UNIV 100 Course Catalog Fall 2016
Updated: 5-17-2016 Page 2
Art & Music
Section: 038 MWF 12:00P-12:50P Room: MO 227 Faculty: Sahuc, Paul
Topic: I Hear America Singing: History of Song in America
This course will survey cultures and their folk music in its purest form: song. These songs were written as an expression of the
human condition and therefore evolved with strong contributions from other art forms and sciences, including literature, poetry,
dance, visual art and architecture, politics, philosophy, food, mode of dress, education and industrialization. All students interested
in the history of music in American are welcome, regardless of major.
Section: 040 MW 2:30P-3:45P Room: ANG 132 Faculty: Lim, Chan Kiat
Topic: Classical Music of the World Wars
Have you ever wonder what inspired the great minds of the last centuries to create their masterworks? What was Beethoven
thinking when he wrote his Fifth Symphony and what stirred in Chopin’s imagination when he composed his lyrical nocturnes for the
piano? This course explores a rich catalogue of classical compositions that was impacted by the World Wars. Despite the horror of
wars, some of the most powerful and beautiful music was created, at times by necessity, as an outlet for expression, as a mean to
escape, and as a tool for healing. We will delve into diverse selections of classical music and learn to appreciate this repertoire which
ranges from works composed during the war years to newly commissioned works that pay tribute to the devastation of wars as well
as their heroes. (No music background is required.)
Section: 052 TR 12:30P-1:45P Room: JLF 134 Faculty: McClung, Kiwana
Topic: Stalking Beauty
“Beauty will save the world.” -Dostoyevsky In this time of constant consumption and digital media, we have lost our appreciation of
beauty in our daily environments. We live in constant distraction, where the in-between moments are lost in visual noise, a sea of
icons and adrift information. This course seeks to contemplate the ideas of “beauty” in our everyday lives and the reasons why
humans need it. We will challenge you to go out into the city and critically think about examples of “ugly” vs. “beautiful.” You will
travel through the campus and the city, documenting your findings in a journal: a physical record of your semester findings,
solutions, and ways of critically analyzing problems. What exactly constitutes the city you live in, and how does it affect YOU? What
can YOU do to change it? How can YOU become the generator of beautiful ideas and actions? In this course, we hope to activate the
anarchy necessary to initiate change through weekly lectures, outings, presentations, discussions and flash mobs.
Section: 053 TR 12:30P-1:45P Room: JLF 134 Faculty: Stevenson, Liv
Topic: Stalking Beauty
“Beauty will save the world.” -Dostoyevsky In this time of constant consumption and digital media, we have lost our appreciation of
beauty in our daily environments. We live in constant distraction, where the in-between moments are lost in visual noise, a sea of
icons and adrift information. This course seeks to contemplate the ideas of “beauty” in our everyday lives and the reasons why
humans need it. We will challenge you to go out into the city and critically think about examples of “ugly” vs. “beautiful.” You will
travel through the campus and the city, documenting your findings in a journal: a physical record of your semester findings,
solutions, and ways of critically analyzing problems. What exactly constitutes the city you live in, and how does it affect YOU? What
can YOU do to change it? How can YOU become the generator of beautiful ideas and actions? In this course, we hope to activate the
anarchy necessary to initiate change through weekly lectures, outings, presentations, discussions and flash mobs.
Section: 054 TR 12:30P-1:45P Room: JLF 134 Faculty: Domingue, Bradley
Topic: Stalking Beauty
“Beauty will save the world.” -Dostoyevsky In this time of constant consumption and digital media, we have lost our appreciation of
beauty in our daily environments. We live in constant distraction, where the in-between moments are lost in visual noise, a sea of
icons and adrift information. This course seeks to contemplate the ideas of “beauty” in our everyday lives and the reasons why
humans need it. We will challenge you to go out into the city and critically think about examples of “ugly” vs. “beautiful.” You will
travel through the campus and the city, documenting your findings in a journal: a physical record of your semester findings,
solutions, and ways of critically analyzing problems. What exactly constitutes the city you live in, and how does it affect YOU? What
UNIV 100 Course Catalog Fall 2016
Updated: 5-17-2016 Page 3
can YOU do to change it? How can YOU become the generator of beautiful ideas and actions? In this course, we hope to activate the
anarchy necessary to initiate change through weekly lectures, outings, presentations, discussions and flash mobs.
Section: 067 MW 1:00P-2:15P Room: VAA 103 Faculty: DiCaprio, Marion
Topic: The Creative Process: a Journey to Visual Literacy
This course identifies several key aspects to the development and creation of visual art to anyone interested in the visual arts.
Students will engage with the teacher in exploring resources at the University Art Museum, the Edith Dupré Library, and the studios
of working artists. Students will explore how artists create work and what motivates them to create. Weekly assignments will be
given to foster written and verbal articulation of the foundations in art, the elements and principles of art, design and media.
Students will also create two-dimensional and three-dimensional works of art. The artwork will then be discussed in class to
strengthen each student’s understanding of what is relevant subject matter, what is appropriate media for expressing oneself in a
visual format, and how to critically engage themselves and their audience.
Section: 069 TR 9:30A-10:45A Room: B 180 Faculty: Gilbert, Melissa
Topic: Cayenne Goes to College: Your First Semester Through the Eyes of a Puppet
How do your experiences shape the way in which you tell your story? What does your story look like and who gets to tell it? From
Elmo and Miss Piggy to Yoda and ET, throughout history people have used puppets to share stories. In this course you will learn
about the various styles of puppets as well as their history. Both as individuals and in collaboration with classmates you will design
and build a series of puppets that tell YOUR stories on campus and beyond. Whether your Ragin Cajun’ spirit manifests itself
through the jaws of an alligator, the shell of a turtle, or a spicy pepper named Cayenne, you will be able to tell your story as a
member of UL Lafayette with the Puppets that you have made during the course.
Section: 080 TR 2:00P-3:15P Room: JLF 134 Faculty: Young, Sarah
Topic: Stalking Beauty
“Beauty will save the world.” -Dostoyevsky In this time of constant consumption and digital media, we have lost our appreciation of
beauty in our daily environments. We live in constant distraction, where the in-between moments are lost in visual noise, a sea of
icons and adrift information. This course seeks to contemplate the ideas of “beauty” in our everyday lives and the reasons why
humans need it. We will challenge you to go out into the city and critically think about examples of “ugly” vs. “beautiful.” You will
travel through the campus and the city, documenting your findings in a journal: a physical record of your semester findings,
solutions, and ways of critically analyzing problems. What exactly constitutes the city you live in, and how does it affect YOU? What
can YOU do to change it? How can YOU become the generator of beautiful ideas and actions? In this course, we hope to activate the
anarchy necessary to initiate change through weekly lectures, outings, presentations, discussions and flash mobs.
