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University of Westminster
The Site
Diary
Module Tutors: Will McLean
Pete Silver
Scott Batty
Students: Martynas Kasiulevicius (W1423681)
Shaden Meer (W1419966)
Architect: Warren Hagues (CPA Architects)
Shaden
Martynas
Warren
Contents
Chapter 1 ‘Making Sense of Site’ :
1.01 .................................................. 2
1.02 .................................................. 4
1.03 .................................................. 6
1.04 .................................................. 7
1.05 .................................................. 8
1.06 ................................................ 10
1.07 ................................................ 11
1.08 ................................................ 12
1.09 ................................................ 14
1.10 ................................................ 16
1.11 ................................................ 17
1.12 ................................................ 18
1.13 ................................................ 20
Chapter 2 ‘The Design Team’ :
2.01 ................................................ 24
2.02 ................................................ 25
2.03 ................................................ 26
2.04 ................................................ 27
2.05 ................................................ 28
2.06 ................................................ 29
2.07 ................................................ 30
2.08 ................................................ 31
2.09 ................................................ 32
2.10 ................................................ 34
2.11 ................................................ 36
2.12 ................................................ 37
Chapter 3 ‘Statutory Obligations’ :
3.01 ................................................ 40
3.02 ................................................ 42
3.03 ................................................ 44
3.04 ................................................ 45
3.05 ................................................ 46
3.06 ................................................ 48
3.07 ................................................ 50
3.08 ................................................ 51
3.09 ................................................ 52
3.10 ................................................ 53
Chapter 4 ‘Building the Building’ :
4.01 ................................................ 56
4.02 ................................................ 57
4.03 ................................................ 58
4.04 ................................................ 59
4.05 ................................................ 60
4.06 ................................................ 61
4.07 ................................................ 62
4.08 ................................................ 63
4.09 ................................................ 64
Chapter 5 ‘Visible Progression’
5.01 ................................................ 68
5.02 ................................................ 70
5.03 ................................................ 72
5.04 ................................................ 74
5.05 ................................................ 78
5.06 ................................................ 80
5.07 ................................................ 84
Chapter 6 ‘References’ :
Ref (1) ............................................ 90
Ref (2) ............................................ 92
Ref (3) ............................................ 94
Ref (4) ............................................ 95
Ref (5) ............................................ 96
Ref (6) ............................................ 97
Ref (7) ............................................ 98
Ref (8) ............................................ 99
Ref (9) .......................................... 100
Contents
Chapter 1 ‘Making Sense of Site’ :
1.01 .................................................. 2
1.02 .................................................. 4
1.03 .................................................. 6
1.04 .................................................. 7
1.05 .................................................. 8
1.06 ................................................ 10
1.07 ................................................ 11
1.08 ................................................ 12
1.09 ................................................ 14
1.10 ................................................ 16
1.11 ................................................ 17
1.12 ................................................ 18
1.13 ................................................ 20
Chapter 2 ‘The Design Team’ :
2.01 ................................................ 24
2.02 ................................................ 25
2.03 ................................................ 26
2.04 ................................................ 27
2.05 ................................................ 28
2.06 ................................................ 29
2.07 ................................................ 30
2.08 ................................................ 31
2.09 ................................................ 32
2.10 ................................................ 34
2.11 ................................................ 36
2.12 ................................................ 37
Chapter 3 ‘Statutory Obligations’ :
3.01 ................................................ 40
3.02 ................................................ 42
3.03 ................................................ 44
3.04 ................................................ 45
3.05 ................................................ 46
3.06 ................................................ 48
3.07 ................................................ 50
3.08 ................................................ 51
3.09 ................................................ 52
3.10 ................................................ 53
Chapter 4 ‘Building the Building’ :
4.01 ................................................ 56
4.02 ................................................ 57
4.03 ................................................ 58
4.04 ................................................ 59
4.05 ................................................ 60
4.06 ................................................ 61
4.07 ................................................ 62
4.08 ................................................ 63
4.09 ................................................ 64
Chapter 5 ‘Visible Progression’
5.01 ................................................ 68
5.02 ................................................ 70
5.03 ................................................ 72
5.04 ................................................ 74
5.05 ................................................ 78
5.06 ................................................ 80
5.07 ................................................ 84
Chapter 6 ‘References’ :
Ref (1) ............................................ 90
Ref (2) ............................................ 92
Ref (3) ............................................ 94
Ref (4) ............................................ 95
Ref (5) ............................................ 96
Ref (6) ............................................ 97
Ref (7) ............................................ 98
Ref (8) ............................................ 99
Ref (9) .......................................... 100
MAKING SENSE OF SITE
1
CHAPTER
MAKING SENSE OF SITE
1
CHAPTER
2 3
Front Garden
1.01
Located near Goldhawk Road
Station, the property originally
was an old 1800s Victorian
residential building, in which
the lower ground oor of 179
Hammersmith Grove was
turned into ofce space. The
lower ground oor contains
two units; a front unit (C) used
for a small ofce (one room,
lobby and a toilet), and a back
unit (D), which was used as a
clinic by a therapy company
(two treatment rooms and a
kitchen). Subsequently, plan-
ning permission was obtained
to change the two commer-
cial spaces back to residential
units. The new planning pro-
posed a conversion of the ex-
isting ofce space into a studio
unit (kitchen, living space and
a bathroom), and the clinic into
a one-bedroom living unit. By
inlling the two closet therapy
wings on the lower ground oor.
Where is the site, what is the purpose of the building?
179 Hammersmith Grove, London W6
Goldhawk Road
The changed building is going to have
a studio and a one-bedroom living unit.
Existing Plan
Proposed Plan
Ofce
Front Garden
Entrance
Treatment
Room 1
Treatment
Room 2
Kitchen
Studio
Bathroom
Kitchen
Bathroom
Living
Room
Bedroom
Unit 2
Unit 1
Ref (1)
2 3
Front Garden
1.01
Located near Goldhawk Road
Station, the property originally
was an old 1800s Victorian
residential building, in which
the lower ground oor of 179
Hammersmith Grove was
turned into ofce space. The
lower ground oor contains
two units; a front unit (C) used
for a small ofce (one room,
lobby and a toilet), and a back
unit (D), which was used as a
clinic by a therapy company
(two treatment rooms and a
kitchen). Subsequently, plan-
ning permission was obtained
to change the two commer-
cial spaces back to residential
units. The new planning pro-
posed a conversion of the ex-
isting ofce space into a studio
unit (kitchen, living space and
a bathroom), and the clinic into
a one-bedroom living unit. By
inlling the two closet therapy
wings on the lower ground oor.
Where is the site, what is the purpose of the building?
179 Hammersmith Grove, London W6
Goldhawk Road
The changed building is going to have
a studio and a one-bedroom living unit.
Existing Plan
Proposed Plan
Ofce
Front Garden
Entrance
Treatment
Room 1
Treatment
Room 2
Kitchen
Studio
Bathroom
Kitchen
Bathroom
Living
Room
Bedroom
Unit 2
Unit 1
Ref (1)
4 5
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
The client is a former contrac-
tor who left the construction in-
dustry to pursue his bus-driving
career. CPA previously worked
on the neighboring property to
the current site, 177 Hammer-
smith Grove. The client, a few
years later, bought some prop-
erties in both 177 & 179 Ham-
mersmith Grove, to later sell the
177 Hammersmith Grove units
and focus on the 179 Hammer-
smith Grove units, and inherited
the drawings previously pro-
duced by CPA. The client then
contacted the same architect
and assigned him the project.
“The client was very hands-
off the project and was only in-
terested in the nal outcome.”
1.02
“The client found our Architecture
rm logo on the inherited draw-
ings when he purchased the property
and so he called us, CPA Architets.”
How involved was the client?
Why are the girls upset?
They are the owners of the middle
unit. The client owns the whole build-
ing apart from the one they live in.
They are not very happy with the
construction going on around them.
How did the project originate? Who is the client?
18
1. 2.
3.
£
FOR
SALE
UNDER CONSTRUCTION
4.
Client
Warren the Architect
Complaining Neighbours
4 5
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
The client is a former contrac-
tor who left the construction in-
dustry to pursue his bus-driving
career. CPA previously worked
on the neighboring property to
the current site, 177 Hammer-
smith Grove. The client, a few
years later, bought some prop-
erties in both 177 & 179 Ham-
mersmith Grove, to later sell the
177 Hammersmith Grove units
and focus on the 179 Hammer-
smith Grove units, and inherited
the drawings previously pro-
duced by CPA. The client then
contacted the same architect
and assigned him the project.
“The client was very hands-
off the project and was only in-
terested in the nal outcome.”
