CONGRESS Congress 2014 Congress 2014 8th – 11th April 2014 www.iat.org.uk 8th – 11th April 2014 Animal Technologists – essential to biomedical development
CONGRESS  Congress 2014 Congress 2014  8th     11th April 2014  www.iat.org.uk 8th     11th April 2014  Animal Technologis...
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Contents General Information Contacts 2 Welcome from the Congress Committee 5 General Information 7 Animal Technology and Welfare Journal Prize 2013 12 Andrew Blake Tribute Award 2014 13 AAALAC International Fellowship Award 15 21 Agenda for IAT Annual General Meeting Honorary Members 23 Education ‘Drop-In’ Session 24 AAALAC International Fellowship Award - UK Applications 27 Teenage Cancer Trust – Midlands Branch Charity 2014 28 St Columba’s Hospice Update – Edinburgh Branch Charity 2013 31 Sponsorship 64 Index to Advertisers 17 Scientific Programme “At A Glance” Summary – Wednesday and Thursday Platform Programme - Wednesday Platform Programme - Thursday Kevin Dolan Memorial Lecture Poster Presentations Poster Displays Workshop Sessions 32 35 43 47 48 52 65 Social Programme Events and Entertainment 74 Trade Exhibition Exhibitors’ Index and Exhibition Plan Exhibiting Companies 76 78 Animal Technologists – essential to biomedical development The IAT roundel logo is a registered trademark of the Institute of Animal Technology
Contents General Information  Contacts   2 Welcome from the Congress Committee  5 General Information  7 Animal Technology...
Congress 2014 Contacts During Congress the Committee can be contacted via the Congress Reception After Congress, contact should be made via email to: congress@iat.org.uk Registered Office: Institute of Animal Technology, 5 South Parade, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7JL, UK © Copyright Institute of Animal Technology 2014 All rights reserved; no part of this handbook may be reproduced, by any means without prior written permission of the Institute of Animal Technology and the Publisher. Reproduction in whole or part without the express written permission of the copyright holders is prohibited. This HANDBOOK is highly confidential. Please DO NOT leave it unattended during Congress. All information contained is correct at the time of going to press Published on behalf of IAT Congress 2014 by PRC Associates Ltd Designed and Printed in Great Britain Animal Technologists – essential to biomedical development 2 General Information
Congress 2014 Contacts During Congress the Committee can be contacted via the Congress Reception After Congress, contact s...
Welcome Welcome from the Congress Committee Dear Congress Delegate Welcome to Blackpool and Congress 2014. Hopefully we are not suffering from the dramatic weather conditions which struck at Eastbourne! The theme for Congress 2014 is “Animal Technologists – essential to biomedical development” and this will be explored in a variety of presentations. A qualified professional animal technologist will help to ensure high standards of animal care and welfare are maintained, while supporting the needs of the scientific community. This year the Named Persons Workshop took place at a separate venue and date to Congress, and was extremely well attended, with those wishing to attend exceeding places available. A shorter workshop will be held during Congress 2014, and it is hoped a further one day event can be planned for later in the year, to help keep Named Persons informed of the latest legislation and other developments in our sector. Once again we will offer a drop-in session for anyone who wishes to discuss any educational matters, be it Further or Higher Education. Please ask at the Congress Reception for further details. The IAT AGM will take place on Tuesday 8th April in the Connaught Room and everyone is welcome to attend. The IAT is run by and for its members, so make sure that you come along and have an input in the future direction of your Institute. The AGM agenda can be found on page 21. Whilst we recognise that this year’s venue is less than ideal in certain quarters, it does enable all the delegates to stay in a single venue for our event. The Trade Exhibition Hall is large enough to house military tanks, so we are sure we will see some wonderful items of equipment on display by members of the Trade. The hall is also spacious enough for us to serve not only tea and coffee in there but lunches as well! There will also be the Trade Exhibitors Competition running again this year, so don’t miss the opportunity to visit all the stands to get the signatures required for your entry forms. The official opening of the Trade Exhibition with a wine reception will take place on Tuesday evening at 20.30 hrs, so come along and meet up with the new exhibitors, our long standing supporters and friends old and new. We hope that you find Congress 2014 an informative meeting, allowing you to gain knowledge, exchange ideas and network with colleagues, in a friendly and welcoming environment. If you have any suggestions or comments regarding Congress, please contact a member of the Congress Committee, either in person via the Congress Reception, or by e-mail to: congress@iat.org.uk We wish you a very enjoyable Congress 2014. IAT Congress Committee General Information 5
Welcome  Welcome from the Congress Committee Dear Congress Delegate Welcome to Blackpool and Congress 2014. Hopefully we a...
General Information THE VENUE This year all accommodation and meals will be located in the main conference centre. CONGRESS RECEPTION On Tuesday, the Congress Reception will be located in the main foyer of the hotel. Opening hours: Tuesday 8th April 10.00 – 17.45 hrs On Wednesday and Thursday it will be located in the foyer outside the Trade Exhibition Hall. Opening hours: Wednesday 9th April Thursday 10th April 08.00 – 17.00 hrs 08.00 – 13.00 hrs FIRST TIME AT CONGRESS? Is it your first visit to Congress? Or maybe you have come on your own and don’t know many people? Or perhaps you just want to know where you are going – then join us for a tour of the available facilities. We are meeting at the Congress Reception on Tuesday 8th April at 16.30 hrs and afterwards stay for refreshments and a fun Ice Breaker session starting at 17.00 hrs where you can get to know fellow delegates. Further details can be found at the Congress Reception. MEALS Breakfast 07.00 – 09.00 hrs Wednesday and Thursday 07.00 – 09.30 hrs Friday Buffet Lunch: 13.00 – 14.00 hrs Wednesday and Thursday Breakfast will be served each morning in the Castles Restaurant and is a selfservice buffet style. Lunch will be served in the Trade Exhibition Hall. Dinner will be served in the Ballroom on all three nights. On Tuesday evening dinner will be served at 19.00 hrs. This is a sit down meal buffet dinner and will be followed by the official opening of the Trade Exhibition starting with a wine reception at 20.30 hrs in the Trade Exhibition Hall. Dinner on Wednesday evening will be served at 20.00 hrs also in the Ballroom. The Gala Dinner Dance on Thursday evening will start at 20.00 hrs. Please note that the dress code is smart (no jeans or trainers). Gentlemen must wear jackets and ties to the Gala Dinner. General Information 7
General Information  THE VENUE This year all accommodation and meals will be located in the main conference centre.  CONGR...
General Information Gala Dinner Ticket You will find your ticket for the Gala Dinner INSIDE your Delegate badge. Exhibiting companies will sometimes invite you to join their table for the Gala Dinner and in this instance you should hand them your ticket so they can reserve a place for you. If you do not wish to join an exhibitor’s table, or if you have come to Congress on your own and are unsure of where to sit, please see a member of the Congress Committee prior to the Gala Dinner who will be able to help you. Table plans for the Gala Dinner will be available at the Congress Reception from 10.45 hrs on Wednesday (coinciding with the morning coffee break). TEA AND COFFEE Refreshments will be served in the Trade Exhibition Hall at the following times: Wednesday Thursday 10.45 – 11.15 hrs 10.30 – 11.00 hrs and and 15.15 – 16.00 hrs 15.30 – 16.15 hrs TRADE EXHIBITION The Trade Exhibition is situated in the Norcalympia Hall, within the main conference centre. Opening times Tuesday Wednesday Thursday are: 20.30 – 23.00 hrs (Official opening) 09.30 – 18.00 hrs 09.30 – 16.15 hrs Congress 2014 Trade Competition Not one BUT TWO CHANCES to WIN an iPAD See the instructions on page 112 and make sure you are CARRYING your PASSPORT AT ALL TIMES when you visit the EXHIBITION HALL. Good Luck! AGM The 28th Annual General Meeting of the Institute of Animal Technology will be held in the Connaught Room at 18.00 hrs on Tuesday 8th April. A full Agenda appears on page 21 and attendance is open to ALL delegates. 8 General Information
General Information  Gala Dinner Ticket You will find your ticket for the Gala Dinner INSIDE your Delegate badge. Exhibiti...
General Information LECTURES AND PAPERS The Platform Programme will be held in the Ballroom. Please refer to pages 32 to 46 within the Scientific Programme section for all information on the Paper Presentations. The Kevin Dolan Memorial Lecture (formerly known as the Guest Lecture) will be given by M Joan Taylor PhD MRPharmS, Professor of Pharmaceutics at Leicester School of Pharmacy on Thursday at 16.15 hrs. The abstract for her paper entitled “An artificial pancreas in diabetic pigs using a Smart Material Device” can be found on page 47. Kevin Dolan 1926 - 2011 When Kevin Dolan died in 2011 at the age of 85, IAT Council wished to honour his memory in gratitude for the contribution he had made to animal technologists and the industry in general and therefore, fittingly the Special Guest Lecture given annually at Congress was renamed the Kevin Dolan Memorial Lecture. Kevin’s attributes to the IAT included services on Council and for several years he was Editor of the IAT Journal, only standing down on his retirement. He received his Fellowship in 1977 at the same time as attaining a Diploma in Law. He was also made a Vice-President of the IAT and latterly an Honorary Member. He also authored many distinguished books and articles on the subject of law and ethics using animals in science but it was as a teacher that Kevin had most impact. He taught on the Postgraduate Diploma/MSc course, the Medical Technology courses at City of Westminster and on Personal Licence Modular training courses. To paraphrase one of his students ‘Kevin was a great teacher because he was passionate about the subject he was dealing with and the people he was teaching to’. Despite joining the world of animal technology somewhat later in life after many years in the ecclesiastical domain, Kevin’s impact on our industry was outstanding. His was a life well lived in the service of others and in recognition is remembered at Congress. POSTERS Posters will be displayed on Wednesday and Thursday along the foyer outside the Norcalympia Hall. We are delighted that LBS (formerly Lillico) are continuing with their sponsorship of the best poster award. (Further details under Prizes and Awards.) Meet the poster authors - all poster authors will be in attendance at their posters to answer questions during: Wednesday Thursday 12.15 – 13.00 hrs 15.30 – 16.15 hrs Seven Poster Presentations will also take place on Thursday 14.00 - 15.30 hrs in the Ballroom. A schedule and synopsis of each presentation appear on page 48 onwards. Abstracts of the other poster displays start on page 52. General Information 9
General Information  LECTURES AND PAPERS The Platform Programme will be held in the Ballroom. Please refer to pages 32 to ...
General Information WORKSHOPS To attend any of the 7 workshops, please register as soon as possible on arrival at the Congress Reception. A programme and review on each Workshop appears on page 65 onwards. All Workshops are IAT CPD credited. Workshop 1:  Public engagement - challenges faced by the animal technology sector – Heather Sanders, University of Leicester Managing emotion in the workplace – Alison Hopkins, Monkey Workshop 2:  Puzzle Training and Consultancy Ltd Workshop 3:  Expecting the unexpected – practical considerations for research continuity – Norman Mortell, Agenda Resource Management and Lynda Westall, The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Practical application of aseptic techniques for rodent surgery – Workshop 4:  Lucy Whitfield, Royal Veterinary College Workshop 5:  Preparing for RAnTech – Ian Garrod, Learning Curve (Development) Ltd Workshop 6:  Raising concerns about laboratory animal welfare – Penny Hawkins, RSPCA Workshop 7:  Calling all Named Persons – Kathy Ryder, Animals in Science Regulation Unit (ASRU) and David Anderson, Superintendent Inspectorate Home Office (retired) and Pentlands Management Systems
General Information  WORKSHOPS To attend any of the 7 workshops, please register as soon as possible on arrival at the Con...
General Information PRIZES AND AWARDS The First Time Presenter Paper The annual Jack Mundy Prize has previously been awarded at Congress for the best paper given by a Junior Technician but in 2004 the competition was opened up to include anyone who is making their debut presentation at Congress. Six First Time presenters will participate this year, starting at 11.00 hrs on Thursday and thanks to the continued sponsorship from Marshall BKU, a generous monetary gift of £200.00 will be awarded to the winner after the Kevin Dolan Memorial Lecture on Thursday afternoon. Arthur Edward “Jack” Mundy FIAT was thought of by his peers as the founder of the Animal Technicians Association (ATA) in 1950. During the early years as Honorary Secretary, he worked very hard to make the Association work and raise the original membership of 200. By 1960, it had doubled to 400 members. When the Laboratory Animal Centre (LAC) discontinued their support of an annual Congress, it was Jack who petitioned for the ATA to take over and he organised the first one in Bangor with the help of his wife, Mimi. The following year, it was held at the Royal Veterinary College where he worked as Chief Technician and there were two exhibitors! When the organisation became too big for two people to manage, the Congress Committee was formed. On his retirement, Jack was awarded Life Membership of the IAT. Best Poster The award for Best Poster sponsored by LBS (Serving Biotechnology) Ltd will be presented after the Kevin Dolan Memorial Lecture on Thursday afternoon. A selection panel (nominated by Congress Committee), judge according to the criteria of best content, clarity and quality of science. The prize itself is a generous cash award of £200.00 to the winner. AS-ET Silent Auction During the official opening of the Trade Exhibition on Tuesday evening, look out for the AS-ET Silent Auction. Various stands will be displaying items for you to make your bids on and the winning bids will be announced at the end of the evening. Happy Bidding! General Information 11
General Information  PRIZES AND AWARDS The First Time Presenter Paper The annual Jack Mundy Prize has previously been awar...
General Information Journal Article – Marjorie (Sandiford) Whittingham Prize 2013 Animal Technology and Welfare Warm congratulations to Haley Daniels MBA MSc MIAT RAnTech  CIPD for her 2013 winning paper, selected by the ATW Editorial Board, entitled “What obligations of the Psychological Contract are important to Biological Services Facility (BSF) Managers – a UK perspective. When is enough, enough?” Published in the December 2013 issue Volume 12 No 3. Haley will receive her plaque at the Presentation of Awards before the Close of Congress on Thursday afternoon. About the author: Haley is proud to be Yorkshire born and bred! She trained as an animal technician at 18 years of age in Bradford and became Manager of the Biological Services unit at Bradford University 10 years ago. She thrives on a challenge and has now managed the Biological Services Facility at York University for 2 years. Haley completed her MBA in 2010 where her research focussed on staff recruitment and retention within the field of animal technology, this research looked at motivation and job satisfaction of technologists and managers in both public and private sector facilities. She completed her MSc in Human Resource Management and Employment Law in 2013 where her research was concentrated specifically on managers of animal research facilities and the Psychological Contract; (the mutual obligations/ expectations between managers and their organisations/employer) and what happens if this contract is violated or breached; when does ‘enough is enough’ actually mean it. Haley’s interests are in advancements in animal welfare, staff motivation, job satisfaction and the future of animal technologists. Marjorie (Sandiford) Whittingham was a late arrival on Council in 1966 serving 11 years until she retired from work in the late 1970s. For the 7 years prior to her retirement, she was Secretary to the Institute and was also a Member of the Exam Board for all of those 11 years. Marjorie’s husband, Dick Whittingham and Council set up the prize fund after her untimely death in Kenya where they had retired to. The enormity of the amount of work that Marjorie completed during that period made her shorter service even more exceptional. 12 General Information
General Information  Journal Article     Marjorie  Sandiford  Whittingham Prize 2013  Animal Technology and Welfare Warm c...
ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD 2014 ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD The Andrew Blake Tribute Award commemorates the work and life of Andrew Blake, who suffered from Friedrich’s ataxia, a hereditary condition described as one of the “worst of neurological diseases”. Andrew died in May 2002 aged 39. Andrew was passionate about the need to support scientists in their work and his commitment to speaking out against animal rights activists took up much of the last ten years of his life. He died shortly before he was to collect his MBE. The Andrew Blake Tribute Award is given to the animal technologist judged to have made the most significant contribution to improving standards in laboratory animal welfare over the previous twelve months. Winner 2014 –  atalie Edwards N University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Central Biomedical Resources, Centre of Brain Repair, John Van Geest Building, Forvie Site, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0PY Improving animal welfare for neurodegenerative mice Natalie will present her paper on Wednesday at 17.00 hrs. She will receive an engraved glass plaque and a total cash award of £250.00 at the prize giving ceremony prior to the Close of Congress on Thursday afternoon. A full transcript of her paper will appear in Animal Technology and Welfare August 2014 issue (Vol 13 No 2). ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD SPONSORED THIS YEAR BY IAT AND AS-ET General Information 13
ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD 2014  ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD  The Andrew Blake Tribute Award commemorates the work and life...
ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD 2014 ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD About the author, Natalie Edwards: Natalie always wanted to work with animals as she felt a natural empathy with them. To further her desire, she studied for a National Diploma in Animal Management and was pleased to pass with a distinction. She then started looking at different animal related careers and decided to go down the animal technician route as she wanted to make a difference to the animals that were used in research and to ensure they received high standards of welfare. In June 2011, Natalie became an animal technician at Cambridge University within the Phenomics Laboratory. This is a centre which specialises in imaging and phenotyping facilities for research models. During this time, she gained experience with neurodegenerative models, such as Alzheimer, multiple sclerosis and Sandhoff disease as well as cardiovascular disease models, diabetic/obese models and stroke models. Whilst in her first year, she created a rat playpen and provided rats with playtime. So you can imagine her delight when she submitted her idea as a poster at Congress 2013, earning her the ‘best poster’ prize. This encouraged her to document more areas of her work, which has led to her receiving the Andrew Blake Tribute Award 2014. Natalie was promoted to surgery technician in the last year. The centre she now works in provides facilities for neurodegenerative disease models and specialises in behavioural facilities. Part of her training in her new role is learning pre and post operative care of rodents. She also trains new technicians and is learning ways in which she can improve animal welfare. In December 2012 she completed the IAT Level 2 to a distinction and is currently completing IAT Level 3 in which she hopes to also achieve a distinction. ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD SPONSORED THIS YEAR BY IAT AND AS-ET 14 General Information
ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD 2014  ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD About the author, Natalie Edwards  Natalie always wanted to wo...
General Information AAALAC International Fellowship Award Lynell M. Dupepe, B.S., RLATG, 2014 USA Recipient We welcome Lynell M. Dupepe, the 2014 USA Fellowship Winner to Congress 2014. Lynell Dupepe is the Associate Director of the Tulane University Department of Comparative Medicine in New Orleans, Louisiana. She is a Registered Laboratory Animal Technologist, with a Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Science. Lynell has been employed at Tulane University for 25 years and has a total of 32 years’ experience in the field of Laboratory Animal Management. Lynell is responsible for the management of two animal facilities totaling 33,000 sq. ft., a member of the Tulane University HSC Emergency Management Team and is responsible for the implementation and continual revision of the Department of Comparative Medicine’s Crisis and Emergency Response Plan. Lynell has given numerous talks on Emergency Preparedness in response to the Lessons Learned during Hurricane Katrina. Lynell has been a member of both National and local Louisiana Branch AALAS for 25 years. Active in the Louisiana Branch, Lynell served as President in 2011/2012, has held several board positions and is current chair of the Awards Committee. The AAALAC pin will be presented to Lynell at the presentation of awards ceremony on Thursday afternoon in recognition of her being the International Fellow winner and in response, she will give a brief address on her experience in the UK. General Information 15
General Information  AAALAC International Fellowship Award  Lynell M. Dupepe, B.S., RLATG, 2014 USA Recipient We welcome L...
General Information AAALAC International Fellowship Award Stuart Stevenson, 2013 UK Recipient Stuart Stevenson BSc FIAT RAnTech NEBOSH is the Facilities Manager for Agenda Resource Management at Eli Lilly where he is responsible for the day to day running of the Neuropharmacology Drug Development Unit. He is also a member of the IAT Board of Moderators. “My experience started last October when I arrived in Washington late on a Saturday evening and with the next day free to acclimatise, I spent it taking in the sights seeing the White House, Lincoln Memorial, Washington Memorial and the Capitol Building. On Monday I was taken to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and given a tour of the many facilities they have on site which included an introduction into the safe practices for working with small and large laboratory species. The NIH facilities span seven main areas and so the selection on what to see and what to do, is huge and yet, during the week I was very fortunate to see most of it. All major fields of research are carried out here, so anyone will be able to find something that is relevant to their own work experience and interests. Later in the week I was also fortunate enough to visit the AAALAC Head Offices and that afternoon the sponsors at Priority One laid on a special behind the scenes trip to the National Aquarium. After a busy week visiting the NIH, I travelled to Baltimore for the AALAS National Conference the largest of its kind in the world to join the other thousands of delegates. It is impossible to attend everything in four days but I was able to hear papers on refinements in laboratory animal care, the use of novel transgenics, animal welfare, novel cage design and their welfare benefits, effects of anaesthetics on circadian rhythms, how changes in routines can affect animal routines, managing aggressive mice, applying the 3Rs in our work and how animal behaviours change with their age. At the International luncheon provided by AAALAC on the Wednesday, I formally accepted my award and thanked all those who had made it possible for me to come to the USA for the two weeks. This was a fantastic, life changing experience, which I would encourage all Registered Animal Technologists to consider, it is great to meet colleagues from the same industry, doing the same jobs as us but from thousands of miles away and I now really appreciate how global research can be. Very soon I found myself back in the UK, in my regular day job but I am sure I am a different person with the experience I have gained from this fellowship award.” (At 11.20 hrs on Thursday, Stuart will present his experiences and you can read a full account of his time in the USA in the IAT Bulletin, January 2014 issue Vol 50 No 1.) Details on applying for the 2014 UK Award can be found on page 27. 16 General Information
General Information  AAALAC International Fellowship Award  Stuart Stevenson, 2013 UK Recipient Stuart Stevenson BSc FIAT ...
General Information CONGRESS BADGES It is important that you wear your badge at all times within the conference venue. You will not gain access to the exhibition hall, papers, posters, workshops if you are not wearing it. Please also make sure you are wearing it at meal times and for the social events each evening. If you are not wearing it admittance will be refused. We do however recommend you remove your badge if you leave the conference venue. If you lose your badge, please report your loss immediately to a member of the Congress Committee. MOBILE PHONES AND PAGERS Out of courtesy to speakers and other delegates, pagers and mobile phones must be switched off or put on non-audible alerts BEFORE entering the main lecture theatre and the areas hosting the posters and workshops. Mobile phones and mobile phone cameras MUST NOT be used in any of the scientific sessions at Congress. This includes the paper sessions, trade exhibition, workshops and poster rooms – the latter whether poster authors are in attendance or not. Use of personal cameras is permitted at social functions, although not please, where these take place in the trade exhibition areas. A photographer will be available if you wish certain pictures to be taken. Ask at the Congress Reception for information. ENQUIRIES Delegates are advised to contact the Congress Reception if they have any queries or comments regarding Congress. INDEX TO ADVERTISERS Page 3Rs LAB Arrowmight 42 IBC Page LBS OBC Learning Curve (Development) Ltd 70 Allentown Inc 18 MSE Henderson Biomedical 10 Allentown Inc 19 North Kent Plastics 30 Bell Isolation Systems Ltd 34 R&W Associates UK Ltd 22 Charles River Laboratories 26 R C Hartelust BV 24 Contec® 54 SAFE 25 Datesand Ltd 3 Datesand Ltd 20 Sychem Ltd IPS Product Supplies Ltd 38 UNO Roestvaststaal BV Special Diets Services 6 IFC 4 General Information 17
General Information  CONGRESS BADGES It is important that you wear your badge at all times within the conference venue. Yo...
Notice of AGM TWENTY EIGHTH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE INSTITUTE OF ANIMAL TECHNOLOGY To be held on Tuesday 8th April 2014 AGENDA 1. Apologies for absence Minutes of the 27th Annual General Meeting of the Institute of Animal 2.  Technology held on 12th March 2013 3.  Matters arising from the Minutes, which were published in full on the Members’ Section of the IAT website and an abridged version in the Bulletin Vol 49 No 6, June 2013 4. Correspondence 5. Annual Report / Council Objectives 6. Financial Report 7. Appointment of the Auditor 8. Election of Officers: (i) President (ii) Vice-Presidents (iii) Council 9. Proposals for Honorary and Life Membership 10. Any other business Wendy Steel, Hon. Secretary Steve Owen, Chair of Council THE AGM IS OPEN TO ALL DELEGATES Please attend at 18.00 hrs in the Connaught Room COUNCIL ELECTIONS 2014 As there were only eight nominations for the thirteen vacancies on Council, no ballot took place and therefore the following were elected to serve on Council for a three year term as from May 2014. 1 Ken Applebee 5 Linda Horan 2 Charlie Chambers 6 Adele Kitching 3 Steven Cubitt 7 Lynda Westall 4 Alan Graham 8 Haley Daniels General Information 21
Notice of AGM  TWENTY EIGHTH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE INSTITUTE OF ANIMAL TECHNOLOGY To be held on Tuesday 8th April ...
