FAIRFAX CITY MULTIMODAL TRANSPORTATION PLAN R D T F A DRAFT PLAN NOW AVAILABLE FOR REVIEW NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. OCTOBER 2016
FAIRFAX CITY MULTIMODAL TRANSPORTATION PLAN  R D  T F A  DRAFT PLAN NOW AVAILABLE FOR REVIEW NOTE  The draft concepts pres...
DRAFT FAIRFAX CITY MULTIMODAL TRANSPORTATION PLAN Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY VII GUIDING PRINCIPLE VII KEY RECOMMENDATIONS IX GUIDING PRINCIPLE & TARGETS 1 BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 3 TRANSPORTATION CONTEXT AND EXISTING CONDITIONS 3 COMMUNITY INPUT 7 RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER PLANS 10 REGIONAL PLANS 12 GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS 13  Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan iii
DRAFT  FAIRFAX CITY MULTIMODAL TRANSPORTATION PLAN  Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY   VII  GUIDING PRINCIPLE   VII  KEY RECOMME...
DRAFT Figures Figure 1 Performance metrics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii Figure 2 Regional connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix Figure 3 Existing street network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x Figure 4 Major corridors and existing travel flows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi Figure 5 Fairfax City within a regional context. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Figure 6 Daily auto and transit trips within and traversing through Fairfax City (All Trips). . . . . . . . . . 4 Figure 7 Mode share comparison (commute) in Fairfax City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Figure 8 Fairfax City transportation network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Figure 9 Current and preferred mode choices (public input). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Figure 10 Word cloud of common themes of public input. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Figure 11 Examples of participants concerns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Figure 12 Issues and opportunities placed on Fairfax City Wikimapping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Figure 13 Proposed Blake Lane/Jermantown Bypass. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Figure 14 Proposed regional operations on Braddock Road. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Figure 15 Proposed guidance on Metrorail extension. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Figure 16 Proposed Green Ribbon of recreational trails and low-traffic community streets. . . . . . . 20 Figure 17 Proposed network for bicycle travel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Figure 18 Proposed transit services and information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Figure 19 Proposed efficient flow of vehicles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Figure 20 VDOT classification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Figure 21 Proposed Fairfax Boulevard as quality transit corridor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Figure 22 Proposed safe bicycle travel and efficient vehicle flow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Figure 23 Proposed Old Lee Highway plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Figure 24 Proposed balance mobility on Chain Bridge Road and University Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Figure 25 Proposed operations on Pickett Road and Jermantown Road. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Figure 26 Proposed safety and multimodal connections at Fairfax Circle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Figure 27 Proposed vibrant and walkable Northfax. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Figure 28 Proposed Kamp Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Figure 29 Proposed attractiveness and accessibility of Old Town. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Figure 30 Proposed Pickett and Main. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Figure 31 Proposed guidance for Fairfax City Metrorail Station. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 iv Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 
DRAFT  Figures Figure 1 Performance metrics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....
DRAFT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan v
DRAFT  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY      Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan  v
DRAFT vi Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 
DRAFT  vi  Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan
DRAFT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Guiding Principle In 2035, Fairfax is a city with o p t i o n s f o r r e s i d e n t s to easily, safely, and efficiently move within and between n e i g h b o r h o o d s e i t h e r by walking, bic ycling, taking public transportation or driving. To advance and ultimately achieve the desired multimodal transportation network in 2035 the city’s transportation facilities, investments and services must meet one or more of the goals stated below: • Connect to the region. • Provide a balanced network that expands travel choices. • Strategically improve major corridors. • Strengthen local activity centers. • Adopt policies for predictable and sustainable development. The goals are achieved through policies and actions at a range of scales including the following: • Citywide network level actions. • Management and design of major corridors. • Improvements and interventions made within the five local activity centers of the City. • Policy decisions and guidelines for development. Local Activity Centers are concentrated hubs within Fairfax City containing a mix of uses including housing, retail, office and community amenities. Local Activity Centers are destinations for city residents, visitors and workers. The five local activity centers are Fairfax Circle, Northfax, Kamp Washington, Old Town and Pickett/Main. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan vii
DRAFT  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Guiding Principle In 2035, Fairfax is a city with o p t i o n s f o r r e s i d e n t s to easily...
DRAFT Progress on these actions will be measured by a number of metrics with the objective of reaching these targets: • 100% of residents will have convenient access to the needs of day-to-day life without having to drive. Residents will be able to access necessary goods and services such as groceries, recreational opportunities, community services, and entertainment within a 20-minute walk or bicycle ride from home. • Fairfax City will be connected to the core of the metropolitan region via transit, bicycle trails, and reliable high capacity vehicular facilities. • At least 50% of all residents (dwelling units) will have convenient access to transit (complete sidewalk connections within 1,250 feet – or a 10-minute walk – of transit stops). • 100% of residents (dwelling units) will have convenient access to walkable green space (complete sidewalk connections within 1,250 feet – or a 10-minute walk – of parks and trail facilities). • Fairfax City will achieve a commute mode share target of 40% non-single occupant vehicle (SOV) by 2040. Figure 1 Performance metrics 100% 100% of residents 40% Non-auto mode share 2,000’ 15 min walk 100% of residents 20 min neighborhood viii REDUCE SPEEDING Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The 1,250’ 10 min walk PROVIDE A BALANCED SYSTEM
DRAFT  Progress on these actions will be measured by a number of metrics with the objective of reaching these targets     ...
WASHINGTON DRAFT HU RC H Trail CITY OF FAIRFAX REGIONAL CONNECTIVITY TF ALL SC WE S /M TF ALL SC ER RIF IEL D 29 NN LOR ING 50 H H FAL LS C 29 /M ER R IFIE LD WE ST 29 EA S RC HU FAX LOR ING 50 DU NN 50/29 Braddock 66 Road Sidepath Cross 395County 29 236 0 In collaboration 0.25 0.5 1 with regional partners, the Miles plan proposes enhancements to arterials in Fairfax County to accommodate and improve county travel flows and relieve some pressure on Fairfax City arterials. 66 U -GM 495 Parkway Trail FAI R 123 TF ALL SC HU RC Cross County Trail 236 Fairfax County DOWNTOWN WASHINGTON W&OD Trail A/ 50 EA S RC HU FAX FAI R A/ DULLES AIRPORT 50/29 29 VIE NN Fairfax City is a relatively small community 66 29 in a large and growing region. City residents, workers and businesses rely on this larger regional community. Continued success of the city requires the management and appropriate accommodation of regional 123 travel demands and enhanced connections to the regional transit system. 286 DU Connect to the Region Figure 2 Regional connections NN County KeyFairfaxParkway Trail Recommendations 123 VIE 50 H -GM U 66 LEGEND Trail 495 Off-Street Trail Proposed Off-Street Trail Metro Orange Line 123 0 0.25 0.5 1 Miles Braddock Road Sidepath VRE Line 395 Expressways Other Major Routes Metro Stations Extension of Metro’s Orange Line can provide benefit to Fairfax City stakeholders and George Mason University if extended stations are located to serve city activity centers. The plan proposes that a Metro station, located proximate to I-66 and Chain Bridge Road, will connect the city to regional transit and provide additional alternative travel options desired by city stakeholders. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan ix
WASHINGTON DRAFT  HU  RC  H  Trail  CITY OF FAIRFAX REGIONAL CONNECTIVITY TF ALL SC  WE S   M  TF ALL SC  ER  RIF IEL D  2...
DRAFT Balanced Network that Expands Travel Choices Figure 3 Existing street network Fairfax City must have a well-integrated multimodal transportation plan for the city. With only a handful of streets that provide continuous connectivity through the city and to destinations beyond, the city is challenged in providing an equally high level of accommodation for all the modes and demands that can fit within the right-of-way. As with new and alternative ways of commuting, new technologies are also changing how people are using the transportation network. As the City continues to consider the balance of the network and travel choices, it should begin to consider the potential benefits and implications of automated and connected vehicles. Intelligent transportation technologies have the potential to improve congestion and expand capacity by increasing through-put without adding new lanes. SOURCE: City of Fairfax, 2016 Multimodal refers to the availability of multiple transportation options within a system or corridor. x Mode refers to the different means of travel such as automobile, bicycle, transit or walking. Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The multimodal network plan ensures that all streets are safe for all users and that, taken as a whole, the city provides attractive and efficient travel corridors for each mode. In this way the city is able to provide streets for everyone and a network for all. The multimodal network plan is comprised of separate modal networks for pedestrians, bicycle travel, transit services, and principal vehicle and freight corridors. When
DRAFT Balanced Network that Expands Travel Choices  Figure 3 Existing street network  Fairfax City must have a well-integr...
DRAFT reassembled into a composite system, the multimodal network identifies modal emphasis on some corridors in order to provide a quality system for each mode of travel (i.e., transit) and complete streets for every mode. Figure 4 Major corridors and existing travel flows The companion “street typology” supplements the conventional street classification system designating arterials, collectors, and local streets and guides street design to be responsive to the adjacent land uses and community context along street segments. Strategically Improve Major Corridors Within Fairfax City there are six corridors of citywide or regional significance: Fairfax Boulevard/Lee Highway, Main Street, Old Lee Highway, Chain Bridge Road/University Drive, Pickett Road, and Jermantown Road. While there are many details to the corridor recommendations, at a high level, each corridor should provide for safe and continuous pedestrian travel while some corridors are recommended to provide enhanced accommodation for certain modes: • Fairfax Boulevard is a principal vehicular corridor that must efficiently provide for public transit, private autos, and freight movement. The key objective is a smooth flow of vehicles through metering (managing the volume of City boundary Major corridors SOURCE: Virginia Department of Transportation, 2014 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan xi
DRAFT reassembled into a composite system, the multimodal network identifies modal emphasis on some corridors in order to ...
DRAFT vehicles entering the corridor) and speed management. Pedestrians will be accommodated at safe crossings, particularly within the three local activity centers. Vehicle access to destinations within the local activity centers is restricted to perpendicular side streets and shared access drives. Strategically added or extended center median islands manage traffic speeds, improve safe operations, and enhance street character. • Main Street is enhanced for vehicles and bicycle commuters. Vehicular traffic should be smooth and even, xii but maintained at moderate speeds between local activity centers and lower speeds within the centers. The corridor is well-served by transit and bus stops should provide appropriate amenities for passengers. • Old Lee Highway will emphasize pedestrian, bicycle, and transit use providing enhanced bicycle facilities and operational advantages to transit. It will be a lush, green corridor that accommodates all modes. • The Chain Bridge Road/University Drive corridor will balance all modes providing Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan EXECUTIVE SUMMARY quality bicycle and transit connections and reliable vehicle flow in the context of a green, walkable place. • Pickett Road will continue as an efficient north-south vehicle connection, even while improving bicycle connections to the Metrorail station to the north and improved walkability to the south. • Jermantown Road will play an increasingly important role as a segment of the proposed enhanced BlakeJermantown vehicle bypass. Street design must, however, preserve the quality of Jermantown as a walkable place with community destinations on either side.
DRAFT  vehicles entering the corridor  and speed management. Pedestrians will be accommodated at safe crossings, particula...
DRAFT Strengthened Local Activity Centers Area specific concepts and recommendations are provided for each of the five local activity centers within Fairfax City. • Fairfax Circle should be redesigned to reduce complexity and improve pedestrian mobility. Operational changes are required to encourage regional traffic to utilize alternate regional routes, such as a potential northern bypass on Blake Lane and Jermantown Road. Street design should enhance pedestrian crossings across Fairfax Boulevard west of the Circle and provide a safe bicycle and pedestrian connection to the Metrorail station northeast of the Circle. Additional local street connections through the large blocks lining Fairfax Boulevard increase walkability, access, and circulation. Whenever possible, parking resources should be shared and vehicle access permitted only from the secondary and tertiary street network. • The Northfax local activity center will be enhanced through the addition of a finer grain network of tertiary streets dividing the large development blocks adjacent to the Fairfax Boulevard and Chain Bridge Road intersection. Pedestrian crossings should be enhanced across both major corridors and an attractive and continuous pedestrian facility should be provided from Northfax to the potential site for a new Metrorail station at I-66 and Chain Bridge Road, should the Orange Line be extended. A roundabout or other improvement at the intersection of Eaton Place and Chain Bridge Road may enhance operations and provide an attractive northern gateway to the city while operational changes at Warwick Avenue can improve safety and operations at that intersection. • Improvements are already underway in Kamp Washington at the intersection of Fairfax Boulevard and Main Street. Additional recommended improvements include a number of non-motorized connections providing neighborhood access to the commercial amenities and offerings of the activity center; improved pedestrian crossings across the major corridors; and additional street grid to improve connectivity within the area. Non-motorized networks connect area trails and provide access to the center. An enhanced bicycle facility on Main Street continues through the area and provides connectivity to the Fairfax County Government Center area to the west. Property access directly from the major arterials is limited, but well provided by way of the minor street network and connected service drive along the north side of the intersection. • Significant improvements are recommended for Old Town including; the extension of South Street to West Street that connects to Main Street, and provides for the rerouting of traffic to bypass north and south of Main Street; additional local streets providing substantial new connectivity to significant development in the area; EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan xiii
DRAFT  Strengthened Local Activity Centers Area specific concepts and recommendations are provided for each of the five lo...
