Volume One, Number One, a quarterly telling the stories of historic California Gold Rush community

Volume I, Number I Columbia, California Octobris xx
II
MMXVI
For the people
and by the people
of the fair township
of Columbia
the Illustrated
COLUMBIA
GAZETTE
Fancy New Newspaper
Published in Columbia
8
8
By Michael Gahagan
The history of Columbia is
replete with newspapers but there
never has been an illustrated maga-
zine in its 158-year-old history that
was published to exclusively serve
the greater Columbia township.
The first version of this issue
was printed on with color photo-
graphs and not in keeping with
the black and white format of the
early newspapers. With this historic
revised issue — a veritable collec-
tors item at that — the fine town
of Columbia now has a quarterly
newspaper it can proudly call its own.
The publication is to be called
“The Illustrated Columbia Gazette”
and will not only feature history col-
umns, dispatches from the Diggin’s,
but also current news, views, tidbits
and events along Main Street that
will “appeal to visitors and long-
time residents alike,” according to
the Publisher and fearless Editor
Michael Gahagan.
In addition we plan to include,
regular and periodic features such
as “Classyfieds,” a one-page direc-
tory of local organizations “Spheres
of Influence,” state park updates,
an historical photo section “Now and
Then,” will keep you contemporaneous
with all the community doin’s.
8
READ ALL ABOUT IT!
EXTRA! EXTRA!
NEWSPAPERS OVER the YEARS
in Columbia
Columbia Star
Oct. 25 & Nov. 1851 (2 issues)
November 13, 1851
the Ramage Press is Burned!
By 1852 $100,000.00 a week,
in gold, is coming from Columbia.
GOLD DISCOVERED IN 1850
On March 27, 1850, Dr. Thaddeus
Hildreth, with his brother George
and a handful of other prospectors,
made camp near here. They found
gold, and miners streamed in to share
the wealth. Before the month was
out Hildreth’s Diggings, a tent and
shanty town housing several thousand
miners, was created. Its original name
was soon changed to Columbia.
The first year was almost the
last for the new town. Water, indis-
pensable for mining placer gold,
was in short supply. The area had
no natural streams, only gulches
carrying runoff from rain and snow.
So, in June 1851, the Tuolumne
County Water Company was
formed to bring water into the
area. The Tuolumne County Water
Company’s rates were high, so the
miners formed the Columbia and
Stanislaus River Water Company in
1854 to build a 60 mile aqueduct to
supply the mines.
Meanwhile, Columbia’s tents
and shanties were being replaced
with more permanent structures.
Streets were laid out, and by the
end of 1852 more than 150 stores,
shops, saloons, and other enterpris-
es were going strong. There was
also a church, a Sunday School, a
Masonic Lodge, and even a branch
of the Sons of Temperance.
Wood had been the main con-
struction material used in these
buildings. In 1854, fire, the scourge
of many mining towns, destroyed
everything in Columbia’s central
business district except the one
brick building. When the town was
rebuilt, locally produced red brick
was used for thirty buildings. Iron
doors and window shutters, and
bricks laid on the buildings’ roofs
were additional fire protection.
In 1857 a second fire destroyed
all the frame structures in the
13-block business district, as well
as several of the brick buildings.
Rebuilding began immediately, and
the citizens decided to form a vol-
unteer fire department. In 1859
the fire department acquired the
Papeete, a small, fancifully deco-
rated fire engine. Its arrival in
Columbia was the occasion for
much fanfare and celebration.
After 1860, when the eas-
ily mined placer gold was gone,
the town began to decline. In
the 1870s and ‘80s many of
the vacated buildings were torn
down and their sites mined, and
Columbia’s population dropped
from a peak of perhaps six thou-
sand to about five hundred.
The town continued to sur-
vive, but not prosper for many
years. During the 1920’s ideas
began to arise concerning the
inclusion of Columbia into the
new and growing California
State Park System.
Columbia was only one of
hundreds of settlements that
sprang up during the exciting
years when the cry of “Gold!”
brought Argonauts from all over
the world to seek their fortunes in
California. Located in the heart
of the Mother Lode, a mile wide
network of gold bearing quartz
that extends 120 miles along
the western edge of the Sierra
Nevada, from Mariposa northward
to Georgetown, Columbia yield-
ed $87 million in gold at 1860’s prices.
Unlike many of these settle-
ments, which have long since
succumbed to fire, vandalism,
and the elements, Columbia has
never been completely deserted.
Through the years it has retained
much the same appearance as
when miners thronged its streets.