IAT HONORARY MEMBERS The IAT Council may nominate as an Honorary Member, any person who in the opinion of the Council, has substantially furthered the interests of the Institute, subject to approval, at the Annual General Meeting. Once nominated the Honorary Member is invited to IAT Congress to receive their award, the period of election being five years. This year, we are delighted to welcome all four nominees who will attend the AGM at 18.00 hours on Tuesday to receive their awards. Please come along and show them your support for their achievements working in our industry. Andy Jackson MIAT RAnTech Andy has been working in animal technology for over 40 years in varied posts at different companies and organisations. He has been a long standing member of the IAT Council serving on the Congress Committee since 1991 and latterly as Chair until standing down in 2013. Andy has always encouraged staff to develop their careers and has been an Ambassador to the Institute of Animal Technology. Brian Lowe MSc FIAT PGCE Brian was an animal technologist for over 25 years and then moved into teaching. He is nominated for his work since 2005 as the IAT’s Educational Consultant, advising on many matters including the IAT’s application to become what is now an Ofqual Awarding Organisation for Levels 2 and 3. Brian is also the programme manager of the Higher Education Certificate and Diploma courses and is working towards the establishment of the full BSc in Laboratory Animal Science. David Spillane FIAT David was an animal technologist for 20 years, starting his career working with all the common lab species plus some of the more exotic varieties. In 1986, he set up his own company and since Tecniplast UK was established in 1997, he has been the driving force as managing director. David has always taken an active part in his local IAT branch and is currently President of Hunts, Norfolk and Suffolk. He is a firm believer that education is the one most important fundamental factor that underpins our industry. Pete Willan DMS FInstMgt MIAT RAnTech Pete has worked for over 40 years in animal technology starting as a trainee through to facility manager and more recently development and project consultant at Allentown Europe. An IAT member since 1972, he has had involvement on both branch and council committees and is also an inspector for AAALAC. In collaboration with a number of companies, Pete has helped develop various products and equipment to enhance animal welfare and improve working conditions for animal welfare staff. Most members will associate him as the founder of the Animal Welfare Management & Discussion Group (AWMDG), a site which has proved to be a valuable communication network. Please refer to the February 2014 issue (Vol 50 No 2) of the IAT Bulletin for full biographies. General Information 23
IAT HONORARY MEMBERS The IAT Council may nominate as an Honorary Member, any person who in the opinion of the Council, has...
General Information Education ‘Drop-in’ Session Thursday 10th April 10.30 – 11.00 IAT FE and HE Qualifications Following the success of last year’s ‘Drop-In’ session, we will be offering this opportunity again. Anyone who has any queries relating to the IAT Higher Education or the IAT Further Education (Levels 2 and 3) qualifications is very welcome to visit the IAT stand during the coffee break on Thursday morning. The IAT stand is located in the foyer outside the Trade Exhibition Hall and you can ask any questions on the IAT qualification system that you may have. R C artelust bv H P.O.Box 2170 5001 CD Tilburg The Netherlands Tel: + 31 13 4555189 Fax: + 31 13 4550175 E-mail: info@hartelust.net Macaca fascicularis Macaca mulatta Beagle dogs Purpose bred for research use Health screened for a range of organisms Quarantined before shipment Full documentation with every delivery Direct delivery in own vehicle Prices and terms request 24 General Information
General Information  Education    Drop-in    Session Thursday 10th April 10.30     11.00 IAT FE and HE Qualifications Foll...
Call for nominations now open for the 2014 AAALAC International Fellowship UK Award If you are an IAT Registered Technologist (RAnTech) apply today! (Deadline is 1 June 2014) The AAALAC International Fellowship recognises two outstanding individuals— one IAT Registered (RAnTech) and one AALAS Registered (RALAT, RLAT, RLATG, CMAR)—who have made (or have the potential to make) significant contributions to the field of laboratory animal care and use. This fellowship is valued at more than £3,000. In the Autumn of 2014 the UK winner will enjoy a week-long visit to a leading biomedical research facility in the USA. They will also enjoy complimentary attendance at the National AALAS Meeting in San Antonio, Texas, home of the famous Alamo. This is the USA’s largest laboratory animal science and technology meeting (registration, travel and accommodation expenses are included in the award, plus a generous daily allowance for meals and out-of-pocket expenses). TO APPLY: 1.  rite a brief letter nominating yourself (or have someone write this letter W on your behalf). 2.  nclude a 500-word written statement describing why you should be selected. I 3. Include a copy of your CV. 4. Include no more than three letters of support. TIPS: You should consider these points in your application package: l  hat have you done to encourage animal welfare and refinement in your W workplace? (e.g., membership of AWERB, training others, advising on refinement, etc.) l  hat have you done to promote animal welfare and refinement outside of W your workplace? (e.g., IAT activities, school visits, public presentations, etc.) l  ow have you shared your knowledge of laboratory animal care with others? H (e.g., lectures, posters, workplace projects, etc.) l f you are selected, how will this award benefit your career and your I associates? l  ow will you disseminate your AAALAC Fellowship experience back to your H workplace and other colleagues? l  oes your package include evidence of leadership or leadership potential D and wider participation? (e.g., with posters, presentations or publications?) l  ave you participated in overseas meetings in the past? H Winners will be expected to share their experiences briefly by preparing a brief written report for AAALAC International and a full report to be published in a future issue of the IAT Bulletin. They will also be expected to communicate their experiences to others by presenting at a local or national conference e.g., talk or poster at an IAT Branch meeting or Congress. Mail, fax or email your application materials by 1 June 2014: AAALAC International c/o The International Fellowship Committee 5283 Corporate Drive, Suite 203 Frederick, MD 21703, USA Fax: +301.696.9627 Email: fellow@aaalac.org For complete details and a list of selection criteria, visit www.aaalac.org/about/ fellowship.cfm. Receipt of application will be confirmed by email to candidates by 5 June 2014. If you have not received confirmation or have any questions about this award, please call +301.696.9626 or email fellow@aaalac.org. (The AAALAC International Fellowship Award is presented by the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC) International through a grant by Priority One Services, Inc. and in cooperation with AALAS, IAT, Medical Research Council and National Institutes of Health.) Don’t delay get your application in now! Carol Fox FIAT RAnTech was the 2009 recipient Laura Foster MIAT RAnTech Senior Animal Technologist at AstraZeneca, 2010 winner left to right: Mark Gardiner, Jose (Pepe) Figueroa, President of Priority One Services Inc, sponsors and Dr Christian E Newcomer, Executive Director of AAALAC (right) Martin Heath, the 2012 award winner holding the attractive inscribed crystal globe Stuart Stevenson BSc FIAT RAnTech. Facilities Manager at Eli Lilly, is the current 2013 winner
Call for nominations now open for the  2014 AAALAC International Fellowship UK Award If you are an IAT Registered Technolo...
2014 CHARITY NOMINATED BY THE MIDLANDS BRANCH Around seven young people aged between 13 and 24 are diagnosed with cancer every day in the UK.  We are the only charity dedicated to providing expert care and support from the moment they hear the word cancer. We treat them as young people first, cancer patients second and everything we do aims to improve their quality of life and chances of survival.     We also educate young people in schools about cancer to help improve the speed and quality of diagnosis. We rely on donations to fund our vital work. Help transform the lives of young people with cancer. Teenage Cancer Trust is a registered charity: 1062559 (England & Wales), SC039757 (Scotland) Visit www.teenagecancertrust.org 28 General Information
2014 CHARITY NOMINATED BY THE MIDLANDS BRANCH  Around seven young people aged between 13 and 24 are diagnosed with cancer ...
Lucy’s story … please spend two minutes reading it Lucy was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer, a Rhabdomyosarcoma, just before Christmas 2009 when she was 14. She was referred to the Children’s Hospital in Birmingham and received her first few rounds of chemotherapy on the children’s oncology ward there. The staff were wonderful but when she was so poorly she just did not need Disney pictures on the wall and very young children on toy tractors running around the ward and so when the brand new Teenage Cancer Trust unit was officially opened there in March 2010, she was one of the first teenagers to be admitted. It made such a difference to her… obviously you would not expect her to be looking forward to going in for her treatment but this unit had been designed especially for teenagers and their social needs to help make the experience more tolerable being kitted out with DVD players and TVs at each bed, Wi-Fi skylights with coloured ceiling lights controlled by a touch screen next to the bed, PlayStations, a pool table, juke box and kitchen and rather bizarrely for a cancer ward… hairdryers! (Needless to say, they do not get much use!) It is a bit like the Big Brother House except that friends and siblings are encouraged to visit too and parents can stay on a drop down bed next to their child – a vast improvement on the fold up plastic camp beds set out in the old ward. The communal area was brilliant allowing Lucy the benefit of getting to know other teenagers going through the same treatment. It cannot be underestimated that no matter how lovely old friends are, they just have no understanding of the emotional and physical effects of cancer diagnosis and treatment. Believe it or not it is a really happy place to be, swapping tips on beanie hats versus wigs - and how to avoid the hospital teacher- for which Lucy found that grabbing a vomit bowl as she approached was the best deterrent! The specialist staff on the unit were amazing too. As Lucy said “how sensible to leave teenagers asleep in bed as the ward doesn’t normally wake up until after 10.30 in the morning”- and why not?! Lucy also thought the introduction of the Teenage Cancer Trust Funded youth support coordinator was a great idea too, she organised trips and monthly nights out, again encouraging the socialising between the teenagers and was always available to have a chat. Lucy is now 19 and has been in remission for 3 years. Her hair has grown back and she returned to school to complete her A-levels. She is now at Bristol University studying Cancer Biology, with a view to going into research. Her ‘cancer journey’ has been a huge part of her life to date and she looks forward to helping improve outcomes for others in years to come. Left: Lucy going through treatment Right: Lucy with Roger Daltrey at the opening of the Teenage Cancer Trust unit, Birmingham Children’s Hospital. These teenagers are amazing. They have been through more than we as adults can imagine. Teenage Cancer trust helps in such an important way – it allows them to be teenagers – not just cancer patients. With your support we can help more young people like these. Thank you for generously donating to the raffle. General Information 29
Lucy   s story     please spend two minutes reading it Lucy was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer, a Rhabdomyosarcoma, ...
General Information EDINBURGH BRANCH NOMINATED Thank you! Last year, £1,500 was raised at Congress in support of St Columba who are building a new hospice. On behalf of the Edinburgh Branch who nominated this worthwhile cause, we thank everyone who bought a raffle ticket. General Information 31
General Information EDINBURGH BRANCH NOMINATED  Thank you  Last year,   1,500 was raised at Congress in support of St Colu...
Scientific Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL VENUE: BALLROOM Time Event 09.00 - 09.05 Opening of Congress 2014 Alan Graham Chair Congress Committee 09.05 - 09.35  Principles of actual severity recording using a model of myocardial infarction (MI) Kathy Ryder 09.35 - 10.00  Refining oral gavage: assessing and improving animal welfare in the laboratory-housed dog Laura Hall In 10.00 - 10.30  at the deep end Joy Penson 10.30 - 10.45  LASH TRADE PRESENTATIONS F A selection of one minute talks on current industry innovations COFFEE 10.45 - 11.15 11.00 - 13.00 WORKSHOP SESSIONS Location and full details on page 65 onwards 11.15 - 11.45  ‘Welfare first’: caring for those that care for animals Norman Mortell 11.45 - 12.15  Animal research: time to talk Kirk Leech 12.15 - 12.45  Bloom where you are planted Ann Turner 12.15 - 13.00  Meet the poster authors – Foyer outside Trade Exhibition 12.45 - 13.00  LASH TRADE PRESENTATIONS F 13.00 - 14.00 LUNCH 14.00 - 17.00  WORKSHOP SESSIONS Locations and full details on page 65 onwards 14.00 - 14.30  How do you decide which laboratory diet will meet your needs? Carrie Schultz 14.30 - 15.00  Applications of new techniques to health monitoring programmes Stephanie Durand 15.00 - 15.15 F  LASH TRADE PRESENTATIONS 15.15 - 16.00 TEA 16.00 - 18.00  WORKSHOP SESSIONS Locations and full details on page 65 onwards 16.00 - 16.30  Cryopreservation and bio-banking and how it plays a role in the 3Rs Philip Damiani 16.30 - 17.00  The low(er) carbon laboratory animal research facility Steven Cubitt and Fintan Lyons 17.00 - 17.30  ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD – sponsored by Institute of Animal Technology and Animals in Science Education Trust Title: Improving animal welfare in neurodegenerative mice Winner: Natalie Edwards 32 Scientific Programme
Scientific Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL VENUE  BALLROOM Time Event 09.00 - 09.05  Opening of Congress 2014   Alan Graham ...
Scientific Programme THURSDAY 10th APRIL VENUE: BALLROOM Time Event 09.00 - 11.00  WORKSHOP SESSIONS Locations and full details on page 65 onwards 09.00 - 09.30 Animals in Science Committee (ASC) overview John Landers 09.30 - 10.00  forward look from Animals in Science Regulation Unit (ASRU) A Will Reynolds Animal research and the public: building bridges 10.00 - 10.30 Bella Williams 10.30 - 11.00 COFFEE 11.00 - 13.00  WORKSHOP SESSIONS Locations and full details on page 65 onwards FIRST TIME PRESENTERS – sponsored by Marshall BKU 11.00 - 11.20  Can exercise wheels improve the mouse as a research model? Jonathan Lock 11.20 - 11.40  My experiences as the AAALAC International Fellowship 2013 Award winner Stuart Stevenson 11.40 - 12.00  Surviving an infiltration Amy Wathen I ntroduction to cryopreservation of Zebrafish sperm 12.00 - 12.20 Jenna Hakkesteeg 12.20 - 12.40  Egg to egg in 2 months: variability in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Heather Callaway 12.40 - 13.00  Sheep behaviour and welfare: applications of behaviour in research Susannah Parkin 13.00 - 14.00 LUNCH 14.00 - 15.30 POSTER PRESENTATIONS – sponsored by LBS Full details on page 48 onwards 15.30 - 16.15 Meet the poster authors – Foyer outside Trade Exhibition 15.30 - 16.15 TEA 16.15 - 17.00  KEVIN DOLAN MEMORIAL LECTURE AN ARTIFICIAL PANCREAS IN DIABETIC PIGS USING A SMART MATERIAL DEVICE M Joan Taylor - abstract features on page 47 17.00 - 17.20 Presentation of Awards  – sponsored by Marshall BKU First Time Presenters Best Poster – sponsored by LBS Journal Article 2013 – Animal Technology and Welfare (Marjorie (Sandiford) Whittingham Memorial Prize) Andrew Blake Tribute Award 2014 – sponsored by IAT and AS-ET AAALAC International USA Fellowship Award 2014 C  lose of Congress: Steve Owen Chair Institute of Animal Technology Scientific Programme 33
Scientific Programme THURSDAY 10th APRIL VENUE  BALLROOM Time Event 09.00 - 11.00   WORKSHOP SESSIONS Locations and full d...
34 Scientific Programme Scientific Programme
34  Scientific Programme  Scientific Programme
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL VENUE: BALLROOM 09.00 Opening of Congress 2014  Alan Graham MA FIAT Chair Congress Committee  avid Spillane FIAT Chair: D  Honorary Member Institute of Animal Technology 09.05 Principles of actual severity recording using a model of myocardial infarction (MI) Kathy Ryder MB BS BSc MRCP DPhil  Unit Inspector, Animals in Science Regulation Unit (ASRU), PO Box 6779, Dundee DD1 9WW  Models of myocardial infarction cause significant harm to animals and mortality rates can be high both intraoperatively and post-operatively. There is variation in prospective classification of protocols which appears to be similar in different project licences. The reasons why this variability exists will be discussed. The classification of actual severity of animals subject to this procedure needs to be reported from January 2014. Factors to be considered in determination of classification of individual animals will be presented. There are many issues which can be considered as potential refinements to this procedure, such as the use of antiarrhythmics.  Evidence in favour of the use of them, or lack of evidence will be discussed. Factors and supplementary techniques which need to be justified before subjecting animals to anything but the simplest procedures with the earliest endpoints will be outlined. The development of heart failure and sudden death in these models will also be discussed. 09.35  Refining oral gavage: assessing and improving animal welfare in the laboratoryhoused dog Laura Hall BA Psychology, School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirlingshire FK9 4LA  The dog is a frequently-used, non-rodent species in the safety assessment of new medicines and we have a scientific and ethical obligation to ensure the best quality of data is achieved from their use. Oral gavage (OG) is a technique frequently used to deliver a compound directly into the stomach; OG can be aversive and the frequency of its use is a cause for welfare concern where the technique is not refined. Little research has been published on the OG technique in dogs or the refinement of other regulated procedures. A Welfare Assessment Framework (WAF) (Hall et al, in preparation) was previously developed for use with the laboratoryhoused dog; contrasting patterns of behaviour, cardiovascular, nociceptive and affective measures were found in dogs with poor and good welfare. Using the WAF, we compared welfare measures across three conditions: Sham Dosing (SD), Refined Training Protocol (RTP) and control group that had neither training nor sham dosing, to determine the benefit to welfare and scientific output of each technique. The pattern of findings in this study show that SD is ineffective as a habituation techniquie and ‘primes’ rather than desensitises. Dogs in the control group showed few changes in parameters across the study with some undesirable changes during dosing, while dogs in the RTP condition showed improvements in Scientific Programme 35
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL VENUE  BALLROOM 09.00  Opening of Congress 2014     Alan Graham MA FIAT Chair Congr...
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL many parameters across the study. This presentation will describe the identification of welfare states in the laboratory-housed dog, along with the impact of welfare on data output and a protocol to mitigate the adverse effects of oral gavage. 10.00 In at the deep end Joy Penson BA MIAT  Biomedical Services Unit, University of Birmingham, West Midlands B15 2TT  This paper will outline the process of taking an established forced exercise model of swimming mice developed by a research group outside the UK. Then harmonising and adapting this to UK legislation and the culture of care and ethics that characterises our approach to animal welfare in the UK. We will discuss the challenges this presented to the Named Persons and the way in which we refined the model using the principles of the 3Rs. Despite swimming not being a natural behaviour for mice we were able to develop this model with minimal stress to the mice drawing on the experience we had in-house with exercise models for birds and fish. The refined model that we developed appeared to be successful in meeting the objectives of the study. 10.30 FLASH TRADE PRESENTATIONS A selection of one minute talks on current industry innovations. 10.45 COFFEE/TEA (served in the Trade Exhibition Hall) 11.00 WORKSHOP SESSIONS Venues, timings, running orders and details appear on page 65 onwards. Chair: Professor Sir Richard Gardner MA PhD FSB  Immediate Past President Institute of Animal Technology Hon FIAT FRS 11.15 ‘Welfare first’: caring for those that care for animals Norman Mortell BA (Hons) MIAT RAnTech  of Operations, Agenda Resource Management, PO Box 24, Hull, Yorkshire Director HU12 8YJ  Nobody needs to tell us as Animal Technologists that we have moral and legal responsibilities to the animals in our care. However, ‘Welfare First’ is a programme that considers how the research sector can better express these expectations and put animal welfare front and centre.  a new era of openness ‘Welfare First’ expresses this commitment to animal care In and to supporting those who deliver high quality care. Looking at six key principles it considers how we engage all of our animal technologists, the research sector and the wider community. Most organisations will have elements of a ‘Welfare First’ programme but joining them together makes these principles clear, helps support a culture of care and better protect the integrity of research. 36 Scientific Programme
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL many parameters across the study. This presentation will describe the identificatio...
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL 11.45  Animal research: time to talk Kirk Leech MA BA CertEd  Interim Programme Director, European Animal Research Association (EARA), Understanding Animal Research (UAR), Hodgkin Huxley House, 30 Farrindgon Lane, London EC1R 3AW  The European Animal Research Association (EARA) has been established in response to the need (expressed by the research community) to inform the European public on the continued need for, and benefit of, the humane use of animals in biomedical research. It seeks to provide support, advocacy and reliable communication on behalf of public and private researchers at both National and European levels.  Animal research remains a contentious issue with strong vocal opposition. As a result, public communications by many individuals and institutions across the European Union have diminished.  This lack of communication allows the opposition view to prevail; with the result of public and political opinion turning against the use of animals in research. This has the potential to lead to further restrictions on research, to the detriment of science, medicine, and industry.  events in Italy and Germany have shown, for too long, the scientific community As (with one or two notable exceptions) has allowed the fear of animal rights extremists to prevent them from speaking publically about animal research. This fear – although understandable – is unfounded. Whilst most researchers may encounter legal campaign groups who have ethical objections to the use of animals in research, very few will ever come across extremists. These legal campaign groups are largely well-funded, professional and involved in vocal but legal activities.  Although research remains a controversial subject, at this time of change when new legislation has brought the issue back into the spotlight (and animal rights activists have the attention of the public and the media) it is important for the scientific community to speak openly and collectively of the need for humane and well-regulated animal research. 12.15 Bloom where you are planted Ann Turner PhD  Executive Director, American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS), 9190 Crestwyn Hills Drive, Memphis, TN 38125, USA  Working in the laboratory animal science field is challenging and rewarding – it is also demanding! At times it may seem that the demands of caring for the animals take precedence over the need for professional and personal growth and development. Mentors and mentoring, continuing education, professional development and involvement, risk taking, family relations, friendships, work ethics, leisure and play, community service, personal integrity, humor and career planning techniques will be explored. This presentation will focus on resources and ideas to balance the demands of being a caring and competent laboratory animal science professional and a nurturing and loving spouse, partner, parent and friend while advancing personal and professional growth. Scientific Programme 37
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL 11.45   Animal research  time to talk   Kirk Leech MA BA CertEd    Interim Programm...
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL 12.15 MEET THE POSTER AUTHORS - Foyer outside Trade Exhibition 12.45 FLASH TRADE PRESENTATIONS A selection of one minute talks on current industry innovations. 13.00 LUNCH 14.00 WORKSHOP SESSIONS Venues, timings, running orders and details appear on page 65 onwards. Chair: Pete Willan DMS FInstMgt MIAT RAnTech Honorary Member Institute of Animal Technology 14.00 How do you decide which laboratory diet will meet your needs? Carrie Schultz PhD  Nutritionist, PMI LabDiet®, Richmond, VA, USA  With so many laboratory animal diets on the market it can be a bit overwhelming trying to decide the diet that most appropriately meets best needs. The type of research being conducted can dictate which diet is most appropriate for the study design as well as for decreasing unwanted variables. Perhaps the diet has to follow GLP guidelines further defining which diet to use. The life stage of the animals, such as maintenance, growth, reproduction or lactation can also be a factor in choosing the correct diet. Furthermore, consideration has to be given to the individual needs of the facility. Is the facility a specific pathogen free facility requiring an irradiated or autoclavable diet?  facility that is established as a production/breeding facility may have different A dietary needs than one specifically designed for research purposes. It is also essential to understand the diet specification sheets that are provided by the feed industry.  Specification sheets provide you with information on both the ingredient and nutrient composition of the diets for easy comparison between suppliers but also if the nutrient values are assayed (Certificate of Analysis) or if the values provided on the sheet are just calculated values for information purposes only. When evaluating diets for your facility, it is imperative to take all of these considerations into account to produce healthy animals as well as good sound results for publishable data. 14.30 Applications of new techniques to health monitoring programmes Stephanie Durand PhD1, Ken Henderson PhD2 and Charles Clifford DVM PhD DACVP3 1 Operations Manager, Bacteriology and Serology, Research Animal Diagnostic Services, Charles River Laboratories, Domaine des Oncins, 69592 L’Abresle Cedex, Lyon, France 2 Director, Research and Development, Research Animal Diagnostic Services, Charles River Laboratories, 251 Ballardvale Street, Wilmington MA 01882, USA 3 Director,  Pathology and Technical Services, Research Animal Diagnostic Services, Charles River Laboratories, 251 Ballardvale Street, Wilmington MA 01882, USA  health monitoring programme is an essential tool for the management of A laboratory rodent colonies. Infectious agents can disrupt biomedical research projects and compromise the validity of experiment results. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technology has improved dramatically since the 1980s, and using high-throughput PCR with real-time technology can provide several advantages and improve analytical sensitivity and specificity. Scientific Programme 39
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL 12.15  MEET THE POSTER AUTHORS - Foyer outside Trade Exhibition 12.45  FLASH TRADE ...