DRAFT the area will benefit from improved pedestrian crossings across both main arterials, improvements to pedestrian connections within the commercial properties, and connections to nearby trail assets. As Main Street will provide enhanced bicycle accommodation, bicycle parking and amenities should be provided within the commercial areas. Adopt Policies for Predictable and Sustainable Development better curbside management that favors passenger and commercial loading on street and expands parking access off street through shared strategies; improved pedestrian crossings throughout; and enhanced bicycle connections. • Pickett and Main is not expected to change dramatically in the foreseeable future. The area will continue to be a quality commercial center that is largely accessed by automobile. Nonetheless xiv Many actions that will improve transportation in Fairfax City result from changes in policies and management rather than from capital improvement projects. The following policies will help guide predictable and sustainable growth and development in Fairfax City: • Complete Streets – Every street within Fairfax City must safely accommodate all users. While this does not mean that every street will have a bicycle lane or sidewalks on both sides of the street, it does mean that every street project – whether significant maintenance, retrofit, or new construction – must consider the needs of all users. Adequate accommodation ensures users may access and travel on the Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan EXECUTIVE SUMMARY street, regardless of age or ability, with a reasonable assumption of safety and protection. The policy provides a clear process for seeking and documenting any necessary exceptions. • Sidewalks and Pedestrian Accessibility – Walking is the most fundamental mode of transportation and the basis for nearly all others. In general, pedestrians are only safe to mix with motor vehicle traffic when streets are explicitly designed and/or actively managed with this intent. In all other cases, pedestrians, and especially vulnerable pedestrians such as children, seniors, and persons with disabilities, require and deserve the protection and accessibility provided by a complete sidewalk network and associated curb ramps. New streets, regardless of volume, should provide continuous, connected sidewalks on both sides of the street. For existing streets, sidewalks should be considered on at least one side for streets carrying daily vehicle volumes below 5,000. On moderate volume streets (5,000 to 10,000 vehicles per day), sidewalks are recommended on both sides of the street whenever possible and required on high volume streets – those with daily vehicle
DRAFT  the area will benefit from improved pedestrian crossings across both main arterials, improvements to pedestrian con...
DRAFT volumes in excess of 10,000 vehicles per day. Sidewalks should be provided with any significant street maintenance, rehabilitation, or reconstruction project and may be constructed independent of a street project. • Bicycle supportive policies and services – A number of different factors support bicycling as a viable mode choice: adequate provision of bicycle parking, bike share, bicycle facilities, and building amenities for bicyclists. Transportation demand management policies further support bicycle mode share. Fairfax City proposes supporting bicycling through the adoption of the proposed complete streets policy, expanded bicycle education, improved bicycle facilities including exploration of bike share and increased awareness of the bicycle network. In addition to the bicycle parking requirements in the recent Zoning Code update, the City will continue to consider the addition of more bicycle accommodations into the Zoning code to include secure bicycle parking, repair facilities, and user amenities (i.e., showers and lockers) in nonresidential uses. • Parking and Transportation Demand Management – In many cities, the over-supply and underpricing of parking creates an incentive to drive. Parking management and transportation demand management (TDM) strategies are used to relieve traffic congestion caused by the use of single occupancy vehicles. Fairfax City should provide, support, and promote a TDM program and develop partnerships for a coordinated regional TDM effort. In conjunction with the recent Zoning Code changes addressing minimum and maximum parking requirements as well enabling shared parking programs, Fairfax City will oversee City wide TDM strategies with measurable goals to be reported on upon annually. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan xv
DRAFT  volumes in excess of 10,000 vehicles per day. Sidewalks should be provided with any significant street maintenance,...
DRAFT xvi Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
DRAFT  xvi  Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
DRAFT 1 GUIDING PRINCIPLE & TARGETS In 2035, Fairfax is a city with o p t i o n s f o r r e s i d e n t s to easily, safely, and efficiently move within and between n e i g h b o r h o o d s e i t h e r by walking, bic ycling, taking public transportation or driving. Transportation is fundamental to many other aspects of life in Fairfax City. Transportation is about more than just being able to move from where we are to where we want to go safely, reliably, and predictably. Transportation impacts how much time and money we must spend, what jobs we take, which schools our children go to, where we shop, our physical fitness and the health of our environment. Sustainable transportation in Fairfax City is fundamental to sustained success and livability of our community. Ensuring the mobility and connectivity for all travelers of all ages and all abilities will support the goals and objectives of many other dimensions of our Comprehensive Plan. To advance and ultimately achieve the desired multimodal transportation network in 2035 the city’s transportation facilities, investments and services must meet one or more of the goals stated below: • Connect to the region. • Provide a balanced network that expands travel choices. • Strategically improve major corridors. • Strengthen local activity centers. • Adopt policies for predictable and Note: Starting with this section, the remainder of the document will be included as the transportation chapter of the 2035 Comprehensive Plan. sustainable development. GUIDING PRINCIPLE & TARGETS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 1
DRAFT  1 GUIDING PRINCIPLE   TARGETS  In 2035, Fairfax is a city with o p t i o n s f o r r e s i d e n t s to easily, saf...
DRAFT The goals are achieved through policies and actions at a range of scales including the following: • Citywide network level actions. • Management and design of major corridors. • Improvements and interventions made within the five local activity centers of the City. • Policy decisions and guidelines for development. Progress on these actions will be measured by a number of metrics with the objective of reaching these targets: • 100% of residents will have convenient access to the needs of day-to-day life without having to drive. Residents will 2 be able to access necessary goods and services such as groceries, recreational opportunities, community services, and entertainment within a 20-minute walk or bicycle ride from home. • Fairfax City will be connected to the core of the metropolitan region via transit, bicycle trails, and reliable high capacity vehicular facilities. • 100% of residents (dwelling units) will have convenient access to transit (complete sidewalk connections within 1,250 feet – or a 10-minute walk – of transit stops). Local Activity Centers are concentrated hubs within Fairfax City containing a mix of uses including housing, retail, office, and community amenities. Local Activity Centers are destinations for city residents, visitors and workers. The five local activity centers are Fairfax Circle, Northfax, Kamp Washington, Old Town, and Pickett and Main. 10-minute walk – of parks and trail facilities). • Fairfax City will achieve a commute • 100% of residents (dwelling units) will have convenient access to walkable green space (complete sidewalk connections within 1,250 feet – or a Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GUIDING PRINCIPLE & TARGETS mode share target of 40% non-single occupant vehicle (SOV) by 2040.
DRAFT  The goals are achieved through policies and actions at a range of scales including the following        Citywide ne...
DRAFT 2 BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Transportation Context and Existing Conditions The city is convenient to many destinations in the region. George Mason University sits on the city’s southern border. Dulles Airport, Figure 5 Fairfax City within the regional context MARYLAND Herndon DC Fairfax City is surrounded by Fairfax County and sits within the larger Washington region. The city is located adjacent to Interstate 66 and within a mile of the Vienna/Fairfax-GMU Metrorail station, the current terminus of the Orange Line. The regional corridors of Fairfax Boulevard (US 50/29) and Main Street (Rte 236) provide easy connections to the Capital Beltway (I-495) and the region’s core. Fairfax City is proximate to a handful of regional trails, with plans to extend a trail facility within the I-66 corridor that will connect to the city. Virginia Railway Express provides service south of the city with a station at Burke Centre. Tysons Corner Downtown Washington Dulles Airport Vienna Falls Church City of Fairfax National Airport Alexandria VIRGINIA N SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau Cartographic Boundary Shapefiles BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 3
DRAFT  2 BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT  Transportation Context and Existing Conditions  The city is convenient to many destinatio...
DRAFT the region’s largest international air hub, is just 15 miles to the northwest. The major employment center of Tyson’s Corner is just 10 miles northeast of the city while the principal employment corridor of Arlington County is 15 miles to the east and the central business district of Washington, DC is just a few miles further. Despite the relative proximity, access to these regional destinations without a car is difficult. Transit trips are often two or three times as long as driving trips, and destinations are far enough to make bicycle commuting a difficult option for many. Figure 6 Daily auto and transit trips within and traversing through Fairfax City (All Trips) 175,000 The vast majority of regional travelers stick to I-66; however, a significant number of commuters use the regional arterials instead. Every day, 68,000 travelers, most of them motorists, make trips through Fairfax City that neither begin nor end there. Traffic on the City’s arterials have remained relatively stable over the past fifteen years. As of 2015, the highest traffic levels were seen on Fairfax Boulevard between Plantation and Draper Drive. Although traffic volumes on the arterials have remained relatively stable over the past fifteen years, the volume of pass-through commuter traffic is a key concern. Bypass Fairfax City on Interstate 66 68,000 Neither begin nor end in Fairfax City 19,000 86,000 Begin elsewhere and end in Fairfax City Begin and end in Fairfax City 65,000 Originate in Fairfax City and terminate elsewhere SOURCE: MWCOG 2.3 v57a Model, 2015 4 Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Daily Trip - A single or one-direction movement (i.e., a visit to the grocery store to and from home is counted as two trips.)
DRAFT  the region   s largest international air hub, is just 15 miles to the northwest. The major employment center of Tys...
DRAFT Figure 7 Mode share comparison (commute) in Fairfax City 72% DRIVE ALONE 8% 4% CARPOOL BUS 7% METRO 1% BIKE 4% WALK 5% WORK FROM HOME SOURCE: American Community Survey Dataset B08301, 2014 Single-occupant vehicle travel is the most dominant form of transportation in the city. 72% of commuters drive alone to work, while 8 percent carpool, 11% take transit (bus or rail), and 5% work from home. Only 5% of Fairfax City commuters walk or bike to work. The addition and enhancement of bicycle and pedestrian networks and transit services can improve community quality of life and provide residents with the transportation options they desire. Safety and access is a significant barrier for many residents. Safety is a concern in the city for all modes of travel but particularly for motorists, pedestrians, and bicycles. Many parts of the city have a generally complete sidewalk system, though certain neighborhoods in the northwest and southeast portions of the city have a deficient pedestrian network. Marked pedestrian crossings can be far apart. Crossings across the large corridors can be challenging. Pedestrian crashes are a concern. Fairfax City has an impressive off-street trail network, but a very limited on-street bicycle network. Discontinuous or disconnected bicycle facilities and trails limit the utility of the system and make walking or bicycling more difficult. Vehicles too are challenged. Some intersections have unclear signage or lane markings or complex and confusing operational patterns. Congestion is a concern on the major arterials, at times resulting in regional traffic spilling over onto neighborhood streets and raising further concerns about vehicle speeds and volumes that are inconsistent with the neighborhood context. Improving safety for pedestrians, bicyclists and motorist will improve safety for all and improve operations throughout the multimodal network. Sidewalks, crosswalks and intersection and roadway improvements can significantly enhance safety. The provision of “familyfriendly” connecting networks will improve safety and access for a wide range of Fairfax City residents. Within the Washington region, approximately one-third of all trips (33%) are less than one mile in distance, according to the 2009 National Household Travel Survey. For the region as a whole, more than 50% of these short trips are driven. It is reasonable to expect that in suburban areas that proportion is likely to be even greater. BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 5
DRAFT  Figure 7 Mode share comparison  commute  in Fairfax City  72  DRIVE ALONE  8   4   CARPOOL  BUS  7  METRO  1  BIKE ...