So, recognizing an opportunity
to preserve a typical Gold Rush
town as an example of one of the
most colorful eras in American
history, the State Legislature in
1945 created Columbia State
Historic Park.
Courtesy www.ColumbiaGazette.Com
ABRIDGED HISTORY OF COLUMBIA
COLUMBIA GAZETTE
Oct. 23 1852 to Nov 10, 1855
Columbia Clipper
May 1854 to May 1857
Clipper & Gazette, Extra.
June 1854 (3 issues)
Columbia Gazette
And the Southern
Mines Advertiser.
1855 to 1857
The population reached
3,000 by 1856.
Campaign Gazetteer
September to November 1856
THE WEEKLY COLUMBIAN
June 1856 to May 1857
In 1857 fire burns 13 blocks - town rebuilt
100 brick buildings.
$1.00
Columbia, California 2016
Page Two
T
hese are exciting times in
Columbia and I am priveleged
to be part of a community that has a
tradition and a solidarity sadly lack-
ing in places where small towns are
being swallowed up in the suburban-
ization of America.
I sense this is the perfect time
to introduce only the second “mag-
azine” published in
Columbia in the color-
ful century-and-half of
the town’s legendary
history.
“The Illustrated
Columbia Gazette” is
intended to be pub-
lished “for the people
and by the people”
of the fair township of Columbia
and surrounds — Gold Springs,
Springfield and Columbia College.
When I write “by the people,”
I mean that I want you to know that
you have a say in the content of
future editions and that your con-
tributions will engender a sense of
ownership in this publishing effort.
The community of Columbia has
often been covered by the local press
and although we can’t compete to
be there for you on a daily basis,
with your help, each issue of “The
Illustrated Columbia Gazette” will
provide you with a true sense of our
community.
Even though I have lived in large
cities, capitals of states (Denver and
Sacramento) and a foreign capital
(Rome, Italy,) my heart has always
been where I have felt most comfortable
in small towns including Hanover,
New Hampshire, Ecija (Spain),
Inverness and Point Reyes Station
(Marin County), Carmel and St. Helena.
My love of community journal-
ism began in the 70’s when I edited
and published the Point Reyes Light,
a weekly newspaper that not long
Columbia Gazetteer
Web Links
From time to time I will publish
the internet sites and web links
which are informational regarding
subjects or items we have written about.
E.mail the Gazetteer at:
Gazetteer@hub3.net
if you would like to add a web site
link that is related to Columbiana.
Columbia State Historic Park
www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=552
Columbia Chamber of Commerce
www.visitcolumbiacalifornia.com/
Friends of Columbia State
Historic Park
www.friendsofcolumbiashp.org/
Columbia Booksellers & Stationers
(Floyd Øydegaard, Proprietor)
www.columbiagazette.com/
St. Charles Saloon
www.columbiagazette.com/
stcharles.html
Columbia Air Attack Base
fire.ca.gov/about_content/down
loads/air_attack_bases/Columbia.pdf
The New Columbia School
www.columbia49er.k12.ca.us/
St. Anne’s Church
www.stannescolumbia.org/
index.php
Old Columbia School House
http://www.columbiagazette.com/
schoolhouse.htm
Jack Douglass Saloon
www.columbiagazette.com/douglasshtm
Tree League of Columbia
www.columbiacalifornia.com/tlc.html
Poison Oak Show
www.columbiagazette.com/
poison.html
Poison Oak Identification Site
(Interactive without getting itchy!)
www.poisonoak-id.com/
THE
ILLUSTRATED
COLUMBIA
GAZETTE
A Distinctive
Quarterly
“For the people
and by the people
of Columbia”
 s
the Illustrated Columbia Gazette
P. O. Box 444
Columbia, California 95310
e.mail: Gazetteer@hub3.net
Musin’s ’n Cogitations from the Diggin’s
after I sold it, won a Pulitzer Prize for
community service, following up an
exposé of the cult Synanon, which I had
begun several years earlier under my watch.
(By the way, literally to the left,
is a “portrait” of me in the 70s as an
editor at my rolltop desk. And yes,
that’s a “ceegar” I really used to light
up when the presses were rolling.
Oh, by the way, I did not
inhale!)
My investigative re-
porter days may be over
but my real interest is to
now be a chronicler of
the life and times of all
of you who live here and
have several generations
of local roots or have
just arrived as a welcome “newbie.”
Although, the “technology” used
to print newspapers and magazines
has changed dramatically since I start-
ed publishing almost 40-years-ago,
the end product’s positive impact,
the engagement with the issues, the
personalities and the circumstances
which make up the complex chemistry
of a true community, are just some
of the ingredients, which I feel are
going to be well worth stowing in our
saddle bags as we journey forward as
partners in this publication.