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL  Three applications are described in this paper:  Research biologics testing: approximately 4,000 – 4,500 samples were tested by – PCR for an extensive panel of viruses (rodent and human). The results showed more than 1% of all samples were found positive for rodent viruses. Less than 0.1%of the human-labelled samples were found positive for rodent viruses.  Quarantine testing: we investigated high-throughput PCR testing PCR Rodent – Infection Agents (PRIA) as a quarantine alternative to sentinels by directly testing pet shop mice to simulate a quarantine scenario. PRIA detected all agents at early time points, whereas five agents were not detected in contact sentinels and in bedding sentinels.  Routine screening: we investigated air exhaust sample testing by PCR from – ventilated animal racks for the detection of pathogens. Thirteen agents were detected, including several that were previously shown not to transmit efficiently to bedding sentinels.  Innovative technologies are expanding the capabilities of diagnostics, which enables earlier, faster and more precise identification of infectious agents while causing minimal interference with the animal populations. 15.00 FLASH TRADE PRESENTATIONS A selection of one minute talks on current industry innovations. 15.15 COFFEE/TEA (served in the Trade Exhibition Hall) 16.00 WORKSHOP SESSIONS Venues, timings, running orders and details appear on page 65 onwards. Chair: David Anderson BVMS MVM MRCVS Superintendent Inspectorate Home Office (Retired) and Veterinary Adviser, Pentland Management Systems 16.00 Cryopreservation and bio-banking and how it plays a role in the 3Rs Philip Damiani PhD  Global Enterprise, Harlan Laboratories, Hillcrest, Dodgeford Lane, Belton, Head of Loughborough, Leicestershire LE12 9TE  is apparent that the number of genetically modified (GM) rodents used in It scientific research continues to increase yearly. Recently the number of GM rodents surpassed non-genetically modified mice and rats used in the research forum and this raises both ethical and scientific issues in terms of their routine husbandry, breeding and maintenance. These issues need to be considered by all involved parties to further ensure that all stakeholders are aware of the challenging ethical issues. Furthermore, it is imperative that all stakeholders are made aware of the current debate regarding their creation and use. As the result of such debates and challenges that GM rodents bring to light, it has been increasing evident that governing bodies and legislation have started to develop relevant and stringent polices regarding such animals. Many of these policies have been calling for an increased monitoring and awareness of the potential animal welfare impacts. 40 Scientific Programme
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL    Three applications are described in this paper     Research biologics testing  a...
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL As many facilities attempt to become compliant with these regulations, there are further requirements to incorporate Russell and Burch’s 3Rs; replacement, reduction and refinement when working with genetically modified as well as nongenetically modified animals.  Recent advances in assisted reproductive techniques (ART), such as superovulation, ovarian and embryo transfer, sperm and embryo cryopreservation, have allowed for the further propagation of GM rodents. These techniques have now become routine in their use that many facilities have devoted resources for in house capabilities to ensure the propagation of their valuable lines. Although ART is characteristically utilised for the breeding of GM rodents, many of the routine techniques can be incorporated in the application of the 3Rs. This paper will address how some routine ART procedures, such as in vitro fertilisation, sperm and embryo cryopreservation can be used to further reduce, replace or refine the generation and breeding of GM rodents, thus complying with new regulations and public demand for stringent animal welfare standards. In addition, the recent adaptation of the newest technologies in the generation of GM animals will be explored. 16.30 The low(er) carbon laboratory animal research facility Steven Cubitt MSc FIAT and Fintan Lyons BA (Hons)  Cube Clean Tech, St John’s Innovation Park, Cowley Road, Cambridge CB4 0WS  The worldwide research community has never been so interconnected; equally the costs of carrying out research in different regions are more transparent. Biomedical Research within the UK has been recognised as one of the key areas of the knowledge based economy, bringing economic benefit to the UK. The transposition of Directive 2010/63 will remove internal disparities within Europe. The use of new concepts, technologies and designs will allow for a significant reduction in energy and operational costs whilst maintaining or improving environmental quality. Directive 2010/63 establishes a common European standard which enables us to provide high quality environments using evidence based design.  This presentation will demonstrate that traditional approaches to Biomedical Research Facility (BRF) design and operation waste a lot of energy, leading to both high operating and high capital costs. We will demonstrate that you can make large reductions in energy use in current and new facilities to the order of £100,000s each year while maintaining or even improving environmental quality. In addition this approach reduces the capital cost of new facilities and retrofits through better design and right sizing of plant and associated systems.  is of vital importance that we reduce the cost of carrying out research within the It UK, while improving environmental quality. Utilising the highly skilled resources we have within the UK and Ireland, we have the skill base to deliver a new generation of world class Biomedical Research facilities. This will help maintain the UK’s position as one of the leading areas globally for biomedical research into the future. ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD – sponsored by IAT and AS-ET Scientific Programme 41
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL As many facilities attempt to become compliant with these regulations, there are fu...
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL 17.00  Improving animal welfare for neurodegenerative mice Natalie Edwards  University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Central Biomedical Resources, Centre of Brain Repair, John Van Geest Building, Forvie Site, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0PY  Can a neurodegenerative mouse’s weight loss be slowed down by simply providing fresh mash twice a day and ensuring it is always placed in the same area? From 3 months of age Sandhoff disease model mice (Hexb KO) start to have neurological decline and reduced movement so mashed diet is provided. There were four categories of feeding regimes trialled and the mice were weighed daily; the categories covered the placement of mash within a cage and how often the mash was provided. The results show that placing the mash in the same place twice a day promoted the animal’s welfare and the mice had a longer survival time compared to the other categories. 42 Scientific Programme
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL 17.00   Improving animal welfare for neurodegenerative mice   Natalie Edwards    Un...
Scientific Programme THURSDAY 10th APRIL VENUE: BALLROOM Chair: Brian Lowe MSc FIAT PGCE Honorary Member Institute of Animal Technology 09.00 WORKSHOP SESSIONS Venues, timings, running orders and details appear on page 65 onwards. 09.00 Animals in Science Committee (ASC) overview John Landers PhD BSc DLitt  Chair, Animals in Science Committee (ASC) and Senior Research Fellow, Hertford College, Oxford OX1 3BW  This overview will briefly outline the functions of the ASC as set out in the amended Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act (ASPA), its composition and establishment and the competencies of its members. Explaining the committee’s continuing responsibilities arising from the EU Directive, ASPA and the Minister’s commissioning letter, together with the specific tasks assigned to it by the Minister for the current year 2013/4. 09.30  forward look from Animals in Science Regulation Unit (ASRU) A Will Reynolds BSc (Hons) MPhil  Head of Policy and Administration, Home Office, Animals in Science Regulations Unit (ASRU), 2 Marsham Street, London SW1P 4DF  The past two years have been transformational for ASRU (Animals in Science Regulation Unit). 2012 saw us taking through parliament the transposition of the EU Directive into ASPA to have the new regulations in place on 1 January 2013. In 2013, we consulted widely and published extensive guidance on the operation of the act as well as a draft code of practice. We, and our stakeholders, have been active in a number of expert working groups in Brussels to achieve harmonised approaches to the Directive across Europe. We have also published, in partnership with colleagues in BIS (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) and the Department of Health, a delivery plan for our coalition commitment to “work to reduce the use of animals in scientific research” – an ambitious plan containing a number of challenging deliverables for us and for others. After several false starts, 2013 saw us really get to grips with e-licensing, preparing for the widespread launch of ASPeL (Animals in Scientific Procedures e-Licensing) in 2014. We have moved on with centralising our licensing work, mostly into London, having closed regional offices and bidding a fond farewell to several close colleagues. The review of section 24 to create greater openness and transparency was also commenced in 2013. Of course, these and other initiatives, do not end with the chiming of Big Ben at midnight on the 31st December.  this session, colleagues from ASRU will provide updates, status reports and a In forward look on our key activities as we enter the second quarter of 2014. 10.00 Animal research and the public: building bridges Bella Williams PhD BSc (Hons) DPhil MIKE  Head of Engagement, Understanding Animal Research (UAR), Hodgkin Huxley House, 30 Farringdon Lane, London WC1R 3AW  Since October 2012, UAR has been leading a Concordat process which brings together sixty partners from across the life sciences sector, uniting them in a commitment to be open with the public around animal research. However, what Scientific Programme 43
Scientific Programme THURSDAY 10th APRIL VENUE  BALLROOM  Chair    Brian Lowe MSc FIAT PGCE  Honorary Member Institute of ...
Scientific Programme THURSDAY 10th APRIL do the public really think about the use of animals in science? And are we totally addressing their concerns? And if not, how should we go about being more open? In developing the Concordat, a public dialogue was held to understand what the public expect in terms of ‘Openness’ from people and organisations that use animals in their research. Public dialogue is a deliberative social research method which gives groups of public participants the opportunity to explore an issue in depth rather than just the knee-jerk responses that we see in surveys. It can help us understand why people feel the way they do and help us understand what can be done by the life-science community to address their concerns. Public opinion is important; without it not only are our jobs less pleasant but work with animals in science would not be possible. Here I discuss what we found during the public dialogue and the next steps for the Concordat 10.30 TEA/COFFEE (served in the Trade Exhibition Hall) Chair: Will Reynolds BSc (Hons) MPhil  Head of Policy and Administration, Animals in Science Regulation Unit (ASRU) 11.00 WORKSHOP SESSIONS Venues, timings, running orders and details appear on page 65 onwards. FIRST TIME PRESENTERS – sponsored by Marshall BKU 11.00 Can exercise wheels improve the mouse as a research model Jonathan Lock  Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ES  is well known that mice in their natural environment are very active and spend It most of their waking hours searching out food and covering huge distances in the process. Laboratory mice are extremely limited regarding exercise and mental stimulation. We have looked at an exercise wheel as a way of offering this in individually ventilated cages (IVCs), how much the mice use it and how it works in a social group. Scientifically would this make our mice a better model for research? 11.20 My experiences as the AAALAC International Fellowship 2013 Award winner Stuart Stevenson BSc FIAT RAnTech NEBOSH  Facilities Manager, Lilly UK, Erl Wood Manor, Sunninghill Road, Windlesham, Surrey GU20 6PH  2013 I had the honour of receiving the AAALAC International Fellowship Award, In enabling me to travel to the USA in October 2013 and meet with animal care staff working in their facilities and also attend the AAALAS conference in Baltimore. I would like to share this experience with my IAT colleagues to encourage you to apply for this award. (Also see pages 15, 16 and 27.) 11.40 Surviving an infiltration Amy Wathen MIAT CBS  Imperial College, South Kensington, SAF Building, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ  be infiltrated by an ‘Animal Rights’ organisation is devastating for any animal To research establishment. Imperial College fell victim to this last year and the purpose of this paper is to discuss what happened, how we dealt with it and what lessons we learnt. In preparation for this paper I conducted an in-house anonymous survey 44 Scientific Programme
Scientific Programme THURSDAY 10th APRIL do the public really think about the use of animals in science  And are we totall...
Scientific Programme THURSDAY 10th APRIL regarding the emotions experienced by those affected, from junior technicians to vets, researchers and senior management.  is my belief that this kind of infiltration can and will happen again and as a It research community we need to share our experiences and show how a very negative event can result in very positive outcomes. 12.00 Introduction to cryopreservation of Zebrafish sperm Jenna Hakkesteeg  Fish Facility, University College London (UCL), Division of Biosciences, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have become an increasingly favoured animal model within many different scientific disciplines. Over the years, the numbers of genetically distinct strains used has increased exponentially. This has increased the need to preserve genetic strains, some of which may not be of current scientific interest and not required as living fish. Archiving lines by sperm cryopreservation has become an option to dramatically reduce the numbers of live animals. At UCL, we have introduced a sperm cryopreservation programme, with the aim of reducing some of our less used strains. Specific techniques and materials used for each step during the cryopreservation process have a significant effect on the viability of samples, as well as handling of the eggs during in vitro fertilisation (IVF). Introducing a reliable freezing programme to the facility has a significant effect in the reduction of live animals. It is also an efficient resource to back up important strains rather than housing them live elsewhere. By utilising this process we are able to retain hundreds of strains but house smaller numbers of live fish. 12.20 Egg to egg in 2 months: variability in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Heather Callaway PhD MIAT  Fish Facility, University College London (UCL) , Division of Biosciences, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT  the demand for Zebrafish has grown over the years, the need to reduce the time As it takes for the fish to reach sexual maturity has come become a significant issue. In the past many facilities achieved sexual maturity in Zebrafish between 4–6 months – nowadays this time has generally been reduced, with some facilities claiming to achieve sexual maturity by 30–40 days. Is it possible to reduce the time it takes to reach sexual maturity without compromising the health and welfare of the fish? To test this, a secondary section was added to the UCL nursery section – a juvenile section; this allowed us to monitor the growth of the fish over an extended period of time. The nursery and juvenile sections were fed four times a day using different live and dry food sizes corresponding to the gape size of the fish. The larval and juvenile forms were monitored at each feeding to check water rates, flow rates and survival rates. Once the juveniles reached 54–56 days, the fish were tested to see if they had reached sexual maturity – determined by the ability to breed and lay fertilised eggs. From this it has been found that the majority of the lines are breeding by 56 days. This was then compared to an older protocol, to monitor success rates. 12.40 Sheep behaviour and welfare: applications of behaviour in research Susannah Parkin BSc (Hons) Royal Veterinary College, BSU, College Street, London NW1 0TU  Sheep, a gregarious preyed upon species, are quadrupedal, ruminant mammals, even-toed ungulates and herbivores. Over the past 11,000 – 12,000 years, sheep as we know them, have evolved from the wild mouflon whose habitat was desert or mountain grassland in the fertile crescent of western Iran and Turkey, Syria and Scientific Programme 45
Scientific Programme THURSDAY 10th APRIL regarding the emotions experienced by those affected, from junior technicians to ...
Scientific Programme THURSDAY 10th APRIL Iraq. Within this timescale minimal anatomical changes have occurred. Recognised signs of domestication include reduction in body size, tail shape, presence of horns, coat type and colour (Lynch JJ, Hinds GN and Adams DB, 1992, The Behaviour of Sheep; Biological Principles and Implications for Production. CAB International, Oxon, UK).  The presentation defines normal sheep behaviour in differing circumstances. Research involving agricultural animals such as sheep, has been beneficial to several animal professions, for example, experimental studies for biomedical research (orthopaedic fracture repair), pharmaceutical products (inhaler for emphysema), agricultural production research and the study of welfare of food production Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE). The behavioural observations are divided into six components; 1) reproductive behaviour 2) parental behaviour 3) lamb behaviour 4) grazing behaviour 5) cognition and emotion 6) social behaviour and organisation and the narrative explains the expected behaviour throughout each phase. 13.00 LUNCH Chair: Jas Barley MSc FIAT RAnTech Chair Editorial Board and Editor of Animal Technology and Welfare 14.00 POSTER PRESENTATIONS – sponsored by LBS Running order and details on page 48 onwards. 15.30 MEET THE POSTER AUTHORS – Foyer outside Trade Exhibition Hall 15.30 TEA/COFFEE (served in the Trade Exhibition Hall) Chair: Steve Owen FIAT RAnTech Chair Institute of Animal Technology 16.15 KEVIN DOLAN MEMORIAL LECTURE  AN ARTIFICIAL PANCREAS IN DIABETIC PIGS USING A SMART MATERIAL DEVICE M Joan Taylor PhD MRPharms  of Pharmaceuticals, Leicester School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Life Professor Sciences, De Montford University, Leicester LE1 9BH 17.00 Presentation of Awards:   First Time Presenters 2014 – sponsored by Marshall BKU Best Poster 2014 – sponsored by LBS  Journal Article 2013 – Animal Technology and Welfare Marjorie (Sandiford) Whittingham Memorial Prize – Haley Daniels (Winner) Andrew Blake Tribute Award 2014 – sponsored by IAT and AS-ET Natalie Edwards (Winner) AAALAC International USA Fellowship Award 2014 – Lynell Dupepe (Winner) 17.20 Close of Congress 2014 Steve Owen FIAT RAnTech Chair Institute of Animal Technology 46 Scientific Programme
Scientific Programme THURSDAY 10th APRIL Iraq. Within this timescale minimal anatomical changes have occurred. Recognised ...
KEVIN DOLAN MEMORIAL LECTURE An artificial pancreas in diabetic pigs using a Smart Material Device Professor M Joan Taylor PhD MRPharmS This implantable closed loop insulin delivery system or artificial pancreas is not a cell implant or a pancreas transplant and it is not electronic. It doesn’t have moving parts or a battery and it needs no immunosuppression. A smart polymeric material layer controls the release from the device. The material is the sensor and the delivery port whereas most closed loop designs have these as separate components. Why would we want to do this? Automatic regulation of blood glucose levels has been a goal in the treatment of diabetes because disease complications are the consequence of poor manual control. Conventional designs based on either cellular or electronic mechanisms have significant shortcomings at the present time. How did we do it? The assembled doubled-sided and sterilised device was inserted surgically into the peritoneal space, linked by fine tubing to the refill ports located under the dorsal skin. The recovered pigs were rendered diabetic. What did we find? The diabetes took about a week (day 21) to become fully controlled, favourably at day 52, nearly 5 weeks after control had been established, the insulin delivery failed and diabetic levels re-emerged at day 56. This was a small initial trial and the success achieved in this man-sized model was very encouraging, that at the some point in the future, it might be used in humans. Top Left – the larger one, as used in the pig work. Bottom Left – the smaller one, made as a non-working maquette to demonstrate how it could look. Right – the pig immediately post op, looking good – it has a venous cannula in the neck veins and you can see where the refill ports have been placed quite distant from the device but for easy access later Biography Graduated with a Pharmacy degree from the University of Brighton in 1970 and registered as a pharmacist in 1971. Worked as a pharmacist and then Chief Pharmacist at St Paul’s Hospital, London, for some time before leaving to pursue a Master’s degree at King’s College. Read for a doctoral degree at Nottingham University before joining De Montfort University within the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences. Now Professor of Pharmaceutics there, lecturing in formulation with and for proteins, as well as more general pharmaceutics areas. Her main research project is the implantable artificial pancreas but other projects go on in the lab, including skin enzyme responsive gels, insulin stability and sports physiology as applied to diabetes. These all link in a way that might not be obvious to others but keep them all smiling and learning in the laboratory. She is ‘Mum’ to three and ‘Grandma’ to nine! Scientific Programme 47
KEVIN DOLAN MEMORIAL LECTURE  An artificial pancreas in diabetic pigs using a Smart Material Device Professor M Joan Taylo...
Poster Presentations THURSDAY 10th APRIL BALLRoom Chair: 14.00 – 15.30 hrs Jas Barley MSc FIAT RAnTech Chair Editorial Board and Editor of Animal Technology and Welfare 10 minutes is allocated to each participant with adequate time to follow to address questions that may arise Each abstract appears on the following pages in the running order as below: Which nesting do I like best? A rodent’s perspective Karen Travis Dermal dosing in the rat Lauren Wilkinson An increased incidence of dystocia in a new SPF barrier unit Sylvia Mehigan Increasing useable surface area in standard mouse cages Andrew Newman Welfare challenges in high disease containment research using farm animals Hugh Simmons Repeated jugular catheterisation of minipigs using ultrasound guidance Adrian Zeltner You don’t keep anything clean without getting something else dirty! Care of the nude mouse as a sentinel strain maintained in a non-sterile husbandry IVC housing environment Savvas Piperelis 48 Scientific Programme
Poster Presentations THURSDAY 10th APRIL BALLRoom Chair   14.00     15.30 hrs   Jas Barley MSc FIAT RAnTech Chair Editoria...
Poster Presentations POSTERS Chair: Jas Barley MSc FIAT RAnTech Chair Editorial Board and Editor of Animal Technology and Welfare Which nesting do I like best? A rodent’s perspective Karen Travis Department of Biology, York University, Wentworth Way, York YO10 5DD Many research facilities choose to use rodent cage nesting based on many factors. These include cost, historic usage, suitability for the animal and cage change period, the study conducted and ease of use and storage. Our trial is based on current nesting materials which have been used in the facility for a number of years and the introduction of another product newly available to the market. The study focusses on the animals: how well the nesting is utilised, physical properties, natural look and feel and importantly, the behavioural impact. The study will be from an animal well-being perspective, regardless of cost and historic factors. Dermal dosing in the rat Lauren Wilkinson Huntingdon Life Sciences, Occold, Eye, Suffolk IP23 7PX For the safety evaluation of a new chemical entity it is often necessary to replicate the intended or expected route of exposure in an animal model. When this involves a dermal exposure, it is important to prevent accidental ingestion and oral exposure. This poster describes the protection of the dermal test site in rats using a semi-occlusive dressing designed to minimise animal discomfort and prevent ingestion of the test article. It describes the methods and materials necessary for repeated successful daily application. An increased incidence of dystocia in a new SPF barrier unit Sylvia Mehigan Bio Resources Unit, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Republic of Ireland Here we will describe an increased incidence of dystocia seen in a new SPF barrier unit as compared to the breeding performance of the same mouse lines in an older facility. We will present data on rates of dystocia and post mortem examinations and our findings, including significant variations according to genetic background and pointing out whether the female was birthing a first litter. This poster will examine potential explanations for the higher rates of dystocia such as embryo transfer of the lines, improved health status, environmental stressors and diet. It will also outline improvements made as well as further areas to investigate. Scientific Programme 49
Poster Presentations POSTERS Chair     Jas Barley MSc FIAT RAnTech  Chair Editorial Board and Editor of Animal Technology ...
Poster Presentations Increasing useable surface area in standard mouse cages Andrew Newman Wellcome Building, Resource unit, MSI/WTB Complex, Dow Street, Dundee, DD1 5EH We have been investigating how an interactive environment can be developed in a laboratory caging system. These ideas were tested in cages in our unit but could also be used in other caging systems. We presented a poster at the Canadian Association for Laboratory Animal Science in Winnipeg in 2013. We have continued to look at additional ideas on enrichment in relation to mouse caging. While most of the ideas are more suitable for cages with a height greater than the recommended minimum (120 mm) there are still possibilities in incorporating them in a ‘standard cage’. This poster will cover some of these enrichments. Finding enrichment that is both physical and cognitive for an animal in the confines of a laboratory cage would help remove a sterile environment and give a more enriched life within the cage. This poster shows some of the initial concepts and our attempts to turn these into a working reality. Welfare changes in high disease containment research using farm animals Hugh Simmons Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA), New Haw, Addlestone, Surrey KT15 3NB Undertaking research into diseases that require high containment using farm animals presents many challenges that need to be overcome to ensure animal welfare. The application of the five freedoms is particularly challenged by the Category 3 or 4 legislation, which defines key elements of building design and management necessary to contain these diseases. These have an impact on the kind of environment that can be offered to the animals, and consequently on how some of the freedoms such as ‘expression of normal behaviour’ can be achieved. The nature of the infectious agent used, and design of the experiment, will also both be critical to the animal’s freedom from pain, injury or disease. As this has a fundamental impact on the welfare of the animal, the principles and techniques for refinement for farm animals housed in containment will be discussed. 50 Scientific Programme
Poster Presentations  Increasing useable surface area in standard mouse cages Andrew Newman Wellcome Building, Resource un...
Poster Presentations Repeated jugular catheterisation of minipigs using ultrasound guidance Adrian Zeltner Ellegaard Göttingen Minipigs A/S, Soroe Landevej 302, Sjaeland 4261 Dalmose, Denmark Serial infusion and blood sampling are often important technical aspects of an experimental design. Superficial vessels in the minipig are not readily accessible. Although minipigs have a convenient size for handling, restraint and venipuncture can be stressful and affect blood parameters. Therefore, when experiments require frequent blood sampling, catheterisation is often the best option, both ethically and scientifically. When implanting catheters in the jugular veins of minipigs, we used the Seldinger Technique assisted by the use of ultrasound guidance. We found that this approach is a refinement, as it provides a relative easy and safe method to locate and puncture deep veins, avoiding a more invasive and traumatising surgical approach. Once the catheter is withdrawn, the vessel is left patent, enabling for several catheterizations during the study period. In certain types of studies, this can eliminate the need for permanently placed catheters, allowing periods of group housing and decreasing the number of animals excluded from the study prematurely due to complications related to long term catheterisation. You don’t keep anything clean without getting something else dirty! Care of the nude mouse as a sentinel strain maintained in a nonsterile husbandry IVC housing environment Savvas Piperelis Central Biological Services Department, Imperial College, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ Individually ventilated cage (IVC) systems are widely used in many rodent research facilities. Traditionally these units are monitored using immunocompetent sentinels exposed to dirty bedding and tested via methods including serology, bacteriology and parasitology. This screening method can be costly and requires the use of many animals. Also, because various factors may influence detection, it is not always effective. Our poster demonstrates how the use of immunocompetent sentinels is partially replaced by introducing immunodeficient sentinels where samples are tested via PCR. Whilst there may not be any advantage with regards to the transmission to the sentinel cage, there is an increased susceptibility of the sentinel to pathogens. We focus on the use of the nude mouse as a sentinel housed in non-sterile conditions over a 6 month period in a large academic establishment, and the husbandry and care provided by animal technicians. The nude mouse is vulnerable to a variety of opportunistic infections; however there are few reports of maintaining this strain over an extended time and none which demonstrate deliberate exposure to pathogens via dirty bedding in a non-sterile environment. Data presented will summarise the strict housing and checking regimes, health recording, weight records and incidence of spontaneous disease. These protocols have been reviewed and approved by our establishment’s ethics committee. It supports the key aims of the IAT i.e. Advancing and promoting excellence in the care and welfare of animals in research as there is an overall reduction in animals used for routine health screening and avoidance of transport stress associated with live animal transport. Scientific Programme 51
Poster Presentations  Repeated jugular catheterisation of minipigs using ultrasound guidance Adrian Zeltner Ellegaard G  t...
