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Good nutrition is our mission:

SO Drop those fries, and move those thighs


This is

The Nutrition Booklet

By: Travis THor

What   is   a   carbohydrate?

If It Is Bad For Me... How much should I eat?

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that carbohydrates make up 45 to 65 percent of your total daily calories. So, if you get 2,000 calories a day, between 900 and 1,300 calories should be from carbohydrates. That translates to between 225 and 325 grams of carbohydrates a day.

I got 99 problems and they all involve carbs...

Carbohydrates are the sugars, starches and fibers found in fruits, grains, vegetables and milk products. Though often maligned in trendy diets, carbohydrates — one of the basic food groups — are important to a healthy life.

But why?

G o o d   c a r b s   vs.   b a d   c a r b s

What do good carbs do?

What's the bad?

- Carbs can help prevent weight gain—and even promote weight loss.

- Carbs are good for your heart.

- Carbs can help boost your mood.


- Carbs will help you trim your waistline.

- Carbs will keep your memory sharp.

- Simple carbohydrates included sugars such as fruit sugar (fructose), corn or grape sugar (dextrose or glucose) and table sugar (sucrose).

- Simple Carbohydrates tend to have high glycemic index - leading to higher blood pressure

- Diets rich in foods that have a high glycemic index have been linked to an increased risk for diabetes, heart disease, obesity, age-related macular degeneration, infertility and colorectal cancer.

F U N   F A C T  !

A carbohydrate has 4 calories per gram! 

ALSO... Carbohydrates, more specifically simple carbohydrates, can be an addiction!

GOOD :)

bad :(

The  Ugly  Truth

The "whey" proteins are good for you

Protein keeps your hard-earned muscles happy, your stomach from growling an hour after you eat, and your metabolism humming at a fiery pace. But just like other really good things, getting tons and tons of extra protein isn't always better. Here, five weird ways your body can go haywire when you start eating insane amounts of protein.

One does not simply gain muscle, without protein...

Too much protein can be bad, so keep calm with your protein and you will for sure look lean

- You might wreck your kidneys.

- You're plagued with GI issues.

- You gain weight.

- Your breath smells funky.

- Your mood takes a dive

Your body uses protein to build and repair tissues. You also use protein to make enzymes, hormones, and other body chemicals. Protein is an important building block of bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, and blood. Along with fat and carbohydrates, protein is a "macronutrient," meaning that the body needs relatively large amounts of it. Vitamins and minerals, which are needed in only small quantities, are called "micronutrients." But unlike fat and carbohydrates, the body does not store protein, and therefore has no reservoir to draw on when it needs a new supply.

How protein "Whey"s you down

Here's Why

any of a class of nitrogenous organic compounds that consist of large molecules composed of one or more long chains of amino acids and are an essential part of all living organisms, especially as structural components of body tissues such as muscle, hair, collagen, etc., and as enzymes and antibodies.

For all you vegans, lactose intolerant, or cant-stand-dairy people, egg white is a great replacement for Protein Drinks. In fact its actually more helpful!

Most official nutrition organizations recommend a fairly modest protein intake. The DRI (Dietary Reference Intake) is 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight, or 0.36 grams per pound. This amounts to: 56 grams per day for the average sedentary man.

F A C T   T I M E !

What Is a Protein?

K e e p     C a l m

a n d

J u s t    M a n a g e    y o u r    p r o t e i n    i n t a k e

LEttuce get vegucated

any of a group of organic compounds that are essential for normal growth and nutrition and are required in small quantities in the diet because they cannot be synthesized by the body.

Nowadays, everything from bottled water to orange juice seems to have souped-up levels of vitamins and minerals in it. That may sound like a way to help cover your nutritional bases, especially if your diet is less than stellar. But routinely getting an overload of vitamin can hurt you.

Too much vitamin C or zinc could cause nausea, diarrhea, and stomach cramps. Too much selenium could lead to hair loss, gastrointestinal upset, fatigue, and mild nerve damage.

How to avoid eating your vitamins at the dinner table. with facts!

What is a vitamin?