Toward this end, please feel free
to let me know about articles you’d
like to see, even contribute some
yourselves, “pen” letters to the editor
(Cuss ‘n’ Discuss), help promote the
regular continuance of this commu-
nity publication and shop locally with
advertisiers and supporters.
I had a dream 40-years-ago to
be a country editor who would grow
older and maybe wiser with my
extended neighbors and those who
supported their community newspaper.
I feel very fortunate to be able to
resurrect my dream here in Columbia.
I’d be honored if you join me.
By Michael Gahagan
8
s
By Consuelo
Greetin’s dear and gentle read-
ers. By way of introduction this shall
be the first in a series for the Il-
lustrated Columbia Gazette. I’ll be a
tellin’ stories, tales and rumors that I
heared ‘round the nearby camps.
Well now, the thing that most
folks in The Diggin’s are whisper-
in’ and rumorin’ and rumminatin’
and congetatin’ about is the BIG
news that a “mysterious visitor”
from Europe is comin’ to perform
at The Diggins.’ The men are whis-
perin’ that this may be The Lady
Performer that’s all the rage across
the oceans...I don’ rightly know
her name as yet, but when I do I’ll
be a tellin’ it right here! I declare
tho’she needs to be ’a hurryin’
along if she’s to get here in time for
the celebration [May 29, 30, 31 and
June 1) on the new ‘theater stage’
built in honor of her visit! Get thee
to the Barber Shop for a Bath & a
Shave my Good Man!
If you see our own darlin’ Ma-
ria Egger and her handsome beau
Mr. Michael Kennedy smiln’ more
than usually...could be reasonin’
that our musical-duo kids will be
makin’ their own special music
come June 14th when ‘tis rumored
that they’ll “tie THAT knot” in a
private ceremony at an undisclosed
spot in The Diggins’ ..tell ‘em,
“Congratulatuns”!
Some more of these fer-piece
travelers we welcomed home these
days past are Mike and Jennifer
(Nelson) McMahon who went to
the Greek Isles and explored Mark’s
ancestry....they followed closely on
the heels of Pam and Norm Ivie
who heard the call of the wild all
the way from Costa Rica. They’re
ready to regale ya with tall tales of
all them exotic birds and animals
and sleepin in the JUNGLE and all
that scary stuff!
Well, I’d best be gettin’ back
to m’ chores now - so, that’s all the
musins’ for this week...call Consue-
lo at 532-5763; or, that new fangled
thing called e.mail at: yonderhill@
hub3.net to ll me in on your or
others stirrins’ & happens’ ‘round
The Diggins’...
Genuine
Gossips,
Doin’s,
Comin’s,
’n Goin’s
Page Three
ILLUSTRATED COLUMBIA GAZETTE
Brown’s Coffee House
&
Sweets Saloon
Home of the Original
Columbia Soda Works Sarsaparilla Soda.
We serve DELI-SANDWICHES
and HOME-MADE SPECIALTIES.
Bill of Fare and School House Specials!
BAKED GOODS & HARD TACK
FULL ESPRESSO BAR!
FANCY HOT COCOAS
on COLD DAYS.
or
OUR FAMOUS BLENDED ICE DRINKS
to wet your whistle in the summer months.
HOUSE BLENDED TEAS & COFFEE!
many special jams, preserves, chutneys
and sugar free spreads lining our shelves.
You never know what you might nd in
our shop to delight
your tastebuds or imagination!
Phone 209.532.1850
227690 Main Street, Columbia
http://nendandy.biz/columbiacoffee.htm
COLUMBIA SODA WORKS
SARSAPARILLA
A very precious
liquid locally
made from 49er
“spesication’s”
Distributed
in all the ne
saloons in town
Columbia Soda Works
Post Ofce Box 1032
Columbia California 95310
(209) 532-0475
(209) 532-1850 FAX
8
“Bringing back the taste of the
Old West —
a taste as rich as the Mothe Lode”
SOAP WORKS
&
COLUMBIA CANDLE
CANDLES & CANDLE MAKING SUPPLIES
HANDMADE SOAPS & BATH ITEMS
N. E. CORNER of PARROTTS FERRY RD.
and STATE STREET, COLUMBIA
209.536.9047
COLUMBIA
CLOTHIERS & EMPORIUM
Phone 209.532.1850
22711 Main Street, Columbia
http://facebook?
IS THE FROSTY BACK?