Poster Displays The Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus), breeding and husbandry Melissa Bean Nottingham University, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD For the animal technologist who wishes to learn more about the animals they work with, there is limited information available on the Siberian hamster. At Nottingham University we have a breeding colony of Siberian hamsters that have been with us for several years. The stock animals are used primarily for studies involving photoperiod and the colony is kept on a continuous tick over which consists of six breeding pairs. A new pair will typically take 2-3 months before the first litter is produced. Often, they lose this litter, usually due to cannibalism. There was a desire for the breeding performance of the Siberians at Nottingham to be improved so that fewer breeding pairs were needed. This would save the researcher money and reduce the numbers of animals being used. Most textbooks covering laboratory animals group the different breeds of hamster into one. The guidelines and advice that they give is aimed more at the Syrian hamster. So it is difficult to find accurate breeding data on the Siberian. Husbandry information on the Siberian that can be found on the internet indicates that “The young become sexually mature soon after weaning or at a couple of month’s age, which helps to give this species an impressive capacity for reproduction” (Macdonald 1984, Nowak 1991, Parker 1990). Yet this is not what we were seeing at Nottingham. My poster explains a bit more about the husbandry of the Siberian and shows the trials that were undertaken to see whether breeding could be improved. How best to train sheep in research Katherine Chambers Smith & Nephew Plc, Research Centre, York Science Park, Heslington, York YO10 5DF Taking sheep out of their natural environment is challenging as they have strong herding instincts and live closely together in a flock. Therefore, acclimatising them to adapt within the research environment presents problems. This poster investigates how effective our acclimatisation techniques are concerning: l reducing animals’ stress l climatising both animals and technologists to the new environment l making handling easier and safer for experimental procedures and observations Introducing an objective animal health welfare assessment system Gary Martin Cancer Research UK (CRUK), Blanche Lane, South Mimms, Potters Bar, Hertfordshire EN6 3LD An objective system was required by staff in the Biological Resource Unit (BRU) at the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) London Research Institute (LRI) to allow the lifetime experience of an animal under procedure to be assessed. A team of animal technicians, a researcher and the veterinary surgeon developed this scoring system, as we needed to benefit mouse welfare but also keep producing good scientific results. In the planning process of the scoring system the team researched an existing scoring system used but felt there was a need to develop a tailor made system involving clinical signs and a traffic light system that could be adapted across multi project units and be easy to use. The scoring system was trialled on ageing studies that have been in place for over a year and is responsible for improved communications between staff involved in mouse welfare issues and most importantly has improved response times. 52 Scientific Programme
Poster Displays  The Siberian hamster  Phodopus sungorus , breeding and husbandry Melissa Bean Nottingham University, Univ...
Poster Displays Life with automated water – a review of our experiences after five years Matt Coleman Medical Research Council (MRC), Ares Building, Babraham Research Campus, Cambridge CB22 3AT Automated water has been used in the MRC, Ares Building, Cambridge for over 5 years supplying drinking water to 95% of mice housed in over 8,000 IVCs. This poster will describe how using automated water has positively improved animal welfare by providing clean fresh, reverse osmosis (RO) water and how, by making some simple changes, we have greatly reduced the number and impact of water leaks. As well as providing a refuge from leaks, the cage loft is an additional floor level which is constantly used by mice for activity and nesting. Staff welfare is greatly improved by eliminating the repetitive tasks around bottle maintenance and allowing more husbandry time for technologists. Successful maintenance of the automated water system is described, from preventative maintenance to setting up emergency alarms. In conclusion, buy-in and commitment by all staff is essential and has been the key to the success of our automated water system. Rabbit accommodation goes full circle Felicity Hood Charles River Ltd, Fleets Road, Tranent, Edinburgh EH33 2NE Housing rabbits in floor pens has been discussed within Charles River for some time. However when presented with two long term studies that required housing rabbits for up to 78 weeks minds became more focussed and the team within the rabbit area set about evaluating possible designs. With assistance from our onsite engineer and after several preliminary trials the team derived a simple circular pen constructed in transparent polycarbonate. This design proved to be simple and therefore relatively inexpensive and more importantly the rabbits loved it! Managing emotion in the workplace Alison Hopkins Monkey Puzzle Training and Consultancy Ltd., The Waggon House, Dean Street Farm, Dean, Somerset BA4 4SA It is becoming increasingly recognised that working closely with animals particularly in a laboratory environment can be both physically and emotionally challenging. By virture of the unique nature of the work in this area and the context, many work related issues can become exacerbated and this leads to increased levels of sickness, stress and burn out for staff. This poster highlights such challenges for all those working in this field that would like to understand and address the issues causing these problems. We will look at the main challenges faced and consider what interventions can help people to effectively manage their own emotional conflict. We will also look at some of the leading edge thinking in the field of psychology that tells us that there is a way to support people in a way that works for them and for the organisation. It is possible to support people to develop good coping mechanisms in this field and we will talk through how this can be done both for ourselves and as managers, enabling technologists to be confident that they can cope with whatever challenges come their way and fully experience the value in their work. Scientific Programme 53
Poster Displays  Life with automated water     a review of our experiences after five years Matt Coleman Medical Research ...
Poster Displays Determination of disinfectant efficacy against the eggs of Syphacia species Alison Livsey Contec Inc, 525 Locust Grove Road, Spartanburg, South Carolina 29303, USA The objective of this study was to determine the rate of kill of Syphacia species eggs when treated with, an aqueous ready to use disinfectant, hypochlorous acid at 2000ppm. The Syphacia eggs were collected from the perianal area of rats by application and then removal of strips of clear cellulose sticky tape (Flynn RJ, 1973, Parasites of Laboratory Animals. Ames Iowa State University Press 238-240). The collected eggs were immersed in the hypochlorous acid for a range of exposure times (10, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) placed into a hatching medium and incubated to allow determination of viability compared to untreated control eggs. The results showed that following exposure of the pinworm eggs to the hypochlorous acid, 95% kill was achieved in 10 minutes. Experimental and husbandry procedures impact on quality of results and animal wellbeing Laura Roberson Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA Minimising data variability through standard experimental procedures is an important part of optimising animal use. We investigated the impact of standard animal husbandry and common experimental procedures on data variation and the well-being of laboratory mice. Body weight, cardiovascular output, core temperature and blood glucose were measured in response to routine activities including cage changing, individual housing, overnight fasting, blood sampling and intra-peritoneal injection. Our results showed that mouse physiology and behaviour were modified by common experimental practices and differences between sexes were evident. This has important implications for the design and implementation of multi-component experiments, where the lasting effects from previous tests may modify the outcomes of subsequent ones, and on long term animal health and welfare. Importantly, we also describe simple refinements to working practices which minimise method related stress thus reducing data variability and the numbers of animals required in an experimental protocol in accordance with the 3Rs. Distance vs classroom learning – which is better? Megan Woodberry Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, DuCane Road, London W12 0NN As you start your career as an animal technologist you will have to decide whether distance or classroom learning are more beneficial to you. Obviously the learning environment you choose has to complement your overall learning experience. This poster examines both the advantages and disadvantages of the traditional way of classroom learning verses the method of online learning. Scientific Programme 55
Poster Displays  Determination of disinfectant efficacy against the eggs of Syphacia species Alison Livsey Contec Inc, 525...
Poster Displays Alternative handling methods: a technician’s tale John Waters Mammalian Behaviour and Evolution (MBE) Group, Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Leahurst Campus, Neston, South Wirral, Cheshire CH64 7TE Recent studies have shown that the method choice in handling laboratory mice is important to animal welfare. Hurst & West 2010, showed that handling mice via their tail induces aversion and high anxiety, whereas using alternatives, such as a tunnel or the open hand, leads to voluntary approach, encourages low anxiety and ready acceptance to some form of physical restraint. In 2013 just over 3 million mice were used in procedures across the UK making up 75% of all animals used in procedures. Given the high amount of mice within global facilities, mouse welfare should be given high priority. Experience has shown tail handling leads to increased aggression from the mice when in a highly stressful situation whereas improved handling not only leads to more consistent scientific data, it can also lead to improved animal welfare. Tunnel and cup handling are two alternative methods for handling mice which reduce aggression and lead to a higher level of tolerance by the mice. Two methods will be highlighted as accepted (by technician and mouse) methods of handling. Here we will show the animal technician alternative methods of handling and also ease some apprehension about its implementation. After time you will see that the response from the mice on a daily basis is a positive step in the right direction from a welfare perspective. How will New Zealand White rabbits respond to consistent handling? Debbie Ridley GlaxoSmithKline, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage, Hertfordshire SG1 2NY Published research information has established that the handling process is stressful for prey species such as rabbits and can lead to different results depending on the experience of the animal. Consistent handling was identified as an important element to reduce variability in rabbits during a study, comparing the behaviour of caged rabbits with access to floor pens verses those without access to floor pens. Eight female adult NZW rabbits were randomised and singly housed into two groups. All rabbits were removed from their home cage 3 times a week and petted for up to 3 minutes each. They were then either returned to their home cage or taken to a floor pen for one hour prior to being returned to their home cage. All rabbits were approached, picked up and handled in the same manner throughout the study period by the same two trained handlers. Observations were made regarding the rabbits’ demeanour, and ranked into 3 groups: “come forward” “remain stationary” or “retreats to the back of the cage”. There was not enough data for a full statistical analysis, however, the handlers noted distinct difference between the rabbits. This poster discusses the change in rabbit behaviour towards the handlers during the study. 56 Scientific Programme
Poster Displays  Alternative handling methods  a technician   s tale John Waters Mammalian Behaviour and Evolution  MBE  G...
Poster Displays A method of obtaining large blood collections from Guinea pigs via the saphenous vessel Maria Rasmussen Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Innes Building, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ES Guinea pigs are often overlooked in antibody and vaccine studies due to the difficulty in obtaining reasonable blood samples and quite often the need for cardiac puncture with recovery in order to obtain a pre-bleed reference sample. At the University of Cambridge we have developed some subtle but highly effective refinements that has alleviated these issues meaning no further cardiac punctures being required and maximum legal sample volumes being attained. NACWO exchange Samantha Izzard GlaxoSmithKline, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage, Hertfordshire SG1 2NY NAWCOs play an important role in the overview of animal facilities and the new legislation requires that the person in the role maintains their continued professional development (CPD). However there are not many training courses available specifically for NACWOs which offer them the opportunity for an in-depth knowledge of different units and the opportunity to meet other NACWOs for open one to one discussions. We wanted to find a way to enhance our CPD programme for NACWOs and devised a scheme whereby we would begin a networking opportunity. We created a document for the visit to ensure there was structure and so that each person would gain the maximum benefit. It gave the participant the opportunity to see how others fulfil their role, and build a network of NACWOs and trust. This poster discusses the development of the scheme and the outcomes of the first NACWO exchange. Alternative restraint of Göttingen minipigs for blood sampling Adrian Zeltner Ellegaard Göttingen Minipigs A/S, Soroe Landevej 302, Sjaeland 4261 Dalmose, Denmark Traditionally minipigs are restrained in dorsal recumbency to have access to the blood vessels in the neck. Animal do not like to be restrained and being laid on the back with the belly exposed is not a position animals prefer to be in. With increasing weight this method creates some physical challenges to the technologists as well. Lifting and turning a larger minipig on its back does not always comply with occupational health regulations. The aim of this study was to test whether the sling could be used as a restraint in various blood sampling situations: Single, multiple sampling; low and high volumes; small and large animals. A standard sling was modified and several options explored to find the most satisfying design. One of the goals was that the method should be practical as well in demanding settings like toxicokinetics/pharmacokinets (TK/PK) sampling. While there is still some work needed we could come up with a method and design that works flawlessly in most cases if the minipigs are properly acclimatised. The minipigs are calm, do not appear to be stressed and no vocalisation was observed. Less manpower than usual was required and we were able to take a sample every 2 minutes with time to spare. Scientific Programme 57
Poster Displays  A method of obtaining large blood collections from Guinea pigs via the saphenous vessel Maria Rasmussen D...
Poster Displays Dried blood spot samples for serological testing of rodents Massimo Foa IDEXX Research, Riverside House, Riverside Walk, Windsor, Berkshire SL4 1NA Conventional blood sample collection from rodents is accomplished by cardiocentesis or superficial venepuncture and requires a relatively large volume of blood due to the logistical constraints associated with downstream processing, preparation, and transport of serum. Dried Blood Spot (DBS) sampling technology involves the collection of a single drop (~25 μl) of whole blood onto filter paper. The DBS sample, once dry, is very stable and amenable to a variety of quantitative and qualitative analyses, making ante mortem sampling easily achievable and potentially reducing the number of mice used for sentinel monitoring. Choosing a system for managing training records Alison Hopkins a-tune AG, Julius-Reiber Strasse 15, Darmstadt, Darmstadt 64293 Germany There is no question that well trained, competent personnel are key to a successful laboratory animal research establishment operation and exceptional animal welfare. Across the world, numerous organisations, both commercial and non-profit ones, have established excellent training programmes for diverse levels of animal care and use a variety of training recording systems. Training also has an important legal aspect. It is required by law that most countries adhere to and maintain certain training and competencies for personnel working with animals. Decision makers have a great range of tools and systems to choose from when looking at data management systems for managing training records. So how is the most suitable one chosen? What needs to be looked for when assessing different options? What should the system actually do for you? Criteria to consider include: l logging, l tracking l linking and checking l reporting l security l validity/audit trail Domain specific systems consider this criteria by combining all the advantages of central databases with the possibility to model the complex relationships between species, techniques/procedures, competencies and (if applicable) Personal Licences. Training administrators, supervisors and principal investigators as well as any member of the research staff then have the opportunity to not only check personal training records, but also to ask questions of the availability of certain competencies within the team or the entire organisation. If the system also manages Project Licences/Protocols, it is even possible to have a quick, automated cross-check helping all individuals involved to contribute to compliance. 58 Scientific Programme
Poster Displays  Dried blood spot samples for serological testing of rodents Massimo Foa IDEXX Research, Riverside House, ...
Poster Displays Refining fish health and welfare after undergoing experimental procedures Lynda Westall Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA The Sanger Institute uses Zebrafish as a model organism in its research into gene function and understanding disease. As part of this, fish need to be genotyped. Currently 96 well plates and small static water tanks with corresponding letters and numbers are used to identify the fish following removal of a small section of tissue from their dorsal fin. Concerns with our current system are that we are not able to: l maintain fish in flowing system water l feed fish whilst waiting for genotyping results to be returned l provide fish with any environmental enrichment Ideas have been formulated to develop a tank system to address these concerns which resulted in a tray and holding tank being designed and trialled in house. Information from the trial has led to the development of a full size genotyping unit, capable of housing large numbers of Zebrafish for an indefinite period of time. An evidence based approach to determine the environmental requirement for animal holding rooms Steven Cubitt The Cube Ltd, St John’s Innovation Park, Crawley Road, Cambridge CB4 0WS The standardisation of scientific animal model physiological processes such as growth, maturation and reproduction are influenced by environmental factors such as temperature, relative humidity and ventilation. For these reasons modern animal facilities take considerable efforts to control environmental factors that are known to influence experimental investigations such as: l variation of food and water intake l growth l variation of drug activity l increase/decrease in fertility, lactation and teratogenesis l incidence of disease Biomedical research is very important to the UK, we need to maintain standards of welfare, quality, competitiveness and sustainability, whilst improving or maintaining environmental quality. Utilising the highly skilled resources we have within the UK, we have the skill base to meet these challenges. This will help maintain the UK position as one of the leading areas globally for biomedical research into the future. We have shown significant savings in energy, carbon and cost are possible whilst maintaining a high standard of environment for research, animals and humans. For the facilities we have reviewed so far, the capital investment to achieve these savings is paid back in less than 2 years. Scientific Programme 59
Poster Displays  Refining fish health and welfare after undergoing experimental procedures Lynda Westall Wellcome Trust Sa...
Poster Displays Application of molecular technologies on non-invasive samples to enhance health monitoring programmes of rodents in IVCs: a comparison with a traditional approach Francisco Diaz Ramirez Central Biological Services Department, Imperial College, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ Individually ventilated cage (IVC) systems are widely used to protect the health status of laboratory mice. Meaningful sampling of the IVC-housed population to establish the health status is challenging as each cage may be its own microbiological entity and so sentinel programmes are often deployed. Sentinel programmes are prone to yielding false negative laboratory results due to compromises in sampling. This study compares immunocompetent outbred mouse sentinels (CRL:CD1) exposed to soiled bedding utilising laboratory methodologies typically described in FELASA health monitoring recommendations, against non -terminal sampling from pairs of immunodeficient and immunocompetent outbred mouse sentinels (Crl:CD1-Foxn1nu / nu and Crl:CD1-Foxn1 nu / +), utilising an array of real time PCR tests and a serology panel. The study was designed around ten single-sided IVC racks of a defined health status managed as a unit in one facility spread over three rooms and involved two sample points each being submitted to two independent laboratories. The exposure of immunodeficient mice to soiled bedding with non-terminal sampling of those mice enabled the detection of Helicobacter species, pinworms and various opportunistic bacteria. In contrast, the traditional exposure and detection methods were consistently negative at each time point. No clinical signs were recorded in any of the immunodeficient mice. These data indicate the use of a more targeted soiled bedding programme exposing immunodeficient mice combined with molecular diagnostic approaches can be more sensitive for prevalent agents. Molecular diagnostics also support refinement through the shipping of clinical non-terminal samples rather than animals. A ‘road map’ towards ending severe suffering Penny Hawkins Research Animals Department, RSPCA, Wilberforce Way, Southwater, West Sussex RH13 9RS Animals in scientific research can experience both physical and psychological suffering and this can be severe. This is of concern to the public, animal welfare organisations and many in the research community. Any level of suffering is a concern for the RSPCA but ending severe suffering is a top priority. The RSPCA has been working closely with the scientific community to develop strategies and resources to help reduce suffering. This includes establishing expert working groups to produce guidance on practical measures to reduce suffering in severe models and procedures. The Society is also encouraging information on refinement approaches and methodologies that could avoid or reduce suffering to be included in publications. This poster will outline the key questions and practical considerations that establishments need to address in order to reduce suffering for all animals and to work towards ending severe suffering. 60 Scientific Programme
Poster Displays  Application of molecular technologies on non-invasive samples to enhance health monitoring programmes of ...
Poster Displays Harmonised welfare review system for non-human primates (NHPs) on long term studies Maria Martinez Department of Biomedical Services, University of Oxford, The Old Observatory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RQ There is an ethical and legislative (ASPA) requirement to carry out assessments of the cumulative effects of regulated procedures on animals. This can be a challenging exercise for animals on long term studies. This poster examines a harmonised system that facilitates the proactive management of individual primates on long term studies and the implementation of early intervention points to ensure optimum welfare. This system enables the assessment and reduction of any cumulative effects. The process involves: l the regular record keeping of experimental and welfare parameters (to provide  objective measures) l a six monthly meeting consisting the named veterinary surgeon (NVS), the NACWO  and involved scientists to review each individual animal and agree adequate outcomes l a follow up standardised report summarising the content of review and its outcomes.  The result is the key to success, achieved by sound recordkeeping together with the collaboration of all parties. The use of computed tomography (CT) and digital X-ray in sheep Lisa Griffin Smith & Nephew Plc, Research Centre, York Science Park, Heslington, York YO10 5DF The use of CT in the research environment is still relatively novel. Radiographic imaging has been previously obtained by the use of Fluoroscopy, digital x-ray and standard radiography. By combining both CT and Digital X-ray it increases the amount of information available from that animal. The use of CT and Digital within our establishment has proved to be very beneficial not only to pre-screen animals for surgical suitability but by providing quantitative data throughout the live phase of the animal. This poster looks at the implementation of the CT scanner/digital x-ray into our establishment, and the positive outcomes achieved. Does bedding type affect eye soreness in nude rats? Matthew Smith AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK10 4TF At AstraZeneca we ran a study to investigate different types of bedding materials with different compositions and particle sizes to assess if they affect the degree of eye soreness seen in nude rats. Using a novel scoring system the rats were assessed 3 times per week by different technologists for 22 weeks. Scientific Programme 61
Poster Displays  Harmonised welfare review system for non-human primates  NHPs  on long term studies Maria Martinez Depart...
Poster Displays Welfare first: developing a welfare culture by caring for the staff who care for animals Norman Mortell Agenda Resource Management, PO Box 25, Hull, Yorkshire HU12 8YJ The poster outlines a new programme developed to meet moral, legal and ethical welfare needs of the animals in our care by providing a framework which supports those who provide the care. The aim of the programme is to engage all animal technologists with the organisation’s focus on welfare and to have unified understanding and agreement of the principles that help us to deliver excellent care and welfare. The programme is built around 6 key principles: Welfare contract: signed statement of focus on welfare, linked to the 3Rs and organisation position statement, behavioural expectations and reporting of any concerns. The welfare contract is a clear statement of our commitment to welfare. Technologist care: support, mentors, benefits, occupational health support and staff handbooks, etc., to support the delivery of excellent welfare. Training and development: commitment to animal care qualifications, CPD, competency records, e-learning, professional memberships and web based training resources. Recognition: technologist of the year, qualification awards, quality awards, success published, career development and ‘Hall of Fame’ to inspire others. Communication: ‘Welfare First’ e-newsletter for technologists, tech-talk resources online, ‘Got a concern?’ process, social and animal technology event attendance and social media to connect the technologists to each other and the organisation. Security assured: social media code of conduct, welfare and security statements in job advertisements, confidentiality agreements, organisational certifications, security advice and guides and security awareness training to encourage a security aware culture. Refinements in minipig serial blood sampling Terrance Ballard GlaxoSmithKline, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage, Hertfordshire SG1 5QR Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in minipigs are being performed more frequently in drug discovery to support the progression of new molecules into the clinical stage of medicine development. One of the main challenges when working with minipigs for this type of study is vascular access, for both the delivery of an intravenous (IV) dose and serial blood sampling. Both of these are needed to generate an accurate concentration-time profile of the molecule being evaluated. During routine PK studies we evaluated the use of angiocath IV catheters vs. needle venepuncture, inserted into either the saphenous vein in the hind limb and/or the marginal ear veins. The benefit of using the angiocath is to reduce the pain and distress to animals undergoing repeated blood sampling by negating the use of direct venepuncture without the need for surgery. Our poster will look at some of the challenges we had to overcome in order to perform these studies. All animal studies were ethically reviewed and carried out in accordance with Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act, 1986 and the GSK Policy on the Care, Welfare and Treatment of Animals. 62 Scientific Programme
Poster Displays  Welfare first  developing a welfare culture by caring for the staff who care for animals Norman Mortell A...
