FOTL FALL 2016 NEWSLETTER

newsletter Friends of Tennessee Libraries Fall 2016 Volume 23, Number 4 Sevier County Friends To Host FOTL Annual Meeting in 2017 The 2017 Annual Meeting of Friends of Tennessee Libraries is in the capable hands of the Friends of Sevier County Public Library. Scheduled for March 24-25 at the King Family Library in Sevierville, the program will develop the theme “Telling the Friends of the Library Story in Tennessee” with help The 41,000-sqaure-foot King Family Library opened in May 2010. from many quarters including best- Library will welcome guests with food Retired Tennessee Supreme Court Mountain Storytellers Association. selling author Sharyn McCrumb and Justice Gary Wade. and with entertainment by the Smoky Saturday’s program will begin with Other highlights include an a continental breakfast followed by a Copas and discussions of practical officers and division representatives appearance by young writer Luke matters of concern to Friends. For example, forms that the state requires nonprofit groups to file will be reviewed, and representatives from Friends in Tennessee will describe their fundraisers and other projects. On Friday a reception in the Grand Reading Room of the King Family brief FOTL business meeting when will be elected. A buffet luncheon will be offered, and door prizes will be awarded throughout the day. Other features of the meeting will Three groups make up Sevier County Friends: those from the King Family Library and those from the Kodak and Seymour branches as well. The hosts are hoping to keep the registration fee at an affordable level that will cover reception, breakfast, morning and afternoon sessions, and lunch. Registration will begin with the winter issue of the newsletter.. Attendees who linger in the be the presentation of certificates of area will be able to hear Sharyn by FOTL and the announcement of afternoon at the King Family Library. appreciation to volunteers honored recipients of FOTL grants. What’s Inside 3 Governor Recognizes Friends of Libraries Week 4 Columnist Remembers Libraries in His Youth 5 Kids Take to Yoga in Putnam County 5 Little Free Libraries Thrive in White County 6 People Working Together Clean Up Smyrna Library 8 Librarian Creates Cuddly Critters 10 FOTL Welcomes New Board Members McCrumb again on Sunday That free event is open to the public. Friend of Year Nominations Due by Nov. 15 In collaboration with Tennessee Library Association, FOTL bestows its highest honor on the Friend of the Year. November 15 is the deadline for nominations. See page 9 for more information.
newsletter  Friends of Tennessee Libraries  Fall 2016  Volume 23, Number 4  Sevier County Friends To Host FOTL Annual Meet...
CONTACT US FOTL Officers President DON REYNOLDS President-Elect WILLIAM SUNDQUIST Past President SUSIE WEBB RIES Treasurer MARJORIE KAUP HAINES Secretary DWIGHT SHEPHERD Newsletter Editor MARTHA GILL Full directory online: . Click on “About.” The FOTL Outlook By Donald B. Reynolds, President As FOTL moves into another year, we have planned many activities to serve our members and the Tennessee library community. On our website http://www.friendstnlibraries.org, you will find the following: Annual Meeting 2016 PRESENTATIONS BOOKLET a summary of the presentations from our annual meeting in Clarksville http://tinyurl.com/AnnualMeeting2016Presentations Friends of Tennessee Libraries 2015-2016 Annual Report a summary of what we did throughout last year http://tinyurl.com/FOTL2015-16AnnualReport You will also find our FOTL 2016-17 Work Plan Calendar on pages 4-5 in Welcome to the . . . Friends of Tennessee Libraries http://tinyurl.com/WelcometoFOTL2016-17 and the full list of our activities this year FOTL 2016-17 Activities Plan http://tinyurl.com/FOTL2016-17ActivitiesPlan We are also pleased that Governor Bill Haslam has proclaimed October 16-22, 2016, as Friends of Libraries Week in Tennessee (p. 3). This is the seventh year that Tennessee’s Governor has recognized library Friends as an important asset for local community libraries. FOTL has compiled a Tool Kit of sample proclamations, articles, and press releases Tennessee Friends of Libraries Week — An Ideas Tool Kit http://www.friendstnlibraries.org On pages 10-11, you’ll read about our new Board members. These Division Representatives will be contacting Friends groups in their area to find out what’s happening in local communities, to share available FOTL resources, and to find out how FOTL can help. Please do let us know what your group is doing. We’d like to include that information on our Facebook page http://tinyurl.com/FOTLFacebook and Newsletter. Send your news to Editor Martha Gill at marthagill491@gmail.com. Thank you for being an FOTL member. We appreciate your support for our mission of helping local groups. 2 SPECIAL UPCOMING DATES TO REMEMBER October 16-22, 2016 - Friends of Libraries Week (p.3) November - Picture Book Month November 13-19, 2016 - Tennessee Ag Literacy Week November 15 Friend of Year application deadline (p.1, p.9) February 14, 2017 - Deadline for Grants and Recognition Applications March 25, 2017 - FOTL Annual Meeting, King Family Library, Sevierville (p.1) April 7, 2017 - Tennessee Library Association Trustees/Friends Lunch, Knoxville Friends of Tennessee Libraries newsletter Fall 2016
CONTACT US FOTL Officers  President DON REYNOLDS  don.reynolds2030 gmail. com  President-Elect WILLIAM SUNDQUIST  wsundqui...
