The Standards...

Although this is a lierature standard that will help you read anything more closely and understand more deeply, what you learn about words will enrich your writing... they go hand in hand.

RL 4

 

  • I can determine the meaning of a word or phrase from context or when it is used in literary devices.

  • I can analyze and explain how an author’s word choice can change the meaning or tone of a text.

 

 

 

 

 

L 5

  • I can recognize figurative language (e.g. literary devices) in a selection of text.

  • I can examine how figurative language impacts a text.

  • I can recognize analogies in a selection of text.

  • I can determine if an analogy makes an appropriate comparison.

So, let's tackle 2 new words...

DENOTATION:

the literal meaning -- the definition in the dictionary

In literary works, we find it a common practice with writers to deviate from the dictionary meanings of words to create fresher ideas and images. Such deviations from the literal meanings are called the use of figurative language or literary devices e.g. metaphors, similes, personifications, hyperboles, understatements, paradoxes, and puns etc.

 

Even in our daily conversation, we diverge from the dictionary meanings of words and prefer connotative or associated meanings of words in order to accurately convey our message. Below is a list of some common deviations from denotative meanings of words that we experience in our day to day life:

 

  • A dog is used to suggest shamelessness or an ugly face.
  • A dove is used to suggest peace or gentility.
  • Home is used to suggest family, comfort and security.
  • Politician has a negative connotation of wicked and insincere person
  • Pushy refers to someone loud-mouthed and irritating.
  • Mom and Dad when used instead of mother and father suggest loving parents.

CONNOTATION:

the emotion or attitude linked to the word, can be positive or negative -- the baggage the word brings with it!

What do you think about these?

 

Are any particularly positive or negative?

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Technically, each pair are synonyms, but really they have connotations.

 

Would you agree?

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Would you agree?

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What gives us a connotation?

What gives us a connotation?

Experiences

 

Culture

 

Situations

 

Language

 

etc.

An example for you...

...which is figurative. The idea of a wall between 2 people has a negative connotation in our language/culture.

See what you think of this...

How about this...

Picky eaters might have a hard time finding restaurants that suit their tastes. Shopper sometimes benefit in the long run by being choosy about what they buy.

Now you try...

Do your ideas look something like this?

Picky eaters might have a hard time finding restaurants that suit their tastes. Shopper sometimes benefit in the long run by being choosy about what they buy.

Some words don't have a particularly positive or negative connotation...

 

They are neutral.