1.02
“The client found our Architecture
rm logo on the inherited draw-
ings when he purchased the property
and so he called us, CPA Architets.”
How involved was the client?
Why are the girls upset?
They are the owners of the middle
unit. The client owns the whole build-
ing apart from the one they live in.
They are not very happy with the
construction going on around them.
How did the project originate? Who is the client?
18
1. 2.
3.
4.
Client
Warren the Architect
Complaining Neighbours
6 7
The site was previously used
as ofce spaces. With the rise
in the demand for residential
spaces and their value in the
market, the client chose to
convert the two ofces into
residential units. Furthermore,
the location and unit sizes were
also factors that inuenced the
client’s decision to buy and re-
purpose the property. These
new residential units are going
to be rented out as a long-term
investment and added to the
client’s portfolio. Many projects
like this happen throghout Lon-
don, with rich investors not only
from the UK, but from all over
the world who come and invest
in such projects, to gain nan-
cial benets in the long run.
What is the business framework for the project, what makes it viable?
The project had a budget of
£150,000 + VAT. It com-
menced construction on the
2nd of November 2014
and was completed on the
23rd of April with a 5 week
delay to initial completion
date of March 19, 2014.
What is the contract value of the project? What is the time scale?
Contract Value of the Project: £150,000 + VAT
£
1.03 1.04
HOUSE PRICES
DEMAND FOR HOUSING
£
Ref (2)
6 7
The site was previously used
as ofce spaces. With the rise
in the demand for residential
spaces and their value in the
market, the client chose to
convert the two ofces into
residential units. Furthermore,
the location and unit sizes were
also factors that inuenced the
client’s decision to buy and re-
purpose the property. These
new residential units are going
to be rented out as a long-term
investment and added to the
client’s portfolio. Many projects
like this happen throghout Lon-
don, with rich investors not only
from the UK, but from all over
the world who come and invest
in such projects, to gain nan-
cial benets in the long run.
What is the business framework for the project, what makes it viable?
The project had a budget of
£150,000 + VAT. It com-
menced construction on the
2nd of November 2014
and was completed on the
23rd of April with a 5 week
delay to initial completion
date of March 19, 2014.
What is the contract value of the project? What is the time scale?
Contract Value of the Project: £150,000 + VAT
£
1.03 1.04
HOUSE PRICES
DEMAND FOR HOUSING
£
Ref (2)
8 9
Who are the key professionals and companies involved in the project?
1.05
Chartered Practice Architects Ltd
Architect
Warren
Matt
Martin Gustin & Associates Ltd
Structural engineer
Martin
Ryan Property Consultants Ltd
Approved inspector & Party wall surveyor
Marc
BBS Group
CDM coordinator
Dry Waterproong Ltd
Specialist Subcontractors
Darryl
Lee
CPA Architects are a Hammer-
smith based architecture rm.
They offer a full range of ar-
chitectural services from initial
consultations through to com-
pletion of the project on site.
Martin Gustin & Associ-
ates Ltd in Watford is a pri-
vate limited company that
specialises in engineering
activities and related techni-
cal consultancy and provision.
Quester Building Ltd, which
is run by Thomas Quester
(main contractor), pursuie to
complete various of projects
alongside his team of skilled
workers, through manual labour.
Dry Waterproong Ltd spe-
cialise in traditional damp
proong and waterproong
in buildings, and in particu-
lar, structural waterproong
of below ground structures.
Ryan Property Consultants
Ltd has been involved in all
aspects of Building Surveying
for almost 30 years and built
up a signicant client base
and a multitude of experience.
BBS’ CDM services are there
to ensure legislative compliance
and added value via specialist
skills in design, occupational
safety, construction safety
and end user documentation.
Quester Building Ltd
Main Contractor
To m
The Team
Ron
Aliston
8 9
Who are the key professionals and companies involved in the project?
1.05
Chartered Practice Architects Ltd
Architect
Warren
Matt
Martin Gustin & Associates Ltd
Structural engineer
Martin
Ryan Property Consultants Ltd
Approved inspector & Party wall surveyor
Marc
BBS Group
CDM coordinator
Dry Waterproong Ltd
Specialist Subcontractors
Darryl
Lee
CPA Architects are a Hammer-
smith based architecture rm.
They offer a full range of ar-
chitectural services from initial
consultations through to com-
pletion of the project on site.
Martin Gustin & Associ-
ates Ltd in Watford is a pri-
vate limited company that
specialises in engineering
activities and related techni-
cal consultancy and provision.
Quester Building Ltd, which
is run by Thomas Quester
(main contractor), pursuie to
complete various of projects
alongside his team of skilled
workers, through manual labour.
Dry Waterproong Ltd spe-
cialise in traditional damp
proong and waterproong
in buildings, and in particu-
lar, structural waterproong
of below ground structures.
Ryan Property Consultants
Ltd has been involved in all
aspects of Building Surveying
for almost 30 years and built
up a signicant client base
and a multitude of experience.
BBS’ CDM services are there
to ensure legislative compliance
and added value via specialist
skills in design, occupational
safety, construction safety
and end user documentation.
Quester Building Ltd
Main Contractor
To m
The Team
Ron
Aliston
10 11
of work at tender stage. When
using the Minor Works Build-
ing Contract with contractor’s
design, the employer must also
detail the requirements for the
parts of the works that the
contractor is to be responsible
for designing. Minor Works
Building Contracts are normally
administered by the architect
or a contract administrator.
The JCT Minor Works Build-
ing Contract is designed for
smaller, basic construction
projects where the work is of a
simple nature. In this case, the
contractor is responsible for
designing a specic part of the
work so a Minor Works Build-
ing Contracts with Contractor’s
Design is used. The contractor
contributed all drainage (above
and below ground), mechanical
(extracts, heatings, BTU for the
size of radiator, sizes of boil-
ers), and electrical (wiring) de-
signs. During tender stage, the
architect issues a performance
specication which requests a
detail to be designed or sup-
plied by the contractor, for
example an electrical speci-
cation of a light dimmer. The
contractor then provides his
own drawings of how these de-
signs are going to be realised.
Features of projects using the
Draw a diagram of the basic contractual relationship of the project.
1.06
Minor Works Building Contract:
The employer is responsible for
the design, and this is usually
supplied to the contractor by
the architect or design team
working on the employer’s
behalf. The employer (through
its advisers) will also need to
provide drawings, a speci-
cation, or work schedules to
specify the quantity and quality
Traditional Procurement: Minor Works Building Contract With Contractor’s Design
1.07
What is the architect’s appointment and role on the project?
The architect is appointed
as a full architectural and
contracts administrator.
He is also the mediator be-
tween the client and the main
contractor at most of the time.
He makes the nal impartial
decision. Payments to the main
contractor, in terms of the proj-
ect construction and material,
are only made after the works
are completed, as specied by
the works contracts. However,
some items and jobs require a
deposit before they can be be-
gun on site, which are called
Named Items. These will be
agreed on upon signing the
contract and money for them
will be received once needed.
In this case, 50% deposit was
needed to pay the damping
proof company before works
started. Once a job is complet-
ed, the main contractor gives
the architect his calculated fee,
which is determined by the main
contractor’s Quantity Surveyor
(QS). The architect then carries
out an evaluation, usually every
two weeks, to compare against
the main contractor’s QS re-
port. After gures have been
adjusted, a certicate is issued
by the architect to the main
contractor and the client. The
main contractor then sends the
client an invoice with calculated
VAT for the client to pay. So,
the architect acts as a nan-
cial spectator to protect both
the client and the contractor.
Client
Architect
Main Contractor
Invoice
QS Report
Approved Fee
Approved Fee
Job RequestProject
Payment
Client
Architect Contractor
Quantity Suveryor
Consultants
Subcontractor
Suppliers
Contractual Links
Functional Links
10 11
of work at tender stage. When
using the Minor Works Build-
ing Contract with contractor’s
design, the employer must also
detail the requirements for the
parts of the works that the
contractor is to be responsible
for designing. Minor Works
Building Contracts are normally
administered by the architect
or a contract administrator.
The JCT Minor Works Build-
ing Contract is designed for
smaller, basic construction
projects where the work is of a
simple nature. In this case, the
contractor is responsible for
designing a specic part of the
work so a Minor Works Build-
ing Contracts with Contractor’s
Design is used. The contractor
contributed all drainage (above
and below ground), mechanical
(extracts, heatings, BTU for the
size of radiator, sizes of boil-
ers), and electrical (wiring) de-
signs. During tender stage, the
architect issues a performance
specication which requests a
detail to be designed or sup-
plied by the contractor, for
example an electrical speci-
cation of a light dimmer. The
contractor then provides his
own drawings of how these de-
signs are going to be realised.