Writers, Librarians Were Inspirations By David Hunter Columnist, Knoxville News Sentinel Reprinted, with permission, from June 28, 2016 When I was a third-grader at Beaumont Elementary School, which would have made me around 8 years of age, we were regularly escorted to the library by our teacher to pick out a book. On one of my early visits I found a biography called "George Washington: Young Leader." The next week I went to the same section and found "Andrew Jackson: Young Soldier," and I was David Hunter hooked. The series of biographies had no dust covers, and as best I recall were blue hard-covers. Despite my complaints, the librarian would not let me have more than one book at a time. The next year, though, my fourth-grade teacher, Mrs. Davis, realizing how much and how fast I read, took mercy on me and talked to the librarian. I was bumped up to five books a week. At such a tender age, the author's name was not important — just the stories. The books were worth the beatings I took from certain classmates during my daily trek, books under my arm, from Beaumont Elementary, through Western Heights to Virginia Avenue, where my father had bought a neighborhood grocery store that quickly failed. A kid who wore glasses, read books, was obviously rich because his parents owned a grocery store and seemed to be "stuck up" was marked for trouble. The part about being rich would have surprised my ironworker father, who put in eight brutal hours, then ran the store at night. Also, I'm still an introvert, apt to be called "aloof," who reads books and wears glasses. Recently I began to wonder about those books that had meant so much to me and went online for information. It took only a few minutes to find out that many of my generation had read and been inspired by those books, and one of my peers had tracked them down and published a link on a discussion page called LibraryThing.com. The author was Augusta Stevenson (1869-1976), a schoolteacher from Indianapolis. I also discovered that she wrote 28 biographies during her career of the kind that had set my imagination on fire — plus numerous other books and works of a historical nature. Many of her biographies are now available from Simon & Schuster. It has been said that books are wings that can take us places we have never been and may never see in person. If this is true, then the librarians I have known were the people who taught me how to fly. With the exception of a librarian who once decided that her primary job was censorship, I 4 remember librarians as patient people, mostly women, who acted as if I was just as important as the grown-ups looking for particular books. The public library was my alma mater. When we think of great writers, Stevenson does not come to mind, but to me, though I didn't know who she was for years, she was the writer who introduced me to Daniel Boone, Kit Carson, Buffalo Bill and other heroes, who fired my imagination to believe that I might one day write books that people would read and remember. How long my books will be remembered, I don't know. But in the 26 years since the first of my 18 books was published, I've heard from readers on almost every continent and regularly hear from adults who thank me for introducing them to reading. It's not a bad way to be remembered. Old Friends: FOTL, Imagination Library Trust a librarian to save important documents. Don Reynolds, FOTL president, was director of the Nolichucky Region on May 29, 2003, when FOTL’s Past President Maryann Bork went to the First Baptist Church in Dandridge to introduce Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library to public librarians and their communities. “Catch ‘Em in the Cradle,” Maryann’s slogan, headlined the agenda (below), and Don welcomed the audience. With Maryann were Amanda Willis, regional director of the Dollywood Foundation, who spoke about the research supporting the program, and Jinx Watson from UT’s School of Information Science, who explained how books were chosen. The document harks back to Imagination Library’s beginning. A part of that beginning, FOTL continues to support this program promoting earlychildhood literacy. See FOTL’s website for more about this story and for the photo of Maryann Bork (on the left) and FOTL’s Frances Darnell with Dolly Parton in 2003: http://www.friendstnlibraries.org/about/. Friends of Tennessee Libraries newsletter Fall 2016
Writers, Librarians Were Inspirations By David Hunter Columnist, Knoxville News Sentinel Reprinted, with permission, from ...