DRAFT One potential explanation for both the high rate of driving for short-distance trips and the relatively high levels of traffic on the handful of major arterials is due to limited connectivity between the residential areas of the city and the commercial centers, as well as limited connections between neighborhoods. Neighborhoods on the west side of the city have fairly good connectivity to one another. Old Town is relatively well connected, while Kamp Washington and Northfax are surrounded by larger blocks and difficult pedestrian connections across busy roadways. While neighborhoods on the east side have a more limited street network, trails help to fill the gaps. Access to Old Town, Fairfax Circle, and Pickett and Main are limited. Across the City, few residents are within easy walking or bicycling distance of the Vienna/Fairfax-GMU Metrorail station. Figure 8 Fairfax City transportation network SOURCE: City of Fairfax, 2016 TOTAL VEHICULAR NETWORK (All Streets) Additional connections between neighborhoods and from neighborhoods to activity centers will enhance the opportunity to make short, local trips without driving and on local streets. 6 VEHICULAR FUNCTIONAL NETWORK FUNCTIONAL NON-MOTORIZED NETWORK (Connected Streets) (Connected Streets and Trails) Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT
DRAFT  One potential explanation for both the high rate of driving for short-distance trips and the relatively high levels...
DRAFT Community Input Transportation affects everyone. The city undertook a broad-based engagement campaign to understand the needs, desires and aspirations of Fairfax City residents, leaders and stakeholders with regard to transportation. The team met with individual stakeholders and small groups; held pop-up meetings at major public events such as Rock the Block, Bike to Work Day and Saturday farmer’s market. The team brought meetings to the public at various locations throughout the city including libraries, parks, retail centers, and community facilities. Information and activities were available online through a website and interactive mapping applications. In all, more than 200 members of the Fairfax City community contributed to the development of this plan. Through the various meetings and modes of engagement, a number of themes emerged: Figure 9 Current and preferred mode choices (public input) Most Fairfax City residents drive to work, but would prefer to use other travel modes for work and non-work trips. HOW FAIRFAX CITY RESIDENTS TRAVEL TO WORK HOW DRIVERS WOULD PREFER TO TRAVEL Prefer to carpool 6% Work from home 6% Walk or bike 3% Prefer to walk 12% for WORK TRIPS Transit 9% Prefer to drive alone 35% Prefer to bike 19% Prefer transit 29% Carpool 9% Prefer to carpool 2% Drive alone 72% for NON-WORK TRIPS Prefer to bike 10% Prefer transit 20% Prefer to drive alone 35% Prefer to walk 32% SOURCE: Community engagement meetings on August 29, 2016 and August 30, 2016. (157 responses) BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 7
DRAFT  Community Input Transportation affects everyone. The city undertook a broad-based engagement campaign to understand...
DRAFT Figure 10 Word cloud of common themes of public input • CHOICE: Community members want more transportation choices, especially the opportunity to walk or bike throughout the city. While the majority of residents do drive alone, a significant portion of Fairfax City residents would rather not if there were other viable and competitive options available to them. When asked how they currently travel to work, 72% of the 110 respondents at the public pop-up meetings indicated they currently drive alone. However, nearly one-third of those drivers would prefer to use transit if it were more convenient, 8 while another third would prefer to walk or bike. When asked how they travel for non-work trips, 77% of the 157 participants reporting their travel habits currently drive. Nearly two-thirds would like to have the opportunity to walk, bike, or take transit for these trips. • TRAFFIC: Traffic is a problem. While regional arterials connect Fairfax City’s residents to jobs and City businesses to employees, heavy traffic threatens safety and livability. • TRANSIT: Transit is a benefit to the community. Stakeholders generally want to see an Orange Line extension that better serves the city. They appreciate the CUE bus, but want more frequent service. • SAFETY: Safety is a huge concern for all users, especially for youth, students and those who bike. • GREEN: Residents are committed to the Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT community’s identity as a green city, and want to preserve and expand the trail network.
DRAFT  Figure 10 Word cloud of common themes of public input       CHOICE  Community members want more transportation choi...
DRAFT Figure 11 Examples of participant concerns Figure 12 Issues and opportunities placed on Fairfax City wikimap Fairfax City engaged the public through multiple efforts including pop-up meetings and an interactive wikimap where the public could point out areas of issues and improvement. SOURCE: http://wikimapping.com/wikimap/Fairfax-City-Multimodal.html#. WA-dBvorJaQ Dedicated bike lane on Old Lee Highway Sidewalks ALL OVER the city More trees Make walking & biking to Mason from downtown more inviting BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 9
DRAFT  Figure 11 Examples of participant concerns  Figure 12 Issues and opportunities placed on Fairfax City wikimap  Fair...
DRAFT Relationship to Other Plans The Multimodal Transportation Plan is a component of the city’s larger Comprehensive Plan and was prepared in concert with the 2035 Comprehensive Plan. The multimodal transportation component is designed to support the land use, open space, housing and economic development goals and outcomes articulated by the larger plan. The transportation component provides a network and policies that respond to the needs of the present while anticipating changes and opportunities possible in the future. This plan also builds on many preceding and on-going planning efforts, which have been reevaluated and incorporated in the Comprehensive Plan. This plan also incorporates a number of capital improvement projects approved and/or underway at the time of plan development. 10 The Multimodal Transportation Plan is a component of the city’s larger Comprehensive Plan and was prepared in concert with the 2035 Comprehensive Plan. The multimodal transportation component is designed to support the land use, open space, housing and economic development goals and outcomes articulated by the larger plan. The transportation component provides a network and policies that respond to the needs of the present while anticipating changes and opportunities possible in the future. This plan also builds on many preceding and on-going planning efforts, which have been reevaluated and incorporated in the Comprehensive Plan. This plan also incorporates a number of capital improvement projects approved and/or underway at the time of plan development. Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT
DRAFT  Relationship to Other Plans The Multimodal Transportation Plan is a component of the city   s larger Comprehensive ...
DRAFT Old Lee Highway Fairfax Boulevard Old Lee Highway was the subject of two recent planning efforts. The Old Lee Highway Transportation Study (2005) examined the operation and geometry of Old Lee Highway from Layton Hall Drive to Ridge Avenue. The objective of the plan was to identify improvements for vehicle, bicycle, and pedestrian circulation and safety. To reinforce the City’s vision for this roadway as a residential collector, rather than a commuter arterial, Old Lee Highway should be designed to reduce traffic speed and increase mobility for bicycles and pedestrians. The Fairfax Boulevard Master Plan (2007) envisioned the redevelopment and growth of Fairfax Boulevard around a number of principles: The Old Lee Highway “Great Street” Conceptual Plan (2015) built upon the principles of the Old Lee Highway Transportation Study and laid out conceptual plans for the street. The plan divided the corridor into three distinct segments to provide an appropriate recommendation for each. Recommended features include landscaped medians through the commercial segments and protected bicycle lanes and a shared use path the entire length of the corridor. • Plan for feasible, phase-able pieces. • Enable the market. • Make the Boulevard a “great walkable street.” • Allow the Boulevard to change on the community’s terms, with controlled size and scale. • Support a mix of uses and destinations. • Balance traffic capacity, safety, and character. The boulevard plan identified the three unique centers along the corridor – Fairfax Circle, Northfax, and Kamp Washington – each with a fine-grained network of streets. Fairfax Boulevard would become a multiway boulevard that would allow for heavy through traffic in the middle, separated from more pedestrian friendly outer “slow lanes.” A summary of the plan was adopted as an appendix in the 2012 Comprehensive Plan. In 2015, at the bequest of the City Council, the Planning Commission conducted a thorough review of the plan’s recommendations. These were discussed with the City Council and it was agreed that the 2035 Comprehensive Plan and Multimodal Transportation Plan would further investigate and make a final determination on the multi-way boulevard concept, including slow lanes, roundabouts, bike lanes, signal timing, reverse lanes, municipal parking, and walkability. Old Town The Old Town Fairfax Circulation Analysis (2014) evaluated the performance of the twoway operation of Main Street and North Street in Old Town Fairfax after their 2006 conversion from one-way operations. The analysis found that: • Overall traffic volumes have decreased since the conversion. • One intersection demonstrated improved LOS while LOS declined at two others. • Although there was a slight rise in vehicle crashes shortly after the conversion, crashes have generally decreased. • Recommended pedestrian improvements had been implemented while bicycle infrastructure remains incomplete. BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 11
DRAFT  Old Lee Highway  Fairfax Boulevard  Old Lee Highway was the subject of two recent planning efforts. The Old Lee Hig...
DRAFT • Vehicle speeds have increased since the two-way conversion. The analysis generally found that the Old Town operational conversion is working as expected. No immediate changes to the operation of North and Main Streets were recommended. Connections to George Mason University The Mason to Metro Bicycle Plan (2012) was a coordinated effort between George Mason University and the City to establish a bicycle route that links the Vienna Metro Station to the University campus.The plan outlines alternative routes and bicycle infrastructure improvements required to make these connections safer and more accessible for bicyclists. The three-day Vision Fairfax-Mason Charrette (2014) examined connectivity, livability, and sustainability between Old Town and George Mason University. Through the workshop process, the community and City identified immediate, short, and long term recommendations to improve connectivity between the two areas. 12 Regional Plans Northern Virginia Transportation Authority TransAction The TransAction Update builds on the vision and goals developed for previous TransAction plans to develop a comprehensive long range transportation plan that reduces congestion and improves the quality of life in Northern Virginia. The plan guides NVTA investments to fulfill its mission to address regional transportation challenges. New revenues generated by nearly $300 million each year, go to transportation improvements throughout Northern Virginia. VTrans Multimodal Transportation Plan Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority Long Range Plan Momentum is Metro’s vision for the future that builds on the work underway to rebuild the system. The strategic plan looks beyond today’s trends and lays out near-term goals for 2025 along with the steps that Metro must take to prepare for future growth. For riders, Momentum will mean more trains, reduced crowding, faster buses, brighter, safer, easier-to-navigate Metrorail stations, and information when and where you want it. Within the region, Momentum will increase capacity throughout the system enabling future expansion. VTrans is the long-range, statewide multimodal policy plan that lays out overarching Vision and Goals for transportation in the Commonwealth. It identifies transportation Investment Priorities and provides direction to transportation agencies on strategies and programs to be incorporated into their plans and programs. Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT
DRAFT       Vehicle speeds have increased since the two-way conversion. The analysis generally found that the Old Town ope...
DRAFT 3 GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Improvements are recommended at a range of levels, from citywide policies and networks to area specific strategies, to address the needs, seize opportunities, and serve the objectives of the 2035 Comprehensive Plan. TRANSPORTATION GOAL 1. CONNECT TO THE REGION Fairfax City is well-connected to the larger Washington metropolitan region. I-66 provides a direct vehicular connection to the region, while the Vienna/Fairfax-GMU Metrorail station provides high-quality, high-capacity transit service to the core. I-395 and the Capital Beltway provides convenient access to additional significant destinations in the region, while three state routes and US 29/50 carry significant traffic through the city. These regional connections are a vital asset to the city and its economic strength and livability, but they come with a cost. The convenience provided by these connections has enabled and supports growth and development beyond Fairfax City. However, residents from these areas travel through the city, providing only limited contributions to Fairfax City while making it difficult to create the kind of pedestrian-friendly development envisioned in the city’s comprehensive plan. Attaining the city’s vision requires strategies to limit or decrease the growth of traffic on these corridors. These strategies will require regional partnership and collaboration. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 13
DRAFT  3 GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS  Improvements are recommended at a range of levels, from citywide policies and netwo...
DRAFT 2 ACTION T1.1.2  Encourage regional partners to facilitate traffic flow along the Blake -Jermantown corridor. 3 ACTION T1.1.3  Support regional efforts to widen the bridge over I-66. 4 ACTION T1.1.4  Widen Jermantown Road between I-66 and Fairfax Blvd, where feasible to provide adequate capacity for regional bypass traffic. 14 HW Y LE E JE RM AN TO RD W N TO CKETT ORCHA RD RD ST AX IRF FA WY EH LD LE O AIN CH GEORGE MASON EY SH IRL MAIN ST BURKE STATION RD ER IDG L DR BR GA TE RD ICIA ROBERTS RD JUD D ST BL VD IN D BLV PICK ETT R D ICK A VE MA Y LEE HW ARLINGTON BLVD EATON PL WAR W 1 66 1 OLD PI AN RM 4 JE 66 LITTLE R IVER TPK 0 GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY OX RD ACTION T1.1.1  Improve intersection operations at Fairfax Boulevard, at Jermantown Road and Blake Lane to encourage the flow of regional traffic to utilize Blake Lane. 3 RSITY DR IVE UN 1 RD BRIDGE RD The Blake Lane-Jermantown corridor within Fairfax County could provide a convenient and viable alternative route for county and regional traffic if widened to accommodate additional vehicle volumes. Several actions are necessary to attract and divert commuter traffic: N W BLAKE LN 2 CH AIN East-west travel demand is tremendous. Fairfax Boulevard (US 50), as a parallel corridor to I-66, carries substantial traffic to and from destinations within Fairfax County. Fairfax City desires to create compact, higher density local activity centers along Fairfax Boulevard. Accommodating and supporting this vision requires that some regional traffic be accommodated elsewhere. % Figure 13 Proposed Blake Lane/Jermantown Bypass ILL RD W A P L ES M Outcome T1.1 Complete the Blake Lane/Jermantown Bypass 0.25 0.5 1 Miles N BRADDOCK RD Proposed Blake Lane/Jermantown Bypass NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS E
DRAFT  2  ACTION T1.1.2    Encourage regional partners to facilitate traffic flow along the Blake -Jermantown corridor.  3...