Poster Displays The development of hormone loaded diets to promote tumour growth Alison Ritchie Division of Cancer Biology, D Floor, West Block, Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH In our facility, we use several tumours which are dependent on hormone supplementation, delivered via subcutaneous pellets, for growth. Due to supply issues, we had to develop an alternative method of diet hormone therapy supplementation and decided to try delivery via a fortified diet, as this would be less invasive and stressful to the animals and more convenient for the staff. After development, the diet was tested against the LNCaP prostate tumour line and was found to be as effective in stimulating growth as pellets. We then decided to adopt the same method for estradiol delivery hoping it would eliminate associated side effects, and MCF-7 breast carcinoma growth was stimulated as required with side effects markedly reduced. We believe delivering hormones via the diet, rather than pellets, is a major refinement in welfare terms by reducing both the need for invasive implants and in side effects, while still promoting tumour growth. Pain management in sheep Emma Tozer Smith & Nephew Plc, Research Centre, York Science Park, Heslington, York YO10 5DF Most animals used in research will, at some point, be scored/observed for signs of pain/ abnormal behaviour post procedure and dependent on the procedure, may be administered analgesia to help keep the pain to a minimum. To manage the analgesia consideration must be given to the species, quota administered, product used and duration. Practically all of the procedures carried out at our unit are for orthopaedic surgery. This can be both long and complicated which in turn leads to increased periods of analgesia being administered, sometimes for up to two weeks. In the past analgesia was administered manually which, over long periods, can prove painful for the sheep and requires the technologists to be on hand during unsociable hours. This poster looks at how we think sheep show signs of pain/ discomfort and how we developed new means of administering analgesia over a period of time to help improve animal welfare. Advances in sheep anaesthesia within our facility Katie Blackwell Smith & Nephew Plc, Research Centre, York Science Park, Heslington, York YO10 5DF Improvement of anaesthetic techniques is essential for the refinement of research studies and for the welfare of the animals within our facility. The length of anaesthesia carried out on our sheep can vary from 1 hour up to 5 hours dependent on the type of procedure carried out. In the past the parameters we checked whilst the sheep where anaesthetised were minimal but over the past 2 years we have studied different techniques for anaesthetising sheep and monitoring the parameters whilst they were anaesthetised. This poster looks at the changes made within our facility in the past 24 months and how successful these changes were. Scientific Programme 63
Poster Displays  The development of hormone loaded diets to promote tumour growth Alison Ritchie Division of Cancer Biolog...
Scientific Programme SPONSORSHIP The Congress Committee wish to thank all the companies that have supported Congress by Exhibiting and/or Advertising in this Handbook. The following companies and organisations are especially thanked for their further sponsorship: Allentown Europe Notepads Harlan Laboratories UK Ltd Mugs IDEXX BioResearch Umbrella, Gala Dinner Wine Institute of Animal Technology Bags Institute of Animal Technology and Animals in Science – Education Trust Andrew Blake Tribute Award IPS Product Supplies Ltd Badges LBS Best Poster Award Learning Curve (Developement) Ltd USB Sticks Marshall BKU First Time Presenter Award R C Hartelust BV Pens Special Diets Services Highlighters Tecniplast UK Wine and Cheese Quiz 64 Scientific Programme
Scientific Programme  SPONSORSHIP The Congress Committee wish to thank all the companies that have supported Congress by E...
Each course is CPD accredited Workshops Animal Technologists – essential to biomedical development Seven workshops will take place over two days and attendance is subject to availability. It is therefore important for you to register to attend at the Congress Reception as soon as possible on your arrival. CPD certificates will be issued to all attendees at the end of each Workshop. WEDNESDAY 9th APRIL Time Workshop/Venue 10.45 - 11.15 COFFEE in Trade Exhibition 11.00 - 13.00 WORKSHOP 4  Practical application of aseptic techniques for rodent surgery - Richmond Suite 13.00 - 14.00 LUNCH in Trade Exhibition 14.00 - 16.00 WORKSHOP 2  Managing emotion in the workplace - Adam Suite 14.00 - 17.00 WORKSHOP 5  Preparing for RAnTech - Blenheim Suite 15.15 - 16.00 TEA in Trade Exhibition WORKSHOP 3 16.00 - 18.00  Expecting the unexpected – practical considerations for research continuity - Connaught Suite THURSDAY 10th APRIL Time Workshop/Venue 09.00 - 11.00  WORKSHOP 1 Public engagement – challenges faced by the animal technology sector - Connaught Suite 09.00 - 11.00  WORKSHOP 4 Practical application of aseptic techniques for rodent surgery - Richmond Suite 10.30 - 11.00 COFFEE in Trade Exhibition 11.00 - 13.00  WORKSHOP 6 Raising concerns about laboratory animal welfare - Adam Suite WORKSHOP 7 11.00 - 13.00  Calling all Named Persons - Connaught Suite 13.00 - 14.00 LUNCH in Trade Exhibition Scientific Programme 65
Each course is CPD accredited  Workshops  Animal Technologists     essential to biomedical development Seven workshops wil...
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 65 for timings and the venue 2 hours CPD credit Workshop 1 Public engagement – challenges faced by the animal technology sector Presented by Heather Sanders MIAT HNC in animal technology RAnTech Director of Biomedical Services, University of Leicester, PO Box 138, Leicester LE1 9HN In the era of Freedom of Information, there is much discussion in the animal technology sector on being “more open”. However, this is often led by organisations who do not directly work in research facilities. At the University of Leicester we are very committed to openness and this workshop will help you to rise to the challenge, finding effective ways to engage with the public. Topics include: l should we be more open? l examples of some ways to engage with the public l who should be involved? l how to get the balance right between openness and security l ways to get your colleagues involved Heather Sanders Heather Sanders has worked in this industry since leaving school and has over 30 year’s experience in different disciplines including academia, pharaceuticals and for a commercial breeder. She also taught on animal care courses at Bishop Burton College for several years. Heather regularly delivers training sessions in her current role at the University of Leicester. 66 Scientific Programme
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 65 for timings and the venue  2 hours CPD credit  Workshop 1  Public e...
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 65 for timings and the venue 2 hours CPD credit Workshop 2 Managing emotion in the workplace Presented by Alison Hopkins BSc MIAT RAnTech Coach and Trainer, Monkey Puzzle Training and Consultancy Ltd, The Waggon House, Dean Street Farm, Dean, Somerset BA4 4SA There is evidence to suggest that working in the laboratory environment, particularly working closely with animals, can be both emotionally and physically challenging. Owing to the unique nature of the work in this area and the context, many work related issues can become exacerbated and this leads to increased levels of sickness, stress and burnout for staff. After years of working in the industry, Alison has first-hand experience of the emotional demands and internal conflict that can arise. Topics include: l why we can no longer ignore this and why emotions can affect our behaviour  l what the research says and what emotions we may be experiencing  l how managers and individuals can understand and manage these emotions with  some simple psychological techniques l how to take the learning back to the workplace to support and retain key animal  technologists for biomedical development Alison Hopkins Alison worked for Pfizer Pharmaceuticals from 1996 until 2011 as an animal technologist and later worked as a senior associate scientist progressing to a research quality assurance manager. Since 2013, Alison has been a part time coach and trainer with Monkey Puzzle Training and Consultancy. She has a particular interest in the human-animal bond and how those closely working with animals can utilize psychological techniques to effectively manage emotion. Scientific Programme 67
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 65 for timings and the venue  2 hours CPD credit  Workshop 2 Managing ...
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 65 for timings and the venue 2 hours CPD credit Workshop 3 Expecting the unexpected – practical considerations for research continuity Presented by Norman Mortell BA (Hons) MIAT RAnTech1 and Lynda Westall BSc (Hons) FIAT DMS RAnTech2 1Director of Operations, Agenda Resource Management, PO Box 24, Hull, Yorkshire HU12 8YJ 2Facilities Manager, The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA All organisations face risks and challenges that can disrupt the normal and effective running of the facility. In research there are additional demands to consider such as the welfare of the animals and the continuity of the research taking place. There are many issues to consider but this workshop will provide a practical introduction to research continuity to enable participants to review risks and develop contingencies in their work place. Discussing what those risks are, the initial response to incidents, research continuity planning and the eventual recovery and return to normal operation are discussed in detail during this interactive workshop. We will also use ‘Turning Point’ to get some facts and opinions to feed into the discussion so that everyone can have some input. We look forward to a very positive and constructive workshop and hope to see you there! Topics include: l discussing what the risks are to research  l planning for the expected and unexpected  l the initial response to incidents  l research continuity planning  l eventual recovery  l returning to normal operation  Norman Mortell Norman has worked within the life science sector for over 35 years working within Academic, Pharmaceutical and Contract research facilities including a spell employed at an Italian research facility. Norman has worked in his current position at Agenda for over 12 years overseeing the resource management, marketing and security divisions. An active member of the Institute of Animal Technology, he is a council member, chairing the Communications Group and has also presented numerous papers on animal welfare, facility design and research security. Research continuity, resilience and openness are key areas of interest to Norman. Lynda Westall Lynda has been in the animal technology industry for 40 years and a member of IAT Council for 26 years where she is currently the Branch Liaison Officer, member of the Communication Group and assists with the ATW Editorial Board.  She started work for the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in 2000 and was involved with setting up the animal facility there.  Lynda is now the Facilities Manager of this unit and having contingencies in place for research or business continuity, should a ‘disaster’ event occur, is one of the responsibilities of this role.  She regularly takes part in Sanger site wide Business Continuity exercise days and has also run a ‘disaster scenario’ exercise for the involvement of the animal facility to raise their awareness of this type of situation. 68 Scientific Programme
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 65 for timings and the venue  2 hours CPD credit  Workshop 3 Expecting...
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 65 for timings and the venue 2 hours CPD credit Workshop 4 Practical application of aseptic techniques for rodent surgery Presented by Lucy Whitfield MA VetB DLAS MRCVS Named Veterinary Surgeon, Royal Veterinary College, Royal College Street, London NW1 0TU This course is designed for animal technologists and licensees who will be involved with undertaking surgical procedures, or assisting in the peri-operative care of the animals, using a mixture of formal teaching and hands-on fun. Topics include: l nderstanding the importance of proper aseptic technique to safeguard animal u welfare, the integrity of studies and compliance with ASPA l  nderstanding the advantages and disadvantages of various sterilisation techniques u l preparing a surgical area with instruments and consumables following aseptic technique l dressing and preparing appropriately for surgery l preparing the animal for surgery l being familiar with a range of materials to undertake surgical procedures aseptically Lucy Whitfield After four years in general veterinary practice, Dr Lucy Whitfield joined the technical services team of an animal health company with a small research animal facility, which opened up an insight into the fascinating world of laboratory animal science. She made the move to full-time Named Veterinary Surgeon work soon afterwards and is “still hooked and still learning!”. Director of NVS services at the Royal Veterinary College since 2004, she splits her work between clinical visits to RVC research clients and teaching Home Office Licensee plus other courses at the College. Lucy is lucky enough to be able to call upon a team of six full- and part-time vets, all of whom are experienced in the field, providing specialist NVS support for a range of pharmaceutical, academic and other research clients in the London and Cambridge areas. She holds the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons’ (RCVS) Diploma in Laboratory Animal Science and currently helps some of her colleagues in their studies toward post-graduate qualifications too. On the other side of the fence, Lucy is an examiner for the RCVS, the RVC’s Animal Welfare MSc course and previously, the Institute of Animal Technology’s Membership Board. Enthusiastic to contribute to this interesting veterinary field, she is a past president of the Laboratory Animals Veterinary Association (LAVA) and Council member since 2000. Lucy is a current member of the Laboratory Animals Science Association’s (LASA) Ethics, Training and Education committee, which has recently published guidance on surgical practice and Ethical Review Process function. Scientific Programme 69
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 65 for timings and the venue  2 hours CPD credit  Workshop 4 Practical...
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 65 for timings and the venue 3 hours CPD credit Workshop 5 Preparing for RAnTech Presented by Ian Garrod FSB CBiol MBPharmacolS PTLLS CPD and Training Manager, Learning Curve (Development) Ltd, PO Box 140, Ware Hertfordshire SG9 0ZN The Register of Animal Technologists demonstrates to the public, to employers and to the regulatory authorities the high ethical standards and qualifications of career animal technologists. Individuals are included on the Register who by qualification, experience and personal conduct are considered suitable to promote a culture of care and hold posts of great responsibility in laboratory animal facilities. This workshop will take you through all the various stages to prepare for inclusion in the Register. Topics include: l application process  l completing the CV  l legislation refresher on the Animal (Scientific Procedures) Act, 1986 Amended  Regulations 2012 l other legislation  l code of conduct  l continuing professional development (CPD)  l RAnTech interviewing techniques  Ian Garrod Ian Garrod has extensive experience working within academia and the pharmaceutical industry in Regulatory Compliance, with education, training and personal development his other main area of expertise. A significant proportion of Ian’s expertise includes the construction, provision and execution of the Home Office Modular courses. He is a member of the Society of Biology Accreditation Board and this makes him the ideal person to ensure the course content is first class and up-to-date. Ian also visits schools and works with Understanding Animal Research (UAR), informing children and the public about animal care and welfare in medical science. Having previously managed the Pfizer school speaker programme, this makes Ian an important link between science and the people who use medication for health reasons. Ian is committed to developing and extending current and new training courses, workshops and seminars offered by the Learning Curve. Scientific Programme 71
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 65 for timings and the venue  3 hours CPD credit  Workshop 5 Preparing...
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 65 for timings and the venue 2 hours CPD credit Workshop 6 Raising concerns about laboratory animal welfare Presented by Penny Hawkins BSc PhD Deputy Head, Research Animals Department, RSPCA, Wilberforce Way, Southwater, West Sussex RH13 9RS This workshop aims to provide animal technologists with an opportunity to discuss how they act upon concerns they may have about animal welfare at their establishments, so that they can be quickly resolved in a constructive way to help maintain good standards of both animal welfare and staff morale – and to prevent non-compliance. Topics include: l systems for identifying any concerns staff may have  l the confidence to raise those concerns l effects on work status, job prospects or relationships with colleagues l satisfactory outcomes and implementing the 3Rs Penny Hawkins Dr Penny Hawkins joined the RSPCA 17 years ago and is Deputy Head of the Society’s Research Animals Department. Her main areas of work relate to promoting refinement and the implementation of UK and European regulations on animal use. Penny is convenor of the RSPCA/UFAW Rodent Welfare meetings and a member of three AWERBs (Animal Welfare and Ethical Review Body) and the European Commission Expert Group on Actual Severity Assessment. She also served two terms on the Animal Procedures Committee and is now a member of the new UK Animals in Science Committee (ASC). 72 Scientific Programme
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 65 for timings and the venue  2 hours CPD credit  Workshop 6 Raising c...
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 65 for timings and the venue 2 hours CPD credit Workshop 7 Calling all Named Persons Presented by Kathy Ryder MB BS BSc MRCP DPhil1 and David Anderson BVMS MVM MRCVS2 1Unit Inspector, Animals in Science Regulation Unit (ASRU), PO Box 6779, Dundee DD1 9WW 2Superintendent Inspectorate Home Office (Retired) and Veterinary Adviser, Pentland Management Systems, Milton Bridge, Nr Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0BA This workshop follows up the 30th January 2014 meeting held in partnership with LASA and LAVA. Topics include: l common roles and responsibilities l the 3Cs – clarification, communication and co-ordination l how to work together l CPD structure l education, training and future plans Kathy Ryder Dr Kathy Ryder is an inspector with the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Inspectorate based in Dundee. She has been an Inspector for 16 years, based first in London, before moving to cover Scotland and NE England. She is a physician by training, having worked in London and Oxford, with a particular interest in cardiovascular diseases. Cathy has also worked as a Clinical Lecturer in Oxford researching sudden cardiac death and heart failure and teaching medical and biology students. She has worked with trainers and Accrediting Bodies over many years to improve training to work with laboratory and other animals in science. She has developed interests in neuroscience, primates and fish. She is currently working with several expert working groups to refine animal models and to replace some of the severe tests performed for regulatory purposes. David Anderson Dr David Anderson is a veterinary surgeon with over thirty years’ experience in practice, academia and government service. He worked initially in a University teaching environment where he developed an interest and expertise in veterinary reproduction and was Named Veterinary Surgeon under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act. Until 2010, he worked in the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Inspectorate and advised on the care and use of animals in scientific procedures and was involved in the development of improved practices in welfare, accommodation and care of animals used in scientific procedures in UK and Europe. He is at present working as a veterinary advisor for Pentlands Management Systems, where his main role is to provide technical support to the European Commission during transposition of the new European Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes. David is a Trustee for Guide Dogs, which he finds a hugely rewarding role and in his “spare” time, he continues to enjoy curling and golf. Scientific Programme 73
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 65 for timings and the venue  2 hours CPD credit  Workshop 7 Calling a...
Social Programme Tuesday 8th April TOUR 16.30 DINNER - Served in the Ballroom 19.00 Never attended Congress before or have you come on your own and don’t know many people or simply want to know where you are going ... Then join us at the Congress Reception for a tour of the venue and an Icebreaker session afterwards EXHIBITION OFFICIAL OPENING 20.30 - 23.00 The Trade Reception always gets Congress off to a great start so come along and mix around the stands meeting our industry colleagues Copper Face Jacks bar will stay open after the reception has finished Wednesday 9th April DINNER - Served in the Ballroom 20.00 Smart casual dress is required please - no t-shirts, jeans or trainers Then afterwards WINE AND CHEESE QUIZ which will start promptly in the Boston Room 21.00 (Numbers are restricted so you MUST request a ticket at Congress Reception to attend, otherwise you won’t get in) Alternatively, there will be a Cocktail evening in Copper Face Jacks with live music accompaniment provided by BELVADERE 21.00 Thursday 10th April Smart dress, jackets and ties are required (No jeans, t-shirts, trainers or fancy dress please) Copper Face Jacks will be open for pre-dinner drinks GALA DINNER AND DANCE 20.00 - 02.00 Served in the Ballroom Followed by the marvellous Innovation at this venue, you cannot possibly sit down! Roadshow Congress Badges must be worn by EVERYONE 74 Social Programme 19.15
Social Programme  Tuesday 8th April  TOUR   16.30  DINNER - Served in the Ballroom   19.00  Never attended Congress before...
Social Programme GALA DINNER and DANCE Following the Gala Dinner on Thursday evening as we are at the heart and heritage of Ballroom Dancing, we plan to bring you a short demonstration on how it should be done before you hit the floor with your own interpretations! OFFICIAL OPENING OF TRADE EXHIBITION This wine reception is always a wonderfully relaxed beginning to Congress and sets the atmosphere as delegates and trade colleagues meet new and greet old friends. Also for this night only, a silent auction will be held on behalf of AS-ET and the items to bid on will be displayed at various exhibitors’ stands. WINE AND CHEESE QUIZ Do you know a Mersault from a Merlot or a Stinking Bishop from a Hereford Hop? Yes? Then you are in with a good chance at winning the Wine and Cheese Quiz. Prizes will be given to the winner, runner up and competitor with the lowest score. REMEMBER places are limited so NO whining or getting cheesed off that you couldn’t get in – organise a ticket now at the Congress Reception! Many thanks go to Tecniplast sponsoring this event UK for generously BELVADERE BELVADERE are a fresh and exciting band who describe their sound as modern folk, Mumford and Sons-ish with a bit of jazz thrown in. Come along to hear them on Wednesday evening in Copper Face Jacks. Social Programme 75
Social Programme  GALA DINNER and DANCE Following the Gala Dinner on Thursday evening as we are at the heart and heritage ...
Trade Exhibition Exhibitors’ Index Exhibitor 1st Biotech Ltd 3Rs LAB Agenda Resource Management Ltd Allentown Europe Ltd Andersons Bedding Products Aquaneering / Fairfield Controlec Ltd Arrowmight AS-ET a-tune software AG AW Anaesthesia Services Ltd Bioquell UK Ltd Charles River Clinipath Ltd Contec Inc Datesand Ltd Edstrom Inc (Europe) Ellegaard Göttingen Minipigs Fisher Scientific Getinge UK Ltd Harlan Laboratories Ltd Harvard Apparatus IDEXX BioResearch IMPEX Services International Ltd Institute of Animal Technology IPS Product Supplies Ltd IWT (A Tecniplast Company) Laboratory Animal Science Association (LASA) Lantra LBS (Serving Biotechnology) Ltd Learning Curve (Development) Ltd LEEC Ltd Locus Technology Inc Lomir Biomedical Inc Marshall BKU MMM Medical Equipment UK Ltd Moor Instruments Ltd MSE Henderson Biomedical Noray Bioinformatics SLU North Kent Plastics Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems Plexx BV R&W Associates UK Ltd Rees Scientific S3 Science SAFE Scanbur Technology A/S Scientific Lesser Society of Biology Special Diets Services Ssniff Speciality Diets GmbH Steel Line Ltd STERIS Ltd Surrey Diagnostics Ltd Sychem Ltd Tecniplast UK Ltd The Cube Ltd UNO Roestvaststaal BV Veltek Associates Inc VetTech Solutions Ltd Williton Box Company Animal Technologists – essential to biomedical development 76 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition  Exhibitors    Index Exhibitor 1st Biotech Ltd 3Rs LAB Agenda Resource Management Ltd Allentown Europe Lt...
Trade Exhibition Exhibition Plan Trade Exhibition 77
Trade Exhibition  Exhibition Plan  Trade Exhibition  77
Trade Exhibition The Publisher and the IAT accept no responsibility for any claims made by companies in the following entries. 1st Biotech Ltd 1st Biotech is a family business, manufacturing and supplying bespoke laboratory clothing for over 40 years. Our clothing comes in a lightweight and mid-weight fabric, with many colour choices and can be manufactured in any of your chosen styles. We can personally visit your premises to discuss the clothing you may require and advise on sizing and styles. All orders are manufactured bespoke to your requirements, exactly as you want them. For example you can choose from stud cuff or elasticated cuff, short sleeve or long sleeve, leg pockets, etc. The choices are endless! Our range of products has greatly expanded over the years and we are authorised distributors of brands such as 3M, Moldex, Segre, Marigold, Ansell, Anistel, Primeguard, Toffeln, Pal, etc. As authorised stockists of these brands we are able to offer great pricing, please ask for a ‘no obligation’ quote and put us to the test! As stockists of all disposable items, including facemasks, overshoes, oversleeves, mob caps, disposable coveralls, visitor coats, gloves, etc., we can offer next day delivery, direct from our warehouse. Our offices are open daily with professional staff on hand to answer any question or enquiry you may have. In addition to our office staff, Luke and Sadie, our Sales Team are available too and would be happy to speak with you and/or arrange to visit you. We hope you enjoy Congress 2014 and we look forward to meeting you. Contact us at: 1st Biotech Ltd, Unit 10 Tovil Green Business Park, Tovil, Maidstone, Kent ME15 6TA T / F: +44 (0) 870 300 9554 E: sales@1stbiotech.co.uk www.1stbiotech.co.uk 3Rs LAB Unique laboratory animal bedding renewed • recycled • revitalised Products: 3Rs LAB Basic 3Rs LAB Premium 3Rs bedding is made from >99% recycled paper and utilises no virgin material and no additives or chemicals. As a recycled product, it saves landfill space, saves energy, reduces pollution and uses less resource than virgin material. Findings from facilities overseas and more recently from laboratory animal facilities within the UK have demonstrated outstanding performances of both products with the following benefits: l proven cost savings  l animal welfare benefits l longer intervals between cage changes l significant odour control l minimal dust l lower levels of coliform and endotoxins than other laboratory bedding forms l easy to use, clean and dispose l biodegradable 78 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition The Publisher and the IAT accept no responsibility for any claims made by companies in the following entr...
Trade Exhibition l product available ex stock 3Rs bedding is produced in a custom built facility in the UK dedicated to the production of quality, absorbent animal bedding by a manufacturer with 20 years’ experience. Contact us at: 3Rs LAB, Scunthorpe, Lincolnshire DN15 9YJ T: +44 (0) 800 612 1619 E: info@3rsbedding.com www.3rsbedding.com Agenda Resource Management Ltd Looking for novel solutions to staffing? Agenda provides quick and cost effective solutions to all of your staffing requirements by supplying staff at all levels whether you need permanent recruitment support, short term temporary cover or one of our experienced contract animal technologists.  Agenda Resource Management provides a highly skilled, friendly yet professional tailor made service to clients throughout the industry regardless of your resourcing needs.  Our service includes: l full range of resourcing options available from permanent recruitment or local  temporary staff to contract staff for short or long term placements l experienced, friendly and professional recruitment consultants  l comprehensively security screened job candidates and contract staff  l fully matched, interviewed and pre-selected job candidates.  Staff available at all  levels from cage wash operatives to research directors, often within 24 hours l the largest database of research facility job seekers available  Other services available from Agenda Resource Management include: l facilities management  l consultancy  l staff training and development  Looking for new opportunities? Agenda has a team of highly experienced, highly successful recruitment specialists with strong links to leading employers throughout the UK and Europe to help you find the perfect career move – completely free of charge. Find out more One call puts you in touch with all support and advice you could need and much more besides. Contact us at: Agenda Resource Management Ltd, PO Box 24, Hull HU12 8YJ T: +44 (0) 8456 445545 / International: + 44 (0) 1964 671791 F: +44 (0) 8456 445547 E: stuartl@agenda-mc.co.uk www.agenda-rm.co.uk Trade Exhibition 79
Trade Exhibition l product available ex stock  3Rs bedding is produced in a custom built facility in the UK dedicated to t...