Section: 081 TR 2:00P-3:15P Room: JLF 134 Faculty: Russo, Kelly
Topic: Stalking Beauty
“Beauty will save the world.” -Dostoyevsky In this time of constant consumption and digital media, we have lost our appreciation of
beauty in our daily environments. We live in constant distraction, where the in-between moments are lost in visual noise, a sea of
icons and adrift information. This course seeks to contemplate the ideas of “beauty” in our everyday lives and the reasons why
humans need it. We will challenge you to go out into the city and critically think about examples of “ugly” vs. “beautiful.” You will
travel through the campus and the city, documenting your findings in a journal: a physical record of your semester findings,
solutions, and ways of critically analyzing problems. What exactly constitutes the city you live in, and how does it affect YOU? What
can YOU do to change it? How can YOU become the generator of beautiful ideas and actions? In this course, we hope to activate the
anarchy necessary to initiate change through weekly lectures, outings, presentations, discussions and flash mobs.
Section: 082 TR 2:00P-3:15P Room: JLF 134 Faculty: Arcuri, Nick
Topic: Stalking Beauty
“Beauty will save the world.” -Dostoyevsky In this time of constant consumption and digital media, we have lost our appreciation of
beauty in our daily environments. We live in constant distraction, where the in-between moments are lost in visual noise, a sea of
icons and adrift information. This course seeks to contemplate the ideas of “beauty” in our everyday lives and the reasons why
humans need it. We will challenge you to go out into the city and critically think about examples of “ugly” vs. “beautiful.” You will
UNIV 100 Course Catalog Fall 2016
Updated: 5-17-2016 Page 4
travel through the campus and the city, documenting your findings in a journal: a physical record of your semester findings,
solutions, and ways of critically analyzing problems. What exactly constitutes the city you live in, and how does it affect YOU? What
can YOU do to change it? How can YOU become the generator of beautiful ideas and actions? In this course, we hope to activate the
anarchy necessary to initiate change through weekly lectures, outings, presentations, discussions and flash mobs.
Culture & Literature
Section: 001 MW 1:00P-2:15P Room: HH 112 Faculty: Robeck, Jacquelene
Topic: World Culture through Clothing
In this course, we investigate a variety of global cultures by studying their current dress through a variety of lenses (including social,
economic, ethical, and political). Students will complete individual research resulting in visual and oratory projects of world cultures'
dress. We will examine the specific challenges faced by various cultures and countries in clothing, as well as various proposed
solutions.
Section: 002 MW 2:30P-3:45P Room: HH 112 Faculty: Robeck, Jacquelene
Topic: World Culture through Clothing
In this course, we investigate a variety of global cultures by studying their current dress through a variety of lenses (including social,
economic, ethical, and political). Students will complete individual research resulting in visual and oratory projects of world cultures'
dress. We will examine the specific challenges faced by various cultures and countries in clothing, as well as various proposed
solutions.
Section: 003 TR 12:30P-1:45P Room: HH 112 Faculty: Robeck, Jacquelene
Topic: World Culture through Clothing
In this course, we investigate a variety of global cultures by studying their current dress through a variety of lenses (including social,
economic, ethical, and political). Students will complete individual research resulting in visual and oratory projects of world cultures'
dress. We will examine the specific challenges faced by various cultures and countries in clothing, as well as various proposed
solutions.
Section: 004 TR 2:00P-3:15P Room: HH 112 Faculty: Robeck, Jacquelene
Topic: World Culture through Clothing
In this course, we investigate a variety of global cultures by studying their current dress through a variety of lenses (including social,
economic, ethical, and political). Students will complete individual research resulting in visual and oratory projects of world cultures'
dress. We will examine the specific challenges faced by various cultures and countries in clothing, as well as various proposed
solutions.
Section: 034 MW 4:00P-5:15P Room: MO 209 Faculty: Winters, Ryan
Topic: Disobeying the Norm: Finding Life’s Meaning via 20th Century Social Change Movements
What is the context of “normal,” and how does it affect our values? Is this sense of “normal” responsible for creating movements
that challenge the status quo which uproot and redefine “normal”? In this course, students attempt to answer the question, “Can a
focus on the history of society’s outliers, underdogs, and experimenters in social change uncover the meaning in life?” Students will
critically analyze social change movements and dive deeply into existentialism and how it relates to these movements. The course
will discuss through this Existential lens movements such as Da-Daism, Beatnick culture, the Civil Rights Movement, and additional
social change cultures and movements. Additionally, students will be introduced to the philosophies of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche,
Heidegger, Camus, and Sartre, and will be asked to, with the help of these ideas, assess their own meaning in life, and how they
approach self-care, academics, and self-discovery. The class will include a class project, readings, video resources, group discussions,
and in-class activities.
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Section: H02 MW 1:00P-2:15P Room: HLG 405 Faculty: Wright, Monica
Topic: Women in Medieval France: Fact and Fiction
The medieval period is among the most misunderstood in history. This course will debunk myths about the French Middle Ages
generally and challenge misconceptions about the role women played during the era. We will look at a variety of different kinds of
sources to discover what place women occupied in medieval French society and how they made significant contributions to their
own time and to ours.
Section: H03 T 3:30P-6:00P Room: JUDI 105 Faculty: Frederick, Julia
Topic: Choosing Your Path: The Unity of Knowledge
The basic premise of this course is that all things are inter-related. In a search for connections, the course will attempt to cut across
the usual lines that separate one academic discipline from another, accenting relationships among the literary, historical, artistic,
scientific, and other areas of human experience and knowledge. Each student will choose a space in nature and be assigned a
section of the library. They will keep a journal of his/her reflections during the course, writing a dated entry every day. Readings will
be from The Path by Chet Raymo to accompany them to their nature space and articles from their library sections. Students will also
attend two culture events in the evening. By learning the campus and its surroundings we will choose a space to become our
community project. Together we will sharpen our skills as critical observers, rational thinkers, talkers, and writers.
Section: H16 MWF 11:00A-11:50A Room: HLG 128 Faculty: Saloom, Jesse
Topic: Reasoning and Decision-Making
Which politicians do you support? What majors and careers would you like to pursue? Would taking out student loans be preferable
to working a part-time job? Do you plan to have children? The answers to questions such as these have a monumental impact on
one’s future. Unfortunately, most people spend little if any time evaluating the processes which bring about their thoughts and
decisions. In this class, students will do exactly that, by exploring the most useful elements of Philosophy, Economics, and
Psychology. To have fun and get the most out of this class, be sure to bring an open mind!
Section: H17 MWF 12:00P-12:50P Room: HLG 128 Faculty: Richardson, Sami
Topic: Dystopian Literature, Digital Media, & the Culture of World Changers
This class will examine the pessimism of dystopian short stories, art, poetry, music, and games-- from Bradbury & LeGuin to Banksy's
Dismaland & The Stanley Parable-- in order to develop a sense of reckless optimism in the classroom. We will contrast these critical
constructs to studies that showcase examples of technological advancements, social and environmental change, and the
globalization of innovation and the communication. We will delve into the human experience of the digital age and find pride in our
peers and positivity in our passions. In addition, this thematic approach will lend itself to university skills, including selecting a major,
educational uses for technology, community outreach, sustainability projects, and mental health education. Through the lens of
fictional worlds designed to create fear and distrust of our leaders and our environment, we will instead find hope and motivation to
change the circumstances of our world.