A longtime popular “eatery in-
stitution” just outside of the his-
toric core of Columbia, the Frosty,
is getting a facelift, a new roof and
is for sale.
It is called the Frosty since no
matter what you name it everyone
always refers to it as the Frosty.
Locals hope the new owners
would revitalize a Frosty type res-
taurant were the the hamburgers
used to be “bigger than what most
folks could nish.”
MAINSTAY FACELIFT
New roong and new exterior paint
scheme for long-time local eatery.
JACK B. QUICK/ ILLUSTRATED COLUMBIA
TOWN IS FILLING UP
It’s been some years since so
many of Columbia’s commercial
buildings have had open signs in
their front windows.
The City Hotel and the Fallon
Hotel, the What Cheer Saloon, the
Columbia House Restaurant and
Angelo’s Hall, the St. Charles Sa-
loon and the Columbia Clothiers
and Emporium (formerly the Pio-
neer Emporium).
One interesting building in town
that is still closed is the Columbia
Gazette building.
The location of the “Columbia
Gazette,” rst published in 1852,
eventually was near the site of the
present building but over the years
res caused the building to be repo-
sitioned and nally rebuilt in 1863.
It wasn’t until 1966, that the cur-
rent Columbia Gazette ofce was
built on Washington Street from a
1855 drawing of the facade.
This reproduction of the 1855
building was constructed for $33,000
after buying the lot for $1 from the
University of the Pacic. The Cali-
fornia Newspaper Publishers Asso-
ciation contributed $12,500 to the project.
The main press used in past dem-
onstrations of letter-press printing
at the Gazette building was once
used at the “Tuolumne Independent,”
then sold to the Segerstrom family
with explicit instructions that it was
never to leave the county. The press is
now on loan from the Segerstrom family,
still “residing” in Tuolumne County.
MEN’S, WOMEN’S CLOTHING
Accessories ~ Jewelery
WHAT THEY’RE TALKING ABOUT on MAIN STREET
Columbia
CANDY KITCHEN
Handmade confections
of the finest quality for
four generations
22726 Main Street
209.532.7886
BLUE
MOUNTAIN
MINERALS
COLUMBIA
CALIFORNIA
209.533.0127
Manufacturing & Retail
You use our limestone
products everyday
Murphys — Sonora — Columbia
JACK B. QUICK/ ILLUSTRATED COLUMBIA
ILLUSTRATED COLUMBIA GAZETTE
Combining a timeless feel with modern comforts,
Evergreen Lodge is Yosemites premier mountain resort.
Come see why Frommer’s Guide calls the Evergreen
the Classic Yosemite Experience”.
Cabins • Restaurant • Tavern • Recreation
www.evergreenlodge.com (800) 93-LODGE
Located o Hwy 120 on Yosemite’s western border
“HIDDEN GEM”– Sunset Magazine
EXPLORE YOSEMITE
Located less than a mile from the park’s Highway 120 West entrance
An authentic, timeless feel with modern amenities
for a consummate national park lodge experience.
From Bloomberg Business, Rush Creek Lodge is
“A Destination within a Destination”
143 Rooms Restaurant General Store Fully Guided Recreation Program
www.ruschcreeklodge.com (209) 379-2373
. . .
Church of 49er Congregation
Says Goodby to Pastor Bill
By Leslie Davis
COURTESY PHOTO/ HARRY WRIGHT
March 30, 2008 was a special day
in the life of Church of the ‘49ers—
we honored Pastor Bill David for
his 12 years of loving pastoral care
to this congregation.
The ushers counted 150 in the
pews, all listening intently to Bill’s
nal inspiring sermon.
Then we were dismissed to Faith
Hall for a Farewell Luncheon.
Rev. Arch Marston gave an invoca-
tion, Jean Peters recited her poem,
“Along Came Bill,” Elizabeth Wal-
lace sang “In This Very Room,” the
choir sang a couple of hymns, and
Marian Cramer presented the Da-
vid Family with gifts from the con-
gregation.
After I thanked the many people
who donated generously to this af-
fair, Rev.Arch said a blessing for
the Davids and for the congrega-
tion and we joined hands and sang
“Blest Be the Tie That Binds.”
It was a sad day but also a cel-
ebration of Pastor Bill’s many special
years of ministry to this congregation.
What is in store now for Church
of the ‘49ers? Ofcially known as
the First Presbyterian Church of
Columbia, it is afliated with the
Presbyterian Church USA denomi-
nation, and plans are in place to
continue functioning while a new
pastor is sought.