Trade Exhibition Allentown Europe Ltd Allentown would like to welcome you to our stand Allentown Inc is the leading global provider of quality built animal housing and related animal care products to the biomedical research community. For over 43 years we have produced innovative and superior animal housing systems, which continue to exceed industry standards.  Our success is based on our strong business integrity and exacting attention to manufacturing detail and unparalleled customer service. Our state-of-the-art manufacturing facility based in Allentown, New Jersey, USA uniquely qualifies us to provide timely, cost-effective solutions for our customers’ research needs. From computer-aided design and development through automated fabrication and welding, Allentown products are manufactured with tight tolerances to precise specifications, which lead to long lasting housing solutions for our customers. Our experienced workforce combines craftsmanship with innovation, constantly refining our manufacturing process to ensure our customers the highest quality product, at a competitive price, on schedule to meet their needs. Contact us at: Allentown Europe Ltd, PO Box 3056, Reading, Berkshire RG1 9UY T: +44 (0) 845 045 0243 F: +44 (7884) 63625 Andersons Bedding Products The Andersons Bedding Products is the manufacturer of quality bedding, nesting and enrichment products. The Andersons have been manufacturing corn cob bedding specifically for the laboratory animal industry since 1962. The Andersons have expanded their line of bed-o’cobs bedding products to meet today’s enrichment and bedding needs. The innovative new bedding products include bedding and enrichment in one bag along with nesting material and post-surgical recovery pads. All The Andersons’ innovative products are available exclusively through The Datesand Group. Contact us at: Andersons Bedding Products, 521 Illinois Avenue, Maumee, Ohio 43537, USA T: +1 419 897 6700 F: +1 419 891 6539 E: coborders@andersonsinc.com www.AndersonsLabBedding.com Aquaneering / Fairfield Controlec Ltd Fairfield Controlec Ltd are the UK representatives for Aquaneering Inc, designers and manufacturers of high quality aquatics systems. Aquaneering’s aquatics systems range in size from small stand alone bench top racks for Zebrafish and Xenopus, up to extremely large systems with dedicated centralised water treatment (over 33,000 Zebrafish tanks is the largest so far). In all cases, Aquaneering’s expertise in water treatment ensures that animals are held in the very highest quality of water and full training in system operation is provided for technicians and end users. Systems can be equipped with full critical parameter monitoring systems, with alarm outputs including mobile phone SMS messaging, email, landline and BMS options. Fairfield Controlec Ltd provide installation, full service support and emergency backup, including spare parts stocks for Aquaneering’s systems. Our staff has a collective experience 80 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Allentown Europe Ltd  Allentown would like to welcome you to our stand Allentown Inc is the leading globa...
Trade Exhibition of over 50 years of design, installation, maintenance and support of aquatics systems and include marine biologists and control system engineers. We can also provide service, support and spare parts for most makes of aquatic systems and also offer training and consultancy in all aspects of system operation and troubleshooting. Contact us at: Aquaneering / Fairfield Controlec Ltd, London House, King Edward Street, Grimsby, Lincolnshire DN31 3LA T: +44 (0) 1472 268141 F: +44 (0) 1472 243149 E: graham.willoughby@fairfield-controlec.co.uk www.aquaneering.com Arrowmight Arrowmight’s 30th Anniversary Arrowmight are celebrating over 30 years as the premier supplier of design and build housing for large species, continuing to invest in the development of innovative products designed specifically for the biomedical research sector. We have unrivalled experience in the design, manufacture, installation and servicing of equipment specifically for the laboratory animal industry. Our range of isolators has expanded to cover speciality units and bespoke designs, utilising the very best materials and the most robust twin-fan system in the marketplace. The Arrowmight Maxiseal IVC system continues to offer unrivalled protection for staff and animals, with the unique cage level HEPA filtration ensuring that the airway plenums do not become contaminated with cage debris. Our unique FresH20 sterile watering system offers unrivalled drinking hygiene for animals via self-contained pouches of sterile water, fed through autoclavable non-return drinking valves. The Arrowmight Argus environmental monitoring system offers secure and time saving wireless monitoring and management of your facility and equipment. Argus can be quickly installed into existing facilities at minimum expense. Arrowmight is also the exclusive UK distributor for the Better Built range of cagewashers, bedding disposal stations and automatic bedding dispensers. Better Built’s new exciting Activ™ range of automated solutions specifically meet the challenges facing washing facilities in the animal research industry. Arrowmight – Innovation through partnership Contact us at: Arrowmight, Campwood Road, Rotherwas Industrial Estate, Hereford HR2 6JD T: +44 (0) 1432 379111 F: +44 (0) 1432 344960 E: salesadmin@arrowmight.com www.arrowmight.com Trade Exhibition 81
Trade Exhibition of over 50 years of design, installation, maintenance and support of aquatics systems and include marine ...
Trade Exhibition AS-ET Animals in Science – Education Trust The Animals in Science – Education Trust is a charity registered under the UK Charities Act 1993. Our objectives are the advancement of education and the promotion of excellence in the care and welfare of animals used in science. The Trust’s main activity is to provide bursaries to enable people to attend education and training courses. The only conditions are that they are: employed in the care and welfare of animals used in science, that the course is relevant to their work and they are unable to obtain funding from other sources, e.g., employers. If you would like to discuss the possibility of applying for a grant for educational purposes we will be pleased to talk to you on our stand. This year we are launching two special bursary competitions: l the second special travel bursary competition that enables the winner to attend the  AALAS National Meeting in San Antonio, USA l the first Congress bursary competition for animal technicians who have just gained  the IAT Level 2 Diploma in Laboratory Animal Science and Technology. This will enable the winner to attend Congress 2015 We have the target of signing up 100 new official supporters by the end of Congress. It only costs £6.00 a year and you not only help a good cause but you will receive an exclusive AS-ET badge and will be entered into a draw for a substantial prize. Industry suppliers and manufacturers give great support to AS-ET and are arranging activities to raise money for us at this meeting. We thank them for their support. a-tune software AG tick@lab is the software solution for the management of animal research facilities including management of protocols, meetings, inspections, animal orders, capacity management, stock and facility management, veterinary records, breeding, cost accounting, reporting and statistics. 100% web technology, easy to learn, easy to use, easy to integrate! a-tune software AG is a medium sized, financially stable, independent German software vendor and a trusted partner for long lasting and stable co-operation with its customers mainly within the pharmaceutical industry. “Make IT simple” is both a-tune’s motto and the measure of all its activities, including the key focuses: l data management research and development in life sciences  l task and project management  Objectives we provide: l optimisation of work and data flows  l creation of transparency for users  l guarantee of governance, compliance and best practices  l lowering expenses and risks  Competitively priced, a-tune’s products, project solutions and professional services make these goals a reality. Contact us at: a-tune software AG, Julius-Reiber-Strasse 15, 64293 Darmstadt, Germany T: +49 6151 951310 F: +49 6151 9513129 E: sales@a-tune.de www.a-tune.de 82 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition AS-ET  Animals in Science     Education Trust The Animals in Science     Education Trust is a charity reg...
Trade Exhibition AW Anaesthesia Services Ltd Products: l anaesthetic machines, all types, also custom designed to your specification  l oxygen concentrators  l vaporisers  l ventilators  l low flow breathing circuits and masks  l induction chambers  l heated tables  l temperature monitors  l reconditioned equipment  l waste gas management solutions  l medical gas supply and installation  l pollution monitoring  l CPD and training  l annual on-site servicing and calibration checks for all types of anaesthetic machines  and associated equipment, also includes CO2 chambers and full service reports With over 35 years’ experience as a biomedical engineer specialising in anaesthesia in the NHS, veterinary and laboratory industries, AW Anaesthesia Services Ltd provides a reliable, affordable and quality service for all your anaesthesia requirements. Our equipment is manufactured using high quality materials and components and usually supplied with extended warranty as standard. The low flow breathing circuits help to conserve oxygen and anaesthetic agent; this reduces pollution as well as your revenue budget. Oxygen concentrators are also becoming popular as an alternative to cylinders. However, they may not be suitable for all applications and some modifications to your equipment may be required. Please contact us for free advice. Contact us at: AW Anaesthesia Services Ltd, 11 Cranmore Grove, Aston Lodge Park, Stone, Staffordshire ST15 8XD M: +44 (0) 7961 957992 E: albwalk@yahoo.co.uk Bioquell UK Ltd Bioquell specialise in the design, manufacture and application of complete bio-decontamination solutions. Our hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) solutions are suitable for airborne and surface contamination within the bio-medical industry. The process is fast, repeatable, validatable and residue-free. We also provide HPV integrated ‘walk-in’ and ‘cart-to-cart’ transfer chambers for the movement of materials in and out of controlled areas. Bioquell hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) equipment and services are designed to provide bio-decontamination of equipment, rooms or entire facilities. HPV is the clear choice when replacing traditional formaldehyde or chlorine-based applications offering fast, residuefree and repeatable cycles within a sensitive and controlled environment. Contact us at: Bioquell UK Ltd, 52 Royce Close, West Portway, Andover, Hampshire SP10 3TS T: +44 (0) 1264 835835 E: info@bioquell.com www.bioquell.com Trade Exhibition 83
Trade Exhibition AW Anaesthesia Services Ltd   Products  l anaesthetic machines, all types, also custom designed to your s...
Trade Exhibition Charles River Charles River continues to be the world’s largest producer of laboratory animals and related services. As the exclusive UK distributor for The Jackson Laboratory’s products animal models we provide access to over 5000 strains of JAX™ mice including the NSG (NOD scid gamma), the most highly immunodeficient mouse. The Research Animals Diagnostics Services (RADS) group can advise you and conduct your health surveillance programmes utilising the latest technologies. As well as our globally standardised animals which include rats, mice, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters and gerbils we can provide contract breeding, rederivation, cryopreservation, backcrossing and genetic monitoring through our Genetically Engineered Models and Services group (GEMS). We supply ALZET® osmotic infusion pumps, catheters and wound clips. With the recent addition of Bioscientific Events, we are now able to conduct a wide range of training courses to meet your needs. Our surgical teams can provide ‘study ready’ animals with a range of surgical alterations. Our preconditioning services offer aged animals and dietary studies. Be sure to visit our stand and talk to our representatives about our extensive range of products and services. Contact us at: Charles River UK Ltd, Manston Road, Margate, Kent CT9 4LT T: +44 (0) 1843 823388 E: margate.enquiries@crl.com www.criver.com Clinipath Ltd Supplying leading edge equipment of tomorrow at unrivalled value today Clinipath Ltd is a distribution and service company for laboratory supplies and equipment with a focus on biomedical research and laboratories. The primary markets that we supply are universities, hospitals, biotechnology and pharmaceutical research and development. Our mission is to provide quality products at competitive prices with timely deliveries and our goal is to become one of your valued suppliers. We support advances in the technology of science, while respecting the impact on our environment. We provide problem solving solutions, quality products, superior customer service and support to our clients through the complete understanding of their business objectives and needs. The company mission involves constant product scouting in the international marketplace to supply the latest technology advancements to the scientific community. Clinipath Ltd will evaluate through a strict quality assurance system and on-site testing of all new products to guarantee the reliability of the goods supplied to our customers. Our business and our sales will grow in direct response to our drive, our clients’ support, our commitment to provide state-of-the-art products and to offer the best price quality ratio. We also differentiate ourselves from the competition through our vast selection of products covering a wide range of activities. Clinipath’s core values - Integrity, professionalism, enthusiasm and a commitment to excellence Contact us at: Clinipath Ltd, PO Box 523, Hull HU9 9HD www.clinipathequipment.com 84 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Charles River  Charles River continues to be the world   s largest producer of laboratory animals and rel...
Trade Exhibition Contec® Speciality cleaning products for animal laboratory facilities Protect the investment you have made in research, with cleaning products which minimise contamination risks to your animals. Contec’s innovative equipment is designed to meet the specific requirements of laboratory animal facilities. Contec is the leading supplier of critical cleaning products to the global life science market. Disinfectants and cleaning solutions: Contec ProChlor V is a powerful disinfectant ideally designed for laboratory animal facilities. Bactericidal, fungicidal, virucidal and sporicidal in one minute, it is one of the fastest acting disinfectants available for the laboratory animal market. Uniquely, it will also eliminate 95% of Syphacia spp pinworm eggs in ten minutes. With no hazard classification it has good operator acceptability and material compatibility. Also available, Contec HydroPure has no residue and can be used in combination with Contec ProChlor V. Sterile and filtered 70% alcohol solutions complete the product range. Mops and cleaning systems: Contec’s mops can increase cleaning effectiveness, improve ergonomics for operators, minimise cleaning time and reduce overall costs. Lightweight and easy-to-manoeuvre, with broad surface coverage and low operator fatigue, Contec’s polyester mops are lighter weight than traditional cotton or rayon mops and can be cleaned in most cage wash systems up to fifty times. Mops are colour-coded so specific mops can be designated to specific areas. Pre-saturated and dry wipes: Our range of presaturated wipes PROSAT and SATWipes enable effective cleaning while reducing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Available in different sizes and formats there is a cost effective option for every facility. Contec’s wide range of dry wipes offer excellent abrasion resistance. They are compatible with a wide range of chemicals and maintaining high strength when wet, are ideal for the application of disinfectants and cleaning solvents. Tack wipes and mops: TaxFre surface and floor wipes effectively remove and minimise the spread of pinworm eggs, dust and dirt due to their excellent capacity to trap and retain contaminants. Contact us at: Contec®, ZI du Prat - RP 3707, 56037 Vannes Cedex, France T: +33 2 97 43 76 90 E: info@contecinc.com www.contecinc.com Datesand Ltd The Datesand Group has been in business for over 30 years and is still a family run, friendly and reliable company. Datesand have diversified over the past three decades and now offer consumables, technologies and environmental divisions. Within these divisions, Datesand are committed to offering the widest range and highest quality of products. Consumables: l the widest range of quality bedding and nesting materials including Tapvei Aspen,  UK produced softwood beddings and The Andersons’ corn cob range l Europe’s widest range of enrichment products  l Nestpaks - exclusive 3 in 1 bedding, nesting and enrichment l PPE l chemicals and cleaning equipment l exclusive ranges including ClearH2O hydration and nutrition, FresH2O pouched  water and NSET (non-surgical embryo transfer device) Trade Exhibition 85
Trade Exhibition Contec    Speciality cleaning products for animal laboratory facilities Protect the investment you have m...
Trade Exhibition l new and exclusive Bed-r’Nest – portioned naturalistic nesting material  Technologies: l UK manufactured and exclusive to Datesand; Mini-Thermacage and Mark III  Thermacage for animal warming l working in an exclusive partnership with TBJ Inc to offer ventilated workstations,  bedding dispensers, surgery and necropsy tables and water bottle fillers l servicing and maintenance contracts  Environmental: l unique super absorbent polymer products for liquid to gel applications  Datesand is now working in partnership with Harlan to offer streamlined diet and consumable product deliveries. Datesand – Caring for those who care for others We look forward to seeing you at our stand. Contact us at: Datesand Ltd, PO Box 45, Manchester M11 1XD T: +44 (0) 161 2741080 F: +44 (0) 161 2741089 E: sales@datesand.com www.datesand.com Edstrom Inc (Europe) Edstrom Inc is the world-leading designer and manufacturer of automated watering systems for animals in the pharmaceutical, academic and government vivarium for over 40 years. We protect animal health and valuable research through automated animal drinking water systems, water purification, environmental monitoring and workflow management systems. Edstrom automated watering systems deliver purified water on demand, 24 hours a day, eliminating ergonomic injuries and reducing the costs associated with bottle cleaning, filling and manipulation. Our A160 valve technology is the most reliable on the market. Edstrom Pulse CMC™ provides real-time data readings, alarming and reporting through an intuitive user interface that puts you in total control of your facility’s data. Monitor and control your automated watering system and so much more. Edstrom eResearch management software ensures proper animal welfare while performing valuable research all with an intuitive interface. This software provides unsurpassed data integrity by eliminating manual record keeping, delivering time stamped data and securely storing facility information. The web-based animal management platform enhances communication throughout all levels of the research and animal care team. Edstrom water purification and treatment systems help achieve consistent water quality with Reverse Osmosis (RO) water purification, clean system design principle and automated flushing. Edstrom recommends RO water for all transgenic rodents. Visit us and see why successful facilities worldwide rely on Edstrom and have been doing so for 40 years! Contact us at: Edstrom Inc (Europe), PO Box 13, Hereford HR1 4ZU T / F: +44 (0) 1432 370745 M: +44 (0) 7976 380572 E: europe@edstrom.com www.edstrom.com 86 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition l new and exclusive Bed-r   Nest     portioned naturalistic nesting material    Technologies  l UK manufa...
Trade Exhibition Ellegaard Göttingen Minipigs A/S Ellegaard Göttingen Minipigs (EGM) is the exclusive breeder of genetically well-defined Göttingen Minipigs and has supplied the scientific community for more than thirty years. The company has been AAALAC accredited since 1998 and has a high standard of minipig health. Göttingen Minipigs are fully accepted by the regulatory authorities such as EMA and FDA and should always be considered when choosing your non-rodent model for pharmacology or toxicology as they are often the scientifically correct research model. Animal models for human diseases have been developed in this species and used in the safety assessment of many marketed drugs. EGM also provides biological specimens from Göttingen Minipigs for in vitro research as well as courses in husbandry, handling, dosing, sampling techniques and training of Göttingen Minipigs. Clean pigs for clear results. Contact us at: Ellegaard Göttingen Minipigs A/S, Soroe Landevej 302, DK-4261 Dalmose, Denmark T: +45 5818 5818 E: ckt@minipigs.dk Fisher Scientific Fisher Scientific is the leading supplier of laboratory chemicals, safety products and equipment. Fisher Scientific distributes own label and branded products to 40,000 customers in the British Isles, Republic of Ireland and selected overseas markets. Our plant and headquarters in Loughborough employs 450 people. Our comprehensive safety product range offers a one-stop shop for all your requirements and is designed to meet the needs of a demanding market. With over 200,000 product lines and working closely with our suppliers, we provide everything from your day-to-day needs to the most innovative modern technological products required by a world class market. Our company shop window is a dynamic, fully interactive web catalogue that provides real-time stock availability and a considerable range of customer oriented features. This is supported by a series of catalogues covering the entire breadth of general laboratory activity. In the UK, we list over 170,000 products. Contact us at: Fisher Scientific, Bishop Meadow Road, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 5RG T: +44 (0) 1509 231166 E: fisheruk.quotations@thermofisher.com www.fisher.co.uk Getinge UK Ltd Complete biosafety solutions for containment facilities Getinge is a leading provider of bio-containment solutions and like all laboratories and research facilities, bio-containment suites need autoclaves for sterilisation and decontamination. The pathogenic nature of the waste material from such facilities coupled with the use of the autoclave as a barrier between the facility and the outside world places special requirements on the autoclave design and processes used that standard autoclaves cannot fulfill. Getinge are also dedicated to helping our customers achieve maximum productivity in the most cost efficient way by offering customised solutions which includes a design service, manufacturing, project management, installation and commissioning, field support and Trade Exhibition 87
Trade Exhibition Ellegaard G  ttingen Minipigs A S  Ellegaard G  ttingen Minipigs  EGM  is the exclusive breeder of geneti...
Trade Exhibition servicing of bio-containment equipment. We have a range of sterilisers, washers and isolators plus the patented DPTE rapid transfer port system specifically designed for use in BSL3 and BSL4 facilities together with other supporting equipment. Please visit our stand and we will be happy to provide advice and guidance and will have industry specific literature available or email us on uklssales@getinge.com. Contact us at: Getinge UK Ltd, Orchard Way, Sutton in Ashfield, Nottinghamshire NG17 1JU T: +44 (0) 1623 510033 F: +44 (0) 1623 440456 www.getinge.com Harlan Laboratories Ltd Harlan Laboratories is a leading provider of essential, pre-clinical and non-clinical contract research, research models, animal diets and services to the pharmaceutical, biotech, medical device, agrochemical and chemical industries, as well as universities, government and other research organisations. The company’s focus is on providing customers with products and services to optimise the discovery and safety of new medicines and compounds. Our key strength is the diverse range of interrelated research tools we offer. These include laboratory animals, standard and customised diets, technical services (such as health and genetic monitoring and transgenic services), biological products and services, contract breeding, projects and containment solutions. Contact us at: Harlan Laboratories Ltd, Shaw’s Farm, Blackthorn, Bicester, Oxfordshire OX25 1TP T: +44 (0) 1869 243241 F: +44 (0) 1869 246759 E: orders@harlan.com www.harlan.com Harvard Apparatus Ltd Harvard Apparatus is a global developer and manufacturer of a broad range of specialised products, primarily scientific instruments. Harvard Apparatus products are used to accelerate drug discovery and aid research at pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, universities and government laboratories worldwide. The Harvard Bioscience family of companies supplies the bioresearch community with such a broad line of specialised products for neuroscience, physiology, pharmacology, toxicology and more that we truly are a one-stop shop. We continually expand our product line through invention and acquisition. We have sales and manufacturing operations worldwide. Contact us at: Harvard Apparatus Ltd, Fircroft Way, Edenbridge, Kent TH8 6HE T: +44 (0) 1732 864001 E: sales@harvardapparatus.co.uk www.harvardapparatus.co.uk 88 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition servicing of bio-containment equipment. We have a range of sterilisers, washers and isolators plus the pa...
Trade Exhibition IDEXX BioResearch IDEXX BioResearch, a global leader in veterinary diagnostics, offers a fully integrated suite of innovative animal health monitoring and biological materials testing services, global clinical laboratory resources and laboratory animal diagnostic instruments to suit your needs. Simplified sourcing: l comprehensive and customisable offering enables you to simplify internal coordination  and logistics Rapid results: l rapid reference laboratory testing turnaround and state-of-the-art diagnostic  instruments provide real-time results Validated species: l specific reference intervals for laboratory animal species and sub-strains for accurate data  Flexible data handling: l download results electronically and easily organise data into reports that quickly  guide study analysis and clinical decisions Unrivalled expertise: l more than 50 years of knowledge and experience in the fields of veterinary medicine  and laboratory animal health Professional support: l laboratory animal medicine board-certified veterinarians, PhD level microbiologists,  molecular biologists and geneticists available to consult on your specific needs Contact us at: IDEXX BioResearch, Riverside House, Riverside Walk, Windsor, Berkshire SL4 1NA T: +44 (0) 1753 838909 E: elen-aspden@idexx.com www.idexxbioresearch.com/europe IMPEX Services International Ltd IMPEX Services International Ltd have been serving the research industry for 15 years with Europe’s largest independent fleet of specially equipped and designed DEFRA registered vehicles. Our dedicated team work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to offer a complete handling and shipping service for all laboratory animals, bio samples and equipment regardless of your shipping needs. Our complete global coverage guarantees you a secure, efficient, door-to-door service to or from any destination worldwide. Our budget shipping options for smaller consignments offer clients a cost effective alternative, with the same excellent level of service and commitment within the UK and across the European continent. With a range of vehicles from our eco-friendly Minis, to large trucks, IMPEX really do offer you ‘total logistics solutions’. We are confident you will be delighted with our services. Please contact us for brochures and further information. Contact us at: IMPEX Services International Ltd, PO Box 187, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE28 4JF T: +44 (0) 8456 021662 F: +44 (0) 8456 021663 E: info@impex-uk.com www.impex-uk.com Trade Exhibition 89
Trade Exhibition IDEXX BioResearch  IDEXX BioResearch, a global leader in veterinary diagnostics, offers a fully integrate...