Section: H18 MW 1:00P-2:15P Room: HLG 128 Faculty: Marsh, Katherine
Topic: Food, Identity, and American Culture
In addition to being a basic component of survival, food is a crucial part of our identities and our culture. From apple pie to kimchi,
the foods we eat give us a sense of place and history, while also broadening our imaginations and palates. Using our own
experiences and observations, as well as engaging with essays, films and other texts, students in this course will examine several
regional food cultures in America (including the incredibly rich one that surrounds us here in South Louisiana), analyze food trends
and major shifts that reflect values and concerns of our culture, and explore how food can be used as a form of cultural exchange,
opening us up to people and flavors we never thought we’d experience but also raising questions about authenticity and other
issues. And while food plays a large part in culture, we’ll also turn a critical eye towards how the food we eat is tied to our individual
memories, beliefs, and tastes, and how we use food to express ourselves and connect with others.
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Section: H19 MW 2:30P-3:45P Room: HLG 128 Faculty: Terranova, Joel
Topic: Vampires, Ghosts, and Monsters
Everyone knows of Dracula, the Frankenstein Monster, the Loch Ness Monster, ghosts, and other things that go bump in the night,
but what is it about these creatures that contribute to their continued relevance in society's collective consciousness? How is it that
each generation seems to reinterpret Stoker's Dracula for something that speaks directly to them? What do ghosts tell us about our
fears of the past invading the present? What does Frankenstein's monstrous nature say about society's own nature? Are these
entities truly monstrous or just a reflection of our own inner selves? In this course, we will look at images of monsters from
literature and film in order to understand why monsters continue to fascinate and speak to us. We will discuss and examine how the
monstrous have been depicted, and what function they serve as a continued social metaphor. While you might be tempted to leave
the lights on during the night, you should nonetheless come prepared for a chilling discussion about society's favorite monsters!
Section: H20 MW 1:00P-2:15P Room: HLG 402 Faculty: Mielusel, Ramona
Topic: Tell Me What You Eat and I’ll Tell You Who You Are
Food is an important component in our daily life: from a survival trait to a social and cultural artifact. Part of our life goes around
eating: eating alone and in a hurry, eating with friends and family, weighing what to eat and what not to eat, being concerned with
where our food comes from, etc. It becomes even a bigger concern when one starts university. What is the best way to acquire the
best nutritional diet daily? How to plan your meals? What to choose? How to choose wisely on a tight budget? What does food
mean to you and to your identity? In order to answer these questions, the course is focusing on different aspects of food: from its
importance for the body, its historical evolution in time, the ways it is produced in our society and its costs; all the way to the
cultural signification of food in diverse cultures around the world. The course follows the social and cultural significance of food
through centuries and cultures, through a mix of literature and cinema (fictional and documentaries) as well as through culinary
reviews and TV shows and academic and scientific articles. At the end of this course, you will not see food the same way as before, I
bet!
Section: H23 TR 8:00A-9:15A Room: MDD 310 Faculty: Hylton, Jessica
Topic: The Poetics of Song Lyrics
Ever wonder why certain songs stay with you? Is it because the words are easy to remember or because it speaks to you on a
deeper level? In this course, we’ll focus on rhyme schemes, the rhythm of language, metaphors, conceits, and genre specific
conventions. We’ll study music ranging from pop and country to rap and metal paying specific attention to the similarities based on
race, gender, and sexuality that transcend genre classification. Over the course of the semester, students will gain a deeper
appreciation for language, learn how to write effectively within genre boundaries, understand how images can become cliché, and
make connections across different genres based on the human condition.
Section: H25 TR 11:00A-12:15P Room: HLG 525 Faculty: Albano, Paul
Topic: Surrealism in Literature and Culture
Non sequiturs, melting clocks, impossible staircases, two FBI agents constantly stumbling onto paranormal crimes that defy all logic
and often Newtonian physicssurrealism has a long, and fittingly strange influence on American literature and culture. In this
course we will examine the antecedents of surrealismwhere it came from and what it might be a reaction to or againstand the
role of Freud’s notion of the unconscious in its development. We will also look at different manifestations of surrealism in literature,
film, and popular culturefrom the enthrallingly bizarre short stories of Donald Barthelme, to the Salvador Dali designed dream
sequence in Spellbound, to surrealism’s intersection with comedy, particularly sketch comedy. Our objective will be to provide a
contextual framework for this odd, and seemingly abstract, cultural and artistic aesthetic, as well as to sharpen our analytical skills
by searching from meaning and understanding beyond surface level content.
History & Politics
Section: 005 MW 1:00P-2:15P Room: FGM 105 Faculty: Cauvin, Thomas
Topic: Louisiana French Heritage: A Community Collection
This UNIV 100 course provides an opportunity for students to approach history in non-traditional ways. Instead of lectures, the
course focuses on student production. Students will learn by making history. We will explore the history of French Heritage in
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Louisiana through objects and stories. Among the main topics, we will cover the history of Cajuns, Creoles, Houmas and other
French-speaking people in Louisiana. There is NO NEED to speak French to attend this class. The main assignment for the class will
be the organization of a public project called History Harvest (HH). During the HH, members of the local community will bring objects
and stories about Louisiana French Heritage. Students will discuss with community members, collect objects and stories, and create
a collection that we will upload on our website.
Section: 012 MWF 9:00A-9:50A Room: CLR 312 Faculty: Williams, Christine
Topic: Profile Thy Neighbor
You see a person dressed in old dirty clothes walking down the street. You make a snap decision about them. What are you doing?
Profiling? Most people believe profiling is limited to law enforcement, but it is not. Students who want to learn more about the
nature and analysis of profiling should register for this course. This course will explore how society profiles individuals based upon
characteristics such as gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status. Students will experience obtain real
world experience through guest speaker presentations, off campus activities, group and individual projects. The goals of this course
are to assist students in recognizing profiling practices, to acknowledge the effects of profiling on a generation’s mindset, and to
address their inclination to profile.
Section: 013 MWF 10:00A-10:50A Room: CLR 312 Faculty: Williams, Christine
Topic: Profile Thy Neighbor
You see a person dressed in old dirty clothes walking down the street. You make a snap decision about them. What are you doing?
Profiling? Most people believe profiling is limited to law enforcement, but it is not. Students who want to learn more about the
nature and analysis of profiling should register for this course. This course will explore how society profiles individuals based upon
characteristics such as gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status. Students will experience obtain real
world experience through guest speaker presentations, off campus activities, group and individual projects. The goals of this course
are to assist students in recognizing profiling practices, to acknowledge the effects of profiling on a generation’s mindset, and to
address their inclination to profile.