The worship service, open to all,
is Sunday mornings at 10:00 a.m.,
and includes Sunday School for the
children.
Also, Adult Sunday School is at
9:00 a.m. The church has an active
Presbyterian Women’s group and a
Men’s Fellowship Breakfast Group.
The church’s community out-
reach program includes providing
a Community Dinner in Faith Hall
each Tuesday at 6:00 p.m. (free),
and supplying 30 take-out dinners
weekly for the needy.
And as the service ended, all were
invited to the front of the church while
Harry Wright took a group portrait
of the congregation surrounding
Pastor Bill, Jenny, Aaron and Michael.
Editor’s Note: This article is a re-
print of a farewell that appeared in
a previous issue of “The Illustrated
Columbia Gazette” (March, 2008).
More about the church can be found
at the website: www.49erchurch.org.
8
CLAUD’S COLUMBIA MARKET
209-532-7511 22620 Parrotts Ferry Road Columbia
Fresh Local Goodness
Nutin Flat Farm
Local, seasonal, sustainably
grown owers
Columbia, CA
nutinatfarms.blogspot.com
Cover’s Tomatoes
Pesticide free
Greenhouse grown
coversappleranch.com
Steller’s Jay
Ridge Ranch
Columbia
Fresh
organically
grown produce
9 am to 7 pm (except Sunday 6 pm)
Much of the historical content
for this “version” of the “Illustrated
Columbia Gazette” has been tran-
scribed from the colorful and infor-
mative website maintained by Floyd
Øydegaard, www. ColumbiaGazette.com.
Floyd (photograph to the right) is
the longtime proprietor of the Co-
lumbia Booksellers and Stationers
on Main Street where every effort
is made to have available many
unique items that one might nd in
a period store of the gold rush era.
Michael Gahagan
Editor
Our Thanks to Flloyd
HILLSIDE FARM
Fresh produce sustainably grown
right here in Columbia.
Know your food.
Know your farmer.
Buy local.
Visit us on Facebook
www.facebook.com/sierrahillsidefarm
Page Four
Page Five
Columbia, California 2016
40982 Hwy 41, Oakhurst, CA 93644
www.yosemitegatewaygalleryrow.com
Yosemite Gateway Gallery Row
Home to ve outstanding arts galleries
Gallery Yosemite
Stellar Gallery
Stavast Studio Gallery
Timberline Gallery
8
Williams Gallery West
22768 Main Street, Columbia, CA 95310
Restaurant / 209-532-5964 Saloon / 209-532-1486
Catering - Available on and off-site
Call 209-532-5964 for more infomation
www.cityhotelrestaurant.com
CHRISTOPHER at the
CITY HOTEL RESTAURANT
&
WHAT CHEER SALOON
C
O
L
U
M
B
I
A
48 South Washington St.
209.588.0297
https://ventanagallery.com/
VENTANA GALLERY
Contemporary and Vintage Fine Art
photographs on display at Mountain Sage
18653 Main St., Groveland, CA 95321 209-962-7455
www.RobbHirschPhoto.com
Robb Hirsch Photography
also Guided Photo Workshops
DARDANELLE PARLOR
A Native Daughters of the Golden West, Sonora No. 66 parlor, pose
for their ofcial “portrait” in the late 1880s. At the height of the
popularity of the organization there were some 300 parlors and
10,000 members throughout the state of California. There were local
parlors in Angels Camp, Sutter Creek, Columbia, and the Jackson,
Ursula No. 1 parlor was the rst in the state in 1887. The Sonora parlor
no longer exists and now there currently are 92 parlors statewide.
COURTESY PHOTO/ TUOLUMNE COUNTY MUSEUM
COLUMBIA NATIVE DAUGHTERS
The Columbia Golden Era Parlor was host of a visit by the Grand
President recently at the City Hotel. Left to right, front: Mari-
lyn Rickett, Past Grand President, Fort Bragg Parlor 210; Doro-
thy Ambrose, Grand President, Eshcol Parlor 16, Napa; Virginia
Tremaine, Bonita Parlor 10, Redwood City and Patricia Sharrant,
Grand Trustee, Sutter Parlor 111, Sacramento. Back row, from left,
Jean Koehl, Grand Vice President, Gilroy Parlor 312 and Florence
Anderson, President, Golden Era Parlor 99, Columbia.
Now and Then....
By Jack B. Quick, Staff Photographer
Periodically, this publication
will present historical past and
present photographic “compare and
contrasts.”
If you have suggestions or early
photographs of Columbia, of Co-
lumbia families, or events you
would like to share please contact
our ace staff photographer Jack B.