DRAFT Outcome T1.2 Enhance regional operations on Braddock Road % Figure 14 Proposed regional operations on Braddock Road HW Y LE E JE RM AN TO RD RD ST D BLV WY EH LD LE PICK ETT R D ICK A VE O ST ER IDG L DR AIN CH EY SH IRL OX RD 2 GEORGE MASON GA TE BR RD ICIA BURKE STATION RD JUD ROBERTS RD ACTION T1.2.2  Facilitate connections to Braddock Road. D IN 1 RD ORCHA WAR W MA Y LEE HW CKETT EATON PL BL VD RM AN TO WN JE ILL RD W A P L ES M ARLINGTON BLVD OLD PI AX IRF FA 2 BLAKE LN RSITY DR IVE UN 2 ACTION T1.2.1  Support regional initiatives to enhance the operation and efficiency of Braddock Road. RD BRIDGE RD 1 66 N W CH AIN Braddock Road is an efficient regional corridor connecting George Mason University to points to the east and west. Fairfax City will work with regional partners to support and encourage improvements to the corridor to accommodate regional traffic demands and reduce the impact of regional traffic on city arterials. 66 0 GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY MAIN ST LITTLE R IVER TPK 0.25 0.5 1 Miles E N BRADDOCK RD Proposed regional operations on Braddock Road NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 15
DRAFT  Outcome T1.2 Enhance regional operations on Braddock Road     Figure 14 Proposed regional operations on Braddock Ro...
DRAFT 2 ACTION T1.3.2  Support station location at I-66 between the Vienna Metrorail station and the Fairfax County Government Center that serves the City of Fairfax. ACTION T1.3.3  Support and aid multimodal connections to the Metrorail station with walkable connections to Northfax. 3 HW Y ICK A VE WY EH D OL LE BURKE STATION RD CH IRL EY ROBERTS RD L DR AIN GA TE RD ICIA BR IDG ER JUD D ST BL VD IN D BLV RD PICK ETT R D 3 RD ST WAR W MA Y CKETT EATON PL ORCHA GEORGE MASON RM AN TO WN RD OLD PI AX IRF FA LEE HW E 2 RSITY DR IVE UN JE 1 BLAKE LN ARLINGTON BLVD ILL RD W A P L ES M 66 N W RD 66 LE JE RM AN TO % Figure 15 Proposed guidance on Metrorail extension BRIDGE RD The city should support the Metrorail extension and advocate for an intermediary stop at Chain Bridge Road and I-66. This permits the line to run within the I-66 right of way, lowering project costs, while providing access to George Mason University and the Northfax local activity center. Alternate locations considered include I-66 and Jermantown Road, Chain Bridge Road and Fairfax Boulevard, and within Old Town itself, which would provide more direct access to the city, but require substantial diversions to the route that dramatically increase cost and complexity while increasing travel time. ACTION T1.3.1  Support extension of Metrorail to Fairfax County Government Center. CH AIN For over 40 years, the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Metrorail has served significant regional travel demands and provided an alternative to driving that has reduced increases in traffic on major roads. Fairfax City can benefit from an extension of Metrorail’s Orange Line to the Fairfax County Government Center area with complementary transportation improvements. 1 SH Outcome T1.3 Guidance on Metrorail Extension 0 OX RD GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY MAIN ST LITTLE R IVER TPK 0.25 0.5 1 Miles N BRADDOCK RD Proposed guidance on Metrorail extension NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. 16 Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS E
DRAFT  2  ACTION T1.3.2    Support station location at I-66 between the Vienna Metrorail station and the Fairfax County Go...
DRAFT Transportation Goal 1. Performance Metrics • Traffic volume on city arterials with neither origin nor destination in the city. • City transit commute mode share. CONNECT TO THE REGION Vehicle travel throughout the City Transit mode share by City residents + employees residents + employees GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 17
DRAFT  Transportation Goal 1. Performance Metrics      Traffic volume on city arterials with neither origin nor destinatio...
DRAFT TRANSPORTATION GOAL 2. PROVIDE A BALANCED NETWORK THAT EXPANDS TRAVEL CHOICES Citywide transportation recommendations take a “complete network” approach that recognizes that each corridor cannot be all things to all people. While every street in the network should be a complete street, some streets will provide certain enhancements for one or two modes. When taken together, this provides an overall network that provides quality connections and mobility for all users. This plan proposes a complete, connected network for pedestrians, low stress/” familyfriendly” travel corridors, commuter bicycle networks, transit, and vehicles. Together, these networks provide a composite multimodal network plan. This plan is supplemented by a proposed street typology. The street typology augments the traditional roadway functional classification system to provide additional guidance in designing streets appropriate and responsive to their land use context and function. As with new and alternative ways of commuting, new technologies are also changing how people are using the transportation network. As the City continues to consider the balance of the network and travel choices, it should begin to consider the potential benefits and implications of automated and connected vehicles. Intelligent transportation technologies have the potential to improve congestion and expand capacity by increasing through-put without adding new lanes. 18 Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS
DRAFT  TRANSPORTATION GOAL 2. PROVIDE A BALANCED NETWORK THAT EXPANDS TRAVEL CHOICES Citywide transportation recommendatio...
DRAFT Outcome T2.1 Provide a safe and accessible pedestrian network Every street must provide for safe accommodation of pedestrian travel. On busy streets, the best practice is to provide protected sidewalks on both sides, while streets with lower traffic volumes may only need a sidewalk on one side. Some streets may be purposefully designed as shared streets – so called woonerf or shared street concepts. ACTION T2.1.1  Adopt a formal sidewalk policy requiring sidewalks on all new, reconstructed, or substantially rehabilitated streets that respond to local needs and community context. ACTION T2.1.2  Develop and act on a prioritized list of sidewalk improvements in the commercial areas and provide sidewalks on at least one side of every residential street in neighborhoods that are in agreement. ACTION T2.1.3  Ensure the pedestrian network is accessible to all and meets the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). ACTION T2.1.4  Provide a buffer/parkway/ amenity zone between sidewalks and curb or edge of pavement, with street trees planted wherever possible. ACTION T2.1.5  Provide crosswalks at all approaches of every signalized intersection at intervals of least every 500 feet within local activity centers except where doing so would result in operational failure of the corridor. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 19
DRAFT  Outcome T2.1 Provide a safe and accessible pedestrian network Every street must provide for safe accommodation of p...
DRAFT % Figure 16 Proposed Green Ribbon of recreational trails and low-traffic community streets HW Y LE E JE RM AN TO RD D OL ST ER IDG L DR EY CH AIN GA TE BR RD ICIA LEGEND BURKE STATION RD JUD ROBERTS RD IN WY EH LE D MA Y LEE HW D BLV BL VD FA AX IRF PICK ETT R D ICK A VE MAIN ST LITTLE R IVER TPK E Existing Off-Street Trails Proposed Off-Street Trails Existing Shared Use Path 0 GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY Proposed Shared Use Paths “Green Ribbon” of connected trails OX RD Parks and Private Open Space 0.25 0.5 1 Miles N BRADDOCK RD Proposed Green Ribbon of recreational trails and low-traffic community streets NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. ACTION T2.2.3  Identify priority links and corridors to connect city trail facilities and identify necessary improvements for safety and wayfinding. 20 RD RD ST WAR W GEORGE MASON RM AN TO WN EATON PL IRL ACTION T2.2.2  Improve trail crossings across arterial streets, including Fairfax Boulevard at Pickett Road, Pickett Road near Thaiss Park, and Main Street at Main Street Square and Railroad Avenue. CKETT ORCHA JE ILL RD W A P L ES M ARLINGTON BLVD OLD PI SH ACTION T2.2.1  Create the "Green Ribbon" by expanding the trail network. This includes completion of connections to existing segments, implementation of projects proposed by the Parks and Recreation Master Plan, and new trail connections as needed. 66 BLAKE LN RSITY DR IVE UN The city will strive to strengthen the utility of the green ribbon of trails and enhance community access by managing traffic volumes and speeds on streets connecting to the trial network. This will provide low-stress, on-street corridors for residents of all ages to access the trail network. Along arterial corridors, off-street shared use paths provide connections. 66 N W RD BRIDGE RD One of the much beloved features of Fairfax City is the great number of multi-use trails located throughout the city. At present, however, not all residents have easy access to this valuable community amenity. CH AIN Outcome T2.2 Connect the Green Ribbon of recreational trails and low-traffic community streets Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS
DRAFT     Figure 16 Proposed Green Ribbon of recreational trails and low-traffic community streets  HW Y LE E  JE RM AN TO...
DRAFT Figure 17 Proposed network for bicycle travel % Outcome T2.3 Provide a robust network for bicycle travel ACTION T2.3.2  Review bicycle facility design standards to ensure best practices in design and delivery of facilities. LE E HW Y JE RM AN TO OLD PI EATON PL ST JUD ICIA GEORGE MASON BLVD L DR RD Legend GA TE Existing Off-Street Trails EY Proposed Off-Street Trails IRL Existing Shared Use Path Proposed Shared Use Paths WY EH PICK ETT R D D OL LE BURKE STATION RD IN D BLV ROBERTS RD ICK A VE MA Y RD RD ST WAR W AX IRF FA LEE HW CKETT ORCHA CHAINBRIDGE RD JE RM AN TO WN RD ARLINGTON BLVD ILL RD W A P L ES M 66 MAIN ST LITTLE R IVER TPK E Existing On-Street Bicycle Facilities Proposed On-Street Bike Facilities Parks and Private Open Space 0 GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY Concentrated Bicycle Supportive Infrastructure OX RD ACTION T2.3.1  Adopt a plan for a system of bicycle facilities linking major destinations including George Mason University, Old Town, Metrorail, and the regional trail system. BLAKE LN RD SH Main Street, Old Lee Highway, and University Drive have been prioritized for bicycle travel. Bicycles are accommodated on Jermantown Road, Fairfax Boulevard, and Pickett Road by way of shared use paths (also known as sidepaths) on one side of the street. N W RSITY DR IVE UN Although bicycling currently accounts for just 1% of commute trips to and from Fairfax City, bicycle use has skyrocketed across the nation and within the Washington region. Communities very similar to Fairfax City have reported large increases in bicycle trips when safe, dedicated facilities are available. A lowstress bicycle network will be available for users of all ages and abilities, while direct, on-street facilities will connect more confident bicycle commuters to local destinations. 66 0.25 0.5 1 Miles N BRADDOCK RD Proposed network for bicycle travel NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. ACTION T2.3.3  Adopt bicycle-supportive policies, including the provision of short- and long-term bicycle parking, showers, and changing facilities. ACTION T2.3.4  Complete a bike share feasibility study including definition of necessary station density, recommended “starter system,” operating and management structure, and funding program. ACTION T2.3.6  Promote transportation demand management plans that encourage bicycling. ACTION T2.3.5  Improve and expand bicycle safety and education programs targeted at both drivers and cyclists. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 21
DRAFT Figure 17 Proposed network for bicycle travel     Outcome T2.3 Provide a robust network for bicycle travel  ACTION T...