Features of projects using the
Draw a diagram of the basic contractual relationship of the project.
1.06
Minor Works Building Contract:
The employer is responsible for
the design, and this is usually
supplied to the contractor by
the architect or design team
working on the employer’s
behalf. The employer (through
its advisers) will also need to
provide drawings, a speci-
cation, or work schedules to
specify the quantity and quality
Traditional Procurement: Minor Works Building Contract With Contractor’s Design
1.07
What is the architect’s appointment and role on the project?
The architect is appointed
as a full architectural and
contracts administrator.
He is also the mediator be-
tween the client and the main
contractor at most of the time.
He makes the nal impartial
decision. Payments to the main
contractor, in terms of the proj-
ect construction and material,
are only made after the works
are completed, as specied by
the works contracts. However,
some items and jobs require a
deposit before they can be be-
gun on site, which are called
Named Items. These will be
agreed on upon signing the
contract and money for them
will be received once needed.
In this case, 50% deposit was
needed to pay the damping
proof company before works
started. Once a job is complet-
ed, the main contractor gives
the architect his calculated fee,
which is determined by the main
contractor’s Quantity Surveyor
(QS). The architect then carries
out an evaluation, usually every
two weeks, to compare against
the main contractor’s QS re-
port. After gures have been
adjusted, a certicate is issued
by the architect to the main
contractor and the client. The
main contractor then sends the
client an invoice with calculated
VAT for the client to pay. So,
the architect acts as a nan-
cial spectator to protect both
the client and the contractor.
Client
Architect
Main Contractor
Invoice
QS Report
Approved Fee
Approved Fee
Job RequestProject
Payment
Client
Architect Contractor
Quantity Suveryor
Consultants
Subcontractor
Suppliers
Contractual Links
Functional Links
12 13
The architect visits the site ev-
ery fortnight to overlook prog-
ress and carry out a site valu-
ation and evaluation. However,
he is also on-call for whenever
there is an issue that needs im-
mediate attention. (Not much of
a problem since his ofce is a
10-minute walk from the site).
His visits are effective for site
evaluations because there is
enough time between visits
for noticeable work progress.
This way the architect will be
able to see development as
well as identify any issues at
an early stage. If any issues
were to arise, the architect
can quickly and effectively nd
a way to resolve the problem.
What is the architect’s role whilst the project is on site? Is it effective?
1.08
The architect will mostly go on
site to tackle problems directly
with the contractor, though
phone calls and emails might
be used to resolve some of the
easier problems indirectly. The
architect records everything
from informal discussions and
drawings on the walls to agree-
ments done over the phone.
Newly Installed Steel Framework
Architect Inspecting the historic brickwork
Mistake spotted at an early stage:
The ceiling boards covered up the window
frames, which prevented the windows from
functioning properly.
Problem Resolved:
By raising the ceiling boards, the window
frames are given appropriate space to function.
12 13
The architect visits the site ev-
ery fortnight to overlook prog-
ress and carry out a site valu-
ation and evaluation. However,
he is also on-call for whenever
there is an issue that needs im-
mediate attention. (Not much of
a problem since his ofce is a
10-minute walk from the site).
His visits are effective for site
evaluations because there is
enough time between visits
for noticeable work progress.
This way the architect will be
able to see development as
well as identify any issues at
an early stage. If any issues
were to arise, the architect
can quickly and effectively nd
a way to resolve the problem.
What is the architect’s role whilst the project is on site? Is it effective?
1.08
The architect will mostly go on
site to tackle problems directly
with the contractor, though
phone calls and emails might
be used to resolve some of the
easier problems indirectly. The
architect records everything
from informal discussions and
drawings on the walls to agree-
ments done over the phone.
Newly Installed Steel Framework
Architect Inspecting the historic brickwork
Mistake spotted at an early stage:
The ceiling boards covered up the window
frames, which prevented the windows from
functioning properly.
Problem Resolved:
By raising the ceiling boards, the window
frames are given appropriate space to function.
14 15
For such a small project, there
are only a few drawings cre-
ated by the architect. The
structural engineer produced
more drawings as necessary.
The main drawings are two
plans and two elevations. Some
building regulations are referred
to in regards to sound reduc-
tion and isolation of the ceiling
and party walls, in which the
‘IsoMax Noise Control Sys-
tem’ is used. The architect and
contractors circulate drawings
of scale 1:50 & 1:20 extracts
while on site. This makes it
easier for those on site to vi-
sualize the construction as well
as have them as ready-at-hand
guidance tools and references.
What documents and drawings are being referred to on-site and in meetings?
1.09
Detailed Masterplan
Unit 2 Unit 1
IsoMax Acoustic Clip System
Section of Acoustic System Building Regulations
Ref (3)
Ref (4)
14 15
For such a small project, there
are only a few drawings cre-
ated by the architect. The
structural engineer produced
more drawings as necessary.
The main drawings are two
plans and two elevations. Some
building regulations are referred
to in regards to sound reduc-
tion and isolation of the ceiling
and party walls, in which the
‘IsoMax Noise Control Sys-
tem’ is used. The architect and
contractors circulate drawings
of scale 1:50 & 1:20 extracts
while on site. This makes it
easier for those on site to vi-
sualize the construction as well
as have them as ready-at-hand
guidance tools and references.
What documents and drawings are being referred to on-site and in meetings?
1.09
Detailed Masterplan
Unit 2 Unit 1
IsoMax Acoustic Clip System
Section of Acoustic System Building Regulations
Ref (3)
Ref (4)
16 17
Site meetings are held on site
while design meetings are done
via email. Because of the nature
of the client’s job, in which he
is a bus driver working for the
bus company, it is very dif-
cult for him to take time off for
meetings. Nevertheless, that did
not delay or hinder the design
process because the client was
already very hands off the proj-
ect and trusted the architect
with his decisions. An agenda is
made to be followed in the meet-
Who are all the various professionals on site and in meetings? What happens in a site meeting?
1.11
The architect and main con-
tractors are always present.
The main contractor is ac-
companied by a site foreman
who acts as a general builder
with a little knowledge of ev-
erything. The site foreman
mostly has a job that is more
strategic in nature in which he
delegates tasks to everyone
working on site. In other words,
the site foreman can easily
replace the main contractor if
he were to be absent from the
site at any time. Other profes-
sionals, such as the structural
engineer, the approved building
executive/party wall surveyor,
and the damp-proof company
workers, are available when
needed. The same can be ap-
plied to meetings in which
professionals are called when
relevant, including the client.
Always present Present on site when needed Present in meetings when needed
Tom, the main contractor, has jobs on various
sites, which requires him to leave for a while.
Hence, Ron, the site foreman is left in charge.
However, in the end, everything needs to be
referred back to the main contractor.
1.10
Agenda
Approval of previous minutes
Discussion of Progress
Conrmation of Decision
Determin Next Actions
Date Set for Compeletion
Minutes
ing and minutes of what is be-
ing discussed are recorded. The
agenda lists items that need to
be discussed, such as structural
issues, party walls, extension
of time, delays, etc., and are
talked about sequentially. The
purpose of a meeting is to track
the progress, identify what
needs to be done, who needs to
do what, and when everything
needs to be done by. After
the meeting, everyone leaves
knowing what steps to take next.
16 17
Site meetings are held on site
while design meetings are done
via email. Because of the nature
of the client’s job, in which he
is a bus driver working for the
bus company, it is very dif-
cult for him to take time off for
meetings. Nevertheless, that did
not delay or hinder the design
process because the client was
already very hands off the proj-
ect and trusted the architect
with his decisions. An agenda is
made to be followed in the meet-
Who are all the various professionals on site and in meetings? What happens in a site meeting?
1.11
The architect and main con-
tractors are always present.
The main contractor is ac-
companied by a site foreman
who acts as a general builder
with a little knowledge of ev-
erything. The site foreman
mostly has a job that is more
strategic in nature in which he
delegates tasks to everyone
working on site. In other words,
the site foreman can easily
replace the main contractor if
he were to be absent from the
site at any time. Other profes-
sionals, such as the structural
engineer, the approved building
executive/party wall surveyor,
and the damp-proof company
workers, are available when
needed. The same can be ap-
plied to meetings in which
professionals are called when
relevant, including the client.
Always present Present on site when needed Present in meetings when needed
Tom, the main contractor, has jobs on various
sites, which requires him to leave for a while.
Hence, Ron, the site foreman is left in charge.
However, in the end, everything needs to be
referred back to the main contractor.