Little Free Libraries Dot Landscape Of White County Thanks to Putnam County Friend Yoga Comes to Summer Reading By Chelsea Gifford Children’s Services Librarian Assistant Director Putnam County Library System FOTL Board Member The 2016 Summer Reading Program had a sports, health, and fitness theme, and what better way to get kids active than fun stretches, bends, and activities! With the help of the talented yoga instructor, Nicole Pugh, the Putnam County Library was able to offer a Kids Yoga class as a part of our Summer Reading program on June 21. We had a full class with 30 little yogis in attendance stationed on their mats! Nicole worked with them on breathing using balloons while the children discussed their emotions. It was exciting to see the kids focusing on their movements as they worked through each new yoga pose. The program wrapped up with a watercolor craft where the children used colors to represent their favorite emotion. Kids Yoga was one of the favorite special programs we offered this year during Summer Reading, and a big thanks to Nicole Pugh for making it such a great success! Nicole is a member of the Putnam County Friends of the Library, the group whose substantial donation helped to make our successful Summer Reading Program possible. Fall 2016 By Chris Dodd FOTL Board Member White County is enjoying more than a few new pops of color these days, with cheery wooden book boxes that have been springing up in and around the area since the summer of 2015. The boxes, of course, are examples of Little Free Libraries, the movement that started in the Midwest in 2009 (www.littlefreelibrary.org) as a way of spreading the love of reading and bringing people together. Sparta’s were begun under the direction of Cathy Farley, director of the White County Public Library. “Always have a [wish] list,” Farley laughs, “so that when someone offers to donate money to the library, you can respond with a specific project.” When the family of Erbie Clark, a local man who passed away last year, asked for an idea to honor him, Farley suggested a LFL as one idea. They were captivated. The first was dedicated on the library grounds August 17, 2015, and made the local paper’s front page. Another relative out of state contacted Farley and offered a generous donation to keep the project going. “We wanted to do this effectively and efficiently, to put these not on private property or in people’s yards but on public lands, where people gather.” The first natural sites were at the county’s seven elementary schools, middle school, and high school. The donated funds were used as matching grants for funds provided by a donor or donors in the individual school’s immediate neighborhood. Farley ordered unpainted houses from the LFL site and had them painted in the school’s colors. A member of the White County Friends of the Library made a house as well. The county Maintenance Department installed the completed houses. Please see Little Free Libraries, page 11. Friends of Tennessee Libraries newsletter 5
Little Free Libraries Dot Landscape Of White County  Thanks to Putnam County Friend  Yoga Comes to Summer Reading  By Chel...
Community Works Together Polishing the Gem Called Smyrna Library By Theresa Pickett President, Friends of Smyrna Public LIbrary Editor’s note: May 12 was a red-letter day for the Smyrma Public Library, for it was the day when Friends of the Library and Keller Williams Realty of Murfreesboro worked together to spruce up the library. Theresa Pickett, president of the Friends of Smyrna Public LIbrary, provides the back story. The Friends of Smyrna Library (FOSL) began their fundraiser in April 2015 to raise funds to put a shine on the gem that we call the Smyrna Public Library. FOSL created the Spruce Up Smyrna Library Campaign Committee for this task. The goal was to raise $100,000 to replace aging floor- ing, repaint the library interior, and generally “spruce up” the space. We hoped perhaps to accomplish additional refurbishing if finances allowed. We were very close to our goal when Murfreesboro’s Daily News Journal ran two articles on our campaign. One of those articles prompted Keller Williams Murfreesboro’s Amanda Mills to act. Amanda had been charged with finding a suitable project for the Keller Williams 2016 Red Day, and the Smyrna Library project seemed to fit the bill. Following a call to FOSL President Theresa Pickett, Amanda joined the Spruce Up Committee at their next meeting to discuss this wonderful opportunity. [For more about Keller Williams Mur- freesboro, see .] Once our project was reviewed and selected by Keller Williams Murfreesboro, things moved quickly. Keller Williams offices throughout the nation were scheduled to participate in this day of service on May 12, 2016, so we would be on a tight schedule. At Amanda’s request, we provid- ed a wish list. The Red Day Committee started with our “reach-for-the- stars list” and narrowed it down to items that could be completed in a short period of time. Planning down to the smallest detail would be neces- sary to complete such an See Red Day, page 7 ambitious project. 6 Friends of Tennessee Libraries newsletter Fall 2016
Community Works Together Polishing the Gem Called Smyrna Library By Theresa Pickett  President, Friends of Smyrna Public L...