DRAFT % Figure 18 Proposed transit network enhancements 1 Frequent transit service is typically considered to be transit service with headways of 15 minutes or better – 10 minutes is generally preferred. Current CUE bus frequencies are typically 30 minute headways during the bulk of the day. 22 HW Y LE E OLD PI RD ST ST JUD ICIA % PICK ETT R D LE O SH IRL EY Legend GA TE RD GEORGE MASON BLVD L DR WY EH LD Vienna-Fairfax/GMU Metro Station BURKE STATION RD IN D BLV ROBERTS RD ICK A VE MA Y RD ORCHA WAR W AX IRF FA LEE HW CKETT EATON PL CHAINBRIDGE RD RM AN TO WN RD ARLINGTON BLVD JE 66 MAIN ST LITTLE R IVER TPK Bus Routes Ridership Denoted by Thickness Bus Improvement Corridors Bus Transfer Improvement Areas 0 GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY OX RD CUE bus service will provide convenient and frequent access to the Vienna/Fairfax-GMU Metrorail Station; provide service seven days a week; meet all published schedules; and provide accessibility to all users. 66 BLAKE LN RD RSITY DR IVE UN Transit service is most concentrated on Fairfax Boulevard, Main Street, and the Chain Bridge/University corridor. Multiple CUE and Metrobus routes converge around Kamp Washington, in Old Town, and in the vicinity of Fairfax Circle. N W JE RM AN TO Stakeholders repeatedly indicated what a tremendous asset the CUE bus system is to the Fairfax City community. Although current CUE service does not constitute “frequent transit,” routes provide 16 hours of service each day. 1 Regular users report that it is reliable, comfortable, and convenient and appreciate the real-time arrival information available online. ILL RD W A P L ES M Outcome T2.4 Provide effective transit services and information. 0.25 0.5 1 Miles N BRADDOCK RD Proposed transit improvements NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS E
DRAFT     Figure 18 Proposed transit network enhancements  1  Frequent transit service is typically considered to be trans...
DRAFT ACTION T2.4.1  Implement recommendations of the CUE Transit Development Plan to maintain the highly valued service of the CUE transit system. ACTION T2.4.2  Prioritize transit operations along key corridors. ACTION T2.4.3  Emphasize transit operations along Fairfax Boulevard, including the provision of high quality stop amenities and implementation of priority treatment measures where possible. ACTION T2.4.4  Enhance transit operations on Old Lee Highway and Main Street, and carefully design the corridors to reduce or eliminate conflict between bicycles and transit, particularly at stop locations. ACTION T2.4.5  Improve connections to other transit routes and facilities through enhancements at significant transfer locations such as quality passenger amenities, expanded information, and improve pedestrian facilities. Significant transfer locations include the Kamp Washington area, Fairfax Circle, Old Town, and Pickett and Main. ACTION T.2.4.8  Expand ADA-accessible sidewalks and crosswalks serving bus stops. ACTION T.2.4.9  Encourage employers to provide transit subsidies or other transit incentives. ACTION T2.4.6  Improve traveler information and trip planning. Provide up-to-date bus schedule information on the city’s web site and at major bus stops. Continue to develop and promote real-time transit information. ACTION T.2.4.7  Promote transit-friendly design features in new development and redevelopment projects. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 23
DRAFT  ACTION T2.4.1    Implement recommendations of the CUE Transit Development Plan to maintain the highly valued servic...
DRAFT % Maintained capacity corridors N W JE RM AN TO Enhance vehicle corridors Balanced vehicle roadway Y E LE RD EATON PL RD ST AX IRF IN D BLV ST GEORGE MASON GA TE EY IRL SH ACTION T2.5.3  Improve safety for all travelers by improving lane markings and directional signage at complex intersections in the city, including Fairfax Circle. 24 D OL 0 GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY OX RD ACTION T2.5.4  Control traffic entering Fairfax City at Fairfax Circle, Northfax, Kamp Washington and Pickett and Main. L DR BL VD RD ICIA WY EH LE PICK ETT R D ICK A VE BURKE STATION RD WAR W MA Y RD ORCHA FA LEE HW CKETT ROBERTS RD RM AN TO WN OLD PI JUD ACTION T2.5.2  Relieve vehicle congestion on Fairfax Boulevard by pursuing the Blake Lane/ Jermantown Road bypass and facilitating use of it. HW ARLINGTON BLVD JE 66 66 BLAKE LN RD CHAINBRIDGE RD ACTION T2.5.1  Promote and support regional efforts to enhance vehicle performance of Braddock Road. Legend RSITY DR IVE UN Motor vehicle travel is and will continue to be the leading form of travel in Fairfax City. For many, commuting by private vehicle is the most convenient, if not the only viable mode. Prioritizing motor vehicle travel on some corridors recognizes the need to accommodate local residents and visitors and to provide efficient connections to regional networks. It is not intended to invite or accommodate additional regional traffic through the city. Figure 19 Principal vehicle corridors ILL RD W A P L ES M Outcome T2.5 Provide for the efficient flow of vehicles MAIN ST LITTLE R IVER TPK 0.25 0.5 1 Miles N BRADDOCK RD Vehicle corridors NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS E
DRAFT    Maintained capacity corridors  N W  JE RM AN TO  Enhance vehicle corridors Balanced vehicle roadway  Y  E LE  RD ...
DRAFT Outcome T2.6 Improve context sensitive street design livability of neighborhoods, and the vitality and vibrancy of commercial districts. Like many states, the Virginia Department of Transportation defines street types as a hierarchy “according to the character of service they are intended to provide. [Street type] defines the role that a particular roadway segment plays in serving [the] flow of traffic through the network.” Increasingly, communities across the United States and abroad have developed unique street types that describe both the transportation link function of streets and their distinct place function as well. While this is a useful approach for designing and managing the street network, it only addresses the transportation function of a street. Streets also have important roles to play in contributing to a quality of place, the This methodology ensures that street designs help the transportation network function and supports the objectives of local neighborhoods, development districts, and the city as a whole. It aids the design process, particularly for non-auto facilities, by focusing on the quality of a street. It recognizes that while Fairfax Boulevard and Main Street are both critical segments in a larger arterial street network, the uses abutting these corridors are very different and must be factored into the approach to street design. Five street types are recommended for adoption in the City of Fairfax: 1 LIMITED CONNECTION RESIDENTIAL – These are interior neighborhood residential streets that generally do not connect well to other streets in the network. These streets are very green in GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 25
DRAFT  Outcome T2.6 Improve context sensitive street design  livability of neighborhoods, and the vitality and vibrancy of...
DRAFT nature, lined with broad front yards and a robust tree canopy, and generally selfregulate both vehicle speeds and volumes. 2 NEIGHBORHOOD CIRCULATORS – These are residential streets that contribute to community connectivity, hosting parks, community centers, schools, or houses of worship. Residential Circulators are also very green with abundant street trees and open space along them. These streets may need design techniques that reduce travel speeds and traffic volumes to support activities such as kids playing and neighbors visiting in any portion of the street. 3 AC T I V E S T R E E T S – Active Streets 4 COMMERCIAL MAINS – Commercial connect multiple destinations within a neighborhood and are more mixed-use or commercial in nature. They are generally the street type for new streets within activity centers and are the primary location for property access. Active Streets should be designed to create a comfortable environment for strolling, shopping, and dining while at the same time accommodating circulation by pedestrians, bicyclists, cars and trucks, and in some cases transit vehicles. Mains are where commercial activity is concentrated, such as Fairfax Boulevard through the Northfax area or Main Street around Kamp Washington. Commercial Mains have high volumes of vehicle traffic that mixes with bicycles, transit vehicles, and pedestrian crossings. Streets should be designed to slow traffic speeds while facilitating traffic flow. The pedestrian zone of the street should buffer pedestrians from the chaos and noise of the adjacent traffic. Access management on Commercial Mains improves vehicle flow while reducing conflicts with people on foot or bike. Figure 20 VDOT classification 26 VDOT Classification Link + Place Street Type Local Limited Connection Residential Minor Collector Neighborhood Circulators Major Collector Active Streets Minor + Major Arterial Commercial Mains Minor + Major Arterial Boulevards DEFINITION OF LINK + PLACE The consideration of each street in its context, as both a movement element of the road network (i.e. a Link) and as a Place in its own right. Street types will vary according to the balance of significance of these two at any location. Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS
DRAFT  nature, lined with broad front yards and a robust tree canopy, and generally selfregulate both vehicle speeds and v...
DRAFT 5 B O U L E VA R D S – Boulevards carry moderate to high volumes of traffic, but do so through a parkway like setting. They include sections of arterial corridors between the local activity centers that may be designated as Boulevards, as well as minor arterials such as Pickett Road, Old Lee Highway, and Jermantown Road. Medians or planted median islands are common and curb cuts and access drives are few and far between. While vehicle throughput is generally smooth through these areas, traffic speeds should remain consistent with the residential or park-like setting the streets travel through. ACTION T2.6.1  Develop and adopt a Link + Place street typology. ACTION T2.6.2  With community consultation, develop specific design objectives, desired outcomes, and performance metrics for each street type. Link design objectives to the street design and project development process, guidelines, and reference documents. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 27
DRAFT  5  B O U L E VA R D S     Boulevards carry moderate to high volumes of traffic, but do so through a parkway like se...
DRAFT Transportation Goal 2. Performance Metrics • Miles of sidewalk. • Miles of bicycle facilities. • Pedestrian and bicyclist volumes on city trails. • Non-automobile mode share by city residents and employees. PROVIDE A BALANCED SYSTEM Miles of Miles of bike sidewalk facilities Pedestrian + Non-auto bicycle volumes mode share on City trails 28 Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS
DRAFT  Transportation Goal 2. Performance Metrics      Miles of sidewalk.      Miles of bicycle facilities.      Pedestria...
DRAFT TRANSPORTATION GOAL 3. STRATEGICALLY IMPROVE MAJOR CORRIDORS The citywide network builds from both past planning efforts and new information gathered from community input during the development of the plan and informs the design objectives and performance outcomes of the individual principal corridors. Fairfax City travelers tend to self-select among the corridors where they feel most comfortable. Vehicle traffic gravitates to the major arterials of Fairfax Boulevard, Main Street, Chain Bridge Road, Old Lee Highway, and Pickett Road. People who bicycle tend to favor Old Lee Highway, Main Street, and the Chain Bridge/ University Drive corridor toward George Mason University (in addition to heavy use of the trail network). Pedestrians find greatest comfort on University Drive, Main Street, and Old Lee Highway in addition to multiple neighborhood streets. • Main Street will prioritize bicycle travel The recommended corridor strategies generally follow and strengthen these existing patterns: prioritize vehicle flow while respecting and preserving the residential and open space character and uses along those corridors. • Fairfax Boulevard will remain a major in addition to transit services and vehicle throughput. • Old Lee Highway will prioritize bicycles, pedestrians and transit. • The Chain Bridge/University corridor will balance demands from multiple modes. • Pickett and Jermantown Roads will vehicle corridor with centers of walkable districts. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 29
DRAFT  TRANSPORTATION GOAL 3. STRATEGICALLY IMPROVE MAJOR CORRIDORS The citywide network builds from both past planning ef...
DRAFT 2 30 ACTION T3.1.2  Redesign Fairfax Circle to reduce complexity and improve pedestrian mobility. ORCHA RD ST WAR W 4 BLVD 3 ARLINGTON BLVD RD WY EH LD LE O AIN CH GEORGE MASON GA TE EY IRL SH BURKE STATION RD ER IDG L DR BR RD ICIA ROBERTS RD JUD D ST BL VD IN CKETT PICK ETT R D EATON PL MA Y % HW Y LE E JE RM AN TO RD RM AN TO WN 1 JE ILL RD W A P L ES M OLD PI AX IRF FA LEE HW 1 2 ICK A VE 66 BLAKE LN RSITY DR IVE UN 1 ACTION T3.1.1  Improve intersection at Fairfax Boulevard and Blake/Pickett and Jermantown Road to facilitate and encourage use of Blake Bypass. 66 N W RD BRIDGE RD 0 GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY OX RD Fairfax Boulevard was extensively studied in the 2007 Fairfax Boulevard Master Plan. Many of the recommendations made in that plan remain valid today and should proceed to implementation. Additional opportunities identified in this Multimodal Transportation Plan allow some modifications and enhancements to that plan. In general, slow lanes on Fairfax Boulevard are not recommended due to the access restrictions created by the relatively short frontage widths that exist today. However, on some parcels where larger frontage widths can be created, parking access lanes may be appropriate, but should be considered on a case by case basis. Without the proposed slow lanes, buildings may be built closer to the street narrowing drivers’ perspective of the street which can contribute to slowing traffic speeds. Figure 21 Proposed Fairfax Boulevard enhancements CH AIN Outcome T3.1 Improve Fairfax Boulevard as a quality transit corridor with vibrant nodes of activity. MAIN ST LITTLE R IVER TPK 0.25 0.5 1 Miles N BRADDOCK RD Proposed Fairfax Boulevard enhancements NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. 3 4 ACTION T3.1.3  Extend the medians and/or introduce additional planted median islands. Extend to pedestrian crossings to provide refuge island. ACTION T3.1.4  Introduce planted median islands to break up the continuous center turn lane, improve corridor aesthetics and improve safety. Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS E
DRAFT  2  30  ACTION T3.1.2    Redesign Fairfax Circle to reduce complexity and improve pedestrian mobility.  ORCHA  RD ST...
