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Published three times per year March July December Issue Number 70 July 2016 THE MARLY LANCASTER JB604 HW S OF 100 SQUADRON Joe Perry 32nd 100 Squadron Anyone entering the of French village of Marly today cannot fail to notice the mural of a Lancaster and its pilot which covers the entire side of a house close to the church Being a resident of Marly an ex RAF serviceman and a keen enthusiast of the Lanc I went in search of the story behind the mural What I have found is a dedicated team of locals who honour the fallen heroes from Lancaster JB 604 HW S of 100 Squadron The pictorial tribute to the crew of Lancaster JB604 on the corner of Rue de Metz and Rue de la Deille It was on the night of February 24th 25th 1944 as a result of enemy action that Lancaster JB604 crashed on the village of Marly France With the sound of sirens wailing searchlights probing the sky and the sight of a Lancaster in flames descending on the village it was a terrifying night for the inhabitants The doomed plane crashed onto the mill alongside the River Seille Fortunately the bombs from the plane which fell on both sides of the river and in the adjoining fields had not been armed and did not explode The village certainly had a narrow escape and even today the locals shiver at the thought of what might have been Providentially not one villager was killed on that terrible night Two crew members managed to bale out before the impact and were taken prisoner by the Siedler German settlers brought into the village Sadly five of the crew perished in the crash and their bodies were recovered from the site and hastily buried in the early hours of February 26th 1944 with neither blessings nor military honours Life in Marly returned to normal It was only two years later upon the initiative of M Jean Thiriot president and general secretary of the local section of the escapees and resistance movement for Moselle that a commemorative The wooden cross ceremony was organised on erected in 1946 the24th February 1946 to honour the five heroic allied airmen killed in action A wooden cross bearing the inscription Here lie five heroic allies who gave their lives for the liberation of our country the 24th February 1944 was erected on the naked burial mound which was their final resting place A funeral oration in the form of a poem was written and read by M Jean Thiriot before a deeply moved and contemplative crowd Continued on page 3 ON OTHER PAGES From the Editor Those Magnificent Men in their Flying Machines Important Notice Association Standards An Old Lady Comes Home Reflections Memories A Lost Weekend News from Oz Who the Heck are the Beatles Bits Pieces
Published three times per year     March, July   December  Issue Number 70     July 2016  THE MARLY LANCASTER     JB604, H...
From the Editor One of my favourite events in our calendar is the Memorial Day service and the wreath laying at the Permanent Memorial to Boy Entrants It is a poignant day when we can all get together and pay homage to our late comrades It is also a day when we can cast our minds back to those halcyon days where our memories now reside remember our departed pals and do what Boy Entrants have done since 1934 reminisce I would also like to offer my thanks to all who have written in to me this past quarter I now have a fairly large selection of tales of derring do to relate in the coming issues of the Newsletter However if you have an interesting tale to tell then please send it in to me Tom Brown EDITORIAL ADDRESS AND CONTACT DETAILS Please direct any future hard copy contributions letters and telephone calls as follows RAFBEA Newsletter Editor 22 Horsegate Lane Whittlesey Peterborough PE7 1JN T 01733 351105 m 07919 028429 e newsletter rafbea org uk IMPORTANT NOTICE THE ASSOCIATION STANDARD Earlier this year the Committee made the decision to replace the Association s Standard prior to this year s AGM and Reunion as after many years of service it was felt that the Standard was beginning to display signs of wear and tear Members are therefore advised that the current Association Standard which was donated by the late Brian Hulme 26th Entry in 1995 will be ceremonially Laid Up in the church of Christ the King at RAF Cosford on Friday 9th September 2016 at 1500 hours and immediately thereafter the new Association Standard will be Dedicated as part of the same ceremony Since the Church of Christ the King is situated outside the main camp perimeter passes are not required However any Member wishing to attend should make sure that they arrive at the Church which is on the right side driving from the traffic lights towards the Main Gate no later than 1445 hours Reflections Dear Friends RAF Colours were first approved of by the late King George VI in 1943 that being the 25th Anniversary of the RAF but because of the war this was delayed until 1947 25 years later on the 50th Anniversary it was replaced by the Queen s own Colour At our Reunion this year on the Friday afternoon we shall be holding a short but moving ceremony in the Church of Christ the King RAF Cosford where we shall be laying up our old Association Standard and Dedicating our new one There it will remain in perpetuity alongside our Book of Remembrance I find these symbols very moving to see as they hang silently in the solitude of our little country parish churches the places of prayer and worship It s as if they are continually offering by their presence the records of men and women s deeds in war and peace to Almighty God Like the other treasured symbol that each church displays they stand alongside the Cross of Christ the Christ who himself declared Greater love has no one than this that one lay down his life for his friends It so happens that in July I shall also be involved in the laying up of the old No 31 Squadron RAF Marham s Queen s Colour in the local Parish Church before the Squadron becomes deployed in Afghanistan There the Colour will remain as a proud reminder to the community of Marham of the duty and valour the Squadron has given and continues to give in the defence of our land I hope many of you will come early on the Friday afternoon that kicks off our Reunion weekend and honour the laying up of our Standard and the Dedication of our new one which in the years to come will always be there to bear witness to the treasured comradeship we share in our Association You will find many of these fine silken Colours and Standards hanging in the churches and cathedrals throughout our land symbols of military pride honour dedication and sacrifice The oldest RAF Colour incidentally remains at RAF College Cranwell where it was presented by his Majesty on July 6th 1948 With every blessing Yours as ever Canon Tony 02
From the Editor One of my favourite events in our calendar is the Memorial Day service and the wreath laying at the Perman...