Red Day continued from p. 6 From our list, the Red Day Committee chose to refur- bish the Youth Services Area, including the program room, two storage areas and the main children’s library area which houses books and other items to be checked out, computer and puzzle tables, and a play area. Of course, since Smyrna Public Library is part of the Linebaugh Public Library System, permission from the Linebaugh Board was necessary to approve the Red Day Event idea. Linebaugh’s Board also needed to approve carpet, flooring, and paint choices. All of this meant extra board meetings and timely votes so that work could begin on time. Heather Samsa, Smyrna Branch librarian, helps Kennedy Brown get ready to cut the ribbon on May 16. Keller Williams provided a designer and contractor for assis- tance during the entire process, from planning to completion. The majority of materials and labor used in the Red Day event were donated by vendors, businesses, and volunteers. However, because of Red Day the new flooring for the Youth Services Area was purchased by the Friends of Smyrna Library at a very good price. In addition, the library picked up the tab for a custom desk built for the children’s area at a very good price to dovetail with the Red Day event. Smyrna Public Library received permission from the Linebaugh Board to be closed from May 11-14. It was necessary to empty all the areas to be refurbished. That meant moving books, shelves, tables, and chairs into other areas of The Park Play area in the Youth Services Department Carpe Artista’s Ron Alley and Susan Gulleyflanktheentry’sRecognition Tree for donations of $100 or more. Susan Gulley designed the tree. the library. A moving company was hired to move the shelves while staff, FOSL volunteers and Keller Williams volunteers worked to prepare the space the day before Red Day and over the two days following in order to return everything to its proper place. We also had to prepare for the Grand Re-Opening on Monday, May 16, at 9:30 a.m. The Friends of Smyrna Library provided food for all workers on May 11 and May 13. On June 2, Friends of Smyrna Library officially achieved the goal of raising $100,000 in cash donations. Keller Wil- liams Red Day was a wonderful gift to get the ball rolling on our Spruce Up project. While active fundraising by the Spruce Up Smyrna Library Committee is finished, there is still more to be done. We’ll continue to take donations for the spruce up program for those who still want to get in on the fun. We are ready to get bids for flooring and paint in the main library. Those decisions will be made by the Linebaugh Board in the coming weeks. We are so grateful to our patrons, citizens, businesses, civic organizations who partnered with us to polish the gem we call Smyrna Library. It is a wonderful ac- complishment for all of us that this goal was achieved in just a little more than a year. Fall 2016 Front row, from left: Christie Lee, Linebaugh Board president; Roseanne Peppers, FOSL Board; Theresa Pickett, FOSL president; Carol Kersey, Spruce Up Smyrna Library committee member; Betsy Waldron, FOSL Board secretary; Heather Samsa, SPL Branch librarian; Rita Shacklett, Linebaugh Public Library Systems director; back row: Joel Parks, FOSL Board treasurer; Lois Barrett Luke, Spruce Up Smyrna Library Committee; Ginny Williams, Spruce Up Smyrna Library honorary co-chair; Rebecca Lucier Cowan, FOSL Board member and Spruce Up Smyrna Library chair; Robert Myers, FOSL Board vice president. Editor: To see Keller Williams Murfreesboro’s Facebook page in May, go to . Friends of Tennessee Libraries newsletter 7
Red Day  continued from p. 6  From our list, the Red Day Committee chose to refur-  bish the Youth Services Area, includin...