Section: 014 MW 1:00P-2:15P Room: MDD 310 Faculty: Hester, Bridget
Topic: Problems in American Democracy: Rights, Liberty, and Justice
Problems in American Democracy: Rights, Liberty, and Justice will specifically focus on investigating various social, political, and
economic problems within the American political system. Through the reading, analyzing and discussing of primary and secondary
sources, students will be asked to relate the problems of America’s past to current issues in American life. Topics of discussion and
analysis will include: the philosophic foundation of American democracy, major civil rights movements in American history, freedom
of speech and the press, balancing free exercise of religion with establishment concerns, changing attitudes toward rights to privacy,
national security and foreign policy issues, expanding executive powers, social and economic inequality, the criminal justice system,
as well as other relevant issues.
Section: 015 TR 2:00P-3:15P Room: MDD 310 Faculty: Hester, Bridget
Topic: Problems in American Democracy: Rights, Liberty, and Justice
Problems in American Democracy: Rights, Liberty, and Justice will specifically focus on investigating various social, political, and
economic problems within the American political system. Through the reading, analyzing and discussing of primary and secondary
sources, students will be asked to relate the problems of America’s past to current issues in American life. Topics of discussion and
analysis will include: the philosophic foundation of American democracy, major civil rights movements in American history, freedom
of speech and the press, balancing free exercise of religion with establishment concerns, changing attitudes toward rights to privacy,
national security and foreign policy issues, expanding executive powers, social and economic inequality, the criminal justice system,
as well as other relevant issues.
Section: 039 TR 8:00A-9:15A Room: MO 209 Faculty: Weill, Clay
Topic: How to Read a Newspaper and Other Fun Things
Towards the end of the Fall 2016 semester America will head to the polls to not only elect a new president, but a new Congress as
well. The papers will be full jargon laden, context lacking, knowledge assuming articles featuring quotes that are almost always a
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little bit true and a lot misleading. In this course we’ll hang out, consume some caffeine and sugar, and read some headlines in order
to figure out what exactly an Electoral College is and why we have one in the first place. While most of our discussions will center on
the politics of the season, other important topics are bound to creep up. NASA is due to complete important sections of the James
Webb Space Telescope. The Brexit will or will not have come to pass sending ripples through Europe and the financial markets. The
Syrian cease fire will expire. And it’s possible the Saints won’t suck. Together we’ll figure out what it all means and how it affects us
here in Lafayette.
Section: 068 MW 2:30P-3:45P Room: MDD 106 Faculty: Rush, Jami
Topic: Presidential Elections and Political Parties
It’s an election year and there are parts of the election process that are confusing and weird. What is a delegate? What makes some
of them “super”? How does the electoral college work? Why are there only Republicans and Democrats getting the bulk of media
attention? How do you know where you fit in the whole twoparty system? Have presidential hopefuls always run dirty, mudslinging
campaigns? (Spoiler: yes!) In this course, students will learn the history of American presidential campaigns and elections. In
addition, students will analyze the continuously evolving platform of the major political parties (and the short lived third parties that
emerged). Students will utilize various databases to research the presidential elections and campaigns of the past, using the
information gathered to analyze the contemporary issues of each election season. We will explore the various tactics of candidates
and debate their merits and faults. Through a critical analysis of the election process, students will emerge from this course better
informed and more confident in their understanding of the American presidential election process.
Section: 097 TR 2:00P-3:15P Room: FGM 203 Faculty: Rush, Jami
Topic: Presidential Elections and Political Parties
It’s an election year and there are parts of the election process that are confusing and weird. What is a delegate? What makes some
of them “super”? How does the electoral college work? Why are there only Republicans and Democrats getting the bulk of media
attention? How do you know where you fit in the whole twoparty system? Have presidential hopefuls always run dirty, mudslinging
campaigns? (Spoiler: yes!) In this course, students will learn the history of American presidential campaigns and elections. In
addition, students will analyze the continuously evolving platform of the major political parties (and the short lived third parties that
emerged). Students will utilize various databases to research the presidential elections and campaigns of the past, using the
information gathered to analyze the contemporary issues of each election season. We will explore the various tactics of candidates
and debate their merits and faults. Through a critical analysis of the election process, students will emerge from this course better
informed and more confident in their understanding of the American presidential election process.
Section: H05 TR 11:00A-12:15P Room: HLG 128 Faculty: Donlon, Sally
Topic: Cities!
By 2050, 70% of the world's population will live in cities. Will that be a good thing? Let’s take a closer look at what makes a city and
see what you think. Various academic disciplines define the city in differing ways, but they all agree that the city is a revolutionary
human achievement. This interdisciplinary, introductory-level seminar will help students understand cities, and the role they play in
the development and functioning of civilization using the conceptual tools of various disciplines across the curriculum. Cities! will
explore issues that are very close to our own experiences, but that often go unexamined in our daily lives. We’ll ask lots of
questions: What is a city? How did cities develop? How do cities function socially, politically, economically, and culturally? Why do
people live in cities? What are some of the major issues facing cities in the United States and around the world in the early 21st
century? How can citizens address the issues facing their own cities? Students will consider these questions through readings, films,
and professional and academic presentations, and through self-selected assignments that may take them to various locations
throughout Lafayette the fastest growing urban region in Louisiana which serves as the perfect arena for this study.
Section: H06 TR 9:30A-10:45A Room: MDD 310 Faculty: Hester, Bridget
Topic: Problems in American Democracy: Rights, Liberty, and Justice
Problems in American Democracy: Rights, Liberty, and Justice will specifically focus on investigating various social, political, and
economic problems within the American political system. Through the reading, analyzing and discussing of primary and secondary
sources, students will be asked to relate the problems of America’s past to current issues in American life. Topics of discussion and
analysis will include: the philosophic foundation of American democracy, major civil rights movements in American history, freedom
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Updated: 5-17-2016 Page 9
of speech and the press, balancing free exercise of religion with establishment concerns, changing attitudes toward rights to privacy,
national security and foreign policy issues, expanding executive powers, social and economic inequality, the criminal justice system,
as well as other relevant issues.
Section: H07 TR 12:30P-1:45P Room: MDD 310 Faculty: Hester, Bridget
Topic: Problems in American Democracy: Rights, Liberty, and Justice
Problems in American Democracy: Rights, Liberty, and Justice will specifically focus on investigating various social, political, and
economic problems within the American political system. Through the reading, analyzing and discussing of primary and secondary
sources, students will be asked to relate the problems of America’s past to current issues in American life. Topics of discussion and
analysis will include: the philosophic foundation of American democracy, major civil rights movements in American history, freedom
of speech and the press, balancing free exercise of religion with establishment concerns, changing attitudes toward rights to privacy,
national security and foreign policy issues, expanding executive powers, social and economic inequality, the criminal justice system,
as well as other relevant issues.
Section: H08 TR 2:00P-3:15P Room: HLG 425 Faculty: Marceaux, Denise
Topic: Baby, You're a Firework!
Maya Angelou put it best when she said, "Each time a woman stands up for herself, without knowing it possibly, without claiming it,
she stands up for all women." In this course, you'll learn how pop culture, laws, education, health care, and the media impact
women's overall status in society, and about women from all walks of life who are standing up. Along the way, you might surprise
yourself and discover your passion. You just gotta ignite the light and let it shine!