Continued from page 1 In the poem he evoked the sacrifice of the five allied airmen fallen from the glory of the sky to the earth in Marly for the liberation of our nation In 1948 a British military commission following a joint initiative by M Robert Schuman the then MP for Moselle and Foreign Affairs Minister along with the Resistance Fighters Association came to the cemetery to carry out the exhumation of the five airmen in order to fully identify them At the conclusion of this operation five granite headstones were erected above the five tombs and a commemorative plaque indicating their resting place was mounted at the entrance to the cemetery A moment to reflect The full crew listing on that night was Killed in action and buried in Marly Communal Cemetery Pilot 133632 F O Vernon Llewelyn Bowen Jones Bomb Aimer 1233182 Flt Sgt John Carter Grindrod Wireless Operator 1294908 Sgt Joseph Henry Sullivan The five granite headstones To this day the five airmen rest in peace in the old village cemetery in Marly Their graves are kept flowered all year round and certain villagers ensure that they are remembered forever as the soldiers who liberated our sweet Lorraine from the vice of the thuggish Nazi invader Mid Upper Gunner 1661472 Sgt Patrick Anthony Turner Rear Gunner 1351107 Sgt Maurice Herbert Messenger Every year the village hosts a formal ceremony on the anniversary of the crash This year I had the honour to meet many members of the local associations including M St phane Cottel who holds an honorary position with 100 Squadron He asked me to join with him in laying the Squadron wreath at the graveside a great honour indeed Survived as a Prisoner of War Navigator NZ414609 F O R T Garlick PoW in Sagan The cemetery is a long way from home shores but everyone can be assured that these airmen will forever be remembered as Heroes Flight Engineer 1800297 Sgt K E J Head PoW in Schepetowka Camp Footnote M St phane Cottel is in regular contact with RAF Leeming and is personally dedicated to the memory of JB604 and its crew He is a mine of information and would be pleased to hear from anyone who seeks information or who could aid him in his quest to contact any living relatives or friends of the crew His driving force was demonstrated during a conversation with me when he said It is important for me that the British know that we French do not forget the sacrifice of all these young men for our freedom In 2016 72 years later we stand together still M St phane Cottel can be reached on his email address lanc jb604 outlook fr Joe Perry with M St phane Cottel laying the 100 Sqn wreath 03
Continued from page 1 In the poem he evoked the sacrifice of the five allied airmen,    fallen from the glory of the sky t...
A LOST WEEKEND Barry Collins 38th It was early December 1961 and life at RAF West Raynham carried on as normal with a busy flying programme in the build up to the Christmas period with everyone looking forward to the celebrations However there was a strong feeling that all was not well as a fleet of RAF 3 Tonne Bedford trucks arrived on the base Nothing out of the ordinary one would think they were to RAF West Raynham replace our older vehicles was the consensus of opinion The next event to cause ripples of doubt was a broadcast over the station tannoy system stating that all personnel were confined to camp over the coming weekend and that a further announcement would follow hippies Quite frankly we were similarly concerned In the event we caught neither sight nor sound of any protesters although there was a minor scare when a Belvedere helicopter flew over and we were told to look alert and prepared The purpose of this was to show Mr Duncan Sandys the Defence Minister who was on board that we were on the ball So an Duncan Sandys with his uneventful day turned to night head intact intact and we were stood down just before midnight climbed back aboard the trucks and made our way back to RAF West Raynham arriving in the early hours of Sunday morning My billet in Block 103 had never been so welcoming and I crashed out immediately waking sometime in the afternoon After a relaxing shower and tea in the Airmen s mess it was off to the pubs in Helhoughton where the local landlords had never seen such levels of trade on a Sunday evening By this point the Chinese whispers were becoming screams as a few months earlier the Berlin Wall had been erected and we had dispatched half of the Central Fighter Establishment s All Weather Fighter Combat School Javelin Mk 5 s to Germany That was it we are going to Germany as re enforcements there must be a buzz on Either that or the SWO had organised a shopping trip to Kings Lynn The speculation was put to bed when we assembled in the Station Cinema for a briefing by the Station Commander It transpired that the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament or CND were to target the American 20th Tactical Fighter Wing based at Campaign for Nuclear RAF Wethersfield in Essex Disarmament The Government of course was desperately keen to avoid any diplomatic incidents and had offered the services of RAF personnel from stations in East Anglia and the Home Counties to provide security against unauthorised access to the base All weekend passes were cancelled the NAAFI bar was closed that Friday evening SNCO s carried out the Station s Fire Piquet duties and all personnel were to assemble outside the Guardroom and board the 3 Tonne trucks with the officers and SNCOs in the