Jennifer Cowan-Henderson: Knitter Extraordinaire By Kathleen Bradley FOTL Board Member “Who says a zebra has to be black and white?”  Certainly not Jennifer Cowan-Henderson, longtime FOTL Member, Tennessee State Library and Archives Director of Planning and Development, and knitter extraordinaire.  Perhaps she chose to knit her zebra in red and white because the colors recall her first library memory: the red and white striped ottomans in the children’s section of the Putnam County Library.  “I loved picking out a book and sitting on the peppermint-striped ottomans that were made just for me!”  she says.  Or perhaps, in her imagination, zebras can as well be red as black.  The zebra is charming in either case. The red and white zebra is just one imaginative creature from Jennifer’s knitted menagerie of over 70 clever creations.  In addition, her collection includes an amazing one-man band; a sweet and shy appearing donkey, who probably kicks; Mistress Mouse, a nurse; Mr. Tod, the debonair, if irascible, antagonist from Beatrix Potter’s stories; and her favorite animal, an adorable gray elephant. Most striking about Jennifer is that her creativity seems to grow out of an intuitive communication style, which expresses itself through these finely wrought animals that seem born of childhood fantasies.  She has a talent for self-expression, which she reveals in written conversation, but through her craft, too, she creates symbols which share her ideas about beauty, wit, and daring.   It is as though through knitting she is able to discover and explore herself.  Jennifer began knitting in 2002.  She, her mother, and a close friend took a class offered through the local Leisure Services Department, which met on the Tennessee Tech campus, where she also earned her bachelor’s degree. She 8 began knitting scarves, hats, and felted purses, but she knew that what she really wanted to make was stuffed animals.  It is no surprise that her favorite childhood toy was a stuffed tiger. “He was my bestest buddy,” she says. “I still have him actually.”  Knitting also provides a foil for Jennifer’s impish, yet subtle, sense of humor.  She says, “I’ve enjoyed startling people when they ask what I’m knitting, actually.  I was waiting at the hospital one year, and I was knitting a box to felt later, and the surprise on my uncle’s face when I told him what I was doing was priceless.”  She then admits, “I also just think it’s funny that you can knit a box.”  She clearly enjoys being able to confound her fellow knitters as well. Excepting Joseph’s Coat of Many Colors, sewn into musical memory by Tennessee’s beloved Dolly Parton, most knitting projects require only one or two colors, but multiple balls of yarn to complete.  Jennifer’s projects require no more than one ball of yarn in each of sometimes many colors, a yarn purchase so unusual that other knitters feel compelled to ask what she is making.  She delights in remembering their surprise. “No one expects the answer of ‘a one-man band’ or ‘a giraffe.’ It’s great!” “I listen to audiobooks while I knit and the two allow me to let go of everyday things,” she says. Her favorite books are To Kill a Mockingbird, Anne of Green Gables, and Remnant Population.  Notably, the female protagonists from these books, Scout, Anne, and Ofelia, are all independent-minded girls or women who struggle, and then change in ways they cannot possibly imagine beforehand when challenged to adjust to life’s demands, to its rules and realities. Jennifer says, “I’ve discovered that knitting is a great stress reliever for me.” She has won prizes for her craft, but she remains graceful in her response to all the praise that inevitably comes to her. “I’m always surprised and flattered with comments I receive on any of them, actually,” she says. “People have been incredibly generous with their compliments, and I appreciate them all!” Friends of Tennessee Libraries newsletter Fall 2016
Jennifer Cowan-Henderson  Knitter Extraordinaire By Kathleen Bradley  FOTL Board Member    Who says a zebra has to be blac...