There is not necessarily a certain amount of vitamins you must take daily. It will all correlate according to your body shape and size. However there is a possibility of taking too much vitamins and end up damaging your body. You must limit your fat-soluble vitamins.  Fat-soluble vitamins are those that bind to fat in the stomach and are then stored in the body for later use. We are less likely to become deficient in these vitamins (A, D, E, and K), but more likely to build up to toxic levels, usually due to extreme over consumption or overzealous supplement use. The rest of the vitamins are water-soluble, meaning they can be absorbed directly by cells. When in excess, these vitamins are flushed out of our system with each bathroom break. The water-soluble vitamins — biotin, vitamin C, niacin, folic acid, pantothenic acid, and the four B complex vitamins — need to be restored more frequently, but the body can tolerate higher doses.

How much you should eat.

aka vitamins

There are two types of vitamins: fat soluble and water soluble.

When you eat foods that contain fat-soluble vitamins, the vitamins are stored in the fat tissues in your body and in your liver. They wait around in your body fat until your body needs them.

Water-soluble vitamins are different. When you eat foods that have water-soluble vitamins, the vitamins don't get stored as much in your body. Instead, they travel through your bloodstream. Whatever your body doesn't use comes out when you urinate (pee).

Vitamins stay in your body, and uses it as energy when it is needed.

eggs, bacon, grits...

What are vitamins?

...Vitamins?

The Good,

The minerals in our diet are essential for a variety of bodily functions. They are important for building strong bones and teeth, blood, skin, hair, nerve function, muscle and for metabolic processes such as those that turn the food we eat into energy.

Fact Time!

and the how many.

What are minerals? (and i'm not talking about rocks)

Like vitamins, minerals are substances found in food that your body needs for growth and health. There are two kinds of minerals: macrominerals and trace minerals. Macrominerals are minerals your body needs in larger amounts. They include calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and chloride.

Digging up some... Minerals

The amount of minerals we need is actually very small – much smaller than the amounts of carbohydrates, protein, and fats required for a healthy diet. Most adultsneed about 1,000 milligrams of calcium per day, but only about 10 to 15 milligrams of iron and zinc per day (4).

Fruits and vegetables are good sources of potassium. Whole grains are rich in magnesium, selenium, and chromium. Nuts and seeds are sources of copper and manganese. It's important to eat a variety of foods from each of the food groups in order to get all of the minerals in your diet.

The bad,

That may sound like a way to help cover your nutritional bases, especially if your dietis less than stellar. But routinely getting an overload of vitamins and minerals can hurt you. Too much vitamin C or zinc could cause nausea, diarrhea, and stomach cramps.

The big f a t truth

A new product called interesterified fat is replacing trans fats. Early research shows that this new fat may be more harmful than trans fat.

The American Heart Association suggests that healthy adults limit dietary fat to no more than 20 to 35 percent of total daily calories.

How much should you eat?

fun fact

You may wonder isn't fat bad for you, but your body needs some fat from food. It's a major source of energy. It helps you absorb some vitamins and minerals. Fat is needed to build cell membranes, the vital exterior of each cell, and the sheaths surrounding nerves. It is essential for blood clotting, muscle movement, and inflammation. For long-term health, some fats are better than others. Good fats include monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Bad ones include industrial-made trans fats. Saturated fats fall somewhere in the middle.

Good fats come mainly from vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fish. They differ from saturated fats by having fewer hydrogen atoms bonded to their carbon chains. Healthy fats are liquid at room temperature, not solid. There are two broad categories of beneficial fats: monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.

The worst type of dietary fat is the kind known as trans fat. It is a byproduct of a process called hydrogenation that is used to turn healthy oils into solids and to prevent them from becoming rancid. When vegetable oil is heated in the presence of hydrogen and a heavy-metal catalyst such as palladium, hydrogen atoms are added to the carbon chain. This turns oils into solids. 

Saturated fats are common in the American diet. They are solid at room temperature — think cooled bacon grease, but what is saturated fat? Common sources of saturated fat include red meat, whole milk and other whole-milk dairy foods, cheese, coconut oil, and many commercially prepared baked goods and other foods.