cabs with the drivers The convoy was then to depart for RAF Wethersfield At least now we knew what the trucks were for So off we set on an uncomfortably cold and draughty journey Rumours abounded that we were to stop at RAF Lakenheath for a meal yeah right and my granny is the Queen Mum But lo and behold we pulled into RAF Lakenheath and our colonial cousins RAF Lakenheath laid on a slap up meal for us With spirits suitably raised off we set on the remainder of the journey It was a dark dank and thoroughly dismal Saturday morning when we finally arrived at RAF Wethersfield where we were informed that our contingent were to be assigned to the bomb dump in the middle of the airfield Judging by the despairing look on the faces of the USAF personnel it was evident that they were lacking in confidence that we could protect them from the expected hordes of rampaging Barry Collins There is a Path News clip on You Tube showing the local constabulary dealing with the protestors outside the main gate but for us it was a complete and utter non event As a consequence just before Christmas each year I am reminded of my one and only visit to RAF Wethersfield and my lost weekend I left RAF West Raynham for the sunnier climes of Cyprus in May 1963 and had even more fun and games over that Christmas when the civil unrest broke out Ed As with seemingly all politicians all is never what it seems The scandalous divorce trial of Margaret Duchess of Argyll in 1963 featured explicit photographs of two men whose identities were concealed due to their heads being out of shot The case became known as the Headless Man trial and it ruined the Duchess s reputation Almost 40 years later the two men s identities were revealed in a Channel 4 documentary Secret History The Duchess and the Headless Man in which the two men were identified as the by then Lord Duncan Sandys and the other as Douglas Fairbanks Jnr 04
A LOST WEEKEND Barry Collins     38th It was early December, 1961 and life at RAF West Raynham carried on as normal with a...
WHO THE HECK ARE THE BEATLES Doug Grant 46th It was early March 1963 still with ten months to serve at Cosford when one of our roommates came into the hut asking who was interested in seeing the Beatles My first reaction was Who the heck are the Beatles not another basketball team the Harlem Globetrotters had only recently given an exhibition game in Wolverhampton However I was told that the Beatles were a new rock band from Liverpool who were causing quite a buzz in the music world NAAFI juke box in Fulton block On the night of 14th March we set off for the concert which was held at the Gaumont Cinema in Wolverhampton We had a few flight commanders and NCOs on board I guess as chaperones On arrival the local police sent us at the back of the long queue with our officers dressed in typical RAF officer civvies hairy tweed jackets brogues cavalry twills RAF tie trilby hat and umbrella They then proceeded to walk to the front of the queue but not having VIP passes were amusingly escorted to the back behind us Eventually we were seated and the show began Both the American singers were good and the audience response was very good Then the Beatles came on stage and started with The Hippy Hippy Shake and the place exploded with girls crying screaming and dancing in the aisles the security guards having a hard time controlling them We disciplined little Boy Entrants sat down clapping and tapping our feet and at one time sang Sit down sit down for Christ s sake so the B S in the back can see to scornful looks down the row by our permanent staff The Beatles did a number of songs finished and went off stage only to return for an encore which really got the cinema rocking It was some time before we got out of the theatre and back to our bus but what a great night The conversation on the bus was Beatles Beatles Beatles the poor American singers didn t get a mention The Beatles if you didn t happen to know Once back in the billet the SOC team went back to work and returned the civvies to their rightful home It was certainly very late by the time we were in bed and you could still hear guys talking about the show in the early hours Those of us who signed up realised that all our civvies were locked up in a store room and we really did not want to go to the show in uniform Well a SOC team Save our Civvies was quickly organised for the easy job of getting into the locked store room One of our boys was good at picking locks being the son of a locksmith and with the help of a couple of screwdrivers the backs of the lockers were quickly removed as were our civvies Moving on to July 63 we were getting ready for our summer camp in North Wales Before summer camp we were doing route marches around the Cosford Albrighton area to build up our stamina A group of us got talking about the Beatles concert and out of the blue Sgt Gunga Din Kelly said in a loud voice I suppose you boys think that I didn t know about the civvies and the lockers I know everything that goes on in my flight and don t you forget it he said with a smile We found out that the show was really a promotional event for two American singers Tommy Roe and Chris Montez with the Beatles as a supporting act Both the American singers were well known from their recent hits Sheila and Let s Dance Both songs were hammered to death on the 05
WHO THE HECK ARE THE BEATLES  Doug Grant     46th It was early March 1963, still with ten months to serve at Cosford, when...