Do You Know the 2016 Friend of the Year? In 2016, the Friends of Tennessee Libraries (FOTL) and the Tennessee Library Association (TLA) will present two Friend of the Year awards based on community service areas: one representing libraries serving a population of 24,999 or below and another from libraries serving a population greater than 25,000. November 15 is the deadline for nominations. The winning nominees will be announced at the 2016 TLA conference in Kingsport on April 8, but all nominees will be recognized on that occasion, and each nominee will receive a year’s membership in the Friends of Tennessee Libraries and the opportunity to work on an FOTL project of their choice. Will you nominate the person or group to receive an award? n The individual or group must have made a significant contribution to a Friends group and to the advancement of libraries in Tennessee. The deadline for nominations is November 15. Each nominee must be a member in good standing of the Friends of Tennessee Libraries. For example, an individual must hold an individual membership in FOTL; being a member of the local group does not fulfill this requirement. A group must be enrolled in FOTL as a group. (See membership categories on page 12.) Nominees not meeting the FOTL membership requirement will not be considered for the award. n n Describe in no more than 200 words the nominee’s service, achievements, and contributions to a Friends group and/or to the advancement of libraries or education through libraries. n The description and the following information may be e-mailed to or sent by postal service to Susie Ries, 3506 Richland Avenue, Nashville, TN 37205 by November 15. Nominee__________________________________________________________________________________ Category by Size ____Serving a population of 24,999 or Fewer ____Serving More Than 25,000 Nominee’s mailing address___________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ Nominee’s telephone________________________________________________________________________ Nominee’s e-mail address____________________________________________________________________ If nominee is an individual, is that nominee an individual member of FOTL?__________________________ If nominee is a group, is that group a member of FOTL?___________________________________________ Name of nominator__________________________________________________________________________ Nominator’s mailing address__________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ Nominator’s e-mail__________________________________________________________________________ Nominator’s telephone________________________ ______________________________________________ Winners of the Friend of the Year Award The Friends of Tennessee Libraries website details the achievements of recipients of the Friend of the Year Award, co-sponsored by the Tennessee Library Association and FOTL. See relevant newsletters at . Friends of the Art Circle Library, Crossville. See FOTL Newsletter June-July 2011. Friends of the Kodak Library, Sevier County. See FOTL Newsletter May-June 2012. Friends of Benton County Library. See FOTL Newsletter May-June 2013. Friends of the Tellico Village Public LIbrary. See FOTL Newsletter May-June 2014. Friends of the Williamson County Public Library. See FOTL Newsletter Spring 2015. Julie Webb. See FOTL Newsletter Summer 2016 Fall 2016 Friends of Tennessee Libraries newsletter 9
Do You Know the 2016 Friend of the Year  In 2016, the Friends of Tennessee Libraries  FOTL  and the Tennessee Library Asso...
FOTL Welcomes New Board Members Kathleen Bradley, West Tennessee Kathleen Bradley lives in Collierville, where she handles the Friends’ bookstore’s bank account and serves on the town’s library board. She appreciates and applauds the work of Friends throughout the state, and is pleased to have the opportunity to contribute to this important effort. Editor’s note: See Kathleen’s article on Jennifer Henderson Cowan’s hobby on page 8 of this issue. Jim Bronow, West Tennessee His birth certificate says William James Bronow, but everyone calls him Jim.  He was born April 14, 1945, at the Puget Sound Naval Hospital in Bremerton, WA.  He grew up on Puget Sound as far south as Kalama, WA, and north as far as Sequim, WA.  He graduated from Concordia Lutheran high school at Portland, OR, in 1963. He graduated from the University of Nebraska with a BS in elementary education in 1976, thanks, he says, to his wife’s encouraging and prodding. He spent 25 years in the Air Force off and on between 1965-2003. During the Cold War he was a computer systems analyst. From 1990-2004 he was a cargo handler on the flight line. From 1982-2006 he worked for civil service at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, WA, primarily in the nuclear field. In 1972 he and Luanne were married, and in 1980 their son John was born. In 2007 they brought Clay Price to live with them. In 2004 Luanne found (online) a house the Bronows purchased in Milan, TN, and in 2006, when Jim retired, they moved there. Luanne enjoys genealogy research, reading and slots. Jim enjoys reading and civic activities. Whitney Kimball Coe, East Tennessee Whitney Kimball Coe is director of national programs at the Center for Rural Strategies. Her primary focus is coordinating the activities of the National Rural Assembly, a rural movement made up of activities and partnerships geared toward building better policy and more opportunity across the country. Whitney directs national gatherings of the Assembly, which bring together rural leaders and advocates from every region with national policy-makers, Cabinet members, and White House officials. Whitney also coordinates Congressional briefings for policy-makers, funders, and their staff on pressing rural issues. Over the years, Whitney has built partnerships with national public-interest organizations, funders, and grassroots organizers in ways that have informed public policy and private investment in rural people and places.  