Trade Exhibition Institute of Animal Technology The Institute of Animal Technology (IAT) was founded in 1950 and its purpose is to advance knowledge and promote excellence in the care and welfare of animals in science The IAT recognises and supports the benefits arising from research involving animals and its members are committed to the principle that excellence in animal care and welfare is essential for excellence in science. Representing animal technologists both within the UK and around the world, the IAT has over 2400 members, which includes the vast majority of the UK’s Named Animal Care and Welfare Officers (NACWOs). Since 2011 the IAT as a member of the Biosciences Coalition has commented on the transposition of the EU Directive 2010/63 EU into UK Legislation. Also, under the auspices of the European Federation of Animal Technologists (EFAT), the IAT has contributed into a number of the Expert Working Groups in Brussels, which is looking at various aspects of how the new Directive will be implemented throughout Europe as from January 2013. Education and qualification for animal technologists is one of the key roles of the IAT. The IAT is recognised by Ofqual as the Awarding Organisation for its Further Education Level 2 and 3 qualifications in laboratory animal science and technology. In June 2012, the IAT began working with Middlesex University to set up a fully validated BSc programme, which is intended to be in place for the academic year 2014 – 2015. In the interim period, the IAT set up a Diploma in Higher Education, which will be the equivalent of the second year of a degree giving students 120 credits at level 5 and leading directly to the final year of the degree. It is envisaged the BSc in Laboratory Animal Science and Technology will enable career animal technologists to continue to play an invaluable role at the highest levels of scientific research and teaching. Contact us at: Institute of Animal Technology, 5 South Parade, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7JL T: +44 (0) 800 085 4380 E: admin@iat.org.uk www.iat.org.uk IPS Product Supplies Ltd IPS has been supplying biomedical research facilities with industry leading brands for over ten years. We are exclusive European distributors of LabDiet® and TestDiet® and also produce speciality diets such as DIO High Fat Range, AIN Series, Tamoxifen, Fenbendazole in our modern TestDiet® Europe facility here in the UK. The LabDiet® and TestDiet® formulations have evolved as research models have developed and now more and more researchers are relying on the LabDiet® and TestDiet® products for their studies. IPS is also proud to represent Benchguard®, Lignocel Bedding and other high quality products that compliment your research. Contact us at: IPS Product Supplies Ltd, BCM IPS Ltd, London WC1N 3XX T: +44 (0) 870 600 1616 E: customers@ipsltd.biz www.ipsltd.biz 90 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Institute of Animal Technology  The Institute of Animal Technology  IAT  was founded in 1950 and its purp...
Trade Exhibition IWT (A Tecniplast Company) Washing, decontamination and automation solutions With a passion for innovation at the heart of what we do, IWT brings to you an extensive range of washing, disinfection and automation solutions for your animal unit. From compact in-line bottle washers up to fully integrated automated processing lines for cages, lids and bottles; if you have a requirement we have the solution. IWT is globally well known for high throughput and energy efficient rack and tunnel washers, modular robotised cage progressing systems and vacuum assisted material transportation solutions. All our washers are backed up by purpose engineered logistics equipment. This is a key element to making your animal handling unit effective and efficient. IWT also offer turnkey solutions for the decontamination of heat sensitive equipment, integrating our range of stainless steel material locks, interlocking doors and large passthrough chambers, with the most popular low temperature decontamination technologies such as hydrogen peroxide vapour and chlorine dioxide gas, offering you great flexibility and technical independence.  As a subdivision of the Tecniplast family of companies, IWT’s entire focus is washing technology. Twenty years of commitment to laboratory animal science and the deep knowledge of plastic materials and husbandry standards have made IWT the ideal partner for the care of your cages and for the optimisation of your cleaning workloads. Our team of product specialists and engineers are available from the very early days of your projects to support you with flow cycle simulations, layout proposals, project schedules, throughput and workload analysis and detailed running costs and equipment payback charts. Objective data and quantitative information are nowadays becoming increasingly critical factors in driving and steering decisions. For all of the above, you can count on us! Here is an overview of the product range that we bring to you. Washing systems: l bottle washers  l cage washers  l rack washers  Automation: l bedding handling systems  l automated bottle handling systems  l automated cage handling systems  Materials handling/logistics: l material handling for bottles and cages  Decontamination: l decontamination chambers  Contact us at: IWT (a part of the Tecniplast family of companies), BCM Box 3058, London WC1N 3XX T: +44 (0) 0845 050 4556 E: sales@tecniplastuk.com Trade Exhibition 91
Trade Exhibition IWT  A Tecniplast Company   Washing, decontamination and automation solutions With a passion for innovati...
Trade Exhibition Laboratory Animal Science Association (LASA) To advance scientific understanding and knowledge of the use, care and welfare of laboratory animals and promote refinement, reduction and replacement LASA persues its aims in a number of ways: Promoting the interchange of information through meetings, lectures, discussions and publications. LASA has six sections, which together provide a forum to discuss the latest developments in the areas of specialised scientific interest. Every year the scientific sections hold section meetings. The Annual Winter Meeting is a three-day scientific meeting covering a wide range of topics in platform presentations and workshops. The meeting also offers great opportunities to network with Trade Exhibitors. LASA encourages and facilitates education and training in laboratory animal science. This takes place through workshops and the publication of proceedings and best practice guides. We welcome applications of membership from individuals, institutions and students Contact us at: LASA, PO Box 524, Hull HU9 9HE T: +44 (0) 8456 711956 F: +44 (0) 8456 711957 E: info@lasa.co.uk www.lasa.co.uk Lantra Lantra is the Sector Skills Council for Animal Health and Welfare and works with bioscience and animal technology to identify and address issues relating to the competence, abilities, skills and knowledge of those working with animals in research. Skills Manager is a simple to use web-based system developed by Lantra to support the assessment, monitoring and recording of competencies and levels of supervision for bioscience businesses, organisations and institutions across the UK. Key features include: l built around Home Office list of techniques in order to accurately record individual  competencies in handling, procedures and observations against various species l competence and level of supervision is set, reviewed and endorsed by project licence  holders l personal licence holders are able to review and self-assess their competence and level  of supervision against agreed techniques relevant to the project l holds records of all training and qualifications  l allows uploading of evidence documents in support of competence and training  l supports the recording of Continued Professional Development (CPD)  l external audits supported by reporting options and through the optional feature of  remote auditing by sampling l use of SSL for maximum security and Tier 3 hosted solution with leading UK provider  available online 24/7 via a separate internet domain name l all connections between a user’s computer and the server are encrypted in transit  Please visit our stand to find out more about Skills Manager, see the system in action and see how it will work for you. 92 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Laboratory Animal Science Association  LASA   To advance scientific understanding and knowledge of the us...
Trade Exhibition Contact us at: Lantra, Lantra House, Stoneleigh Park, Coventry CV8 2LG T: +44 (0) 2476 696996 E: lisa.jarvis@lantra.co.uk www.lantra.co.uk LBS (Serving Biotechnology) Ltd What a difference a year makes. Since the 2013 IAT Congress LBS underwent a successful management buyout resulting in a more focused company committed to serving the biotech industry in the long term. The company’s heritage and long service to the industry is something all the staff at LBS takes pride in and continues to run through the very veins and DNA of LBS. We continue to focus on meeting and exceeding the requirements of our domestic and international customers in the biotechnology industry through ISO 9001:2008 quality assurance, customer service and logistics management. We offer a combination of tried and tested products along and through a continual process of product development, new innovative product solutions. All of this is developed through a process of working closely with and understanding our customers’ needs which we aim to excel. Visit our stand for information and advice on: l research and zoo diets  l environmental enrichment products  l research bedding and nesting material  l extensive range of small and large hay bales  l water resistant protective clothing and safety footwear  l disinfectants and allied products  l bespoke irradiated packaging and supplies  l transit and transport boxes  l specialist vacuum/floor care products  l broad range of specialist equipment and products for animal technologists  Contact us at: LBS (Serving Biotechnology) Ltd, PO Box 431, Surrey RH6 0UW T: +44 (0) 1293 827940 F: +44 (0) 1293 782235 E: sales@lbs-biotech.com www.lbs-biotech.com Learning Curve (Development) Ltd The Learning Curve provides high quality training and CPD for animal technologists, scientists and support staff. Training that significantly enhances professional competence is more important than ever. The Learning Curve has an impressive and dedicated team, brought together for the purpose of creating and maintaining a high level of theoretical and practical competence in science. We intend to give our customers the knowledge and skills required for a competent and ethical science based career. The Learning Curve delivers its courses at venues across the UK, allowing us to account for local procedures and to customise courses to meet establishment needs. Trade Exhibition 93
Trade Exhibition Contact us at  Lantra, Lantra House, Stoneleigh Park, Coventry CV8 2LG T   44  0  2476 696996 E  lisa.jar...
Trade Exhibition Courses include: l Home Office modular training 1 – 4  l licensee refresher training  l introduction to necropsy  l IAT L2 and L3  l aseptic techniques  l NACWO  l introduction to technical procedures  l training, assessment and competence in the workplace  l support staff workshop  l GLP and AAALAC awareness  Contact us at: Learning Curve (Development) Ltd, PO Box 140, Ware, Hertfordshire SG9 0ZN T: +44 (0) 1763 272588 E: info@learningcurvedevelopment.co.uk www.learningcurvedevelopment.co.uk LEEC Ltd LEEC provides state-of-the-art protection with maximum flexibility Large and small animal solutions. Products include: l downdraught and backdraught tables: surgery, necropsy, perfusion, downdraught pods  l warming cabinets  l pass-through hatch and step over barriers  l lifting trolleys  l CO2 euthanasia chambers  l incubators: CO2  Formalin and anaesthetic exposure is hazardous – control and reduce your exposure. LEEC ventilated laboratory and necropsy tables will reduce your exposure to formalin to below 0.5ppm and anaesthetics gas to below 2ppm, creating a protective environment for your animals as well as your researchers. LEEC is your specialist for necropsy, surgery, perfusion tables and barrier containment equipment. Using downdraught, backdraught, re-circulating airflow with the silent air handling systems, as well as non-ventilated equipment solutions. In the laboratory, LEEC CO2 incubators provide a reliable, efficient and controlled environment for germination/cultivation of cells and microorganisms. LEEC provide a bespoke service, examining all aspects of your working laboratory, ergonomics, containment, hazardous vapour control and odour, setting standards and performance levels to build a protective barrier. Contact us at: LEEC Ltd, Private Road No. 7, Colwick Industrial Estate, Nottingham NG4 2AJ  T: +44 (0) 115 961 6222 E: sales@leec.co.uk www.leec.co.uk 94 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Courses include  l Home Office modular training 1     4   l licensee refresher training   l introduction ...
Trade Exhibition Locus Technology Inc Locus Technology Inc offers data management software to laboratory animal facilities. LabTracks provides functionality with visual appeal and powerful tools. Track cost recovery, licence/PIL/19b, animal orders, accounts, breeding, task scheduling, inventory and animal health in one, configurable package. Connection to financial packages, including SAP and Agresso is included. New: l management of technician skills and training  Contact us at: Locus Technology Inc, 3989 Rupp Road, Manchester, Maryland 21102, USA T: +1 443 507 5196 E: info@locustechnology.com Lomir Biomedical Inc Established in Canada in 1989 with head office and manufacturing facilities based in Quebec, Lomir Biomedical Inc is one of the world’s leading brands in the design and manufacture of animal jackets for all laboratory animal species, infusion systems for rodents and large animals, collars, restraints, animal handling and enrichment products. Recognised as a design innovator and manufacturer of high quality, durable and easy-touse equipment for biomedical and research applications, Lomir is the supplier of choice for private contract organisations, pharmaceutical companies, research institutes, universities, teaching hospitals, biotechnology companies and government institutions. Lomir’s commitment to pioneering design, continuous product improvement, technical excellence and customer satisfaction is matched only by their people’s dedication to and respect for the wellbeing of research animals. The Company’s range of animal jackets incorporates carefully chosen materials and special features that increase comfort for the subject. Lomir’s infusion, testing and restraint equipment is designed to facilitate ease of use for the handler, minimising animal discomfort and stress levels and ultimately protecting the integrity of the procedure. Lomir strives to deliver effective and affordable solutions to virtually any challenge it is presented with by its customers. For UK enquiries please contact our UK Sales Representative on +44 (0) 7824 861583 Contact us at: Lomir Biomedical Inc UK Office: Agenda Resource Management Ltd, PO Box 24, Hull HU12 8YJ T: +44 (0) 8456 445545 E: stuartl@agenda-mc.co.uk Marshall BKU B&K Universal is a division of Marshall BioResources Inc. Our UK facility is located in East Yorkshire. We have recently opened a large new UK dog facility and this enables us to supply customers with the globally popular Marshall Beagle®. These are recognised throughout the laboratory animal world for their good health, genetic consistency, uniformity and gentle temperament. Our extensive socialisation programme produces dogs that are active and happy when in their enclosures and come willingly to the front when approached and are calm and pleasant when handled. B&K also offer a range of key high health status (SOPF and SPF) rodent stocks and strains, which are bred at our Grimston site near Hull. Amongst the inbred strains available are Trade Exhibition 95
Trade Exhibition Locus Technology Inc  Locus Technology Inc offers data management software to laboratory animal facilitie...
Trade Exhibition C57BL/6, BALB/c, Strain 129 and two interferon receptor knockout strains – the A129 and the AG129. Our non-inbred strains include BKW mice (ICR background) and Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs. We also supply New Zealand white rabbits and ferrets. Our scientific services team offers a highly regarded health screening service and a specialist microbiologist will be on our stand to help advise you. We are able to carry out health screening at your site or, using our collection service, your sentinels can be tested in Grimston. Biological matrices from a range of donors (rodents, Marshall Beagles®, rabbits, human, NHP and farm animals) are also available. We offer a very quick turnaround of your orders for whole blood, plasma, serum, tissues and many other bioproducts. You can also contact us for help with your imports or exports of animals as well as for supplies of animal bedding and enrichment products. Visit our booth to pick up a set of current literature. Contact us at: Marshall BKU, The Field Station, Grimston, Aldbrough, Hull HU11 4QE T: +44 (0) 1964 527555 F: +44 (0) 1964 529039 E: sales@bku.com MMM Medical Equipment UK Ltd Sterilisation, steam generator and disinfection equipment manufacturers MMM Medical Equipment UK Ltd are a subsidiary of MMM GmbH, one of the largest European manufactures of sterilisers and disinfection systems with a workforce of over 1000 employees and responsible for many innovations in sterilisation technology. The sterilisers we manufacture have a very long life expectancy, with reliability playing a major part in the design; our strength is our whole life cycle support. We can offer single door or pass through double door sterilisers, with loading heights of 625mm, 390mm or floor level for ease of loading. Our standard chamber sizes suit all common IVC and cage racks. MMM steriliser chambers are manufactured in-house from top grade materials, in a range of sizes from 316 litres to 6292 litres, plus bespoke units to customers’ requirements. We also offer air tight double skinned barriers for optimum sound and heat insulation (very important in animal house situations). We have our own project management, planning and installation teams based in our UK office and work with architects, design teams and planning departments from the initial concept through to final installation, commissioning and validation. We can incorporate H2O2 (VHP) generators as part of an automated process cycle as an option on MMM sterilisers. Why not talk with us now about your existing and future sterilisation requirements. Contact us at: MMM Medical Equipment UK Ltd, Units 2 & 3 Gateway Drive Business Park, Gateway Drive, Yeadon, Leeds LS19 7XY T: +44 (0) 113 3910717 F: +44 (0) 113 3910503 E: sales@mmm-group.co.uk www.mmm-group.co.uk 96 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition C57BL 6, BALB c, Strain 129 and two interferon receptor knockout strains     the A129 and the AG129. Our ...
Trade Exhibition Moor Instruments Moor Instruments has been committed to life science research for nearly 30 years and is recognised as a market leader in physiological monitoring, offering blood-flow and tissueoxygenation measurement hardware, software and services in support of this research. Moor provides real-time, non-invasive imaging and monitoring systems allowing the user to quantify blood perfusion and tissue oxygenation in the microcirculation and macrovessels of any exposed tissues for pre-clinical and clinical research assays. Our equipment is used in a multitude of research areas including (but not limited to): l neuroscience  l vascular diseases  l drug development  l cardio-vascular research  l ischemia/re-perfusion assay development  l angiogenesis modelling  l inflammation  l endothelial function  l fracture repair  l wound healing  l hypoxia  New product developments at Moor include the moorVMS-LDF latest generation of laser Doppler monitor, which integrates with moorVMS-OXY and other VMS-family systems enabling multi-parameter assessment and automated protocol control through connection to moorVMS-PC or to a generic data acquisition system, e.g., AD Instruments™ powerLAB®. The new moorFLPI-2 real-time blood flow imaging system, allows for high resolution and high speed image capture. With over 35 years’ experience in developing laser Doppler and associated technologies, Moor has the breadth of knowledge, skills and capabilities to help achieve your research objectives. Whatever your needs, as researcher, clinician or manufacturer, Moor will aim to assist you. Contact us at: Moor Instruments, Millwey, Axminster, Devon EX13 5HU T: +44 (0) 1297 35715 E: sales@moor.co.uk www.moor.co.uk MSE Henderson Biomedical MSE Henderson Biomedical is a leading British manufacturer and service provider of laboratory centrifuges, ultrasonic disintegrators, ovens, incubators, vented animal cabinets, class II laminar flow safety cabinets and class III isolators. MSE Henderson Biomedical is split into two distinct branches. Our manufacturing arm is MSE, an international company which exports its products to over 60 countries around the world, whilst Henderson Biomedical is our service and repair division. Both companies are based at our site in South East London. MSE has been manufacturing laboratory equipment since the 1930s and supplies products to a wide range of customers in clinical research, education and industry both here in the UK and abroad. Our ProAir™ animal research range can allow you to protect the user from pathogenic samples and keep your specimens safe in an isolated environment. Trade Exhibition 97
Trade Exhibition Moor Instruments  Moor Instruments has been committed to life science research for nearly 30 years and is...
Trade Exhibition Henderson Biomedical was established in 1987 and has a team of highly qualified and experienced engineers covering the whole of the UK. Our engineers can not only service and repair your equipment at competitive prices but also calibrate your instruments to ensure that your laboratory complies with the latest ISO standards. We also offer a range of reconditioned laboratory equipment at a fraction of the cost of new. Henderson Biomedical share close business ties with a multitude of prominent organisations such as PHE Porton Down, Cambridge University, the Medical Research Council and Huntingdon Life Sciences. MSE Henderson Biomedical is committed to supplying laboratories involved in animal research with the equipment they need and also to ensure their instruments are serviced, repaired and calibrated in line with the latest ISO standards. Regardless of your requirements, you can be sure that you will receive a friendly service every time from a company with nearly 80 years’ experience in the life sciences sector. Contact us at: MSE Henderson Biomedical, Worsley Bridge Road, London SE26 5AZ T: +44 (0) 20 8663 4610 E: sales@mseuk.co.uk www.mseuk.co.uk Noray Bioinformatics SLU Software for the management of animal experimentation Noray Bioinformatics SLU (NorayBio) is a leading bioinformatics company in Europe represented in the UK by Aston Pharma. We are specialists in the design, development and commercialisation of software exclusively for the life sciences and health sectors: biotechnology, biomedicine and biopharmacy. AniBio’s standard licence, product developed and registered by NorayBio, has been implemented in a wide range of universities, research centres, pharmaceutical companies and CROs, as well as different tailored projects created to meet each customer’s specific needs. A  niBio line products. AniBio line includes two standard software applications: l AniBio – for the management of animal facilities  l AniBio Aquatic – for the management of aquatic animal  Are you interested? Contact us at: anibio@noraybio.com for a demo to test it. AniBio in Europe. NorayBio currently has three sales offices in Europe: Cambridge, Lyon and Turin. The purpose of these offices is to support foreign customers. NorayBio also has a strategic alliance with Aston Pharma in the UK. NorayBio has been recognised by Microsoft in the use of its technologies and also holds the quality certificate: UNE-EN-ISO 9001:2008 Contact us at: Noray Bioinformatics SLU, Parque Tecnológico 801A, 2º, 48160 Derio (Bilbao), Spain T: +34 94 403 6998 F: +34 94 403 6999 E: noguero@noraybio.com www.noraybio.com UK Office: Babraham Research Campus, Cambridge CB22 3AT T: +44 (0) 1223 497465 98 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Henderson Biomedical was established in 1987 and has a team of highly qualified and experienced engineers...
Trade Exhibition North Kent Plastics The new NKP Following the re-launch in 2012 of the NKP brand, we have firmly established the company as a major supplier of animal housing systems to the life science industry. Also, NKP now offer flexible isolator systems and servicing through our partnership with Harlan Laboratories UK Ltd. Manufacturers and suppliers of the following: Cages: l all existing NKP cages are still available in polypropylene, polysulfone,  polycarbonate and polyclear for all species l stainless steel lids  l aluminium or stainless steel cages for rabbits, guinea pigs, cats and marmosets  l metabolism cages, all styles  l floor pens and enclosures for large animals  l bespoke design service for all projects  Racking: l racking for all NKP cages is made in aluminium and stainless steel  Trolleys: l trolleys are made to individual design specifications  Flexible isolators: l full stainless steel framed flexible isolator systems  l comprehensive technical services department to carry out all servicing requirements  Other equipment: l a variety of drinking bottles, rubber bungs, nozzles and melamine tops  l mouse nest boxes in various colours  l filter tops for the NKP cage range  l food bins and dollies  l food hoppers  l animal carrying cases and enrichment products  l drug security cabinets  l allergen containment enclosures  l cleansing stations  NKP are agents for Thoren Caging Systems in the USA (Maxi-Miser® ventilated racking system). Contact us at: North Kent Plastics, PO Box 10131, Coalville, Leicestershire LE67 0DZ T: +44 (0) 800 112 3047 E: info@northkentplastics.co.uk www.northkentplastics.co.uk Trade Exhibition 99
Trade Exhibition North Kent Plastics  The new NKP Following the re-launch in 2012 of the NKP brand, we have firmly establi...
Trade Exhibition Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems At Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems, we tailor our laboratory systems to meet the specific needs of individual species and we specialise in turnkey systems that are secure, efficient and virtually fail-safe. Our mission is to support the success of your research now and for years to come. As biologists and engineers, we understand and appreciate the complexity of aquatic life. As a result, we tailor our laboratory systems to meet the specific needs of individual species including Zebrafish and Xenopus. Our goal is to equip you with the finest systems and support available for engineering, project management, system commissioning, training, husbandry and more. With any research project, it is essential for habitats to promote optimal animal health, while being flexible enough to meet a variety of requirements. Our Aquatic Habitats custom and turnkey systems are secure, efficient and virtually fail-safe. Depend on Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems for state-of-the-art aquatic housing that is easy to use. We have been designing large-scale aquatic research facilities since 1997 and continue to lead the industry in quality of equipment and service. You will get flexible options regarding tank sizes, shelf configurations, rack widths and heights, everything. No facility design is too complicated. If you envision it, we can make it a reality. Aquatic Habitats’ systems require minimal upkeep; our multi-rack system designs do not require daily, weekly or even monthly service. You will save money on labour and replacement consumables and you will not have to worry about constant maintenance. We want you to focus on your research; you can leave the rest to us. Contact us at: Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems, 2395 Apopka Blvd, Apopka, Florida 32703, USA T: +1 407 886 7575 E: PAES.Habitats@Pentair.com www.pentaraes.com Plexx BV Plexx BV is the sole European representative for BioMedic Data Systems, Lab Products Inc and E-Z Systems/Euthanex. With nearly 30 years’ experience in the pharmaceutical and biomedical industry, we have a proven track record of providing high quality products and outstanding customer service. Animal identification: Injectable transponders give the option to programme unique identification codes as well as reading body temperature. Individually ventilated micro isolator systems: Protect both your staff and animals with our positive cage in a negative rack design. Ask about our unique OneCage and the SuperMouse750/1800™. Econo-cage® disposable system: The Econo-cage® is a completely disposable caging system that has been designed to fit with the SuperMouse750 ventilated racks. Hydropac: Innovative delivery of water to rodents using on-site produced pouches and drip-free single use valves. Anaesthesia equipment: The E-Z anaesthesia systems offer user friendly, simple operation equipment with a level of precise automation that minimises operator error. 100 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems  At Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems, we tailor our laboratory systems to meet the...
Trade Exhibition Automated home cage euthanasia systems: The Euthanex product range offers automated home cage euthanasia with CO2 for small, medium and large numbers of cages at the press of a button. Metabolic cages: Simple and easy to use as it is made up of only eight parts. Conventional caging: Cages are available from stock and can be used interchangeably with your existing European cages. These can be supplied in polycarbonate or polypropylene. Environmental enrichment: Special diets, treats and toys for all laboratory animal species. Contact us at: Plexx BV, PO Box 86, 6660 AB Elst, The Netherlands UK Office: T: +44 (0) 800 228 9460 E: uk@plexx.eu www.plexx.eu R&W Associates UK Ltd R&W will be showcasing the ARMIS management system New for 2014, our ARMIS change station software can be run from android tablets or smart phones. Our full change station product connects to peripherals such as RFID or barcode readers, printers, weighing scales, uses touch screens to let technologists or researchers to intuitively record all of their animal work without the need for paper or a keyboard and accommodates the use of 1D and 2D barcode readers. ARMIS uses the internet to forge a direct link between the researcher and their animal colonies. The researcher is able to track, monitor and issue work requests such as genotyping, pairings and disposals in real-time without the need to breach the animal unit bio-security barriers. The change station client is equally at home in the aquarium as it is in the transgenic breeding room. It maintains breeding, health, clinical signs and procedure records and is able to predict work flow such as weaning and genotyping schedules. It seamlessly interfaces with the Tecniplast Tritone fish feeding robot. ARMIS has the capability to map rooms details of which can be interrogated over various criteria prior to any visit to a unit. Each stake holder involved with the animal unit; researchers, department contacts, unit and enterprise managers has their own website to interact with ARMIS. ARMIS is highly scalable and is capable of running a one PC operation all the way up to the largest multi-unit enterprise spread over numerous locations. It manages all stock, finance and compliance across the entire enterprise. ARMIS fully supports the current Home Office Reporting, EU competency, pain threshold management and manages all stock and financials. For more information on how we can help your business, please visit our trade stand. Contact us at: R&W Associates UK Ltd, St John’s House, 5 South Parade, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7JL T: +44 (0) 844 800 4128 E: contact@randw.biz www.armis.co.uk Trade Exhibition 101
Trade Exhibition Automated home cage euthanasia systems  The Euthanex product range offers automated home cage euthanasia ...