Section: H10 TR 9:30A-10:45A Room: HLG 128 Faculty: Parker, Chad
Topic: The Emergence of Modern America (Greenwich Village, 1913)
In this course, students will role-play as different historical figures in the past, from generic voters and workers to specific individuals
like Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, Big Bill Haywood, and W.E.B. Du Bois. Suffragists, labor organizers, and others will “meet” in a Greenwich
Village bar to discuss demands for expanded access to capital and the ballot box. Each group and individual must work to expand
their political influence and convince others of the need for changes. The game asks you to contextualize social, cultural, economic,
and political forces while evaluating historical outcomes related to the emergence of the “modern” world. The course speaks to
issues of class, gender, race, power, and political voice and influence over one hundred years ago, issues still extremely relevant to
national and global conversations today.
Section: H11 T 2:00P-4:30P Room: HLG 128 Faculty: Troutman, John
Topic: Making Music into History
How does music change history? This UNIV 100 section will explore the deep relationship between American music and history. We
will study the roots of our music genres, from the blues, jazz, rock, and soul, to country and rap. We will trace the rise of the music
industry and the impact of digital media. We will learn about life on the road. And we will listen to LOTS of great music!
Section: H12 R 2:00P-4:30P Room: HLG 128 Faculty: Fossey, William R.
Topic: History of American Catholicism
This course is an introduction to American Catholic culture through the lenses of history, fiction, and film. Students will be
introduced to the history of American Catholicism, including the struggle against anti-Catholic bigotry in the early 19th and 20th
century. Leading American Catholic figures will be examined, including St. Katharine Drexel and Dorothy Day. Students will read at
least one novel and watch at least two movies that portray Catholic culture. The course will include brief writing assignments and a
group project on "Problem Solving with the Saints," in which students will show how a Catholic saint would deal with a
contemporary problem in American society.
Section: H13 TR 11:00A-12:15P Room: FGM 203 Faculty: Maloyed, Christie
Topic: The Real Hunger Games: Food in America
This class tackles some of the challenging questions about food culture in America: Why is America one of the most prosperous
countries in the world, and yet almost 15% of households in our nation faced hunger last year? Why is junk food so much cheaper
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than healthy food? Should the government have a say over school lunches? Are insects the protein source of the future? Should the
government regulate the food you grow or raise? To understand these issues, and many more, first we are going to explore how the
American food system works. Who makes policies about the food we eat? Who has influence? How are decisions made about food
assistance, health, and safety? Second, we are going to focus on whether that system works well. Is our food produced sustainably?
Are the people who work in food production and service treated fairly? Are there better ways to design the system? We will also
engage with local efforts to make our own food environment a little bit better. And, there will be potlucks. Whether you’ve never
thought much about food issues or are a diehard foodie, this class will empower you to be a more thoughtful eater.
Section: H21 TR 12:30P-1:45P Room: HLG 128 Faculty: Weill, Clay
Topic: How to Read a Newspaper and Other Fun Things
Towards the end of the Fall 2016 semester America will head to the polls to not only elect a new president, but a new Congress as
well. The papers will be full jargon laden, context lacking, knowledge assuming articles featuring quotes that are almost always a
little bit true and a lot misleading. In this course we’ll hang out, consume some caffeine and sugar, and read some headlines in order
to figure out what exactly an Electoral College is and why we have one in the first place. While most of our discussions will center on
the politics of the season, other important topics are bound to creep up. NASA is due to complete important sections of the James
Webb Space Telescope. The Brexit will or will not have come to pass sending ripples through Europe and the financial markets. The
Syrian cease fire will expire. And it’s possible the Saints won’t suck. Together we’ll figure out what it all means and how it affects us
here in Lafayette.
Mastering the First Year
Section: 006 MW 1:00P-2:15P Room: CLR 312 Faculty: Allo, Charles
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
Section: 020 TR 3:30P-4:45P Room: MDD 310 Faculty: Rodriguez, Lana
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
Section: 021 TR 9:30A-10:45A Room: JLF 209H Faculty: Crain, Lori
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
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Section: 029 MW 1:00P-2:15P Room: FGM 203 Faculty: Lovel, James
Topic: Experiencing College for Adult Learners
Are you returning to school after taking some time or years off? Are you over the age of 22? Do you have a child or other
dependents? Are you a veteran or in the reserves? If you meet any of these qualifications, this class is geared specifically for your
needs. The goal of this course is to prepare you to be successful in your first year of college and beyond. Course topics will include:
values (What is important to me?); goals (Where am I going with my life?); skills and interests (What can I do? What do I love to
do?); and purpose (What do I hope to accomplish in my lifetime?). Additionally, students will participate in small group discussions,
writing assignments, and projects related to their specific interests, and will explore careers related to those interests.
Section: 031 MW 4:00P-5:15P Room: MO 208 Faculty: Tarver, Matthew
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
Section: 035 MWF 10:00A-10:50A Room: MO 208 Faculty: Zerangue, Gregory
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
Section: 045 TR 2:00P-3:15P Room: MDD 111 Faculty: Joseph, Adriana
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
Section: 056 W 2:30P-5:00P Room: FGM 105 Faculty: Tavares, Diogo
Topic: So you want to be a leader?
This course involves study of basic leadership and management. There is a difference between good leaders, really good leaders and
great leaders. Explore what makes great leaders by analyzing leadership styles, techniques, and organizations that develop leaders.
The course covers management of time, stress, money and people, as well as elements of successful leadership. Leadership
principles translate to college success in learning how to lead others, you will learn how to succeed in college, in your career, and
in life.
Section: 065 MWF 11:00A-11:50A Room: MDD 106 Faculty: Sarver, Lauren
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
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oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
Section: 070 TR 8:00A-9:15A Room: MDD 106 Faculty: Garner, Shonda
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
Section: 073 MWF 8:00A-8:50A Room: MDD 111 Faculty: Eastlin, Carolyn
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
Section: 077 MW 2:30P-3:45P Room: MDD 111 Faculty: Joseph, Adriana
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
Section: 084 MW 2:30P-3:45P Room: MDD 310 Faculty: Breaux, Sheree
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
Section: 087 TR 2:00P-3:15P Room: VLW 403 Faculty: Aldana, Maylen
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
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Section: 088 MWF 8:00A-8:50A Room: FGM 203 Faculty: Miles, Matthew
Topic: Black Male Leadership
This course focuses on leadership as defined by and for males in the Black community. Topics will include differing definitions of
"manhood," expectations of black men (both within and outside of the black community), opinions of racial profiling, cross-
generational differences, and more. We'll look at role models for black men and discuss contemporary issues such as health
awareness and disparities among black populations, entrepreneurship, current events, and financial literacy. Additionally, we'll
discuss interpersonal and political issues, including political activism, domestic violence, fatherhood, and respect towards women.
Students in this course will participate in active engagement and community service.