1.10
Agenda
Approval of previous minutes
Discussion of Progress
Conrmation of Decision
Determin Next Actions
Date Set for Compeletion
Minutes
ing and minutes of what is be-
ing discussed are recorded. The
agenda lists items that need to
be discussed, such as structural
issues, party walls, extension
of time, delays, etc., and are
talked about sequentially. The
purpose of a meeting is to track
the progress, identify what
needs to be done, who needs to
do what, and when everything
needs to be done by. After
the meeting, everyone leaves
knowing what steps to take next.
18 19
“Keeping the site clean and
tidy for easy movement around
the spaces”
The site is kept clean and tidy
due to efforts made by both the
main contractor and the work-
ers. The main contractor would
go around several sites he
manages and pick up left over
material for storage and future
use. Since the site is very small
and limited in space the team
had to stack materials neatly
along the edges of the premises
and always tidy up the rooms
they’ve been working in. It was
opted not use a skip because
hiring one proved to be too ex-
pensive for such a small project,
which also went against the
client’s request to save money.
“Small spaces but two units”
The nature of the site requires
more than one trade taking
place at the same time in order
to stay on schedule. This meant
that when the damp-proong
team entered the site, they had
to alternate trades between
two spaces in coordance with
the contractors who are already
on site. The two units accom-
modated both teams in a man-
ner that allowed them to work
closely but comfortably together.
Detail examples where the construction team has worked efciently together.
Building in Unit 1
Damping in Unit 2
Damping in Unit 1
Building in Unit 2
Bags of waste by the entrance for
easy disposal by the end of the day
Alternate Works in Spaces
11:00 AM
11:15 AM
1.12
It is important for small construction sites to maintain tidiness and or-
ganisation in order to ensure safety, efciency, and ease of movement.
18 19
“Keeping the site clean and
tidy for easy movement around
the spaces”
The site is kept clean and tidy
due to efforts made by both the
main contractor and the work-
ers. The main contractor would
go around several sites he
manages and pick up left over
material for storage and future
use. Since the site is very small
and limited in space the team
had to stack materials neatly
along the edges of the premises
and always tidy up the rooms
they’ve been working in. It was
opted not use a skip because
hiring one proved to be too ex-
pensive for such a small project,
which also went against the
client’s request to save money.
“Small spaces but two units”
The nature of the site requires
more than one trade taking
place at the same time in order
to stay on schedule. This meant
that when the damp-proong
team entered the site, they had
to alternate trades between
two spaces in coordance with
the contractors who are already
on site. The two units accom-
modated both teams in a man-
ner that allowed them to work
closely but comfortably together.
Detail examples where the construction team has worked efciently together.
Building in Unit 1
Damping in Unit 2
Damping in Unit 1
Building in Unit 2
Bags of waste by the entrance for
easy disposal by the end of the day
Alternate Works in Spaces
11:00 AM
11:15 AM
1.12
It is important for small construction sites to maintain tidiness and or-
ganisation in order to ensure safety, efciency, and ease of movement.
20 21
“Unexpected conditions on
opening-up works”
The contractors encountered
some concrete slabs during
their excavation of the back
unit. The architect was informed
of the situation and a decision
was made to keep the concrete
slabs. Once the contractors
began working again they’ve
encountered another problem
with the concrete slabs and an
immediate decision was needed.
The main contractor was avail-
able on site and instinctively
asked for the concrete slab to
be removed, against what was
agreed with the architect previ-
ously. The architect was later
informed of this decision. This
is an example of poor commu-
nication between the architect
and the main contractor in re-
gards to decisions they made on
site while the other was away.
Detail examples where the construction team may not have worked efciently toegther.
“Misinterpretations”
A conversation on site was mis-
interpreted due to assumptions
made by the team without clari-
cation from each other. The
two units needed to be evened
out due to a difference in ground
level. This caused some confu-
sion between the architect and
the contractors during the time
of leveling and laying out the
oor boards. The site foreman
had explained that the insula-
tion for one of the units will be
put over the oor boards. How-
ever, the architect rectied the
site foreman and assumed that
since the boards were already
in place then the insulation must
have been installed under the
boards beforehand. The archi-
tect then learned via a call from
the main contractor that due to
the change in levels of the two
units, it was decided to add the
insulation on top of the board.
This miscommunication was
caused because the workers
and architect assumed work
was done without conrm-
ing with the main contractor.
Sometimes decisions need to be made
as soon as the problem is encountered.
This sometimes causes miscommunica-
tion, however if a job needs to be done
then there is no space for pauses to con-
sult everyone. A phone call later that day
updating the architect is not a problem.
?
1.
Keep it!
2.
Remove it!
Oh, sorry! We Removed it.
3.
4.
1.13
?
20 21
“Unexpected conditions on
opening-up works”
The contractors encountered
some concrete slabs during
their excavation of the back
unit. The architect was informed
of the situation and a decision
was made to keep the concrete
slabs. Once the contractors
began working again they’ve
encountered another problem
with the concrete slabs and an
immediate decision was needed.
The main contractor was avail-
able on site and instinctively
asked for the concrete slab to
be removed, against what was
agreed with the architect previ-
ously. The architect was later
informed of this decision. This
is an example of poor commu-
nication between the architect
and the main contractor in re-
gards to decisions they made on
site while the other was away.
Detail examples where the construction team may not have worked efciently toegther.
“Misinterpretations”
A conversation on site was mis-
interpreted due to assumptions
made by the team without clari-
cation from each other. The
two units needed to be evened
out due to a difference in ground
level. This caused some confu-
sion between the architect and
the contractors during the time
of leveling and laying out the
oor boards. The site foreman
had explained that the insula-
tion for one of the units will be
put over the oor boards. How-
ever, the architect rectied the
site foreman and assumed that
since the boards were already
in place then the insulation must
have been installed under the
boards beforehand. The archi-
tect then learned via a call from
the main contractor that due to
the change in levels of the two
units, it was decided to add the
insulation on top of the board.
This miscommunication was
caused because the workers
and architect assumed work
was done without conrm-
ing with the main contractor.
Sometimes decisions need to be made
as soon as the problem is encountered.
This sometimes causes miscommunica-
tion, however if a job needs to be done
then there is no space for pauses to con-
sult everyone. A phone call later that day
updating the architect is not a problem.
?
1.
Keep it!
2.
Remove it!
Oh, sorry! We Removed it.
3.
4.
1.13
?
THE DESIGN TEAM
2
CHAPTER
THE DESIGN TEAM
2
CHAPTER
24 25
The RIBA Agreements 2010,
which is a versatile suite of
contract documents for the
appointment of architects and
other consultants, is used.
The new RIBA Workstages
are not used because the
RIBA has yet to publish -
nal agreements on them.
What is the nature of the agreement between the Architect and the client?
The two most common remarks clients
and service providers have are usually “we
paid the money up front” and “we didn’t
sign a contract”. The only way to avoid
problems and make sure everyone knows
their rights and what their doing is to do
things properly without any shortcuts.
The architect receives a per-
centage fee from the construc-
tion value and is packaged as
a series of lump sums. The
architect accepted the job for
several reasons. Firstly, the
architect had previously worked
on the neighbouring property so
he was already familiar with the
building. Secondly, the archi-
tect looks forward to potential
future projects with the same
client. Thirdly, the project met
their minimum project value
requirement, in which CPA ar-
chitects do not accept jobs with
values less than £100,00 as,
according to the architect, a
£50,000 job will require the
same effort as a £100,000
job. This would be unfair for the
clients as it would cost them
twice as much a job and would
probably decline their offer.
How has the Architect’s fee been calculated? Why is the architect doing the project?
2.01 2.02
CPA Architects
%
£
Construction
£
£
£
£
Month A
Month B
Month C
Month D
Month E
24 25
The RIBA Agreements 2010,
which is a versatile suite of
contract documents for the
appointment of architects and
other consultants, is used.
The new RIBA Workstages
are not used because the
RIBA has yet to publish -
nal agreements on them.
What is the nature of the agreement between the Architect and the client?
The two most common remarks clients
and service providers have are usually “we
paid the money up front” and “we didn’t
sign a contract”. The only way to avoid
problems and make sure everyone knows
their rights and what their doing is to do
things properly without any shortcuts.
The architect receives a per-
centage fee from the construc-
tion value and is packaged as
a series of lump sums. The
architect accepted the job for
several reasons. Firstly, the
architect had previously worked
on the neighbouring property so
he was already familiar with the
building. Secondly, the archi-
tect looks forward to potential
future projects with the same
client. Thirdly, the project met
their minimum project value
requirement, in which CPA ar-
chitects do not accept jobs with
values less than £100,00 as,
according to the architect, a
£50,000 job will require the
same effort as a £100,000
job. This would be unfair for the
clients as it would cost them
twice as much a job and would
probably decline their offer.