Quick (not to be confused with re-
porter Jack B. Nimby) at the e.mail
address of this publication.
We will scan prints and make
you photographic and digital cop-
ies of your photograph(s) in return
for you contribution(s).
JACK B. QUICK/ ILLUSTRATED COLUMBIA GAZETTE
22929 Main Street, Columbia (209) 532-4861
www.photosincolumbia.com
21st Centeury Photographs
in 19th Century Costumes
Quality Dining in a Historic Setting
5-Star rated restaurant on Yelp
Catering for weddings and other events
Victorian Feast availability see our website below
Now taking reservations for holiday parties
.
Complete restaurant and saloon
available for rent
Monday’s and Tuesday’s for lunch or dinner.
Restaurant
11 am - 2 pm Lunch
5 pm - 8 pm Dinner
Saloon
11 am - 8 pm Saloon Menu
(extended hours Fri/Sat)
OPEN WEDNESDAY - SUNDAY
Page Six
Columbia, California 2016
minors and ladies welcome
special offer to school groups
209.533.4656
corner Jackson and Main, columbia
EST. 1861
thE
ST. Charles Saloon
Main Street, Columbia
www.eblersleather.com (209) 532-1811
Fine leather goods Clothing & Boots Jewelery & Souvenirs
. .
JACK DOUGLASS
SALOON
GOOD FOOD
Coldest beer in the Mother Lode
Celebrating its 151st Year
N. W. Corner of Main & Fulton Sts.
209.533.4176
Born in California? Consider....
To benefit and improve
the social activities of native Californians
Friendship, Loyalty and Charity
in the Native Sons of the Golden West
Columbia Parlor No.258
for a membership application call Dave: 209.532.4377
e.mail: genzorsaco@att.net@or write: Columbia Parlor No. 258
P. O. Box 811, Columbia, CA 95310
for Columbia Parlor history see: ColumbiaGazette.com/hildenbrand.htm
and visit our museum here in Columbia, 222?? Main Street
Membership
Ed Swanzey (locals knew him
as Ernie Swansea), son of Marga-
ret and Jack Swanzey, who left his
hometown of Columbia, after
graduating from Sonora Union High
School, returned home to Tuolumne
County after an absence of 50 years.
As a musician he has per-
formed with major orchestras and
bands, and has been a concert-band
master and conductor.
Swanzey, whose mother, Mar-
garet, was a long-time music
teacher at Sonora High School and
father Thomas conducted voice
training lessons, performed pro-
fessionally on several instruments,
and led his own Hollywood-based
hotel and show band. He has made
the “Nevada Circuit,” and been on
tour in the Far East and the Pacic.
Swanzey is also a published
composer, arranger, and song-writ-
er. He has appeared on TV, and in
the movies. He was a founding
partner of West Los Angeles Music,
Inc., currently the fth largest pro-
fessional music store in America.
He is a life-long student of his-
tory, linguistics and anthropology,
and is a trained archaeologist. “I am
passably uent in three foreign lan-
guages, and can “get by” in several
others,” Swansey said.
Swanzey spent 18 years docu-
menting cultural recovery projects
for several Northwest American In-
dian tribes and was honored for his
work at four “Giveaways.”
His award-winning photogra-
phy has been published nationally
and internationally, and he has been
written up in professional journals.
His specialties include concept-
illustration, domestic animals,
American Indians, and show busi-
ness performance. As an author,
he has written non-ction feature
articles, advertising copy, and tech-
nical manuals.
His current projects are all
Mother Lode oriented. They in-
clude several books, two lines of
greeting cards, and the world’s larg-
est stock image bank of Tuolumne
County and Columbia.
Swanzey’s most recently pub-
lished work includes four-page
spread in MC2 Magazine, about
auto touring the Mother Lode, and
an ad for Columbia City Hotel.
He is also making unique art
photos of Columbia, photographing
the town in great depth.
IRON DOORS IN COLUMBIA
An Ed Swanzey image, part of
an extensive collection now ar-
chived on: http://picaswegoogle.
com/eezey1
ED SWANZEY
What Ever Happened To....
Ernie Swansea aka Ed Swanzey?
His goal is to show people
things they have passed by every
day, and never noticed.
“There is a huge amount of art
built right into our little town. I
want people to know about it!” he
said. “It is very important, and it’s
very beautiful.”
What does he think about Tu-
olumne County after 50 years of
being away? “I love it!” he said.
“It has changed, certainly, but the
core is still the same. Its damned
good to be home!”