Trade Exhibition Rees Scientific Rees Scientific specialise in monitoring temperature in refrigeration, freezing and incubation, lighting, humidity as well as providing automated watering for animal laboratories. Rees Scientific provides automated environmental monitoring to a limitless number of applications in pharmaceutical and laboratory animal research making us the standard by which other monitoring systems are judged. As an ISO 9001:2000 company and fully FDA 21 CFR 11 compliant, Rees Scientific is constantly upgrading policies, procedures and protocols to comply with today’s highly regulated environments. Automated daily printouts, alarm notification, audit trails and complete data encryption are just a few of the standard features that help you meet your AAALAC, FDA, MHRA and Home Office regulations. Visit our stand today to find out more. Contact us at: Rees Scientific, 1007 Whitehead Road Ext., Trenton, New Jersey 08638, USA M: +44 (0) 7748 185307 E: jtelfer@reesscientific.com www.reesscientific.com S3 Science We are the largest supplier of animal technologists in the life sciences sector, since we opened our doors in 2002. Our success is simple; a highly skilled recruitment team that pulls together over 20 years’ recruitment experience and a mission statement at the forefront of all we do: that all great companies are only as good as their staff. Our priority is to source the right candidate with the right skills for your organisation. We have become the preferred or sole recruitment agency to many of the UK’s leading scientific organisations and aim to work with many more over the coming years. Whatever the level of staffing from auxiliary, licensed technician to managers we know that today’s placement will be a part of tomorrow’s success for our clients. Talk to us today and find out how we can provide you with permanent, temporary or contract animal sciences staff. We want to be a key part of your success and hope you can share in our goal of recruitment excellence. New for 2013 – S3 Cleaning! Whether you need a post refurbishment clean, maintenance clean or full decontamination clean, we at S3 Cleaning understand your working environment and exactly what is required to provide cleaning services for all scenarios. Contact us at: S3 Science, BCM Box 1899, London WC1N 3XX T: +44 (0) 844 884 4696 E: info@s3science.com www.s3science.com SAFE SAFE (Scientific Animal Food and Engineering) designs, formulates and produces diets and custom diets for the international research community. With more than 45 years’ experience and partnerships with the foremost research institutes, SAFE is an undisputed international reference. 102 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Rees Scientific  Rees Scientific specialise in monitoring temperature in refrigeration, freezing and incu...
Trade Exhibition The SAFE site is unique. It is certified ISO 14001 (environment), ISO 9001, Codex alimentariusHACCP and GLP and GMP compliant. Entirely dedicated to the life sciences, it has a total product and packaging traceability system based on a baby food manufacturing process. SAFE receives daily support from a group world leader in nutrition and animal health and is strongly involved in research and development activities. We are at the heart of the research process Contact us at: SAFE, Route de Saint Bris, 89290 Augy, France T: +33 3 86 53 76 90 F: +33 3 86 53 35 96 E: info@safe.evls.net www.safe-diets.com Scanbur Technology A/S Scanbur Technology service private and public organisations engaged in medical research and production. We were established in 1968 and have more than 40 years’ experience in developing, producing and selling equipment which is innovative and of superior quality due to our highly skilled and experienced employees. Headquartered in Karlslunde, Denmark, we develop, produce and sell equipment for medical research and production globally. Development and manufacturing: In-house, all engineering and design work is performed on the latest CAD/CAM workstations. Our subcontractors use state-of-the-art Computer Numerical Control (CNC) manufacturing equipment that ensures the highest levels of precision and repeatability. In addition to providing strong customer support in all custom work, the development department is committed to continuous improvement of existing product lines and to ongoing research and development of new solutions to the most current researching and manufacturing problems. All products are assembled and tested before shipment. Contact us at: Scanbur Technology A/S, Silovej 16-18, DK-2690 Karlslunde, Denmark T: +45 56 86 56 00 E: info@scanbur-technology.eu www.scanbur-technology.com Scientific Lesser Ltd Building for science Scientific Lesser is a specialist design and project manager with 30 years’ in-depth experience in the design and construction of pharmaceutical, scientific and electronic facilities and other areas of advanced manufacturing technology. Scientific Lesser found that by aggregating its knowledge exclusively of the pharmaceutical, scientific and electronic industries and the peculiar and specific demands of those industries, it has been able to uniquely ‘fold in’ that expertise. It is this valuable concentration of knowledge that we place at our clients’ disposal as soon as discussions commence. Total spectrum engineering and construction services for science and research facilities: l consulting  l design  Trade Exhibition 103
Trade Exhibition The SAFE site is unique. It is certified ISO 14001  environment , ISO 9001, Codex alimentariusHACCP and G...
Trade Exhibition l engineering  l construction  l qualification and validation  l facility optimisation  l environment solutions  l energy studies  Contact us at: Scientific Lesser Ltd, A Company of the M+W Group, Bridge House, Addlestone Road, Weybridge, Surrey KT15 2UE T: + 44 (0) 1932 836700 www.scientificlesser.com Society of Biology RAnTech for RSciTech The Society of Biology is a single unified voice for biology: advising Government and influencing policy; advancing education; supporting our members and encouraging public interest in the life sciences. The Society represents a diverse membership of individuals and other organisations. As a licensed body of the Science Council, the Society of Biology offers professional recognition for skills, knowledge and expertise for those working in all aspects of life science. Our registers are externally validated awards that can offer career progression, improved status and recognition. The Society of Biology is working with the IAT and offers RSciTech (Registered Science Technician) to holders of the IAT RAnTech. RSciTech is awarded by evidence of RAnTech status and CPD from the past year. We will offer a 50% discount for joining the Society for the first two years. Contact us at: Society of Biology, Charles Darwin House, 12 Roger Street, London WC1N 2JU T: +44 (0) 020 7685 2550 E: markleach@societyofbiology.org (for membership information) www.societyofbiology.org Special Diets Services Special Diets Services, registered to ISO 9001:2008 and GMP+, is the largest supplier of laboratory animal diets in Europe and the only dedicated manufacturer in the UK. For over four decades, SDS has been supplying research establishments and breeders worldwide and we have gained an international reputation for the quality of our diets and manufacturing and storage facilities. As research diets are our core business, SDS has the formulations, packaging and flexibility to suit all your requirements. We have a global network of distributions so local supply is an option. SDS has a professional technical team who are experts in the field of research animal nutrition. Contact us at: Special Diets Services, PO Box 705, Witham, Essex CM8 3AD T: +44 (0) 1376 511260 F: +44 (0) 1376 511247 E: info@sdsdiets.com www.sdsdiets.com 104 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition l engineering   l construction   l qualification and validation   l facility optimisation   l environment...
Trade Exhibition Ssniff Speciality Diets GmbH Ssniff is the leading supplier of laboratory animal diets in Germany, with an unrivalled reputation for quality and flexibility. The company is certified to ISO 9001 standard and can produce GLP compliant diets under GMP conditions. The range of products includes standard, autoclavable and gamma-irradiated feeds for all laboratory species, plus speciality lines covering medicated feeds, test-compound diets and recipes for preclinical studies to induce specific conditions in the animals with batch size as low as 1kg. Formulations suitable for transgenic animals can also be supplied. Full documentation is available for all products, including GLP certificates of analysis. Products can be supplied in standard packaging or vacuum-packed format. The client list in Europe is impressive, including breeders, contract research organisations, pharmaceutical companies and prestigious medical research institutes. Contact us at: Ssniff Speciality Diets GmbH, Ferdinand-Gabriel-Weg 16, D-59494 Soest, Germany T: +49 (0) 29 21 9658 0 F: +49 (0) 29 21 9658 40 E: mail@ssniff.de www.ssniff.com Steel Line Ltd Established in 1979, Steel Line is a Sheffield based UK manufacturer of stainless steel tables for the medical, veterinary and laboratory research markets. Initially designed for hospitals and public mortuaries, the company has adapted these designs to meet the needs of laboratory animal science and veterinary managers/technologists and during 2007 fulfilled its first contracts for two major research organisations in the UK. Although based on generic designs, Steel Line custom builds its products to each client’s requirements. They can be made for small rodent work or even take up to horse size. The products include but are not limited to: l perfusion sinks  l surgery tables l necropsy tables l euthanasia tables l in vitro procedure tables l EEG ante tables l any other table design required by the customer All tables are ventilated, usually downdraught or backdraught if the customer prefers. Fixed or adjustable height tables are also available and sinks, spray hose and wash down (sparge) facilities are fitted as specified. Contact us at: Steel Line Ltd, 415 Petre Street, Sheffield S4 8LL T: +44 (0) 114 231 7330 F: +44 (0) 114 256 0330 E: colin.campbell@steelline.co.uk www.steelline.co.uk Trade Exhibition 105
Trade Exhibition Ssniff Speciality Diets GmbH  Ssniff is the leading supplier of laboratory animal diets in Germany, with ...
Trade Exhibition STERIS Ltd STERIS Corporation is a leading global manufacturer and supplier of infection control products, formulated chemistries, innovative technologies and technical support services. Our comprehensive product portfolio is used extensively throughout the pharmaceutical, research, healthcare and industrial markets and provides our customers with a total solution to maximise productivity, integrity of research and manage contamination control issues. STERIS is uniquely positioned to address these challenges with an integration of capital equipment including autoclaves, washers, effluent bio-decontamination systems, water processing systems, detergents, disinfectants, sterility assurance products and technical support services. For this year’s Congress, our focus is STERIS bio-decontamination services and the use of STERIS VHP® (Vaporised Hydrogen Peroxide) technology. This technology was developed by STERIS over 20 years ago and is a dry gaseous process used for the bio-decontamination of enclosures, rooms, HVAC systems, biological safety cabinets and other laboratory equipment. The process is effective against a wide range of micro-organisms including bacterial spores, validatable and as the technology is a dry process, it has excellent compatibility with materials of construction, including sensitive electrical and electronic equipment and can penetrate through HEPA Filters. VHP® technology is environmentally friendly, as the only bi-products are water vapour and oxygen, and is also residue free. STERIS bio-decontamination services are able to respond to customer contamination challenges on a routine, preventative or emergency basis as well as to support infection control programmes and protocols, all supported by STERIS technical field Service Network. Contact us at: STERIS Ltd, Jays Close, Viables, Basingstoke, Hampshire RG22 4AX T: +44 (0) 1256 840400 E: ukirelandls@steris.com www.sterislifesciences.com Surrey Diagnostics Ltd Surrey Diagnostics Ltd (SDL) specialise in providing independent screening services for laboratory animal health monitoring. Our staff have a wealth of experience in microbiology, serology, molecular biology and veterinary pathology. Through this expertise, SDL can provide consultancy services in all aspects of laboratory animal science. SDL understand the importance of developing and maintaining a comprehensive health monitoring programme for laboratory animals and recognise that it is a fundamental part of successful research. We also aim to provide customer service that is second to none and continually review and improve this where necessary. Our aim is to give customers the best possible, scientifically accurate health monitoring service on the market at a fair price. We use the latest appropriate and proven technologies, such as multiplex serology and real-time PCR to achieve this. SDL has recently installed a new laboratory information management system (LIMS) to further increase customer confidence in results reported. Our enviroscreen service offers a full environmental monitoring service including surfaces, air, water, consumables and laboratory animal allergen (LAA) monitoring. We also offer a range of air quality management options through technologies, which are proven to reduce allergens, odours, micro-organisms, volatile organic compounds and dust in the environment. SDL is the distributor for the Airocide™ in the UK and Ireland. Please call +44 (0) 1483 266533 or email marks.sdl@btconnect.com for further information. Surrey Diagnostics Ltd is an ISO 9001:2008 accredited company. 106 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition STERIS Ltd  STERIS Corporation is a leading global manufacturer and supplier of infection control product...
Trade Exhibition Contact us at: Surrey Diagnostics Ltd, PO Box 156, Cranleigh, Surrey GU6 8ZU T: +44 (0) 1483 268300 F: +44 (0) 1483 266537 E: alistair.sdl@btconnect.com E: andy.sdl@btconnect.com M: +44 (0) 7778 010184 M: +44 (0) 7870 534617 www.sdl.uk.net Sychem Ltd Disinfection and sterilisation equipment specialists Sychem are specialists in the supply, installation and maintenance of disinfection and sterilisation equipment and chemical used within biomedical facilities. Offering a wealth of knowledge and experience, Sychem ensure our customers receive innovative and competitive solutions. Cage and bottle washer range: l AC7000  – cage and rack washer ‘high efficiency/automatic door’ l AC7000  – cage and rack washer ‘high efficiency’ l AC7000 NHP – primate cage and rack washer  l AC1400  – cage and bottle washer ‘cabinet style’ l AC1300  – cage and bottle washer ‘slim line cabinet style’ l AC1200  – aquatic tank washer l AC500  – bottle washer ‘under counter’ l AC3500  – tunnel washer Bottle processing – de-capping, washing, refill and re-capping: l MITO 2B  – semi-automatic bottle processing station l MITO FB  – fully-automatic bottle processing station l MITO PT  – pass through bottle washer l de-capper  – automatic cap remover and emptying station l re-capper  – automatic filling and re-capping station l re-capper  – semi automatic recapping station Fanuc robotics and integration: l fully automated cage and bottle processing solutions l symphony – integration systems l UK based manufacturer support Autoclaves: l floor/IVC loading bulk autoclaves l cabinet style autoclaves l Elara  – medical and laboratory bench top autoclaves ‘pre’ and ‘post’ vac PPM and validation services: l planned and preventative maintenance l emergency response l validation l insurance inspections l team of UK based engineers Clean bedding handling: l BD9000us – ultrasonic bedding dispenser l Clarion system – mechanical drag system ‘clean bedding delivery’ Chemicals – used in facilities for over 30 years: l cage, bottle washing detergents l floor and surface detergents / sanitisers l change station hand sanitiser l general cleaning products Trade Exhibition 107
Trade Exhibition Contact us at  Surrey Diagnostics Ltd, PO Box 156, Cranleigh, Surrey GU6 8ZU T   44  0  1483 268300 F   4...
Trade Exhibition Contact us at: Sychem Ltd, Highcove House, Victory Close, Chandlers Ford, Hampshire SO53 4BU T: +44 (0) 845 644 6824 E: sales@sychem.co.uk www.sychem.co.uk Tecniplast UK Ltd Over 65 years of perfect partnership for your laboratory animal equipment With a passion for innovation, Tecniplast have been at the heart of housing solutions for laboratory animals for over 65 years. The team continues with their commitment to the industry forming the perfect partnership for all of your laboratory animal equipment needs. At Tecniplast we are permanently applying effort to the development of our diverse range of products and to improving the related quality standards and technical expertise. The key factors of Tecniplast’s international success are an acute awareness of the continuous evolution of housing facility needs and the capability to design, develop and integrate products in-house. Our constant investment in tooling, technologies, automation, production capability, stock availability, staff recruitment and training, together with the ISO certified quality and environment management systems, stand clearly in favour of a company that has led the field since the early 1950s. The range consists of: l VC systems that deliver low speed draught-free air to your animals I l  ermetically sealed IsoCage for high containment solutions h l  onventional caging for all laboratory species c l  quatics solutions, now including a truly innovative ‘Tritone’ automated fish feeding a l aminar airflow technology; cage changing stations, bio safety stations, bedding l disposal systems and air showers l  utomation, from partial to fully automated systems to assist with ergonomics, a standardisation of procedure and throughput l  ustomised solutions, all specific to your facility c l  ervicing and maintenance of equipment; helping you to keep the equipment in your s facility up and running Tecniplast, founded in 1949, remains Europe’s premier manufacturer of specialist laboratory animal equipment. Be sure to visit us at our stand to view our latest innovation products. Contact us at: Tecniplast UK Ltd, BCM Box 3058, London WC1N 3XX T: +44 (0) 845 050 4556 F: +44 (0) 845 050 4557 E: info@tecniplastuk.com www.tecniplastuk.com The Cube Ltd Introduction to CCT: Cube Clean Tech or CCT was established by Steven Cubitt of The Cube and Fintan J Lyons (formerly of Frontline Energy and Environmental). The aim of the company is to work with researchers and industry professionals to provide support for the development and delivery of sustainable and energy efficient laboratories and biomedical research facilities. CCT is 108 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Contact us at  Sychem Ltd, Highcove House, Victory Close, Chandlers Ford, Hampshire SO53 4BU T   44  0  8...
Trade Exhibition based in Cambridge and Dublin and partners with leading industry specialists and suppliers to provide a global service. CCT Services: CCT is a specialist company with extensive experience in delivering sustainable laboratories and research facilities. We have extensive experience with clients in the university, government, CROs, pharmaceutical and biotech biomedical research sectors to deliver quality buildings and services that support research and science in the UK and internationally. Our philosophy as a business emphasises competence, reliability and sustainability in infrastructure and supporting technology. We focus our efforts on producing high quality low carbon labs and animal facilities. We are passionate about this sector and deeply involved in the development and regulation of the industry. With our experience we work as leaders, encouraging and inspiring moves towards a more sustainable future through demonstration and education. Our business culture encourages open and candid discussion with our clients and stakeholders to generate practical options with the widest possible support base. At the core of our approach is our commitment to evidence based modelling (EBM). This process enables CCT to capture quantitative and qualitative data and information to inform better decision making at every level. CCT has developed a process we call low carbon labs with evidence based methodologies to enable clients to achieve significant reductions in total energy usage of the order of 30 – 40% and greater for current facilities without compromising safety or reducing standards. This includes savings in electrical energy used to drive the HVAC systems and thermal energy generated by Natural Gas of LPG for example for heating and hot water. Contact us at: The Cube Ltd, St John’s Innovation Park, Cowley Road, Cambridge CB4 0WS T: +44 (0) 1223 429252 E: info@thecube.eu.com www.cctech.eu UNO Roestvaststaal BV The identification of individual laboratory animals has become more and more important. Until recently it was very expensive to introduce the use of RFID transponders into your facility, this has now changed! UNO can offer you three types of transponders and matching readers, all at very reasonable costs. Our programme also includes a number of readers varying from a simple hand held reader that just shows you the transponder number to a sophisticated reader and software combination to introduce not only the transponder number but also a number of observations codes, etc. Last but not least we are happy to introduce our caliper system, which allows you to introduce data like ID-number, weight and f.i. measured tumour growth into a data sheet. More information on this is available on request. UNO is a well-known supplier of a wide range of housing products for the laboratory animal market. Next to our standard line of housing products, UNO has a very successful engineering department, which is constantly working to improve the quality of the products and integrating specific customer needs into ‘standard’ products. The demand for anaesthesia equipment that can be used for small laboratory animals has increased substantially. Following this trend, UNO has been and still is actively involved in the design and manufacturing of complete anaesthesia systems even for the smallest animals. We aim to not only supply the products but make sure that once the product arrived at your facility the know-how about setting up and using the system are also available! UNO provides a wide range of products and services to help you as a laboratory researcher to obtain the most suitable and fitting infusion set up for your goal. A range of handling, Trade Exhibition 109
Trade Exhibition based in Cambridge and Dublin and partners with leading industry specialists and suppliers to provide a g...
Trade Exhibition restraint and capture equipment is available in order not only to safeguard personnel while handling animals but also to handle the animal in a safe and secure way. Contact us at: UNO Roestvaststaal BV, PO Box 15, NL-6900 AA Zevenaar, The Netherlands T: +31 316 524451 F: +31 316 523785 E: info@unobv.com www.unobv.com Veltek Associates Inc Since 1981, Veltek Associates Inc (VAI) has been a global leader and supplier of innovative contamination control products to the pharmaceutical / biotech and associated industries. VAI is an EPA and FDA registered manufacturing facility located in Malvern, Pennsylvania, USA. Veltek Associates Inc is a premium manufacturer of speciality detergents and veterinary disinfectants for use on animal housing, caging accessories and environmental application in laboratory animal facilities. Our comprehensive cleaning and decontamination programme includes water analysis, cleaning verification (ATP), routine service, contamination control consultation and more. Where Veltek excels at assisting customers in particular is our approach to helping identify the appropriate detergent to achieve programme optimisation. Cleaning performance success and cleaning validation support can be realised by implementing scientific rationale to the detergent selection process. Please feel free to call by our stand for further assistance. Contact us at: Veltek Associates Inc, 15 Lee Boulevard, Malvern, Pennsylvania 19355-1234, USA T: +353 87 0506766 E: rmooney@sterile.com www.sterile.com VetTech Solutions Ltd Welcome to VetTech Solutions; the company that prides itself going that extra mile for all customers. We have a dedicated in-house team to assist with design concepts and bespoke solutions. We are specialists in stainless steel, acrylics, Perspex, Polycarbonate and Trespa; and manufacture all equipment to customer requirements. Our team work with CAD and provide all necessary drawings for customer approval prior to ordering. A wide range of anaesthetic equipment is offered from basic to more advanced systems; whether gas is supplied via in-house gas lines, stand-alone cylinders or the latest concept of oxygen concentrators, which provide a cleaner way of working. We were the innovators of the very first home cage euthanasia systems following Home Office guidelines. Each system is built to include either an anaesthetic and CO2 cycle or CO2 only. The VetScav is the unique VetTech designed filter weighing mechanism used in conjunction with the Active Scavenging Unit. 110 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition restraint and capture equipment is available in order not only to safeguard personnel while handling anim...
Trade Exhibition In addition to the VetTech anaesthesia and euthanasia concepts, we also supply a wide range of other products including: l bench top autoclaves l Optilia HD camera systems l Dycem high performance contamination control zones l Esco laboratory and cleanroom equipment such as air showers, laminar flow hoods,  safety cabinets, CO2 incubators and minus 80 freezers l Marston Engineering downdraught tables which can be customised with  anaesthetics, CO2 or warming areas l CurVet Rat Simulator Training Aid Add to this a vast array of consumables and you have the VetTech Solutions range of products. Come along and chat to our friendly team with any enquiries. Contact us at: VetTech Solutions Ltd, Unit 17, Daneside Business Park, Congleton, Cheshire CW12 1UN T: +44 (0) 1260 274333 F: +44 (0) 1260 278822 E: info@vet-tech.co.uk www.vet-tech.co.uk Williton Box Company Williton Box Company manufactures and supplies animal transportation boxes to customers within the UK and internationally. We are able to supply, from our comprehensive range of styles and sizes, a shipping container to satisfy most requirements. Whilst our boxes remain suitable for all land based travel we have produced a range of boxes that conform to the guidelines set out by the International Air Transport Association making them suitable for shipping by air. Our ranges of containers are manufactured from twinwall polypropylene and corrugated cardboard and represent a secure environment and an economical method for the movement of animals. Contact us at: Williton Box Company, Egrove Way, Williton Industrial Estate, Williton, Taunton, Somerset TA4 4TB T: +44 (0) 1984 632538 F: +44 (0) 1984 633050 E: admin@willitonbox.co.uk www.willitonbox.co.uk Trade Exhibition 111
Trade Exhibition In addition to the VetTech anaesthesia and euthanasia concepts, we also supply a wide range of other prod...
112 General Information
112 General Information
Bespoke Primate Housing the latest generation of primate habitation If you are considering a new build, or refurbishing your existing facility, why not give us a call. innovation through partnership t: +44 (0) 1432 379111 | f: +44 (0)1432 344960 info@arrowmight.com | www.arrowmight.com
Bespoke Primate Housing the latest generation of primate habitation  If you are considering a new build, or refurbishing y...
CONGRESS Congress 2014 Congress 2014 8th – 11th April 2014 www.iat.org.uk 8th – 11th April 2014 Animal Technologists – essential to biomedical development
CONGRESS  Congress 2014 Congress 2014  8th     11th April 2014  www.iat.org.uk 8th     11th April 2014  Animal Technologis...