How has the Architect’s fee been calculated? Why is the architect doing the project?
2.01 2.02
CPA Architects
%
£
Construction
£
£
£
£
Month A
Month B
Month C
Month D
Month E
26 27
Who are the Design Team? Draw a diagram showing the consultants
CPA architect Warren Hagues
is the contracts administrator.
He manages the contracts that
have been made with the client
and other professionals that are
invovled with the project. CPA
tries to use RIBA Standard
conditions and documents as
much as possible. However,
they do get clients, such as law-
yers, who disagree with the way
contracts are written. Adjusting
the contracts and rewriting
them is possible, but that could
result in a awed contract. For
instance, the contract may have
void clauses and be slightly bias
towards one of the parties.
Who is administering the contract? Architect / Project Manager / another?
2.03
Architect
CDM CordinatorMain Contractor
Structural Engineer
Client
2.04
CDM Co-ordinator
Always present Present when needed
Contractual Links
Client
Architect
Main ContractorConsultants
Subcontractor
26 27
Who are the Design Team? Draw a diagram showing the consultants
CPA architect Warren Hagues
is the contracts administrator.
He manages the contracts that
have been made with the client
and other professionals that are
invovled with the project. CPA
tries to use RIBA Standard
conditions and documents as
much as possible. However,
they do get clients, such as law-
yers, who disagree with the way
contracts are written. Adjusting
the contracts and rewriting
them is possible, but that could
result in a awed contract. For
instance, the contract may have
void clauses and be slightly bias
towards one of the parties.
Who is administering the contract? Architect / Project Manager / another?
2.03
Architect
CDM CordinatorMain Contractor
Structural Engineer
Client
2.04
CDM Co-ordinator
Always present Present when needed
Contractual Links
Client
Architect
Main ContractorConsultants
Subcontractor
28 29
Knowing that the client was
very hands off the project and
that he trusted the architect
with his opinions, I felt that
the design process was quick,
effecient and cohesive. The ar-
chitect and other members of
the design team were able to
make decisions without inter-
ruptions from the client. Fur-
thermore, by more or less lim-
iting the design team meetings
to professionals, who are on
the same thought level, no time
would be lost on ‘confusion’
situations, as would there be
if the client had no knowledge
of how things were done. This
would focus more on nding
solutions to improve the design.
Shaden’s Opinion
In your opinion has the Design Team worked efciently together?
The project is budget driven.
Due to the nature of the project
in which the client plans on rent-
ing out the new converted units,
many cost cutting decisions
were taken into consideration
and were made. The client aims
to convert the units in the most
cost-efcient way possible in
order to be able to offer it with
low rent. The client strategically
chose a popular location (West
London) to attract tenants. By
lowering construction costs, he
can offer his units with low rent.
This brings in more business for
the client and gives tenants an
ideal location for a low price.
What is driving the project? Budget: Programme: Quality - discuss in detail
2.06
Popular Location (High Property Rent Price)
+
Low Construction Costs (Low Property Rent Price)
Popular Living Location (Low Property Rent)
2.05
From the three visits, I found
a lot of progress in the project
with each visit, evidently, show-
ing efciency and professional
care in the work and time man-
agement from the design team. I
believe that the project was able
to achieve this, due to good and
on going communication be-
tween the architect and the
main contractor as well as be-
tween the main contractor and
the consultants. The two units,
in addition, allowed the differ-
ent tradesmen to alternate be-
tween the two spaces and thus
get on with their work without
getting in each others way.
Martynas’ Opinion
28 29
Knowing that the client was
very hands off the project and
that he trusted the architect
with his opinions, I felt that
the design process was quick,
effecient and cohesive. The ar-
chitect and other members of
the design team were able to
make decisions without inter-
ruptions from the client. Fur-
thermore, by more or less lim-
iting the design team meetings
to professionals, who are on
the same thought level, no time
would be lost on ‘confusion’
situations, as would there be
if the client had no knowledge
of how things were done. This
would focus more on nding
solutions to improve the design.
Shaden’s Opinion
In your opinion has the Design Team worked efciently together?
The project is budget driven.
Due to the nature of the project
in which the client plans on rent-
ing out the new converted units,
many cost cutting decisions
were taken into consideration
and were made. The client aims
to convert the units in the most
cost-efcient way possible in
order to be able to offer it with
low rent. The client strategically
chose a popular location (West
London) to attract tenants. By
lowering construction costs, he
can offer his units with low rent.
This brings in more business for
the client and gives tenants an
ideal location for a low price.
What is driving the project? Budget: Programme: Quality - discuss in detail
2.06
Popular Location (High Property Rent Price)
+
Low Construction Costs (Low Property Rent Price)
Popular Living Location (Low Property Rent)
2.05
From the three visits, I found
a lot of progress in the project
with each visit, evidently, show-
ing efciency and professional
care in the work and time man-
agement from the design team. I
believe that the project was able
to achieve this, due to good and
on going communication be-
tween the architect and the
main contractor as well as be-
tween the main contractor and
the consultants. The two units,
in addition, allowed the differ-
ent tradesmen to alternate be-
tween the two spaces and thus
get on with their work without
getting in each others way.
Martynas’ Opinion
30 31
The contractor has to pay the
client cover for rental loss for
the overlapped time. How-
ever, regardless of the delays
the project has fallen into, the
contractor does not have to
pay any cover fees. The delays
were caused by unexpected
factors which were encountered
during opening up works. It was
difcult to predict what was in
the underfolds of the walls and
oors which happened to be
An extensive amount of damp
was encountered during open-
ing up works. It was evident
that the whole building was
rotting as the workers carried
out the opening up works. Ini-
tially the project was delayed
by 3 weeks due to this ex-
cessive damp which required
replacement of timber joints,
oors, and breaking out con-
crete found in the oor. Later
however, it was discovered
that the incoming water supply
for the whole property needed
to be addressed. Lead pipes,
which were shared with the
neighboring middle at, had to
be replaced. A historic boiler
that was shared between the
front and back units as well
as two electric meters in the
front unit needed to be split
for each. Although this was
meant to be acknowledged by
the main contractor much ear-
lier in time the architect man-
aged to give him 2 weeks extra.
Is the project on course to be completed within the contract period? If not why?
The main contractor initially asked for 3 weeks extension because of a shortage
in men during Easter Break. He should have been prepared for this knowing that
the project extends over Easter holidays. Hence, I’ve only given him 2 weeks
extension for dealing with the utility companies and 2 days for Easter Holiday
What are the penalties to the contractor if the project over runs?
2.07
2.08
an excessive amount of damp
that required more work than
planned for. This caused for
a justiable three week delay.
Moreover, another delay was
caused by the utility companies.
Although the main contractor
is considered to be at fault
for this delay, in which he was
supposed to rectify the joint
boilers and electricity metres
early on in the construction,
a two week extension was al-
X Days Delay
Justiable Reason
Unjustiable Reason
No Penalty
Penalty
lowed. All these delays forced
the project to overrun on Eas-
ter Holiday, which meant that
the contractor would have a
lack in workers. This, on the
other hand, will not justify as a
valid reason for extra weeks of
work, and hence the contractor
was only allowed two days off
Easter Holiday. In the end, the
contractor was given a justi-
able ve weeks of extension
without any penalties applied.
179 Hammersmith Grove Programme to be completed by 23rd April 2015
23 April
04 April
Ref (2)
30 31
The contractor has to pay the
client cover for rental loss for
the overlapped time. How-
ever, regardless of the delays
the project has fallen into, the
contractor does not have to
pay any cover fees. The delays
were caused by unexpected
factors which were encountered
during opening up works. It was
difcult to predict what was in
the underfolds of the walls and
oors which happened to be
An extensive amount of damp
was encountered during open-
ing up works. It was evident
that the whole building was
rotting as the workers carried
out the opening up works. Ini-
tially the project was delayed
by 3 weeks due to this ex-
cessive damp which required
replacement of timber joints,
oors, and breaking out con-
crete found in the oor. Later
however, it was discovered
that the incoming water supply
for the whole property needed
to be addressed. Lead pipes,
which were shared with the
neighboring middle at, had to
be replaced. A historic boiler
that was shared between the
front and back units as well
as two electric meters in the
front unit needed to be split
for each. Although this was
meant to be acknowledged by
the main contractor much ear-
lier in time the architect man-
aged to give him 2 weeks extra.
Is the project on course to be completed within the contract period? If not why?
The main contractor initially asked for 3 weeks extension because of a shortage
in men during Easter Break. He should have been prepared for this knowing that
the project extends over Easter holidays. Hence, I’ve only given him 2 weeks
extension for dealing with the utility companies and 2 days for Easter Holiday
What are the penalties to the contractor if the project over runs?