8
Live Celtic & Olde Time
music for all Occasions
Hammered Dulcimer, Piano,
Mandolin, Bouzouki, Guitar,
Banjo, Fiddle, Accordian, Electric
Bass, Vocals
Norm & Pam Ivie
209.532.5526
sequoiaproductions.com
8
Sequoia
Historic Preservation - Charitable Foundation
A local favorite
Page Seven
ILLUSTRATED COLUMBIA GAZETTE
The town’s old Gold Rush-era
business district has been preserved,
with shops, restaurants and two hotels.
Visitors have the chance to time-travel
to the 1850s, imagining life when gold miners rubbed shoulders
with businessmen and the other residents in Columbia. Visitors can
experience a bygone era watching proprietors in period clothing
conduct business in the style of yesterday. There are opportunities
to ride a 100 year-old stagecoach, hire a “fine steed” for a horse-
back ride through the “diggins,” pan for gold, or tour an active gold mine.
School Programs include:
Special School programs designed to meet state curriculum stan-
dards for 4th graders are offered from September-June. $40 per
class. Students enjoy an hour-long history program at the museum
led by park staff, including trying their hand at being part of
fire “bucket brigade.” Then students walk to the original brick
schoolhouse for an hour-long 1860s living history school program.
Registration forms for the program are available by clicking the
School Programs link on the left side of the page, or may be
obtained by calling the park office at 209-588-9128. Programs are
popular and fill quickly.
Regularly Scheduled Programs
Free Town Tours: Approximately 1 hour.
July 5th - Labor Day: Daily @ 11:00 AM
Year-round: Saturday & Sunday @ 11:00 AM
Led by staff and docents. Meet at the museum.
The Location - Directions
Columbia State Historic Park is three miles north of Sonora,
off Highway 49.
Latitude/Longitude: 38.0364 / -120.4003
Welcome to Columbia
State Historic Park
Town Tours: every Sat. and Sun. at 11 a. m.
Gold Rush Days: every second Saturday.
Father’s Day Fly-In.....................................June 17
Histories Mysteris.............July 23, Aug. 6, Aug. 20
Glorious 4th (of July).....................................July 4
Big Band Street Dance.................................July 16
Back to School 1861....................................Sept. 17
California Admission Day...........................Sept. 10
Columbia Art Show.....................................Sept. 18
Poison Oak Show.........................................Sept. 24
Fiddle & Bango Contest..............................Sept. 24
Harvest FestiFall.....................................Oct. 11-12
Illumination of Jack O’Lanterns.................Oct. 29
Lamplight Tours.........................................Dec. 2-3
Candy Kitchen Cane Making...Dec. 3-4, 10-11, 17-18, 24
Miner’s Christmas......................Dec.10-11, 15-16
Christmas Equestrian Parade...................Dec. 11
Las Posadas Nativity Procession.............. Dec. 11
City Hotel Victorian Feast*.............Dec. 11, 15-16
* Contact City Hotel: 209.532.1479 for details.
Dates may change without notice.
Columbia Chamber of Commerce: 209.536.1672
www.VisitColumbiacalifornia.com
Columbia
State Historic Park
Special Events 2016
COURTESY PHOTO/ LESLIE DAVIS -COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
COURTESY PHOTO/ COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE WEB SITE
Classyfieds
FREE
until the offer lasts!
Send to:
Gazetteer@hub3.net
PAPER BOYS and GIRLS—Sell “The
Illustrated Columia Gazette” during week-
ends and holidays on the streets of Colum-
bia. Sell each copy for $1.00 and keep it!
Could be the beginnings of your college
fund! Call the Editor and Publisher: Mi-
chael Gahagan, 536.1143. or email: Gazet-
teer@hub3.net.
ADULT PAPER GIRL or BOY —Part-
time to full-time advertising sales person
wanted for several publications including
the 40,000 annual circulation Yosemite Ga-
zette, a distinctive quarterly. Choose your
own hours as an Independent Contrac-
tor. The sales market includes the Mother
Lode and the central Sierra Nevada. Sales
experience preferred but will train and
sales materials, brochures, business cards,
sample issues and prspective ads will be
provided. Expenses to be determined af-
ter three-month trial period of sales effort.
Contact Michael Gåhagan at 209.536.1143
or email: Editor@YosemiteCazette.com.
Learn more about the publication Yosemite
Gazette at: www.YosemiteGazette.com
WANTED Old Mother Lode Magazines
published by Peggy and Basil Leever in Co-
lumbia in the 1950’s. The magazines were
rst called the “Mother Lode Gazette.” The
monthly publication also became the of-
cial organ of the Golden Chain Council and
the Mother Lode Highway Association.