Fat is a necessary nutrient. The body needs fat to produce cell membranes, synthesize hormone-like compounds, and maintain healthy hair and skin. Fat is an energy source and is stored in ways that protect vital organs from damage.

What is a fat?

The good, the bad, and the in-between

When your kidneys can't excrete the excess water, the sodium content of your blood is diluted (hyponatremia) — which can be life-threatening. ... In general, though, drinking too much water is rare in healthy adults who eat an average American diet

H! 2! WOAHHH!!!

Water is defined as an essential nutrient because it is required in amounts that exceed the body's ability to produce it. All biochemical reactions occur in water. It fills the spaces in and between cells and helps form structures of large molecules such as protein and glycogen. Water is also required for digestion, absorption, transportation, dissolving nutrients, elimination of waste products and thermoregulation

Water! A Vital Nutrition

how can water be so good, that it is bad for you?

how does water help your body

FACT!

Drinking Water Helps Maintain the Balance of Body Fluids. Your body is composed of about 60% water. The functions of these bodily fluids include digestion, absorption, circulation, creation of saliva, transportation of nutrients, and maintenance of body temperature.

yellow urine is a sign of dehydration, so drink water as soon as you can!

How much water should we drink?

We're constantly losing water from our bodies, primarily via urine and sweat. There are many different opinions on how much water we should be drinking every day. The health authorities commonly recommend eight 8-ounce glasses, which equals about 2 liters, or half a gallon.

The Do's and Do not's of Starbucks!

Don't




% Daily Value*
Nutrition Facts Per Serving (16 fl oz)
Calories 45Calories from Fat 0
Total Fat 0g0%
Saturated Fat 0g0%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg0%
Sodium 10mg0%
Total Carbohydrate 11g4%
Dietary Fiber 0g0%
Sugars 11g
Protein 0g
Caffeine 0mg**

Teavana® Shaken Iced Passion Tango™ Tea

$2.25 ea.
+tax

Unsweetened Passion Tango Tea with Coconut Milk




% Daily Value*
Nutrition Facts Per Serving (16 fl oz)
Calories 15Calories from Fat 5
Total Fat 2g2%
Saturated Fat 0g0%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg0%
Sodium 10mg0%
Total Carbohydrate 9g3%
Dietary Fiber 0g0%
Sugars 0g
Protein 2g
Caffeine 0mg**

DO

Don't


% Daily Value*
Nutrition Facts Per Serving (16 fl oz)
Calories 110Calories from Fat 10
Total Fat 1.5G2%
Saturated Fat 1g5%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 5mg2%
Sodium 40mg2%
Total Carbohydrate 23g8%
Dietary Fiber 0g0%
Sugars 23g
Protein 2g
Caffeine 125mg**

Iced Coffee with Milk

$2.65 ea.
+Tax

do


% Daily Value*
Nutrition Facts Per Serving (16 fl oz)
Calories 80Calories from Fat 0
Total Fat 0g0%
Saturated Fat 0g0%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg0%
Sodium 10mg0%
Total Carbohydrate 20g7%
Dietary Fiber 0g0%
Sugars 20g
Protein 0g
Caffeine 165mg**

iced coffee (sweetened)

Don't


% Daily Value*
Nutrition Facts Per Serving (16 fl oz)
Calories 220Calories from Fat 50
Total Fat 6g9%
Saturated Fat 3.5g18%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 25mg8%
Sodium 140mg6%
Total Carbohydrate 31g10%
Dietary Fiber 1g4%
Sugars 30g
Protein 11g
Caffeine 80mg**

iced green tea latte

$3.25ea
+TAX

do


% Daily Value*
Nutrition Facts Per Serving (16 fl oz)
Calories 45Calories from Fat 0
Total Fat 0g0%
Saturated Fat 0g0%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg0%
Sodium 10mg0%
Total Carbohydrate 11g4%
Dietary Fiber 0g0%
Sugars 11g
Protein 0g
Caffeine 25–30mg**

Teavana® Shaken Iced Green Tea

don't

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don't

do

don't

do

don't

do

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do