2.07
2.08
an excessive amount of damp
that required more work than
planned for. This caused for
a justiable three week delay.
Moreover, another delay was
caused by the utility companies.
Although the main contractor
is considered to be at fault
for this delay, in which he was
supposed to rectify the joint
boilers and electricity metres
early on in the construction,
a two week extension was al-
X Days Delay
Justiable Reason
Unjustiable Reason
No Penalty
Penalty
lowed. All these delays forced
the project to overrun on Eas-
ter Holiday, which meant that
the contractor would have a
lack in workers. This, on the
other hand, will not justify as a
valid reason for extra weeks of
work, and hence the contractor
was only allowed two days off
Easter Holiday. In the end, the
contractor was given a justi-
able ve weeks of extension
without any penalties applied.
179 Hammersmith Grove Programme to be completed by 23rd April 2015
23 April
04 April
Ref (2)
32 33
The architect instructs the main
contractor. Instructions and in-
formation is issued to the main
agent on site/main contractor
and cannot be directed at any-
one else. The main contractor
then delegates the jobs to his
team of workers. Regardless,
every discussion and issued
instruction will be recorded and
sent to both the main contrac-
tor and the client in an ofcial
letter or form. By limiting deliv-
ering the insturcitons to only
the main contractor, mis com-
munication and asumptions are
avoided. No decisions are made
without the approval of the main
contractor, who then , if need-
ed, refers back to the architect.
What is the process and procedure for information and instructions going to the contractor? Is it efcient?
2.09
Although workers are meant to follow in-
structions only given by the main contrac-
tor, it happens to be that sometimes the
main contractor is not on site, but I am.
Because of this the workers might ask
me for instructions. As I mentioned ear-
lier, this caused miscommunication and
confusion a few times between the team.
Architect
Main Contractor
Workers
Specialized Workers
Job Compeletion
Repeat Cycle
Client
Encountered problem: Washing Machine
too deep for the allotted space
Acid test of nal ttings: FAILED
shower head height too short
32 33
The architect instructs the main
contractor. Instructions and in-
formation is issued to the main
agent on site/main contractor
and cannot be directed at any-
one else. The main contractor
then delegates the jobs to his
team of workers. Regardless,
every discussion and issued
instruction will be recorded and
sent to both the main contrac-
tor and the client in an ofcial
letter or form. By limiting deliv-
ering the insturcitons to only
the main contractor, mis com-
munication and asumptions are
avoided. No decisions are made
without the approval of the main
contractor, who then , if need-
ed, refers back to the architect.
What is the process and procedure for information and instructions going to the contractor? Is it efcient?
2.09
Although workers are meant to follow in-
structions only given by the main contrac-
tor, it happens to be that sometimes the
main contractor is not on site, but I am.
Because of this the workers might ask
me for instructions. As I mentioned ear-
lier, this caused miscommunication and
confusion a few times between the team.
Architect
Main Contractor
Workers
Specialized Workers
Job Compeletion
Repeat Cycle
Client
Encountered problem: Washing Machine
too deep for the allotted space
Acid test of nal ttings: FAILED
shower head height too short
34 35
There are no modern methods
of construction used. The job
is too small and simple to re-
quire any developed methods
of construction. However, one
detail that could have been
constructed and installed in a
modern method would be the
window stills and door frames.
The contractor installed these
using a chemical foam x-
ing. Regardless of how strong
the expanded foam is, there
is always a question of how
resilient it is against the test
of time. An alternative would
be the use of mechanical x-
ings in windows which would
offer more resilience against
weather changes and decay.
Foam Fixing is used instead of me-
chanical xing for doors and windows
The foam expands and hardens; xing
the windows and doors into place
2.10
Are any Modern Methods of Construction, such as prefabrication, being utilised? If not, do you think they could?
Personally I prefer me-
chanical xing over ex-
panding foam xtures.
5mm Total Allowance
Foam Residue
Glass
Architect’s Quick Sketch: Window Foam Fixture in Plan
Architect’s Quick Sketch: Window Mechanical Fixture in Sectionvs.
Brick Wall
Lead Weights
Expanding Foam Fixture
Window Sill
Brick Wall
Mild Steel with Galvanised Finish
Glass
3mm
Screw Fixing
Ref (5)
34 35
There are no modern methods
of construction used. The job
is too small and simple to re-
quire any developed methods
of construction. However, one
detail that could have been
constructed and installed in a
modern method would be the
window stills and door frames.
The contractor installed these
using a chemical foam x-
ing. Regardless of how strong
the expanded foam is, there
is always a question of how
resilient it is against the test
of time. An alternative would
be the use of mechanical x-
ings in windows which would
offer more resilience against
weather changes and decay.
Foam Fixing is used instead of me-
chanical xing for doors and windows
The foam expands and hardens; xing
the windows and doors into place
2.10
Are any Modern Methods of Construction, such as prefabrication, being utilised? If not, do you think they could?
Personally I prefer me-
chanical xing over ex-
panding foam xtures.
5mm Total Allowance
Foam Residue
Glass
Architect’s Quick Sketch: Window Foam Fixture in Plan
Architect’s Quick Sketch: Window Mechanical Fixture in Sectionvs.
Brick Wall
Lead Weights
Expanding Foam Fixture
Window Sill
Brick Wall
Mild Steel with Galvanised Finish
Glass
3mm
Screw Fixing
Ref (5)
36 37
During the design process
draawings are exchanged in-
ternally via DropBox. Once the
designs are nalized, drawings
are made to be published on A3
PDFs to be uploaded on the
Planning Portal for approval.
CPA uses A3 PDFs to commu-
nicate information due to regu-
lations imposed by the Planning
Portal that restricts architec-
ture drawings from being larger
than A3. This size allows the
documents to be easily laid out,
handled, and discussed as well
as be small enough in size to
be digitally shared and viewed.
However, this restriction chal-
lenges the architect in which he
has to decide what information
to show and communicate on
each drawing and which scale
to be appropriate. Moreover,
the Planning Portal is an on-
line tool other specialists could
use, such as the structural en-
gineer, to communicate their
own contribution to the project.
How does the Design Team share and Co-ordinate information and drawings? Is this efcient?
2.11
Quick Ideas are being explored on site
and recorded on the walls of the building
Design Team
Building information modeling
(BIM) is a process involving the
generation and management of
digital representations of physi-
cal and functional characteris-
tics of places. It is more useful
for bigger projects with several
different spaces and functions.
However, this project is rela-
tively small. It is a basic change
of use from ofces to residen-
tial units which does not require
many advanced drawings and
diagrams. It would be unneces-
sary and wasteful to try and
produce them for this project.
Is BIM being used? Do you believe that BIM could help the project?
2.12
It is most denitely not! never
was and never will be used!
BIM
BIM
Circulate drawings via
Drop Box
Final A3
PDF Drawings
Posted on Planning
Portal for approval
Printed on A3 and
used in Site
36 37
During the design process
draawings are exchanged in-
ternally via DropBox. Once the
designs are nalized, drawings
are made to be published on A3
PDFs to be uploaded on the
Planning Portal for approval.
CPA uses A3 PDFs to commu-
nicate information due to regu-
lations imposed by the Planning
Portal that restricts architec-
ture drawings from being larger
than A3. This size allows the
documents to be easily laid out,
handled, and discussed as well
as be small enough in size to
be digitally shared and viewed.
However, this restriction chal-
lenges the architect in which he
has to decide what information
to show and communicate on
each drawing and which scale
to be appropriate. Moreover,
the Planning Portal is an on-
line tool other specialists could
use, such as the structural en-
gineer, to communicate their
own contribution to the project.
How does the Design Team share and Co-ordinate information and drawings? Is this efcient?
2.11
Quick Ideas are being explored on site
and recorded on the walls of the building
Design Team
Building information modeling
(BIM) is a process involving the
generation and management of
digital representations of physi-
cal and functional characteris-
tics of places. It is more useful
for bigger projects with several
different spaces and functions.
However, this project is rela-
tively small. It is a basic change
of use from ofces to residen-
tial units which does not require
many advanced drawings and
diagrams. It would be unneces-
sary and wasteful to try and
produce them for this project.
Is BIM being used? Do you believe that BIM could help the project?
2.12
It is most denitely not! never
was and never will be used!
BIM
BIM
Circulate drawings via
Drop Box
Final A3
PDF Drawings
Posted on Planning
Portal for approval
Printed on A3 and
used in Site
I’m ok, I’m ok! Lets carry on with Statutory Obligations.