THOSE MAGNIFICENT MEN IN THEIR FLYING MACHINES Dennis Whelan 19th feeling of somehow making a difference and the comradeship So they simply exchanged their fighters and bombers for our little training planes and went on flying That was the pattern for this magical week flying during the day and tall tales and drinking in the evening My next few days flying was with Will Palmer a good pilot and instructor We flew in various Austers and racked up the hours and the basics of flying with lots of circuits Things were going fine until I landed poor old G AIGC so heavily it broke the bungee shock absorber on the starboard wheel and we taxied back with the wingtip close to the ground Will could see I was a bit stressed so he said Dennis I ve got to fly down to Hamble to pick up some gear so hop into the Anson We flew the Anson G AGVA down to Hamble and I was allowed to fly one of the first twin engine aeroplanes I d ever been in It was such a magic flight with Will sitting back smoking chatting and occasionally sliding back the side window to put his fag into the slipstream to take off the ash Me I was feeling like a real pilot The next day he took me for a test flight in a Proctor G AHES before more training in the Auster Then came training in handling spins and stalls An Auster of the period Have a look at this Roger says I pointing to the advertisement I d seen in a newspaper along the lines of Learn to fly in Seven days for 25 at the Wiltshire School of Flying I m going to book in during the summer break do you want to come along too I enquired Roger Pitman one of my mates during my training at RAF Cosford eventually said ok and with the money from credits the accounts department held in trust for us for our leaves we applied Roger had been a bit reluctant because he wanted to give his parents some of the money to pay them back for his years of dependency but that thought had never crossed my mind So we had our medicals and applied for provisional flying licences I have no memory of the process but the Ministry of Civil Aviation issued the licences and a log book was supplied by the Royal Aero Club We agreed to meet at Thruxton Aerodrome on the due date of 14th August 1954 Thruxton had been built by the MOD in 1942 and had seen operational service with both the RAF and USSAF but by the time we arrived it was only twelve years old and purely for civilian aviation The Wiltshire School of Flying was located in the old RAF control tower which was no longer used operationally there was no radio or tower control of operations I was introduced to Sqn Ldr Jennings who was moonlighting from his real job in the RAF and I remember as we put on our flying suit that I engaged him in some conversation I m Sir to you airman I can see you need a bit of discipline he snapped My wife Peg later told me that she agreed with him So I shut up as he outlined the basics of stalls and spins and what I could and couldn t do with me thinking I m paying your wages but I never said a word And so up we went in G AISH to 6 000 with me in the front cockpit and him in the rear I listened to his instructions through the Gosport speaking tube trying my best to follow through with my The two intrepid airmen hands and feet loosely on the controls and trying to remember what he had done when it came to my turn The stalls were fine Pull the power back and hold back stick as it all went quiet with the nose climbing ever higher until it stalled and down we came Then came the spinning Jennings bellowing down the tube Lock the bloody slats as we wallowed around with me trying to work out what I had to do It s the bloody lever on the side So I finally found it and locked it into place and carried out the same procedure except that the nose went up much higher and the rudder bar went to full deflection as the wing went up and over we went I closed my eyes and when I opened them miraculously the nose was pointing straight down and all was quiet with the earth rotating around us I finally got the hang of it and did stalls and spins until Jennings was satisfied I knew what I was doing On the day we arrived a young woman showed us to our sleeping quarters and we ate a salad meal that had been left out for us and then prepared for the next day Thinking about it now I realise that we were there purely to learn to fly as there was no attempt to even ground us in the elementary aspects of navigation or anything connected with civilian flying So on Aug 15th with Peter Bowery as my instructor we boarded Auster G AGTI and with me in the pilot s seat taxied into wind and took off across the grass for my first ever training flight This was the first of the three flights on that warm summer day Peter did the old instructors trick of letting you fly around until he said Well Dennis where are we I thought Crikey you re the instructor if you don t know then we re all going to die and said in a sad and pathetic voice I don t know Peter turned the plane on its side and said Look down And there of course was Thruxton directly below Dennis he said situational awareness is very important That evening Roger and I were invited into the instructors quarters and had a wonderful time as they filled us up with their favourite tipple cheap port and beer We listened in wonder to those lonely unmarried men recount their stories of flying during the war I say lonely because these men should have died in WW2 They survived but yearned for everything about the war the excitement the fear the The following day 21st August Jennings took me up in Auster G AIGC to review my flying progress As we came in to land he said OK that s enough for now and we taxied 06
THOSE MAGNIFICENT MEN IN THEIR FLYING MACHINES Dennis Whelan     19th feeling of somehow making a difference and the comra...