Section: 089 MWF 9:00A-9:50A Room: FGM 203 Faculty: Lindblom, Amy
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
Section: 090 MWF 11:00A-11:50A Room: FGM 203 Faculty: Lindblom, Amy
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
Section: 099 MWF 8:00A-8:50A Room: CLR 312 Faculty: Sturm, Joey
Topic: Mastering the First Year
Designed for incoming freshmen and the student in transition, the course objective is to help students navigate the first-year
experience through student engagement, campus involvement, academic planning and adjustment, and connections to the culture
that inspires Ragin’ Pride. Some of the lessons learned in the course include time management, study skills, campus resources,
financial and physical health and positive actions that lead to academic and personal success. Through course readings, written and
oral reflections, group activities, and presentations, students should gain a greater awareness of their role as a student and the path
that leads to academic success.
Popular Culture
Section: 008 TR 8:00A-9:15A Room: MO 210 Faculty: Guidry, Monica
Topic: Body Image Culture
In this course, we will discuss how fashion, fitness and pop culture have affected the way we look at body types. As part of the
course, you will learn more about body image spanning several decades of movies and magazines. We will also look at health risk as
well as some benefits of falling prey to what pop culture presents as ‘ideal body image’. Through a variety of readings, discussions,
projects and interactive learning, we will find a ways to maintain a healthy and realistic view of what an ideal body type can and
should be.
Section: 009 W 5:30P - 8:00P Room: HLG 128 Faculty: Broussard, Shaina
Topic: Black Girls Rock!
This course will examine the accomplishments and career paths of successful black women in different areas including the arts,
science, medicine, education, law, and politics. By looking at these exemplars of success, we will discover the traits that lead them to
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where they are, and apply these to current students’ challenges. In this way, we will learn about and practice college and career
readiness as well as life skills that will help students through the current transition from high school to college and throughout their
college careers.
Section: 010 MW 5:00P-6:15P Room: LEE 212 Faculty: Mattox, Matthew
Topic: Baseball
Overview: Baseball has captured the collective memory and imagination of Americans for far longer than any other sport. Cataloging
its central place within American culture, scores of writers and filmmakers have been fascinated by the game and the men and
women who have played it. In this class, we will study baseball and its players as they have represented a microcosm for American
society. We will seek to discover ongoing themes, ideas, and motifs in the artistic record of baseball, and we will try as well to gain
insight into a game that expresses the mind and heart of America.
Section: 011 MW 4:00P-5:15P Room: MO 117 Faculty: Thibodeaux, Shawn
Topic: American TV: Culture in Popular Entertainment
In this class, we will use television shows to analyze American culture and society. Each week will bring with it an opportunity to
watch different types of shows, which will then be analyzed for themes, messages, and implicit arguments. Through class discussion,
activities, and written assignments, we will chart the history of TV as cultural and social commentary as well as examine its effects
on the viewer and on the American cultural landscape.
Section: 042 TR 9:30A-10:45A Room: MDD 111 Faculty: Yarbrough, David
Topic: Sex, Love, and Rock & Roll
This course will examine the roll cohort influence has on dating behaviors and relationships during the adolescent and emerging
adulthood stage of development.
Section: 046 TR 3:30P-4:45P Room: MO 110 Faculty: Philipson, Sarah
Topic: Laugh Out Loud!
Why do we laugh? What makes us laugh? What is funny? What is comedy? This course will explore the major themes and
complexities of comedy. We will study the cultural history of comedy, the psychology of laughter, an analysis of society through
satire, and much more. These historical, artistic, and cultural themes will be explored through television, film, literature, and various
other formats. You will have the option to test your funny bone through improv or stand-up. However, you will be required to share
your favorite jokes, comedians, comedies, and most importantly to laugh out loud!
Section: 059 TR 9:30A-10:45A Room: FGM 105 Faculty: Benjamin, Clifford
Topic: The Twenty-Tens, Hi and Low
Do you find that your interests range from serious to shallow? So do ours! We will discuss and analyze topics in the media today
ranging from the situation in the Middle East to why Kim Kardashian is doing what she’s doing. We’ll examine the different forms of
media on which “news” or “events” are shared, from the traditional news format to the twitter feed and in the process, we’ll learn
a great deal about how so-called “high culture” and “low culture” interact and inform each other.
Section: 092 MW 2:30P-3:45P Room: FGM 203 Faculty: Brasdefer, Thomas
Topic: Remedial Binge Watching
This course is an exploration of beginning college life through and with a television screen. There are countless representations of
what college is, what college means, and what it leads to. Just how accurate are these depictions? In this course, we will focus on
understanding college the way outsiders (actors, directors, producers) are picturing it to be, by contrast with the first-hand
experience of being in college in the twenty-first century. Through individual and group presentations, students will present a movie
or television series of their choice in terms of its relevance to their own situations. We will debate the main issues as a group and
reflect on how they affect our perception as we deal with the expectations of a new college environment.
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Section: 098 TR 3:30P-4:45P Room: FGM 203 Faculty: Tauzin, Monica
Topic: Anyone Can Be an Outlier!
In this class you will reflect on your ultimate potential through the writings of psychologist, Malcolm Gladwell. The context of this
course will provide a blueprint for meeting one’s human potential utilizing the resources and logic presented in Malcolm Gladwell’s
book Outliers. Examined will be how a person’s environment in conjunction with personal drive and motivation affects one’s
possibility and opportunity for success. Reviewed will be extraordinary individuals and their stories of incredible accomplishments.
It will be shown that these people, like Bill Gates, were provided with unique opportunities to log hours and hours of practice to
hone their particular skills to make these accomplishments. Topics included will be “The 10,000 hour rule” and “concerted
cultivation”. The class will include readings, video resources, and group discussions/project.
Section: H01 M 1:00P-3:30P Room: MO 209 Faculty: Teten, Ryan
Topic: Southpark and American Life
This course will look at the animated Southpark series and the commentary and satire that it provides on many of the current events
and major issues in American Life. Southpark has engaged topics like immigration, race conflict, steroids in sports, religion, different
lifestyles, scientific innovations, politics, the media, and almost every other subject of importance over the last 15 years. This class
will examine these same topics for debate and discussion by watching specific episodes of Southpark, reading news articles on the
relevant subjects with which they deal, and then debating those topics, as well as the episodes, in class.
Section: H04 T 8:00A-10:30A Room: MO 110 Faculty: Teten, Ryan
Topic: Southpark and American Life
This course will look at the animated Southpark series and the commentary and satire that it provides on many of the current events
and major issues in American Life. Southpark has engaged topics like immigration, race conflict, steroids in sports, religion, different
lifestyles, scientific innovations, politics, the media, and almost every other subject of importance over the last 15 years. This class
will examine these same topics for debate and discussion by watching specific episodes of Southpark, reading news articles on the
relevant subjects with which they deal, and then debating those topics, as well as the episodes, in class.