BIM
STATUTORY OBLIGATIONS
3
CHAPTER
I’m ok, I’m ok! Lets carry on with Statutory Obligations.
BIM
STATUTORY OBLIGATIONS
3
CHAPTER
40 41
The project achieved planning
permission by submitting an
application to the local plan-
ning authorities, Hammer-
smith & Fulham. The process
was not complicated but was
lengthy, mostly because of the
‘change of use’ application. Unit
C previously had an applica-
tion submitted for a ‘change
of use’, however that applica-
tion expired before any action
was done on the unit. There-
fore, unit C needed to renew
its ‘change of use’ permission.
How did the project achieve Planning permission? Was it complicated?
3.01
Designing Process Application
Planning Authorities
Approval
Rejection
Construction Commencing
Discharging Planning Conditions
CPA
Chartered Practice Architects Ltd
159 Askew Road London W12 9AU T 020 8743 9535 F 020 8743 4875 www.cparchitects.com
179HG_C1_DandA_Studio_151014.doc
Registered Office: 159 Askew Road, London W12 9AU
Company Registered No. 3457171 VAT Registered No. 707 4703 42
DESIGN & ACCESS STATEMENT
179 HAMMERSMITH GROVE LONDON W6 0NL
Ground Floor : Change of Use, Extension and Alterations
Use :
This application seeks to reinstate the lapsed approval given in connection with planning
reference: 2010/01688. The proposal is for the Change of Use from Office (B1) to
Residential (C3) – One Studio unit garden flat.
Context :
Hammersmith Grove is an attractive tree lined road connecting Goldhawk Road to the north
with Beadon Road/Lyric Square to the south. 177 and 179 Hammersmith Grove form a pair of
semi-detached four storey properties on Hammersmith Grove, adjacent to Benbow Road. The
area is predominantly residential. For many years, the two properties were in the same
ownership, and under the same management. Several historic planning applications were
made in respect of the use of the buildings as a whole (mainly residential).
In 2010, having decided to separate and dispose of No 177 in its entirety, an application was
made (2010/01688/FUL) for Change of Use from Office (B1) to Residential (C3) of the front
part of the Ground Floor of 179, and this was granted on 4 May 201. This approval has now
expired. Planning approval has also been obtained for the same Change of Use (B1 – C3) for the
rear unit on ground floor (2014/00160/FUL) which was granted on 14
th
March 2014. Planning
permission was granted in 2012 for the Change of Use of the Ground Floor unit to no. 177
Hammersmith Grove (2012/01272/FUL) from B1 to C3 use.
Proposal/Amount :
This application is made for the Change of Use of the front unit on the Ground Floor of 177
from Office (B1) to Residential (C3) in the form of Studio unit garden flat. The total net area
of the proposed unit is 27 square metres.
Layout :
Although sometimes described as the lower Ground Floor, the floor level is effectively at
ground level as the finished floor level is only 550mm below the level at the back edge of the
public footpath. The proposed flat would be entered from the side passage, providing
dedicated private access off Benbow Road.
The main living space are at the front of the property benefitting from east facing light via
large timber sashed bay windows. Provision is made for bin storage and there is ample space
for the storage of bicycles in the side passageway. (See attached drawings – As listed).
Design
As previously noted, the character of this section of Hammersmith Grove, and the adjoining
Benbow and Beauclerc Roads, is predominantly residential, and lie within the Hammersmith
Grove Conservation Area. The character changes further north towards Goldhawk Road and
further south towards Amor and Trussley Roads, where there is a mixture of residential and
commercial properties. The characteristics of the buildings, which are generally in terraced
Design and Access Statement
Full Detailed Planning Application
Ref (7)
Ref (6)
40 41
The project achieved planning
permission by submitting an
application to the local plan-
ning authorities, Hammer-
smith & Fulham. The process
was not complicated but was
lengthy, mostly because of the
‘change of use’ application. Unit
C previously had an applica-
tion submitted for a ‘change
of use’, however that applica-
tion expired before any action
was done on the unit. There-
fore, unit C needed to renew
its ‘change of use’ permission.
How did the project achieve Planning permission? Was it complicated?
3.01
Designing Process Application
Planning Authorities
Approval
Rejection
Construction Commencing
Discharging Planning Conditions
CPA
Chartered Practice Architects Ltd
159 Askew Road London W12 9AU T 020 8743 9535 F 020 8743 4875 www.cparchitects.com
179HG_C1_DandA_Studio_151014.doc
Registered Office: 159 Askew Road, London W12 9AU
Company Registered No. 3457171 VAT Registered No. 707 4703 42
DESIGN & ACCESS STATEMENT
179 HAMMERSMITH GROVE LONDON W6 0NL
Ground Floor : Change of Use, Extension and Alterations
Use :
This application seeks to reinstate the lapsed approval given in connection with planning
reference: 2010/01688. The proposal is for the Change of Use from Office (B1) to
Residential (C3) – One Studio unit garden flat.
Context :
Hammersmith Grove is an attractive tree lined road connecting Goldhawk Road to the north
with Beadon Road/Lyric Square to the south. 177 and 179 Hammersmith Grove form a pair of
semi-detached four storey properties on Hammersmith Grove, adjacent to Benbow Road. The
area is predominantly residential. For many years, the two properties were in the same
ownership, and under the same management. Several historic planning applications were
made in respect of the use of the buildings as a whole (mainly residential).
In 2010, having decided to separate and dispose of No 177 in its entirety, an application was
made (2010/01688/FUL) for Change of Use from Office (B1) to Residential (C3) of the front
part of the Ground Floor of 179, and this was granted on 4 May 201. This approval has now
expired. Planning approval has also been obtained for the same Change of Use (B1 – C3) for the
rear unit on ground floor (2014/00160/FUL) which was granted on 14
th
March 2014. Planning
permission was granted in 2012 for the Change of Use of the Ground Floor unit to no. 177
Hammersmith Grove (2012/01272/FUL) from B1 to C3 use.
Proposal/Amount :
This application is made for the Change of Use of the front unit on the Ground Floor of 177
from Office (B1) to Residential (C3) in the form of Studio unit garden flat. The total net area
of the proposed unit is 27 square metres.
Layout :
Although sometimes described as the lower Ground Floor, the floor level is effectively at
ground level as the finished floor level is only 550mm below the level at the back edge of the
public footpath. The proposed flat would be entered from the side passage, providing
dedicated private access off Benbow Road.
The main living space are at the front of the property benefitting from east facing light via
large timber sashed bay windows. Provision is made for bin storage and there is ample space
for the storage of bicycles in the side passageway. (See attached drawings – As listed).
Design
As previously noted, the character of this section of Hammersmith Grove, and the adjoining
Benbow and Beauclerc Roads, is predominantly residential, and lie within the Hammersmith
Grove Conservation Area. The character changes further north towards Goldhawk Road and
further south towards Amor and Trussley Roads, where there is a mixture of residential and
commercial properties. The characteristics of the buildings, which are generally in terraced
Design and Access Statement
Full Detailed Planning Application
Ref (7)
Ref (6)
42 43
Look up the project on the Planning Portal and view the Planning Drawings - are they being strictly adhered to?
3.02
Planning Portal
1.
2.
3.
1. 2.
3.
Examples of elements of the drawings being adhered to and realised
Added door for access
to outdoor space
Erected angled wall to divide space
between the kitchen and bathroom
As requested by the client, radiators were in-
stalled instead of underoor heating to cut costs
Ref (4)
42 43
Look up the project on the Planning Portal and view the Planning Drawings - are they being strictly adhered to?
3.02
Planning Portal
1.
2.
3.
1. 2.
3.
Examples of elements of the drawings being adhered to and realised
Added door for access
to outdoor space
Erected angled wall to divide space
between the kitchen and bathroom
As requested by the client, radiators were in-
stalled instead of underoor heating to cut costs
Ref (4)
44 45
Are there any outstanding Planning Conditions still to be discharged?
3.03
An Approved Inspector was
appointed to insure building
regulations were met. Ryan As-
sociates offered a more com-
plete service in which he was
an approved inspector as well
as a party wall surveyor. The
architect chose this particular
route because it was the most
cost-effective choice in which
the Inspector provided two
services. This complies with
the client’s desire to cut costs
as much as possible. The Lo-
How are the Building Regulations being dealt with, i.e. Approved Inspector, Local Authority, why was the particular route
chosen?
3.04
Proposal Drawing
cal Authorities were avoided
because they are not as open
to discussion as an approved
inspector would be; hence avert
any possible delays that might
have been incurred by them.
The Approved Inspector is in-
volved after stage D, commenc-
ing stage E up until completion.