back to dispersal and shut down He said as he got out You re right to go give me a circuit and good luck I started the Auster taxied to the end of the field turned into wind and then opened the throttle As the little Auster lifted into that blue sky I felt the exhilaration and love of flying that has stayed with me for the rest of my life I was 18 and soloed in 8 45 hours Roger beat me by 15 mins I resumed flying training in Australia in 1974 obtained my full PPL and gave up active flying about six years ago AN OLD LADY COMES HOME Pat Patience 44th Forty four years ago in February 1972 my brother and I were both in the RAF and found a 1933 20 25 Rolls Royce Park Ward limousine and a 1953 Bentley R Type saloon on a farm near RAF Lyneham in Wiltshire Although covered with farm debris both were complete the Rolls had been in the barn since 1955 the tax disc date on the windscreen and had yellow cracked windows and flat tyres The silver metallic Bentley was in much better condition having only been off the road for around ten years After a thorough check of the mechanics and electrics we bought them for 1 100 and spent two weeks getting them roadworthy As we had previously owned a Phantom II limousine in the late sixties purchased for the then princely sum of 150 we had a good grounding on how to set up the brakes carburettor and ignition Eventually the cars were ready which had proved challenging especially convincing the garage that they had never had MOTs lanes and a local publican was still awaiting payment for fuel at the then rate of 50p a gallon which was about three times the actual price at the time Later we obtained copies of the original Rolls Royce order forms showing the basic chassis had been sold for just over 1 477 on 11 October 1933 to a Mrs Borthwick of Cadogan Square London to be fitted with an enclosed limousine body from Park Ward finished in blue black and to be delivered on 1 January 1934 As it happened the car was completed and delivered on 15 December 1933 for the total sum of 3 429 Further research showed the lady had a country home close to RAF Lyneham and after a telephone call to the house we met the daughter who in 1939 had been taught to drive in the very same car In due course we took the engine apart and replaced piston rings valve springs and the clutch plate leaving the remainder which after a thorough clean was found to be in remarkably good condition The two vehicles gave us a great deal of pleasure and we alternated them between us which lead to the local newspaper writing an article about two airmen and their cars which in turn led to a feature in the Daily Mirror In 1978 I drove my brother to his wedding in the Rolls which attracted further attention from the press My brother kept the Bentley and I drove the Rolls to my home station RAF St Mawgan in Cornwall and set about cleaning the interior replacing the glass and repainting it maroon and black from its austere black It was not long before it was busy taking brides to church in the local counties and was adopted by the squadron for the pub run as it could seat seven comfortably One of its odd outings was when it was borrowed for advertising in exchange for the use of a Jaguar E Type coupe A fair swap as the Jaguar proved to have a race tuned engine with an exhilarating performance but would only run on the old five star petrol Eventually the Bentley was passed on to another enthusiast and we retained the 20 25 for another seven years when it was sold to an old friend who still owns it Over the next thirty years the car travelled to Ireland and the Continent on a number of occasions and was in use for weddings including my brother s son in 2005 and two in London with a visit to Parliament buildings Recently the current owner has been advised not to drive and the car has been returned to me to service and hopefully pass on to a new owner It is still a delightful experience to get behind the wheel of the old lady now in her eighty third year having first driven her when she was merely forty three and head off down the highway where she still raises smiles and a few thumbs up The then current old card registration book for the Rolls dated from 1947 and showed some interesting stamps concerning petrol rationing in the late forties and that the car had been owned by a sawmill in Essex until around 1952 when it was bought by a farmer in Wiltshire Correspondence with the sawmill owner revealed it had been bought around 1947 for 50 for the so called black sheep of the family whose activities were somewhat questionable During the post war petrol rationing it had at some stage been running on a petrol paraffin mix which left a noticeable smell in the country 07
back to dispersal and shut down. He said, as he got out,    You   re right to go, give me a circuit and good luck   . I st...
A SAD TALE TO TELL walked into a Police Station claiming to have lost his travel warrant and money The police where obliged to help servicemen with travel documents if theirs were lost or stolen He then caught a ferry to the Channel Islands and worked in hotels all summer until he decided to come back to the mainland and give himself up Anonymous 46th When I joined in 1962 I became good friends with B E Larry H I am leaving out his surname so as not to offend either him or his family Larry always seemed to be in trouble with the DIs because of his slovenly and perpetual untidy state of dress As I got to know Larry better it became obvious that he was from a wealthy family and had a father who was of quite a high rank in the RAF He would never divulge any more than that Larry from all accounts had never known family life he had been brought up by a Nanny then private school at a very young age and finally boarding school He did not really want to be in the RAF but was forced to join by his family He was extremely intelligent and could pass exams with very high marks if he was minded or fail if he felt so inclined His applications to Cranwell and Halton had failed and so he became a Boy Entrant He was sentenced to 56 days detention after which he was subsequently dishonourably discharged I did manage to spend a short time with him when he came back to the billet to collect his belongings I happened to be the only person in the room at the time He quickly related his story to me and promised to repay the money I had lent him That was the last I ever saw of him but I wished him well because he was a nice chap