Section: H09 TR 8:00A-9:15A Room: HLG 128 Faculty: Davis-McElligatt, Joanna
Topic: KABOOM! Splat! @!*#!: Reading American Comic Books
Even though you might have come to think of comic books through films about Iron Man, Ant Man, Superman, Batman, or
Deadpool, American comic books are actually much broader, crazier, wilder, and brilliant than superheroes alone (though
superheroes are definitely cool). This course will introduce you to the rich variety of comics art in America. We’ll look at comic strips
(Winsor McKay’s Little Nemo, Charles Schultz’s Peanuts, and Bill Watterson’s Calvin & Hobbes), a comic book (Adrian Tomine’s Optic
Nerve), a comic novel (Chris Ware’s Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth), a comic memoir (Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home), a
work of comics journalism (Joe Sacco’s Palestine), and a history book in comics form (Rick Abadzis’ Laika). This class will introduce
you to some of the technical language we use to talk about comics, the history of the artform, and, with any luck, will turn you into a
comics enthusiast who is ready to go explore the fantastical, amazing, beautiful, and exciting world comics on your own!
Section: H14 MWF 9:00A-9:50A Room: HLG 128 Faculty: Laudun, John
Topic: Memes and Memetics
If you go to MemeGenerator.net, you are presented with the option to add a caption to an image. It seems a simple business,
creating a meme, but it isn't. After all, anyone can create a meme, but for it to take off, to become an actual meme, something else
has to happen. The question is what happens? Participants in "Memes and Memetics" explore the geography of popular culture,
with our focus being memes, as well as the history of such "folk ideas" now termed "memes." In addition, participants encounter
current efforts to quantify memes (memetrics?) and engage in various forms of analysis themselves, including some forms of data
mining. In addition to a variety of reading materials, both of memes and of scholarship about memes, participants are also exposed
to the rudiments of statistical analyses using the R programming language.
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Section: H22 T 5:00P-7:30P Room: HLG 128 Faculty: Thomas, Matthew Caleb
Topic: A Cultural History of Dinosaurs
Beyond their size and stature in the material world, dinosaurs loom large in our collective consciousness. We stand in awe
underneath them as children, we strive to capture their dominance in our own world as adults, and yet after we go the way of the
dinosaurs, their legend will live on. Dinosaurs greet us at the crossroads of science and imagination, and how we represent them
reflects culturally who we are and who we want to be. This class will tell a story of dinosaurs in different media from various cultures
across many centuries. Starting in prehistory (where else?) and progressing into modern times, this class will examine what we have
to say about dinosaurs and what they have to say about us.
Science
Section: 019 TR 7:30A-8:45A Room: BOUR 153B Faculty: Bellar, David
Topic: The Science of Sport
This course will examine the scientific principle involved in sport performance, which will include discussion of how basic sciences
such as physics, chemistry and biology are essential to unraveling the mystery of what makes great athletes perform. During this
course students will have access to real data collected on elite athletes in sports ranging from the traditional (football, track & field,
running) to the less familiar (rowing). The readings for this course will be taken from the scientific literature, and students will be
exposed to the most cutting edge studies examining everything from biomechanics to genetics as it relates to sport. We will discuss
the current state of knowledge surrounding sport performance and also extend the discussions to the future, and how science is
increasingly playing an integral part in the world of sport.
Section: 027 MWF 8:00A-8:50A Room: HG 128 Faculty: Rubin, Lori
Topic: Mainstream Science
Do you enjoy reading magazines or watching the news? Have you come across a science related topic (Genetics of Neuroscience and
Behavior) that left you confused? We all have! Join in as we tackle biology in mainstream media through discussions on Behavior and
Neuroscience, diet and brain function, disease and microbes. Students will work in small groups to gather the facts (newspapers,
magazines and government websites) as presented in the media and lead group discussions while engaging their peers in dialogue.
What will we compare the information found in mainstream press to? I am glad you asked! Students will search peer reviewed
journal articles for answers to questions raised in class. The goal of this course is to encourage students to critically think about
topics presented in mainstream press as opposed to merely believing what is presented without critical analysis.
Section: 050 MWF 8:00A-8:50A Room: HH 116 Faculty: Foret, Jim
Topic: Coastal South Louisiana Environmental Issues & Concerns
In this one UNIV100 course we will investigate the forces, “the perfect storm”, that formed the beautiful rich landscape we call
coastal Louisiana. We will study those rivers, named and unnamed, glaciers, droughts, hurricanes, dust storms, sea levels rising and
falling that formed the earth under our feet. Our conversations will drift from wetlands loss, to habitat fragmentation and
disappearance, to species diversity changes, to fresh water, its sources, reserves and quality, to the condition of our air, to our food
supply, food safety and production issues. This will be a fast moving, exciting course of study. Sign up now, space is limited.
Section: 051 TR 11:00A-12:15P Room: FGM 105 Faculty: Guidry, Jennifer Ritter
Topic: Sustainability
This course introduces students to an interdisciplinary examination of the theory and practices of sustainability. Sustainability can be
defined as meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own
needs. Topics include restoring ecological and environmental health, creating economic welfare, and ensuring social justice.
Students in this course will participate in a project related to the sustainability of our local environment, which may focus on water
quality, consumer waste reduction, reuse or recycling, or community education and engagement on sustainability issues. In the
course of work on the project, students will be introduced to careers related to sustainability. The course is open to all students,
regardless of major. One section will focus on sustainability and service through community building and creative place-making
exercises.
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Section: 060 TR 12:30P-1:45P Room: FGM 105 Faculty: Williams, Michael
Topic: How Science Created the Modern World
Everywhere you look, from smart phones that coordinate our daily lives to vaccines that have all but eradicated major global illness,
you see a world that has been fundamentally impacted by science. Over the many years, science has helped us to unmask the
secrets of the universe and the world around us and led to our understanding of light, matter, stars, germs, disease, genetics,
evolution, technology, and a host of other things upon which our modern world is based. But what is science, really? How does it
work? How did it make the Modern World, well, modern? This course will explore the ways in which science has revolutionized our
understanding of our very existence from the Ancient World to the Modern World by delving into historical paradigms of
technology, medicine, biology, physics, space, and much, much more!
Section: 061 TR 2:00P-3:15P Room: FGM 105 Faculty: Williams, Michael
Topic: How Science Created the Modern World
Everywhere you look, from smart phones that coordinate our daily lives to vaccines that have all but eradicated major global illness,
you see a world that has been fundamentally impacted by science. Over the many years, science has helped us to unmask the
secrets of the universe and the world around us and led to our understanding of light, matter, stars, germs, disease, genetics,
evolution, technology, and a host of other things upon which our modern world is based. But what is science, really? How does it
work? How did it make the Modern World, well, modern? This course will explore the ways in which science has revolutionized our
understanding of our very existence from the Ancient World to the Modern World by delving into historical paradigms of
technology, medicine, biology, physics, space, and much, much more!
Section: 071 TR 11:00A-12:15P Room: RAND 213 Faculty: Vanicor, Gretchen
Topic: Sustainability & Service
This course introduces students to an interdisciplinary examination of the theory and practices of sustainability. Sustainability can be
defined as meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own
needs. Topics include restoring ecological and environmental health, creating economic welfare, and ensuring social justice.
Students in this course will participate in a project related to the sustainability of our local environment, which may focus on water
quality, consumer waste reduction, reuse or recycling, or community education and engagement on sustainability issues. In the
course of work on the project, students will be introduced to careers related to sustainability. The course is open to all students,
regardless of major. One section will focus on sustainability and service through community building and creative place-making
exercises.