Before joining the Rural Strategies staff, Whitney served as assistant editor of Appalachian Journal, an academic regional journal based in Boone, NC. She has a master’s degree in Appalachian studies from Appalachian State University in North Carolina and an undergraduate degree from Queens University of Charlotte. 10 Friends of Tennessee Standing, from left, are Jacque Jenkins, Jim Bronow, Mike Dodd, Cora WillisKing; seated, Kathleen Bradley, Chris Dodd, and Chelsea Gifford. Whitney lives in her hometown of Athens with her husband Matt and two young daughters, Lucy (5) and Susannah (2). She serves on the boards of the Friends of E.G. Fisher Public Library, the Athens Main Street Project, and the Council Advisory Board to the City of Athens. She also directs and performs in productions of the Athens Community Theatre. Mike and Chris Dodd, Middle Tennessee Mike and Chris Dodd, who share a seat as divisional representative for Middle Tennessee, also share a passion for the written word. Both retired journalists, they live near Mulberry, TN, and serve on the board of the Friends of the Fayetteville-Lincoln County Public Library. Mike’s career as a newspaper reporter spanned 43 years, primarily as a sportswriter, from the Buffalo News (formerly the Buffalo Evening News) and Cincinnati Enquirer to USA Today. While at “The Nation’s Newspaper,” he covered 10 Olympics and was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for an investigative series that led to the resignation of the U.S. Olympic Committee president. Chris pursued a career in freelance writing while their two daughters were young, and also enjoyed stints at Writer’s Digest magazine in Cincinnati and the Air Line Pilots Association in Washington, DC, where she was speech writer for the organization’s president. They joined the local Friends group in 2013. Mike currently serves as treasurer, and Chris as secretary. Editor’s note: Please see Chris’s article on Little Free Libraries in White County on page 4. Chelsea Gifford, Middle Tennessee Originally from the little city of Wauseon, OH, Chelsea Gifford made the big move to Monterey, TN, with her mother in 2007. One of the first things she did upon moving was visit the local library and get her library card. Her trips to the library helped her stay connected with friends and family and provided her with resources she didn’t have access to right away at her new residence. After working in child care for a year in Cookeville, TN, she decided to pursue a bachelor’s degree in early childhood education at Tennessee Technological University. She received a graduate assistant position in the Learning See New Board Members, p. 11
FOTL Welcomes New Board Members  Kathleen Bradley, West Tennessee  Kathleen Bradley lives in Collierville, where she handl...
New Board Members, continued from p. 10 Center, a small library and technology center within the education department at TTU. She fell in love with the library setting and changed her major to Curriculum & Instruction with a concentration in Library Science after her first semester.. As the children’s services librarian at the Putnam County Library, she feels that she has the unique opportunity to combine her love of children and the library in one happy place. Now with a full year under her belt, she says that she has learned so much more about her community. Looking for new ways to advocate for the library, promote literacy, and foster a love of reading in young children, she is excited to be a part of an organization that shares the same passion for libraries and looks forward to making connections with Friends groups and getting to know everyone within FOTL. Marjorie Kaup Haines, Treasurer Marjorie Kaup Haines, the oldest of six children, grew up on a turkey farm in Ohio. She relocated to Franklin, TN, about 20 years ago when her husband took a job transfer. Known as Granny Marge, she has four children, two step-children, two grandchildren, and 11 step-grandchildren.     Marge has a B.S. degree from Middle Tennessee State University and a J.D. from Nashville School of Law. Her law practice is focused on commercial real estate, and she does multi-site real estate transactions throughout the state; her office is downtown Nashville. Hobbies are reading (naturally!), running (currently training for the St. Jude Half Marathon in December), crafting stained glass and mosaics, and volunteering. Her reading preferences are true crime and memoirs.   Jacque Jenkins, Memphis Jacque Jenkins has been a proud member of the Memphis Friends of the Library for 12 years. She served as president of the Friends of the Whitehaven branch of the public library system for four years and as vice president of the Memphis Public Libraries (citywide) Friends for two years. She has been president since 2012. Her goals are to help her library system continue to offer quality programs and services and to ensure that everyone has access to those programs and services.  