3 ACTION T3.2.3  Extend South Street to relieve traffic congestion on Main Street through Old Town and permit the continuation of a bicycle facility through Old Town. 4 ACTION T3.2.4  Improve intersection geometry in Old Town to enhance pedestrian crossings while accommodating design vehicles (i.e., a frequent user of the given street). HW Y LE E JE RM AN TO RD JUD 4 3 ER IDG L DR EY CH AIN GA TE BR RD ICIA WY EH 1 2 PICK ETT R D D OL LE BURKE STATION RD ST D IN D BLV BL VD AX IRF ROBERTS RD ICK A VE GEORGE MASON RM AN TO WN JE ILL RD W A P L ES M RD RD ST WAR W IRL 0 GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY OX RD ACTION T3.2.2  Evaluate feasibility of repurposing the bus-only lane to provide a protected bicycle facility. Enable buses to traverse facility at stops to pick up passengers at the curb. EATON PL MA Y CKETT ORCHA SH 2 ARLINGTON BLVD OLD PI FA LEE HW 66 BLAKE LN RSITY DR IVE UN 1 ACTION T3.2.1  Provide an on-street bicycle facility along the entirety of Main Street, though an additional feasibility study is required. 66 N W RD BRIDGE RD Main Street is and will continue to be a major vehicle corridor. At the same time, Main Street is a popular bicycle route that should be further enhanced. Bicycle accommodation is particularly difficult in the more constrained portion of the corridor west of Old Town. With sensitive design however, the whole of the corridor can become a bicycle emphasis route and a quality facility for bicycle travel while maintaining vehicle operations. Figure 22 Proposed actions for Main Street CH AIN Outcome T3.2 Provide safe bicycle travel and efficient vehicle flow on Main Street. % DRAFT MAIN ST LITTLE R IVER TPK 0.25 0.5 1 Miles E N BRADDOCK RD Proposed actions for Main Street NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 31
3  ACTION T3.2.3    Extend South Street to relieve traffic congestion on Main Street through Old Town and permit the conti...
DRAFT % Figure 23 Proposed Old Lee Highway enhancements HW Y LE E JE RM AN TO RD RD RD ST ICK A VE CH AIN GA TE EY BURKE STATION RD ER IDG L DR BR RD ICIA ROBERTS RD JUD IRL D OL 1 ST SH WY EH LE D IN D BLV PICK ETT R D WAR W BL VD RM AN TO WN JE EATON PL CKETT ORCHA MA Y ARLINGTON BLVD OLD PI AX IRF FA LEE HW 2 GEORGE MASON ACTION T3.3.2  Ensure design of Fairfax Circle accommodates bicycle through movements. 66 BLAKE LN RSITY DR IVE UN 2 ACTION T3.3.1  Pursue Old Lee Highway improvements to improve mobility. RD BRIDGE RD 1 66 N W CH AIN Like Fairfax Boulevard, Old Lee Highway has been extensively studied. The recommendations for improvements on Old Lee Highway are fully in concert with the objectives and desired outcomes of this Multimodal Transportation Plan and should be implemented as proposed. ILL RD W A P L ES M Outcome T3.3 Implement the Old Lee Highway plan. 0 OX RD GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY MAIN ST LITTLE R IVER TPK 0.25 0.5 1 Miles N BRADDOCK RD Proposed Old Lee Highway enhancements NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. 32 Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS E
DRAFT     Figure 23 Proposed Old Lee Highway enhancements  HW Y LE E  JE RM AN TO RD  RD  RD ST  ICK A VE  CH  AIN  GA TE ...
DRAFT CH AIN Figure 24 Proposed Chain Bridge Road and BLAKE LN University Drive enahncements D 1 Together, Chain Bridge Road and University Drive provide a true multimodal corridor through the heart of Fairfax City. The streets form an important vehicle and transit corridor, but also must accommodate bicyclists and pedestrians along its full length. University Drive can prioritize bicycle use while Chain Bridge Road can emphasize travel by vehicle and foot. 2 ACTION T3.4.2  Ensure adequate pedestrian facilities from Old Town to Fairfax Boulevard. 3 ACTION T3.4.3  Improve pedestrian crossings in Old Town.66 JE RM AN TO ICK A VE MA IN LVD 2 ST 6 4 ICIA L DR AIN ATE CH EY G IRL D OL L 3 JUD SH WY H EE BURKE STATION RD FA B AX IRF ROBERTS RD ACTION T3.4.7  Extend University Drive to Eaton Place. WAR W D ACTION T3.4.6  Implement traffic calming measures on Chain YBridge Road between LEE HW Judicial Drive and Main Street. RD ST ER ACTION T3.4.5  Manage Chain Bridge Road as a multimodal street that is safe and inviting for all users. 7 ORCHA BL VD JE ACTION T3.4.4  Support distribution of traffic through the extension of South Street. EATON PL BR IDG RM AN TO WN RD 1 RD 7 R GEORGE MASON 6 N W RSITY DR IVE UN 5 ILL RD W A P L ES M 4 ACTION T3.4.1  Ensure pedestrian friendly accommodation from I-66 to Fairfax Boulevard. BRIDGE RD Outcome T3.4 Balance mobility on Chain Bridge Road and University Drive. 0 OX RD GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY BRADDOCK RD Proposed Chain Bridge Road and University Drive enhancements NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 33
DRAFT CH AIN  Figure 24 Proposed Chain Bridge Road and BLAKE LN University Drive enahncements D  1  Together, Chain Bridge...
DRAFT 3 4 5 34 ACTION T3.5.3  When redevelopment opportunities permit, pursue a connection from Jermantown Road to Waples Mill Road north of Fairfax Boulevard. ACTION T3.5.4  Provide a shared use path along Pickett Road to connect important non-motorized networks to the metro station area. ARLINGTON BLVD % 4 RD ORCHA RD ST ICK A VE WY EH LD LE O ST AIN CH GEORGE MASON GA TE EY BURKE STATION RD ER IDG L DR BR RD ICIA ROBERTS RD D 5 JUD BL VD IN D BLV PICK ETT R D WAR W MA Y CKETT EATON PL AX IRF FA LEE HW HW Y LE E JE RM AN TO RD RM AN TO WN 3 JE ILL RD W A P L ES M 1 SH IRL ACTION T3.5.2  Coordinate with Fairfax County and VDOT on the widening of the Jermantown Road bridge over I-66 OLD PI 0 GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY OX RD 2 ACTION T3.5.1  Improve Jermantown Road as a component of the Blake Lane Bypass project. Complete transportation study to determine necessary facility improvements to accommodate bypass operations. 66 66 BLAKE LN RSITY DR IVE UN 1 2 N W RD BRIDGE RD Pickett Road and Jermantown Road lead to and connect to the proposed Blake Lane/ Jermantown Road bypass and provide excellent circulation around the city, providing alternative travel routes that can relieve congestion in local activity centers. However, these streets include residential addresses and must be managed as such, with lower vehicle speeds, safe pedestrian crossings, and quality streetscapes. Figure 25 Proposed Pickett Road and Jermantown Road enhancements CH AIN Outcome T3.5 Enhance operations on Pickett Road and Jermantown Road MAIN ST LITTLE R IVER TPK 0.25 0.5 1 Miles N BRADDOCK RD Proposed Pickett Road and Jermantown Road enhancements NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. ACTION T3.5.5  Design Pickett Road to manage vehicle speeds while providing efficient flow Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS E
DRAFT  3  4  5  34  ACTION T3.5.3    When redevelopment opportunities permit, pursue a connection from Jermantown Road to ...
DRAFT Transportation Goal 3. Performance Metrics The City’s principal corridors provide both sub-regional and local access for all modes with the performance measures primarily evaluating safety related metrics. • Crashes involving pedestrians and bicyclists. • Vehicular crashes along the primary corridors. • Transit travel time reliability/schedule adherence. IMPROVE MAJOR CORRIDORS Crashes involving pedestrians + bicyclists Vehicular Transit travel crashes time reliability GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 35
DRAFT  Transportation Goal 3. Performance Metrics The City   s principal corridors provide both sub-regional and local acc...
DRAFT TRANSPORTATION GOAL 4. STRENGTHEN LOCAL ACTIVITY CENTERS Fairfax City has five distinct local activity centers that present some of the most substantial economic development opportunities in the city. Making them walkable, vibrant community centers is important to the future strength and sustainability of the city in attracting and retaining young professionals, empty nesters, and families of all types and ages. 36 Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS
DRAFT TRANSPORTATION GOAL 4. STRENGTHEN LOCAL ACTIVITY CENTERS Fairfax City has five distinct local activity centers that ...
DRAFT Outcome T4.1 Enhance safety and multimodal connections at Fairfax Circle Fairfax Circle should be redesigned to reduce complexity and improve pedestrian mobility. With Jermantown Road/Blake Lane serving as a bypass, operational changes would be required to encourage through traffic to use this roadway instead of Fairfax Boulevard. Street design in the Fairfax Circle focus area should enhance pedestrian crossings across Fairfax Boulevard west of the Circle and provide a safe bicycle and pedestrian connection to the Vienna Metrorail station east of the Circle. Additional local street connections through the large blocks lining Fairfax Boulevard enable increased walkability, multimodal access and overall circulation. Whenever possible, parking resources should be shared and vehicle access permitted only from the secondary and tertiary street network. 1 2 3 ACTION T4.1.1  Improve intersection operations at Blake Lane and Fairfax Boulevard to support the use of the bypass and provide some traffic relief to Fairfax Boulevard. ACTION T4.1.2  Further explore benefits of improvements at Fairfax Circle to improve circulation and access while providing a gateway feature into Fairfax City. ACTION T4.1.3  Improve pedestrian crossings across Fairfax Boulevard, especially at Pickett Road, to facilitate trail connection across Fairfax Boulevard. Provide pedestrian refuge island within crosswalk. Figure 26 Proposed Fairfax Circle activity center enhancements 2 1 3 6 4 5 7 Pedestrian crossings Proposed new roads Landscape Conceptual draft Fairfax Circle Activity Center NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. 4 ACTION T4.1.4  Provide a shared use path on Pickett Road from Old Pickett Road to Fairfax Boulevard and connecting to the Gerry Connolly Cross County Trail. 6 ACTION T4.1.6  Provide a bicycle facility along Draper Drive to connect to Draper Drive Park and create trail extensions to provide a connection to the George T. Snyder Trail. 5 ACTION T4.1.5  With every new private development project, pursue additional secondary and tertiary street network opportunities. Streets should be well designed as complete streets and align at regular intersections for a continuous street grid. 7 ACTION T4.1.7  Provide a bicycle facility along Old Lee Highway to connect into Old Town and to the Accotink Creek Trail. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 37
DRAFT Outcome T4.1 Enhance safety and multimodal connections at Fairfax Circle Fairfax Circle should be redesigned to redu...
DRAFT Figure 27 Proposed Northfax activity center enhancements In the Northfax local activity center, the addition of a finer grain network of tertiary streets will divide the large development blocks adjacent to the Fairfax Boulevard and Chain Bridge Road intersection. Enhanced pedestrian crossings across both major corridors, as well as a potential pedestrian connection to a new Metrorail station, are critical. To provide improved access and traffic operations, consider a roundabout at the intersection of Eaton Place and Chain Bridge Road, which has the additional benefit of providing an attractive northern gateway to the city. 1 2 3 ACTION T4.2.1  Study a roundabout or other improvements at Eaton Place and Chain Bridge Road to enhance local access, improve corridor operations, and provide a gateway and metering feature into Fairfax City. ACTION T4.2.2  Pursue opportunities to create a street grid in private redevelopment projects. ACTION T4.2.3  Make improvements to enhance traffic flow at the intersection of Fairfax Boulevard, McLean Avenue, and Warwick Avenue. ACTION T4.2.4  Develop and adopt access management policies to prohibit vehicle access from principal streets (Chain Bridge Road and Fairfax Boulevard) and encourage access from minor streets (secondary and tertiary streets). 38 1 2 lvd B fax Fair 3 Chain Bridge Outcome T4.2 Create a vibrant and walkable Northfax Place making focal area Pedestrian crossings Proposed new roads Landscape Conceptual draft Northfax Activity Center NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. ACTION T4.2.5  Provide strong and attractive pedestrian connections north along Chain Bridge Road to connect to a potential future Metrorail station. ACTION T4.2.6  Improve overall pedestrian environment in the Northfax area, including pedestrian crossings, street trees and furnishing zone, buffering sidewalk from vehicle travel lanes, improved pedestrian scale lighting, and active ground floor uses along primary street edges. Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS
DRAFT Figure 27 Proposed Northfax activity center enhancements  In the Northfax local activity center, the addition of a f...