and I was sorry to see him in such circumstances It was not until the summer when we were preparing for summer camp that I discovered what happened to him after his discharge We were out on a route march around the Cosford area and I was chatting to one of our DIs who happened to ask me if I was a close friend to Larry H He then told me this story When a Boy Entrant or Apprentice was dishonourably discharged it was the RAF s responsibility to hand the individual over to his parents who then had to sign a form of acceptance Two NCOs from Cosford escorted Larry H to Germany where his father was serving in the RAF On arrival at the married quarter the father was confronted by his son and escorts and simply said I do not have a son and then slammed the door This of course became quite a dilemma what to do with Larry H They returned to the UK and were at Waterloo Station where they were told by Larry that he had an aunt in the London area who used to take him in during summer holidays and he would be fine staying with her They gave him some money wished him luck and off he went never to be of heard from again As I said Larry was very bright and just sailed through exams without any study whatsoever which was the opposite in my case We entered a phase of training whereby a very important mid term exam took place and if you failed you had two choices retrain with another entry or be discharged When the results were read out Larry had achieved 92 to which he reacted by shouting Impossible The Instructor informed him that in fact he had rated only 8 and as it was very difficult to get such a low mark they had guessed his game plan and decided to reverse the result They also pointed out that he had to have known the subject matter intimately to achieve such a low mark As time went by Larry was constantly in trouble with the Dis PTIs and Instructors He never went home on any leave but was usually invited home by one of his roommates and stayed with their family I would certainly have invited him but my father was serving overseas with the RAF at the time so I was also a bit of an orphan I often wondered what happened to him and I sincerely hoped that he would find some kind of happiness and a family to show him a bit of love and kindness something I know he had never experienced in his life The sad fact was that he was a very bright individual who under different circumstances might possibly have been offered an opportunity to transfer to Halton or Locking as an Apprentice Sadly it just goes to demonstrate that for all the camaraderie which we ex Boys recall of our training days there were some whose experience was very much Larry H less positive than ours One Sunday night Larry and another B E Jock R approached me and told me that they were going AWOL As my parents were overseas I was allowed to keep my civvies in my locker in case of emergency travel I gave them my civvies and if I remember rightly two pound ten shillings I also informed them that to protect myself I would have to claim that the clothes were stolen during the night They duly effected their escape and we later heard that they ended up in the Irish Republic A few weeks later they foolishly crossed the border to Northern Ireland in order to withdraw money from their POSB Post Office Savings Book and were quickly arrested Back to Cosford they came to serve sentences of 28 days in the detention block sometimes referred to as The Little House on the Prairie Back in those days the regime was one of brutal discipline to such a degree that would never be allowed today Quite simply in modern parlance the regime would be regarded as Child Abuse We would often see him and the other poor devils being double marched around the station by the guards and when we were on duty server in the mess would try to give them extra helpings of food provided the guards were not looking of course INDOCTRINATION Senior Boy John Jersey Heys 19th Reading of people s experiences whilst Boy Entrants has induced me to pen an occurrence which on looking back was quite amusing yet to fully understand the poignancy requires a bit of background information To start off you unfortunately need to know a bit about my formative years and so as I lay my soul open I request no mickey taking when we meet in September or history could well repeat Jock R was discharged when he finished his punishment but Larry was sent back to the flight where he lasted a few more weeks before he was gone again This time I found out that he had gone down to Southampton where he Suffice it to say that after the War and the 5 years endured under German occupation my Dad got his business really up 08
A SAD TALE TO TELL  walked into a Police Station claiming to have lost his travel warrant and money. The police where obli...
and running with money rolling in to the point that we became what you would call loaded So that I attended Prep School and then went on to Public School in Somerset an event I did not really relish who would having to leave beautiful Jersey behind Life was hell from the minute I arrived being known as a Guffy Little Junior as all new boys were referred to and I had to fag for some seniors In other words I was their servant and at their beck and call being treated as subhuman which was then accepted as the norm Of course I expressed my shock and displeasure to this foreign chap who was actually a Geordie and he enquired what was I going to do about it I required satisfaction and so we all trooped into a big drying room to settle the matter I suspect that all the boys were rather eager to witness this posh git get a good hammering Well it took about 2 minutes before he realised he was getting hammered and surrendered I was vindicated However and here s where the point of the story really arrives within a couple of weeks I was like a freed bird and effing and blinding with the rest of them We all had a good laugh at how I had entered the real world and I made some really good friends a number of whom attend our fantastic reunions to this day When I was about 8 Dad thought it a great idea to have me toughened up a bit and enrolled me into the Jersey Central Boxing Club Here I really did get toughened up as well as constant bloody noses not realising at the time how the painful experience of all this would stand me in good stead in the future Being constantly whacked with a senior s gym shoe was par for the course and as such did not bother me as all