She hopes to involve as many people as possible in Friends of the Library and to help with the Friends’ program of getting books into the hands of everyone who wants a book, thereby building a love for reading and keeping books from the landfill. She works to make Friends of the Library a well-known organization and to build signature events (such as Halloween Boooks with Friends) that increase awareness of Friends and their purpose. Her experience has led her to believe “Library employees and Friends of the Library are the best!  Never have I been involved with a group of people who so love what they do and who work together for the purpose of improving literacy and their community.”  She is also active in Memphis Police Ambassadors, Gardenview Neighborhood Association as president, Girls Shine Fall 2016 (girls mentoring program) creator and director, and A. Maceo Walker Middle School Civics Club. In addition to a career as florist and event coordinator, her hobbies include reading (of course), making jewelry and mixed media art, and music. Cora Willis-King, East Tennessee Cora Willis-King is president of the LaFollette Friends of the Library. A former children’s librarian, she volunteers and conducts the preschool children’s story time weekly at the library. She is currently employed as the administrative assistant to the director of the Campbell County Chamber of Commerce. Cora is also a professional photographer.   Little Free Libraries, cont. from page 5 Sparta’s city parks were another natural location for three more, and Farley appeared before the City Council to explain how the LFL program worked and how sites are maintained. (A group of volunteer “stewards”—many of them teachers— commits to checking the boxes routinely, making sure they’re tidy and filled with books.) Ah yes, books—the purpose of the little kiosks. Farley and her staff make certain there’s plenty of inventory for the stewards, supplying books from donations, culls from the White County Friends’ book sales, and the library’s surplus. The idea of LFL was originally a book swap—i.e., “Take a book, leave a book,” and certainly that second part sometimes doesn’t happen. “But that’s OK as well,” Farley says. “It’s a way to extend our services,” and it’s definitely getting reading material out into the community. Vandalism hasn’t been much of a problem. Those at the schools, especially, are “very loved and very protected,” she says. The kids will leave notes like “I LOVED Llama Llama” or “Please, no more Mickey Mouse! I don’t like him anymore!” The county now has 14 LFLs, including a unique “seed swap” library at the local Famer’s Market that includes surplus garden produce and gently used gardening books. Like a self-seeding plant, the idea has taken root elsewhere. Dunlap Friends of the Library from Sequatchie County toured the White County LFL sites this summer and have plans to get their own system started, Farley says. Two other communities in White County have asked for one, “so we’ll be looking to get funding for them, too.” (Cost of each box, including installation, is around $550.) “It’s been interesting to see the public’s response to the program,” Farley says. They’ve had library patrons refer to the books they’ve enjoyed from what they describe as their “birdhouse library,” and are delighted to know that they might find a treasure to read even when the library is closed. From her window at the county library, Farley can see four of the LFL locations, and it’s a good feeling. But she was most touched by a comment from Erbie Clark’s daughter Mary Lou, who told her recently, “Daddy would be so proud. This is such a lasting tribute to him.” Friends of Tennessee Libraries newsletter 11
New Board Members, continued from p. 10 Center, a small library and technology center within the education department at T...
Friends of Tennessee Libraries 1560 Country Club Place Cookeville, TN 38501-2062 Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Knoxville, TN Permit No. 582 ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED Online at Facebook Website: www.friendstnlibraries.org The Friends of Tennessee Libraries is a volunteer organization of individuals and groups dedicated to supporting Tennessee libraries and local Friends of Library groups through n Establishing and helping Friends of Library groups succeed n Communicating with libraries and trustees about the value of Friends n Serving members as a communication network and clearinghouse for information n Advocating for library funding and legislative support on a local, state, and national basis Reaching your library from home is easier than ever through the Tennessee Electronic Library. Membership Application Become a Friend of Tennessee Libraries (Membership year is January to December.) INDIVIDUAL or FAMILY q Individual $15/yr q Family $25/yr q Silver $50/yr q Gold $100/yr q Platinum $500/yr ORGANIZATION q 1-49 Members $25/yr q 50-99 Members $55/yr q 100-499 Members $75/yr q 500 Members $100/yr Name _______________________________________________ Phone___________________ Address______________________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip_________________________________________________________________ TN County _______________________ E-Mail_____________________________________ ____________ Check here if you want to receive your newsletter electronically. Make checks payable to Friends of Tennessee Libraries. Send to FOTL Membership Chair Connie Albrecht, 1560 Country Club Place, Cookeville, TN 38501-2062. 12 Friends of Tennessee Libraries newsletter 12 Fall 2016 Friends of Tennes-
Friends of Tennessee Libraries 1560 Country Club Place Cookeville, TN 38501-2062  Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Knoxvi...