DRAFT Outcome T4.3 Improve Kamp Washington Figure 28 Proposed Kamp Washington activity center enhancements At Kamp Washington, the intersection of Fairfax Boulevard and Main Street is already undergoing improvements to its alignment and pedestrian facilities. In addition, recommended improvements within this local activity center include non-motorized connections to provide neighborhood access to the commercial uses. These connections include improved pedestrian crossings across the major corridors of Fairfax Boulevard and Main Street and creating an enhanced commuter bicycle facility on Main Street to the Fairfax County Government Center area. Direct property access from the major arterials remains limited, but well provided by way of the minor street network and connected service drive along the north side of the intersection. 1 ACTION T4.3.1  With every new private development project, pursue additional secondary and tertiary street network opportunities. Streets should be well designed as complete streets and align at regular intersections for a continuous street grid. ACTION T4.3.2  Improve overall pedestrian environment in the Kamp Washington area including pedestrian crossings, enhanced non-motorized connections, street trees and furnishing zone buffering sidewalks from vehicle travel lanes, and improved pedestrian scale lighting. Fai r fax 1 Lee Hw 3 Blv d / lvd xB 29 fa r Fai y 29 5 6 Ma in S tre et Pedestrian crossings Proposed new roads Proposed non-motorized connections Access driveway Conceptual draft Kamp Washington Activity Center NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. 3 ACTION T4.3.3  Consolidate curb cuts and driveways along Fairfax Boulevard to support the existing frontage road and facilitate safety along the Boulevard. 5 ACTION T4.3.5  Provide an enhanced bicycle facility along Main Street continuing to the west to access the Fairfax County Government Center. ACTION T4.3.4  Improve pedestrian crossing across the arterial corridor. Provide pedestrian crossings across all legs of all intersections, and wherever possible, provide pedestrian refuge islands at pedestrian crossings. 6 ACTION T4.3.6  Provide strong and attractive family- friendly connections from trails to the Fairfax Boulevard and Main Street corridors. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 39
DRAFT Outcome T4.3 Improve Kamp Washington  Figure 28 Proposed Kamp Washington activity center enhancements  At Kamp Washi...
DRAFT Outcome T4.4 Enhance the attractiveness and accessibility of Old Town Figure 29 Proposed Old Town activity center enhancements While walkable areas are dispersed throughout the city, the Old Town local activity center uniquely combines a high destination count with a high concentration of walkable infrastructure. The Old Town infrastructure does come with some limitations including sidewalks that are narrow and lack a protective buffer or planting strip between the walkway and the curb. 1 ACTION T4.4.1  Evaluate the feasibility of an enhanced bicycle facility along Main Street continuing to the west to access the Fairfax County Government Center activities and east to Pickett Road. Reconfigure county entrance on Chain Bridge Road. 4 1 9 2 3 Placemaking focal area Pedestrian crossings Proposed new roads 2 3 4 ACTION T4.4.2  Further investigate the completion of the grid with South Street extended to West Street with evaluation of a North Street/South Street bypass system. ACTION T4.4.3  Enhance the trail crossing on Sager Avenue and Main Street and provide a dedicated and clear connection to the northern trail section. ACTION T4.4.4   Pursue opportunities to create a street grid in private redevelopment projects. Proposed non-motorized connections Existing trails Landscape Old Town Activity Center NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. ACTION T4.4.5  Provide management of offstreet parking facilities to enable shared-use policies and enhanced wayfinding to optimize usage. ACTION T4.4.6  Prioritize the completion of existing sidewalk gaps including crossing facilities. ACTION T.4.4.7  Widen existing sidewalks within Old Town where feasible. 40 Conceptual draft Existing street grid ACTION T4.4.8  Adopt urban street design guidelines for the Old Town area. 9 ACTION T4.4.9  With South Street extended, investigate the restoration of curbside uses such as parking on Main Street also enabling increased accessibility through curb extensions and sidewalk widths. Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS
DRAFT  Outcome T4.4 Enhance the attractiveness and accessibility of Old Town  Figure 29 Proposed Old Town activity center ...
DRAFT Outcome T4.5 Enhance Pickett and Main Figure 30 Proposed Pickett and Main activity center enhancements The activity center at Pickett Road and Main Street is already a quality commercial center and is not expected to change dramatically in the foreseeable future. The area will continue to be largely accessed by automobile but will benefit from improved non-motorized connections. Pedestrian crossings across both Pickett Road and Main Street will be enhanced, and will include improvements to pedestrian connections to the trail system and within the commercial properties themselves. As Main Street will provide enhanced bicycle accommodations, bicycle parking and amenities should be provided within the commercial areas. 1 2 ACTION T4.5.1  Improve pedestrian crossings across major arterials. Provide pedestrian crossings across all legs of all intersections, and wherever possible, provide pedestrian refuge islands at pedestrian crossings. Improve overall pedestrian environment in the Pickett Road and Main Street area including the enhancement of multimodal access, circulation and comfort within the commercial areas. 1 1 2 Pedestrian crossings Proposed non-motorized connections Existing trails Landscape Conceptual draft Pickett and Main Activity Center NOTE: The draft concepts presented here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. ACTION T4.5.2  Provide an enhanced bicycle facility along Main Street continuing to the west to Old Town and further to the county government center. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 41
DRAFT  Outcome T4.5 Enhance Pickett and Main  Figure 30 Proposed Pickett and Main activity center enhancements  The activi...
DRAFT JE RM AN TO RD ICK EATON PL ORCHA RD ST 1 WAR W ICK A VE FA IR FA XB LVD W EH D OL Y LE Proposed guidance M for Fairfax City Metrorail Station AIN Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS BURKE STATION RD GE RD ACTION T4.6.3  Effectively manage vehicle access to minimize increases traffic coming JUof D IAL to and from the station utilizingICroadways in DR Fairfax City. BL VD 3 ROBERTS RD ST here are conceptual and presented for discussion purposes. The final NOTE: The draft concepts presented plan will reflect input from residents, property owners, other stakeholders and city officials. EORGE MASON GA TE EY SH IRL 42 OLD P BR ID ACTION T4.6.2  Introduce additional neighborhood connections to new Metrorail station area. 2 CH AIN 2 RD 1 ACTION T4.6.1  Encourage walkable street environment from I-66 to Fairfax Boulevard. RM AN TO WN ILL RD W A P L ES M Y LEE HW RD BLAKE LN RSITY DR IVE UN This station should be designed as a combination walk-up community station and sub-regional park and ride and major bus transfer facility. The station area must be carefully designed to provide a walkable environment from I-66 down to Northfax and invite and encourage access via non-auto modes. N W CH A I N BRIDGE RD Should the Orange Line Metrorail be extended, it is assumed that it will generally follow the alignment of the I-66 corridor and is recommended to provide a station location at I-66 between the Vienna/Fairfax-GMU Metrorail station and the Fairfax County Government Center. This stop would provide walkable access between the Northfax area and Metrorail station and would be an easy bicycle, bus, or shared ride from George Mason University or Old Town to66 the Metrorail system. Figure 31 Proposed guidance for Fairfax City Metrorail Station JE Outcome T4.6 Provide guidance for Fairfax City Metrorail Station MAIN ST
DRAFT  JE RM AN TO RD  ICK  EATON PL  ORCHA  RD ST  1  WAR W  ICK A VE  FA  IR FA  XB  LVD  W EH  D OL  Y  LE  Proposed gu...
DRAFT Transportation Goal 4. Performance Metrics The City’s five activity centers are the hubs of the economic development areas with opportunities for walkable and vibrant community centers. The continued success of these centers from a transportation perspective can be assessed by these performance metrics. • Change in retail rents per square foot in local activity centers. • Pedestrian counts at key crossing locations. STRENGTHEN LOCAL ACTIVITY CENTERS Change in retail rents in local activity centers $ Pedestrian counts at key crossings GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 43
DRAFT  Transportation Goal 4. Performance Metrics The City   s five activity centers are the hubs of the economic developm...
DRAFT TRANSPORTATION GOAL 5. ADOPT POLICIES FOR PREDICTABLE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT In addition to the geometric, operational, and capital improvement projects recommended above, there are a number of policies that are recommended to support, enhance, and implement the plan objectives and bring about the measurable outcomes desired. Outcome T5.1 Provide Complete Streets Complete streets work for everyone in the community, regardless of their travel mode. A complete street network comprises a variety of street types that account for all users and create multiple safe and convenient ways for people to get around in a comfortable and integrated environment. Complete streets support safety and community cohesion. They respect diversity and choice and make multiple transportation options viable. Complete streets enable those that do not drive to remain active and connected members of the community, whether they are too young or old, whether they have a disability, cannot afford a car, or simply choose not to drive. And complete streets support the objectives of improved human and environmental health. Fairfax City has made efforts to improve pedestrian and bicycle facilities, but the overall network favors the mobility of automobiles at the expense of other users. As the city repaves and rebuilds its roadways, Fairfax must take the opportunity to create or retrofit facilities to adequately accommodate pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit users. Best Practice A complete streets policy should be inclusive of a community’s vision for transportation, account for the many types of uses and community needs, and allow for flexible implementation. Generating policies that require complete streets principles to be included in all transportation improvements and projects that impact the right-of-way are key component of implementation. 44 Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS
DRAFT  TRANSPORTATION GOAL 5. ADOPT POLICIES FOR PREDICTABLE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT In addition to the geometric, ope...
DRAFT The following are potential policies to implement complete street principles: • Approach every planned transportation improvement as an opportunity to apply the complete streets principles. • Apply complete street policies to • Allow complete streets elements to be • Actively identify regional, state, and federal funding for complete street improvements. other departments and transportation agencies to efficiently utilize funds. • Identify quantifiable performance measures and report progress annually. • Annually report on progress and all public and private projects and developments that impact the right-ofway. phased over time. • Collaborate and coordinate between performance measures. • Maintain an inventory of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure to identify gaps. Policy Recommendation ACTION T5.1.1  Adopt a complete street policy for Fairfax City. Fairfax City should approach all planned transportation improvements and all planned development projects within the right-of-way as an opportunity to advance the value and objective of safety and complete streets. • Every street should safely accommodate all users. • Identify and prioritize projects based on infrastructure needs. • Train staff and decision makers on the technical content and best practices of complete street principles. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 45
DRAFT  The following are potential policies to implement complete street principles        Approach every planned transpor...
DRAFT • Any street subject to major maintenance, rehabilitation, or reconstruction should provide safe accommodation for all users, of all abilities. • The means of accommodation should be appropriate to the street context and developed in consultation with local community stakeholders. • The city should actively pursue regional, • City agencies and departments should collaborate and coordinate with one another and adjacent jurisdictions to apply complete street principles and provide continuous networks. • Progress on complete streets should be measured in concert with the adopted measures of the Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan. state, and federal funding opportunities to support complete streets improvements. 46 Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS
DRAFT       Any street subject to major maintenance, rehabilitation, or reconstruction should provide safe accommodation f...
DRAFT Outcome T5.2 Ensure Pedestrian Accessibility Pedestrian-supportive infrastructure ensures that adequate pedestrian facilities, primarily sidewalks and street crossings, are accessible, safe, and comfortable for community members of all ages and physical abilities. Pedestrian facilities are a part of the community’s overall transportation network and encourage walking as an alternate option for transportation. In Fairfax City, there is a need to improve sidewalk continuity and street crossings throughout the community, particularly on roadways where vehicle volumes are high and/ or roadways with pedestrian destinations such as schools, parks, and transit stops. The existing gaps in the pedestrian network (sidewalks and crossing locations) discourage walking in the community, limiting opportunities to connect neighborhoods with community destinations. Best Practice The best pedestrian-supportive infrastructure policies are applicable to the entire community and focus on safety and connectivity. Policies are flexible to context-specific applications and permit different types of facilities on different street types. Policies are compliant with all applicable state and federal regulations, including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and establish a methodology for prioritization and performance evaluation. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 47
DRAFT  Outcome T5.2 Ensure Pedestrian Accessibility Pedestrian-supportive infrastructure ensures that adequate pedestrian ...
