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Location: Oceania

Goverment: Federal Parliamentary Democracy

Offical Lnaguage: English (official), Chinese 2.1%, Italian and other aboriginal dialects are also spoken.

Major religons:Catholic 26.4%, Anglican 20.5%, other Christian 20.5%, Buddhist 1.9%, Muslim 1.5%, other 1.2%, unspecified 12.7%, none 15.3%.

Major Ethnic Groups: Caucasian 92%, Asian 7%, aboriginal and other 1%.

 

          Australia

 

 

 

by: bri.

greetings

 

Man .vs. Man - A firm handshake is common in formal and business situations.  A simple nod of acknowledgment works in less formal situations.

 

Woman .VS. woman - A handshake is common in formal and business situations. A nod of acknowledgment is common in less formal situations and between good friends and family a single kiss on the cheek tends to be the norm.   

 

woman .vs. man - A handshake tends to be the norm for formal and business situations. A nod of acknowledgment is common in less formal situations and between good friends and family a single kiss on the cheek tends to be the norm. 

communication

 

  • Australians are known to be very direct and to the point.  Honesty is appreciated and expected.
  • Humor plays a big role in communication.  In general, people like teasing and joking during conversation. 
  • Arrogance is looked down upon heavily.  It’s best to stay humble and modest.

personal space & touching

 

  • Roughly an arm’s length of personal space is generally acceptable during conversations. With friends or family it may be less.
  • With business colleagues an arm’s length would be a minimum requirement, any closer could be deemed inappropriate, especially between colleagues of the opposite sex. 
  • Touching is generally kept to a minimum during conversations.  Between friends and family, light touching to emphasize a point or show closeness is more common. As a general rule, shoulders, upper-arms and elbows are considered safe non sexual touching zones. 

 

Basic's

eye contact

  • Direct eye contact is acceptable and expected. 
  • Avoiding someone’s eyes during conversations is usually viewed as disrespectful and rude.
  • While eye contact is preferred for those of the dominant culture, Aboriginal people do NOT make eye contact. In fact, a lack of eye contact is a mark of respect. This has big implications for the employability of Aboriginal people, and it's important for non-Indigenous people to be aware of this.

view of time

  • Australia has a fairly laid back culture; most people will give time fairly freely to help each other out.
  • Buses, trains, and other services run on time for the most part.
  • Punctuality tends to be valued more in business and professional situations vs. social ones. 

gender issues

  • Australia is a mostly egalitarian society when it comes to gender. Opportunities for women are varied and available.  Women hold positions of power in various arenas.
  • On social occasions or dating, people "split the bill." If you are invited to the movies, expect to pay for yourself. Rarely will a car door be opened for a female, but if it is, it is polite to lean over and open the driver door from the inside, but this is less common now because of keyless entry systems.

gestures

The "V" sign for "victory" or “peace” is shown with the palm facing outward.   If the palm is facing inward the signs sign becomes a rude gesture.

 

taboos

  • Extending the middle finger is rude.
  • Sexist and/or racist language is also highly disdained.

law & order

  • The legal drinking age is 18 and readily enforced.
  • Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.

videos & other stuff

 

Basics continued

Buisness

dress

MenFor a first meeting, a relatively conservative             business suit is a good idea.  Many companies allow business casual dress, which is usually nice pants and a collared shirt with or without a jacket.

 

Women:  Dresses, pantsuits, or business suits are a good idea for a first meeting.  Limited accessories are fine and it is best to avoid overly revealing clothing.

 

 

  • Jeans and more casual attire are common in some industries.
  • Being clean and well-groomed is generally appreciated.

titles & buisness cards

  • Most people will want to interact on a first name basis as quickly as possible.  It's best to begin addressing people using, Mr., Mrs. Ms. or Miss, followed by the surname, and then wait for them to invite you to call them by their first name.
  • There is no specific protocol surrounding the giving and receiving of business cards.

 

 

 mettings

Most people will want to interact on a first name basis as quickly as possible.  It's best to begin addressing people using, Mr., Mrs. Ms. or Miss, followed by the surname, and then wait for them to invite you to call them by their first name.

  • There is no specific protocol surrounding the giving and receiving of business cards.

nogitatiations

  • It’s best to avoid hard selling, pressure tactics and any sort of conflict or confrontation.
  • Bargaining is generally  not expected and is usually frowned upon.
  • It’s important to be direct about intentions and supporting them with hard facts and figures is a good idea.

gift giving

  • Gifts aren’t generally exchanged in business situations.
  • If invited over to someone’s home, it is polite to bring a small gift, such as chocolate, a nice bottle of wine, or flowers.

 

 

Buisness continued.....

 

 

 

 

STUDENTS

CLASS RULES

  • Education begins with Primary School. This begins with Kindergarten, followed by Years 1 to 6.
  • High School (Years 7 to 12) occur after Primary School. Completion of Year 10 is compulsory. Some students leave to gain employment in a trade.
  • Many students that complete Year 12 go on to study at University or complete technical education. Employment is sometimes undertaken as an alternative.
  • It is expected that teachers are treated with respect. In class, teachers will call on students independently and look for students to ask and respond. Peer assessment or collaborative group work is common but copying from the internet is considered cheating.

SOCIALIZING

  • Australian students tend to socialize in similar ways to other western countries. Parties and excessive drinking are common in this age group. However, Australia is a very multicultural society so there a wide variety of activities are available
  • When visiting the house of new friends, bring a small gift - a bottle of wine, or flowers.

 

BY: briana abernethy                   <3