other Guffy Juniors were getting the same treatment But one day one poor chap pulled my hair hard and senior or not my years of boxing skills came to the fore and I was never manhandled by anyone again Once in the School Boxing team I was not quite the Guffy Little Junior any more PS REMEMBER NO MICKEY TAKING IN SEPTEMBER GOOD ADVICE John Dwyer 37th It was July 1959 and my group of u t Airframe Mechanics were to have our first lesson in safe workshop practice by a civilian instructor I can see him now elderly brown overalls and large horn rimmed spectacles a real wise old owl He began the session by saying Right lads what I am going to say next is the most valuable piece of advice you will ever get on this course He continued Never put your fingers where you would not put your manhood and holding up both hands he concluded Take this advice and you will finish your working life with all 10 digits intact So after a couple more years having settled in and actually getting on well and very much enjoying life I came home on Christmas hols in 1952 when Dad called me in for a chat He informed me that he had sold the company for a rather large sum with a view to us all moving to the Bahamas a decision to leave Jersey I did not understand at all However in those far distant days there was no such thing as a business development or purchase loan and so the deal was that Dad would receive a large payment every 6 months till the full amount was paid Two payments had been made and the third was deferred as business in Jersey is somewhat slack in Winter One more payment and then it stopped the purchaser had messed things up taken to drink and the business was declared bankrupt This brought Dad down too being owed most of the deal and he therefore announced he could no longer afford to keep me at Public School SPECIAL MEMORIES OF COSFORD Rodney Hilton 33rd I guess we have a lot in common bull nights bed packs kit inspections but we all have our own special memories Mine are the blackboard on the landing in Fulton Block announcing the death of Buddy Holly and the Big Bopper Summer Camp at RAF Woodvale when we were all sent home on leave early because of an outbreak of dysentery I remember taking Chiefy Hynd his morning mug of tea the two outbreaks of flu and the buzz that went round the camp at the time of the Suez Crisis However he was friendly with a Group Captain who had been advising him on my future i e Public School Cranwell and a flying career all of which had now gone for a ball of chalk as the saying goes So what now Well the advice now was that I could join the RAF immediately But I am only 15 I exclaimed He explained that there was a scheme called the Boy Entrants and as I had always been interested in machines I could join and become an engineer And so in June 1953 there I was at 15 enrolled with the 19th Entry in a hut which appeared to be full of foreigners I could not understand their strange accents as they eagerly tried on their hairy new uniforms Then when I heard a disgusting F word from down the end of the billet I could hardly believe my tender young ears So down to the end of the billet I went to enquire if my ears had made a mistake and who had used such a crude word The result of my kind request was met with a string of expletives many of which I had never heard before One or two memories differ from Trevor Sellick s in the last issue the trough outside the ITS mess was always filled with scalding hot water and made a funny kind of cracking noise The Bath Book must have been introduced after we graduated because we didn t have one I do have one regret and wonder if any others of my entry share it We didn t get our Entry Number painted on one of the hanger roofs that overlooked the parade ground One or two of us did discuss it but never did the deed 09
and running with money rolling in to the point that we became what you would call, loaded. So that I attended Prep School ...
NEWS FROM OZ THE BIRTHDAY BOY BOMBER COMMAND On 23rd January Dennis Whelan s son Michael and daughter in law Keirsten laid on an 80th birthday party at their home located in Melbourne s east in the leafy suburb of Kilsyth and set in the foothills of the Dandenong ranges Among the seventy guests were quite a few ex Boys there to toast their octogenarian pal David Leech Hines representing the RAFBEA and friend representing the RAAF paying their respects at the Bomber Command Remembrance Day in Cairns NQ Ed Happy Birthday Den and many more to come A solemn moment of remembrance ENTRY REUNIONS 28th 29th 30th Telegs 60th Reunion to be held at The Barnsdale Hall Hotel Oakham 14th 15th October 2016 Contact Effie Owen e eddieowen2 talktalk net 44th Entry All Trades to be held at the Telford Whitehouse Hotel on September 30th to October 2nd Contact Jim Doolan e doolan446 btinternet com t 01506 655433 45th Ground Wireless Reunion to be held in York area Details will be released when ready Contact Ron Suddes e suddesr aol com L to R Bendan Lacey Trevor Sellick Roger Rankcom Mike White Michael Sebborn David Leech Hines Birthday Boy Dennis Whelan with his signature glass of red and Tony Fairbridge far right LUNCH AT BOX HILL A smallish gathering of the Victorian Group met at the Box Hill RSL for lunch on a rainy June 6th for a great afternoon with congenial company and excellent cuisine Now in its centenary year the Returned Services League or RSL was formed in 1916 by troops returning from the First World War along The Returned Services League with concerned citizens with the aim of perpetuating the camaraderie concern and mateship amongst the Australian Diggers Since then it has grown to 1 500 sub branches Australia wide and one in the Philippines With over 240 000 members it is the largest ex service organisation in Australia At one time membership was restricted to ex servicemen only though now anyone can join However only ex servicemen can be nominated as Service Members May 10th just happened to be Don Strange s 70th birthday so over the period May 9th to 16th Jeff and Steph Worrall Don and Jan Strange Graham and Dorothy Siggs and Chris and Kay Robinson gathered in a villa near Alicante for a Birthday Knees Up Reunion of the 44th s St Athaners Many more to come Don This happy band All good friends and jolly good company REUNION REPORTS 44th Entry St Athan Reunion 10
NEWS FROM OZ THE BIRTHDAY BOY BOMBER COMMAND  On 23rd January, Dennis Whelan   s son Michael and daughter-in-law Keirsten ...