DRAFT The following are potential policies improve pedestrian supportive infrastructure. • Prioritize walking connections to transit stops, schools, and parks. Implement first-last mile walking connection to transit and prioritize access to transit stops. • Support projects that improve pedestrian connectivity. • Improve pedestrian access to destination areas in the City. • Improve pedestrian routes that connect students to schools. • Maintain a sidewalk inventory. • Establish a methodology for project prioritization and performance evaluation. Policy Recommendation ACTION T5.2.1  Revise Fairfax City sidewalk policy. Fairfax City should ensure that all streets have at least one sidewalk on both new and existing streets of all street types. • All new streets should provide sidewalks on both sides of the street irrespective of anticipated traffic volumes unless explicitly designed as a shared street. • Sidewalks should be considered with every major maintenance, restoration or street reconstruction project. Sidewalks may be constructed independent of other street projects. vehicle volumes (5,000 or more vehicles per day) should have sidewalks on both sides of the street. Moderate volume streets should have a continuous sidewalk at least along one side; local streets (less than 5,000 vehicles per day) should have a sidewalk on at least one side of the street, unless specifically redesigned or actively managed as a shared street. • Sidewalks should be a minimum of 5 feet wide. • The sidewalk network should be continuous and connected. Curb ramps must be provided at street crossings. • Recommended guidance for sidewalks is that streets with moderate to high • Improve pedestrian access across major roadways that create barriers to connecting the network. Comply with all state and federal regulations including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). • Adopt a complete streets policy. 48 Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS
DRAFT The following are potential policies improve pedestrian supportive infrastructure.       Prioritize walking connecti...
DRAFT Outcome T5.3 Enact Bicycle Supportive Policies and Services Best Practice Despite having a temperate climate and moderate topography, bicycle mode share in Fairfax City is quite low compared to other modes and well below what has been demonstrated to be possible in many comparable communities throughout the United States. There is an active and engaged bicycle constituency in Fairfax City who have expressed a desire for greater accommodation and more support to increase the bicycle mode share. Increasing the bicycle mode share has the possibility to reduce the growth of vehicle traffic and congestion, improve public health, and benefit environmental outcomes. A number of different factors support bicycling as a viable mode choice. These include adequate provision of bicycle parking for both short term and long term users; bike share services; enhanced bicycle facilities; and building amenities for bicyclists such as bicycle storage, changing rooms, and showers. Transportation demand management policies can further support bicycle mode share through the provision of bicycle benefits, parking cash-out, and similar programs. Bicycle supportive policies and services should be integrated into the community’s existing transportation policies to strengthen provisions for bicycle facilities and amenities. Policies should be flexible enough to allow for revisions over time as bicycle infrastructure and programming develops. Policies should be in coordination with a Complete Streets policy and proactively look toward the future for opportunities in technology and bicycle programming or systems. Adoption of the following policies have become widespread: • Create conditions that make bicycling more attractive than driving for trips of three miles or less. Recommended Actions and Policy Initiatives ACTION T5.3.1  Increase awareness of bicycle and trail facilities through the distribution of maps and the provision of facility information to travel app programs. ACTION T5.3.2  Expand the provision of bicycle racks for short term bicycle parking. ACTION T5.3.3  Install long term bicycle parking in public parking facilities and private developments. ACTION T5.3.4  Develop a transportation demand management program that incentivizes and rewards the provision of showers, changing rooms, parking cash out programs, and other actions that encourage bicycle use. ACTION T5.3.5  Complete a bike share feasibility study, preferably in partnership with George Mason University, and provide support to establish bike share in Fairfax City. • Expand functional hierarchy of bicycle classifications. • Fully integrate bicycles into ongoing planning efforts. • Further integrate support for bicycling into existing City policies. • Revise existing parking policies to include bicycle parking. • Further detail the classification of the bicycle network. • Develop detailed bicycle plans for specific areas and facilities in the City. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 49
DRAFT Outcome T5.3 Enact Bicycle Supportive Policies and Services  Best Practice  Despite having a temperate climate and m...
DRAFT Outcome T5.4 Improve Parking Standards and Management Complete neighborhood development that provides residents, visitors, and employees with walking, bicycling, and transit connections to most common destinations requires development partners that share the vision and believe in its market viability. One of the most common ways that these visions become undermined is when even wellintentioned developers use conventional parking approaches in their projects. The best way to underscore the importance of “getting the parking right” in local activity centers like Old Town, Northfax, and Kamp Washington in particular, is to codify the details of a preferred approach. At present, Fairfax City’s parking provision is potentially out of balance. Portions of the city are quite dominated by surface parking, while residents, businesses, and visitors feel like parking is insufficient. This has more to do with a lack of parking management than a lack of parking supply. In Old Town, paved parking occupies nearly two-thirds of the total land area of the local activity center occupying 92% more space than buildings. Along Fairfax Boulevard, paved parking areas (including car dealership lots) occupies over 40% of the land area along the corridor. 50 Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS
DRAFT Outcome T5.4 Improve Parking Standards and Management Complete neighborhood development that provides residents, vis...
DRAFT Several factors combine within Fairfax City to merit a distinct set of development standards and parking requirements. 1 Access to Transit – Few areas of the City are beyond walking distance of a CUE or Metrobus stop. 2 Diverse land uses at transit-friendly densities – The combination of development densities and highly diverse land uses create a strong potential for Live Near Your Work opportunities (i.e., enabling employees to live close to their work places), which can be leveraged to fill market-rate housing developments with modest on-site parking facilities. 3 Support from the City and its broad set of stakeholder employers and institutions – (such as GMU) can help ensure that the parking standards are in line with the broader vision for the area. Recent changes to the City’s Zoning Code have revised parking requirements to address changing land use demands. These requirements include: 1 Reduced minimum parking requirements in the Old Town Fairfax Historic Overlay District (up to 100% reduction) and the Old Town Fairfax Transition Overlay District (up to 50% reduction). In the Commercial Urban District where structured parking is provided, a reduction of up to 10% is available. Recommendation ACTION T5.4.1  Allow parking requirements to be met through an In Lieu Fee, or comparable alternative (i.e., allow developers to pay fees into a parking or transportation management fund in place of providing the required parking on site). ACTION T5.4.2  Allow developers to fund public parking or other forms of access infrastructure, in lieu of meeting parking demand on site. ACTION T5.4.3  Allow developers to pay a fee, similar to the In Lieu Fee, to provide excess parking that is not shared. 2 Maximum parking requirements for commercial and industrial uses. 3 Shared parking among different uses and uses with different hours of operation is encouraged to promote efficiency. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 51
DRAFT Several factors combine within Fairfax City to merit a distinct set of development standards and parking requirement...
DRAFT Outcome T5.5 Manage Transportation Demand In many cities, the over-supply and underpricing of parking creates an incentive to drive. Parking and Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies are strategies used to relieve traffic congestion caused by the use of single occupancy vehicles. Majority of people in Fairfax City choose to make trips by car. However, if convenience of other modes of transportation were improved some community members may be influenced to try an alternative mode. 52 A TDM strategy can influence this decision by including incentives such as cost benefits or improved convenience or amenities. These include universal bus passes, car sharing, ride sharing, bike sharing, subsidized transit costs from city or employers, improved bicycle and pedestrian facilities, and parking management systems. Best Practice A TDM policy should be inclusive of all modes of transportations and include flexibility in the types of programs/incentives offered. A policy should be a coordinated effort between public and private agencies to provide and incentivize alternative modes of transportation. Developing a parking management policy that integrates both TDM and parking management strategies aimed at reducing traffic congestion in the community includes the following best practice components: • • • • • Public parking signage and wayfinding. Completion of non-motorized networks. Development of a bicycle master plan. Expansion of transit service. Creation of a bus pass program. Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS
DRAFT  Outcome T5.5 Manage Transportation Demand In many cities, the over-supply and underpricing of parking creates an in...
DRAFT As part of Transportation Master Plans, cities often include a TDM action plan. These TDM action plan policies below are best practice approaches to the continued development of a strategy as a citywide and regional effort. • Increase access to universal transit pass. • Integrate TDM and Parking Management in new and existing developments. • Expand employer outreach TDM program. • Coordinate TDM programs with local and regional partners. Policy Recommendation ACTION T5.5.3  Increase outreach and education to George Mason University, the Central Fairfax Chamber of Commerce, City of Fairfax schools, and other markets that can provide strong partnerships with the TDM program. ACTION T5.5.10  Continue implementation of the recommendations within the Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan and adjust TDM program strategies as appropriate based on needs and demand. ACTION T5.5.4  Evaluate a linked TDM fund for the in-lieu developer fees related to parking requirements to enhance the transit system and citywide TDM programs. ACTION T5.5.11  Establish measurable TDM goals and report on these goals annually. ACTION T5.5.5  Improve access to rideshare programs through enhanced coordination with Fairfax County RideSource, Commuter Connections or initiate a City based program. ACTION T5.5.6  Explore opportunities for car share services within the City to address “last mile” connections. In order for the City to initiate and coordinate a robust TDM program the following strategies are recommended to enable a framework to be laid for future initiatives Citywide. ACTION T5.5.7  Partner with employer-sponsored wellness programs to highlight and market travel options and associated costs. This program aids in the retention and recruitment of residents, employees, and businesses. ACTION T5.5.1  Establish a Transportation Demand Management program framework that can be utilized by the City and adapted by businesses and developers. ACTION T5.5.8  Integrate the City’s new parking requirements with travel marketing options to reduce the demand for long-term commuter/ employee parking in the City. ACTION T5.5.2  Create a Fairfax City TDM brand and website to centralize all available travel option information including transit schedules, bicycle maps, ridesharing opportunities, and education tools. ACTION T5.5.9  Mandate new and existing developments in the City to include TDM strategies in their development programs including bi-annual monitoring to assess resident/employee travel patterns. Adopt these requirements in the City’s Zoning Code. GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 53
DRAFT  As part of Transportation Master Plans, cities often include a TDM action plan. These TDM action plan policies belo...
DRAFT Existing Performance Benchmarks Goal Plan Overall Plan Overall Metric 20-minute neighborhood (3,500 feet of mixed use district via street or trail network) 15-minute walk to nature (1,250 feet of park or trail via street network) Target 100% of residential units 100% of residential units Plan Overall 10-minute walk to transit (1,250 feet of a transit stop via street or trail network) 50% of residential units Plan Overall Non-drive alone mode share (commute mode choice, percent of working residents) 40% Connect to the region Traffic on city arterials with neither origin nor destination in the city. Reduce Connect to the region Transit commute mode share Increase 54 Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Current Benchmark (data source) 44% of residential 86% (GIS analysis) 79% (GIS analysis) 28% (American Community Survey) 68,000 (MWCOG Model) 11% (American Community Survey)
DRAFT  Existing Performance Benchmarks Goal Plan Overall Plan Overall  Metric 20-minute neighborhood  3,500 feet of mixed ...
DRAFT Goal Metric Provide a Miles of sidewalk (excluding trails) balanced system Provide a Miles of bicycle facilities (dedicated on-street facilities + trails) balanced system Provide a Pedestrian and bicyclist volumes on city trails. balanced system Provide a Non-drive alone mode share by residents and workers balanced system Improve major Crashes on major and minor arterials involving pedestrians and corridors bicycles Improve major corridors Crashes of all types on major and minor arterials Improve major corridors CUE transit travel time reliability – on-time performance Strengthen local Change in retail rents per square foot – average per activity activity centers center Strengthen local Pedestrian counts at key crossing locations activity centers Target Increase Increase Increase Decrease Current Benchmark (data source) 126 miles (City of Fairfax) 10.6 miles (City of Fairfax) TBD (annual manual counts) 28% (MWCOG model) Decrease Decrease 90% 837 (Virginia Police) 86% (avg of all routes) (CUE) Increase (adjusted for inflation) TBD Increase TBD GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan 55
DRAFT  Goal  Metric  Provide a Miles of sidewalk  excluding trails  balanced system Provide a Miles of bicycle facilities ...
DRAFT 56 Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS
DRAFT  56  Fairfax City Multimodal Transportation Plan GOALS, OUTCOMES, AND ACTIONS