Section: 072 MW 1:00P-2:15P Room: MDD 106 Faculty: Langley, Christy Sue
Topic: Classic Games that have Hidden Math
Have you ever wondered why some people can do so much “math” in their head? It may be because they spent their childhood
playing games. Did you know playing dominoes helps you with addition, subtraction, multiples, and problem solving? Did you know
that playing with dice or certain card games could teach you about probability? Chess, Checkers and Battleship teach you about
patterns and strategy. It is documented that playing games can reduce math anxiety and help develop positive attitudes toward the
subject. People are less worried about making mistakes or failing and more interested in having fun. This course is designed to help
you have fun with learning. We are going to play some of my favorite childhood games (and some of your favorites as well) and
better our reasoning skills, our problem solving skills, and yes, even our mental math skills. Participation in activities will be the key
to success in this course. Classic games have various skill levels and various numbers of participants, not only will we have to work
alone and try to improve our own scores, but we will compete with and against one another at times. Be prepared to learn the hard
lesson You can’t always win.
Section: 086 TR 12:30P-1:45P Room: FGM 214 Faculty: Cazan, Alfy
Topic: Science: Myths and Facts
News headlines and social media show everyday science related issues such as shark attacks, bacteria outbreaks, immunizations,
genetic modified organisms, climate change, and clean energy. As we can see, science is part of our daily life. It gives us tools to
explore our world and develop technology to improve our lives. Have you ever wondered how accurate is the information provided
UNIV 100 Course Catalog Fall 2016
Updated: 5-17-2016 Page 18
by the media? How much do you know about those topics? This seminar’s goal is to allow students to develop critical reading and
thinking skills by exploring the latest available scientific information on trendy scientific topics.
Section: 094 TR 9:30A-10:45A Room: FGM 203 Faculty: Hargrave, Reko
Topic: A History of Life, the Earth, the Universe, and Everything
In this course we will explore the history of everything. We start with the amazing story of how civilizations and human beings came
into existence, with our unique human capacities to create and destroy, organize and imagine. We then expand our horizons to
understand the origin and evolution of the biosphere, the lithosphere (the continents and oceans), planet Earth and the Solar
System, the Milky Way galaxy, and ultimately, the entire Cosmos. The central idea of this course is the unified nature of Nature, and
of Science as a means to understand the universe.
Section: 096 TR 12:30P-1:45P Room: FGM 203 Faculty: Hargrave, Reko
Topic: A History of Life, the Earth, the Universe, and Everything
In this course we will explore the history of everything. We start with the amazing story of how civilizations and human beings came
into existence, with our unique human capacities to create and destroy, organize and imagine. We then expand our horizons to
understand the origin and evolution of the biosphere, the lithosphere (the continents and oceans), planet Earth and the Solar
System, the Milky Way galaxy, and ultimately, the entire Cosmos. The central idea of this course is the unified nature of Nature, and
of Science as a means to understand the universe.
Section: H24 TR 12:30P-1:45P Room: MDD 106 Faculty: Hargrave, Jennifer
Topic: The Science Around You
Marie Curie said, “Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may
fear less.” As we mark the transition into college life, there is nothing to fear and much to learn over the course of four years. With
this class, we will systematically explore the world around us using the scientific method. We will learn to hone our observational
skills and apply them to our classes, as well as our lives and future careers. We will develop the skills necessary to complete scientific
research, from observation, data collection, analysis, and dissemination. The topics of the course will be tailored to the interests of
the class.
The World of Business
Section: 028 TR 8:00A-9:15A Room: MO 208 Faculty: Alexander, Rachel
Topic: Start Your Own Business
Students will decide on their own dream business, start with an idea, and build on that idea until the business is ready to launch. You
will prepare business ideas, plans, proposals, funding, marketing, and use team building to bring the business together and run the
business in the classroom.
Section: 044 TR 12:30P-1:45P Room: MDD 111 Faculty: Meyer, Pamela
Topic: A Taste of Business
Have you always wanted to know how a business works or how to run a business? This course is designed to introduce the world of
business to new students without any previous background in the subject. Students will learn how to understand the business
environment and explore potential careers in business. This course can help you pick your major, minor, or help you apply your
liberal arts or technical degree outside of school. Business runs the world; it affects everyone!
Section: 076 MWF 12:00P-12:50P Room: MDD 111 Faculty: Chamberlain, Stacey
Topic: Business for Everyone
Have you always wanted to know how a business works, how to run a business, or how to start one? This course is designed to
introduce the world of business to new students without any previous background in the subject. Business Economics, Strategy,
Accounting, Marketing, Law, Finance, and Management will be presented in short lectures with class discussion and current events.
This free elective will help students understand the world they live in and explore potential career areas in business. This course can
UNIV 100 Course Catalog Fall 2016
Updated: 5-17-2016 Page 19
help you pick your major, minor, or help you apply your liberal arts or technical degree outside of school. No matter what your
major, everyone can use just a little taste of business!
Special / Restricted Sections
Some sections of UNIV 100 have special requirements or are restricted to certain populations. Please note the
instructions for each group.
Honors Sections: Honors sections are open to all students, but students in the Honors Program may count any one of
these sections of UNIV 100 towards their Honors' curriculum. Classes with section numbers beginning with an H (e.g.
H01, H20), are honors section. These sections are distinguished by an emphasis on student-led, active learning, critical
thinking, and presentations. Honors LLC students must take an honors section of UNIV 100.
Living Learning Communities other than Honors LLC: These students have already been added to the relevant UNIV 100
section. They may not change their schedule without dropping out of the Living Learning Community (which will change
their housing assignment). Students in the Engineering, Nursing, and Business LLCs also have one or two additional
courses on their schedules they are in a cohort program and will need to stay in all of the courses already scheduled
for them. If you have a conflict between one of the classes already added to your schedule and something else you
need, please work with the LLC Advisor (Dana Bekurs, dana@louisiana.edu) before making any changes.
View UNIV 100
LLC Sections.
Online Section: In addition we are offering the course fully online (section X01). First-time freshmen in fully online
degree programs are required to take this section. There is an additional course fee associated with registering for
online courses. Students who will be attending classes on campus may sign up for the online section (especially
recommended if they have a full schedule of classes and have difficulty finding an open section of UNIV 100). However,
students who are attending classes on campus should plan to attend the Cajun Connection class days (August 18 and
19, 2016) and all students registering for the online section should ensure that they are ready to succeed in an online
environment. For more information on online readiness, please refer students to the self-assessment provided by the
Office of Distance Learning: http://ullafayette.smartermeasure.com/
.
NCAA Student-Athletes: All student-athletes should register for one of the following sections of UNIV 100: 018, 026, or
043. Contact your athletic advisor if you have any questions. View UNIV 100 Student-Athlete sections
.
SOUL Camp C Sections: All students attending SOUL Camp C will already be registered for a section of UNIV 100 by the
SOUL Camp Advisor. If you have any questions, please contact Kyle Sarver, kyle@louisiana.edu.
View UNIV 100 Soul
Camp C sections.