THE PHANTOM DEFILER OF LOCKING Doug Eadon 1st An occurrence in 1948 that might strike a memory in other 1st entry survivors who trained at RAF Locking I recall we were all called from our wooden huts to parade early in the morning where the SWO a Londoner I seem to recall but I can t remember his name then addressed us in a stentorian tone A considerable amount of human residue was found this morning in the bathrooms The person guilty of this offence WILL report to the guardroom after the parade That is all Dismiss I wonder if any of our 1st Entry members who trained at Locking will remember this Doug Eadon RAFBEA MERCHANDISE Cat 04 Formal Tie 15 50 Cat 01 Blazer Badge 14 60 Cat 02 Small BEA Badge Washable and Woven Crest only 3x2 Ideal for Jumpers Shorts Caps Golf Kit 4 50 Cat 03 Bow tie 15 50 Cat 05 BEA Lapel Pin 4 00 Cat 06 BEA Wooden Shield 23 50 Cat 10 BEA Magnetic Car Badge 4 00 Cat 07 BEA Commemorative Mouse Mat 6 00 Cat 11 BEA Windscreen Sticker 2 00 Cat 08 Print of Neil Wooding s Painting 9 50 Cat 12 BEA Rear Window Sticker 2 00 Cat 13 Both Windscreen and Rear Window Stickers 3 00 HOW TO ORDER 3 Cheques payable RAFBEA p p overseas 5 4 To order polo shirts sweat shirts rugby shirts fleeces or hats and caps from the RAFBEA Clothing Store please type http stores clothes2order com rafbea clothing into your browser and once connected you can make your choice of clothing and pay on line 1 Use the Order Form you may have been sent ensuring your name address and telephone number in caps is clearly appended on the front or download a copy from our website 2 If you have no Order Form state requirements by letter addressed to Merchandising Secretary 33 Kingcup Road Stafford Staffs ST17 9JQ T 01785 242570 e dkstringer33 ntlworld com 11
THE PHANTOM DEFILER OF LOCKING Doug Eadon     1st An occurrence in 1948 that might strike a memory in other 1st entry surv...
more PLEASE HELP SPITFIRE Ian Brushneen 50th Pat Patience 44th Spitfire Vb EP122 ex 249 185 Squadrons ran out of fuel and crashed on Gozo 23rd March 1943 I found it in 1968 and it was eventually recovered in the 70s and has now been totally rebuilt to fly in due course I wonder if anybody can help me please I played in the Apprentice Band at RAF Hereford from 1963 to 1965 and ended up as a Sgt Drummer on the base drums We played at the Royal Tournament in 1964 but unfortunately I have no photographs of that event If any member is able to help me in my quest I would be most grateful Ed If any of you can help then please make contact with me and I will pass on Ian s address details On the bottom CONTACT ADDRESSES Newsletter Editor Press Officer Tom Brown 44th t 01733 351105 e newsletter rafbea org uk Editorial Address RAFBEA Editor 22 Horsegate Lane Whittlesey Peterborough PE7 1JN Secretary Graham Orchard 51st t 07774 423505 e secretary rafbea org uk Address 19 Burnet Close Ingleby Barwick Stockton on Tees TS17 0SF Treasurer Ozzie Osbourne 51st t 01253 728641 e treasurer rafbea org uk 19 Sharman Avenue Lytham St Annes Lancashire FY8 3EJ Membership Secretary Terry McNalty BEM 51st t 07990 541865 e membership rafbea org uk 2 St David s Way Sawtry Huntingdon Cambridgeshire PE28 5NZ COMMITTEE MEMBERS Chairman President Treasurer Secretary Membership Secretary co opted Reunion Secretary Merchandising Arboretum Liaison Officer Webmaster RAF Cosford Liaison Officer Museum Snr Boy Newsletter Editor Press Officer Ex officio Chaplain Group Captain Mel Kidd RAF retd 42nd t 01502 561829 Ozzie Osbourne 51st See above Graham Orchard 51st See above Terry McNalty BEM 51st See above Rod Goodier 41st t 07764 781657 Dudley Stringer 41st t 01785 242570 See Merchandising Page for Ordering Information Alain Heaysman 49th Contact is via the Contacts Page Dave Morgan MBE BEM 43rd t 01952 275561 Tom Brown 44th See above Rev d Canon Tony Porter 9th t 01553 811301 ADDITIONAL CONTACTS RAFBEA Golf Secretary BEACHAT Moderator John Thornley MBE BEM 42nd t 01480 468778 m 07583 312708 Ian Andrew 17th e ianandrew telkomsa net 12
more PLEASE HELP  SPITFIRE  Ian Brushneen     50th  Pat Patience     44th Spitfire Vb     EP122 ex 249   185 Squadrons ran...