Call 209.532.5763 or e.mail: Gazetteer@
hub.3.net.
FRENCH URN— with fruit decor, me-
dium sized, all-weather cement for your
garden. $50.00 Call for information: 532-
5763. (SOLD!)
BANNER TIMES — Desktop publisher
will compile your photographic and family
history in digital and textual format for lim-
ited printed editions as family and genera-
tional printed heirlooms. Portions or the en-
tirety can be converted to a personal-family
website for all posterity. Call 532.5763 or
e.mail: GO.Enterprises@hub3.net.
YOSEMITE-MOTHER LODE BOOKS
— Available online at: www.YosemiteGa-
zette.com/publications including “Yosem-
ite’s Hotels and Camps,” “From Dust to
Granite, the Art and Writings of Jo Mora,”
(Limited collectors editions of a journal of
early California artist Jo Mora kept during
his visit to Yosemite in 1904.),“Sonora,
signed by Columbia author Michael Ga-
hagan.
THE YOSEMITE GAZETTE ONLINE
Subscriptions and online memberships avail-
able online at: www.YosemiteGazette.com/
subscription-membership to the distinctive
quarterly telling the colorful stories of the
Yosemite region and chroniling the artistic
legacy and cultural lore and heritage of the
central Sierra Nevada and one of America’s
iconic national parks.
The recollections and “re-
comemberances,” as Gold Gulch
Gus used to call them were printed
regularly in the monthly Mother
Lode Gazette, the rst magazine
published in the early 1950s by
Peggy and Basil Leever of Columbia.
For a old time chuckle and a
chortle here’s another of the ‘ol
geezers genuine, t-to-be tied,
knee slapping tales from Gold Gulch.
m m m
“When Sawmill Sam’s boy,
Newt, wuz helpin’ th’ young wid-
der Abernathy t’ move into her
new cabin t’ other evenin’ she re-
ally had him loaded down fer th’
last trip with a curtin’ rod, a big
kittle, a live chicken, ‘n’, t’ top it
off, he wuz leadin’ a goat.
When they come t’ a dark place
in the gulch she sez, “I’m afraid t’
walk here with you. You might try
t’ kiss me.”
“How could I,” he sez, “with all
these things t’ carry?”
“Well,” sez she, “you might
stick th’ rod in th’ ground, tie th’
goat t’ it, ‘n’ put the chicken under
the kittle.”
GOLD
GULCH
GUS SEZ:
1. 49er RV Ranch
2. Blue Mt. Minerals
3. St. Charles Saloon
4. Columbia Mercantile
5. The Farmer’s Friend
6. Marble Quarry RV Resort
7. City Hotel Restaurant - What Cheer Saloon
8. Brown’s Coffee House & Sweets Saloon
9. Columbia Candle & Soap Works
10. A. deCosmos Daguerrean Photo
11. Towle & Leavitt
12. Friends of Columbia - Museum
13. Hungry Prospector
14. Columbia Kate’s Teahouse
15. Jenny Lind Restaurant
16. Parrotts Blacksmith
17. Fancy Dry Goods & Clothing Store
18. Columbia Booksellers & Stationers
19. Nelson’s Columbia Candy Kitchen
20. JC Miller, Carpenter & Joiner
21. Jack Douglass Saloon
22. Umpqua Bank & ATM
23. Quartz Mountain Stage Line and Saddle Horses
24. Pioneer Emporium
25. Matelot Gulch - Hidden Treasurer Gold Mine
26. Sierra Repertory Fallon House Theatre
Fallon Ice Cream Parlor & Fallon Hotel
27. The Illustrated Columbia Gazette
(sold in various merchant outlets and by street sales)
28. Columbia Gem Motel
29. Brewer Enterprises
30. Zephyr Whitewater Expeditions
31. Sterling Gardens Bed & Breakfast (Sonora)
32. Tuolumne County Visitors Bureau (Sonora)
Phone: 209.536.1672
Website: www.viisitcolumbiacalifornia.com
Columbia Chamber
Fallon Hotel
City Hotel
For Reservations: 209.532.1479
www.parks.ca.gov/columbia
Fine Food
Victorian Elegance
22768 Washington Street
22768 Main Street
The Rainey Residence The Ghiorso Bungalow
Balcony, Parlor and Petite Rooms
Event Packages
50% Off Second Night Specials
Vacation Cottages now Available
Take a step back
into history
and make
Columbia your next vacation destination.