
14
:
59.34
·
18
3.
1206
Bobby
&
Tom
Neth
Chenowth
15:02
.
22
19
4.
1209
John
&
Rick
Lind
ORC
15:07.16
20
5.
1216
Morley
&
Mike
Williams
Chenowth
15:20
.
49
23
CLASS
J -
SHORT
WB
4x4
- 5
START
- 0
FINISH
1.
303
Gene
&
Kirby
Hightower
Jeep
CJ
7
14
:
27.28
Ck
. 7
2.
304
Jim
Yacksyzn/Mark
Hutchins
Ford
Bronco
8:
52
.
33
Ck
. 4
3.
300
Bob
&
Cindy
Chamberlin