He then signs the building off
subject to the electrician and
plumber providing certicates
as proof for trades being com-
pleted to approved standard.
Marc Inspecting the Party Walls
I also inspect the drawings
Ref (8)
44 45
Are there any outstanding Planning Conditions still to be discharged?
3.03
An Approved Inspector was
appointed to insure building
regulations were met. Ryan As-
sociates offered a more com-
plete service in which he was
an approved inspector as well
as a party wall surveyor. The
architect chose this particular
route because it was the most
cost-effective choice in which
the Inspector provided two
services. This complies with
the client’s desire to cut costs
as much as possible. The Lo-
How are the Building Regulations being dealt with, i.e. Approved Inspector, Local Authority, why was the particular route
chosen?
3.04
Proposal Drawing
cal Authorities were avoided
because they are not as open
to discussion as an approved
inspector would be; hence avert
any possible delays that might
have been incurred by them.
The Approved Inspector is in-
volved after stage D, commenc-
ing stage E up until completion.
He then signs the building off
subject to the electrician and
plumber providing certicates
as proof for trades being com-
pleted to approved standard.
Marc Inspecting the Party Walls
I also inspect the drawings
Ref (8)
46 47
Every unit is equipped with
FD20 re doors, heat &
smoke detectors and open
able windows. The main es-
cape routes would be through
re compartments formed in
escape lobby and then through
the main doors for each unit.
However, if these exits were
blocked, the windows would
serve as a secondary means
of escape. The escape route
did not inuence the design.
What is the strategy for means of escape, how has this inuenced the design?
3.05
1. 2. 3.
1.
4. 5. 6.
4.
6.
5.
2.
3.
Main Escape Routes Alternative Escape Routes
46 47
Every unit is equipped with
FD20 re doors, heat &
smoke detectors and open
able windows. The main es-
cape routes would be through
re compartments formed in
escape lobby and then through
the main doors for each unit.
However, if these exits were
blocked, the windows would
serve as a secondary means
of escape. The escape route
did not inuence the design.
What is the strategy for means of escape, how has this inuenced the design?
3.05
1. 2. 3.
1.
4. 5. 6.
4.
6.
5.
2.
3.
Main Escape Routes Alternative Escape Routes
48 49
The projects takes place in an
existing building however since
there is a ‘change of use’, the
two units are classied as two
new dwellings by the Planning
Department. The project is
classed as residential refurbish-
ment under Building Regula-
tions terms. DDA compliance is
no longer in use and is replaced
with the ‘Equalities Act’. This
calls for a lifetime home in which
a person could be born in a cer-
tain house and there’s enough
space to raise a family in the
same house with adequate pro-
vision to deal with handicapped
end users. Planners will gener-
ally insist that new dwellings
have lifetime home compliance
however this is never checked.
Nevertheless, the architect is
still required to ensure the dwell-
ings are lifetime home compli-
ance, or at least built well to be
easily transformed into a dis-
abled user friendly environment.
Is it an existing or new bulding - what steps were taken to achieve DDA compliance?
We haven’t had anybody check for lifetime home compliance.
As long as you can approach it and incorporate it in a practi-
cal manner as much as possible, then they shouldn’t nd any problems.
3.06
177 Hammersmith Grove
179 Hammersmith Grove (Site)
Effects of Damping
Entrance to both units through side door
Ref (6)
48 49
The projects takes place in an
existing building however since
there is a ‘change of use’, the
two units are classied as two
new dwellings by the Planning
Department. The project is
classed as residential refurbish-
ment under Building Regula-
tions terms. DDA compliance is
no longer in use and is replaced
with the ‘Equalities Act’. This
calls for a lifetime home in which
a person could be born in a cer-
tain house and there’s enough
space to raise a family in the
same house with adequate pro-
vision to deal with handicapped
end users. Planners will gener-
ally insist that new dwellings
have lifetime home compliance
however this is never checked.
Nevertheless, the architect is
still required to ensure the dwell-
ings are lifetime home compli-
ance, or at least built well to be
easily transformed into a dis-
abled user friendly environment.
Is it an existing or new bulding - what steps were taken to achieve DDA compliance?
We haven’t had anybody check for lifetime home compliance.
As long as you can approach it and incorporate it in a practi-
cal manner as much as possible, then they shouldn’t nd any problems.
3.06
177 Hammersmith Grove
179 Hammersmith Grove (Site)
Effects of Damping
Entrance to both units through side door
Ref (6)
50 51
There were no party wall is-
sues encountered when the
hired Party Wall Surveyor
carried out a standard inspec-
tion. However, when the leak-
ing that caused the damping
was discovered and sourced
back to the above neighbour-
ing property, a second Party
Wall Surveyor was hired as
requested by the neighbouring
owners. The two Party Wall
Surveyors acted on behalf of
the wall and it was discovered
that the issue was not party
wall related. In our case, the
hopper from the at roof above
Are there any Party Wall issues?
3.07
In this case there were no en-
countered problems, however
the Party Wall agreements are
usually a standard 2 months.
If so how long did they take to reach Party Wall agreement?
I asked Tom & Mark (the party wall
surveyor) if they wanted me down there
to discuss the issue with them and they
said no! Architecture is not the solution
for everything, they don’t need me there.
3.08
We want our own party wall surveyor!
was blocked and had overow
on to the brickwork damag-
ing the render and creating
damping. This was classied
as faults in building works.
Damp effect on external walls
Rotten timber oor spanning of the unit above
50 51
There were no party wall is-
sues encountered when the
hired Party Wall Surveyor
carried out a standard inspec-
tion. However, when the leak-
ing that caused the damping
was discovered and sourced
back to the above neighbour-
ing property, a second Party
Wall Surveyor was hired as
requested by the neighbouring
owners. The two Party Wall
Surveyors acted on behalf of
the wall and it was discovered
that the issue was not party
wall related. In our case, the
hopper from the at roof above
Are there any Party Wall issues?
3.07
In this case there were no en-
countered problems, however
the Party Wall agreements are
usually a standard 2 months.
If so how long did they take to reach Party Wall agreement?
I asked Tom & Mark (the party wall
surveyor) if they wanted me down there
to discuss the issue with them and they
said no! Architecture is not the solution
for everything, they don’t need me there.
3.08
We want our own party wall surveyor!
was blocked and had overow
on to the brickwork damag-
ing the render and creating
damping. This was classied
as faults in building works.
Damp effect on external walls
Rotten timber oor spanning of the unit above
52 53
CDM rules apply if the proj-
ect is a commercial venture.
Since the two units are going
to be rented then they qualify
as a commercial venture and
become notiable under CDM.
The CDM coordinator is in-
volved in parts of the design
meetings to ensure health &
safety regulations are being
adhered to. The main contrac-
tor, Questor Building Limited,
are given all the architect’s and
structural engineer’s drawings,
which ultimately comply with
CDM, and use them as guides
for safe construction methods.
Is the project notiable under CDM? If so who is the Principal Contractor?
No, apart from the need for
method statements from the
contractor in term of struc-
tural support and how that
was going to be carried out, an
Asbestos survey to be carried
out, and reducing the amount
of carcinogenic material such
as dense sand block plas-
ter board for CDM purposes.
Were there any specic design details that were revised in order to comply with CDM?
The ideal thing to do is to try and comply
with CDM in design as much as possible
from the beginning of the project in order
to avoid having so many changes later.
3.09
3.10
CDM Cordinator
Residential units for
commercial use
Private residential units
for personal use
Non Notiable
under CDM
Notiable under
CDM
Methods of Consturction comply
with health and safety regs.
Demolition of the old wall
Temporary support streel structure
Removal of the old load bearing double I-beam
Instalment of the
new load bearing
I-beam superstructure
Insulation
Timber spanning ceiling joist
52 53
CDM rules apply if the proj-
ect is a commercial venture.
Since the two units are going
to be rented then they qualify
as a commercial venture and
become notiable under CDM.
The CDM coordinator is in-
volved in parts of the design
meetings to ensure health &
safety regulations are being
adhered to. The main contrac-
tor, Questor Building Limited,
are given all the architect’s and
structural engineer’s drawings,
which ultimately comply with
CDM, and use them as guides
for safe construction methods.
Is the project notiable under CDM? If so who is the Principal Contractor?
No, apart from the need for
method statements from the
contractor in term of struc-
tural support and how that
was going to be carried out, an
Asbestos survey to be carried
out, and reducing the amount
of carcinogenic material such
as dense sand block plas-
ter board for CDM purposes.
Were there any specic design details that were revised in order to comply with CDM?
The ideal thing to do is to try and comply
with CDM in design as much as possible
from the beginning of the project in order
to avoid having so many changes later.
3.09
3.10
CDM Cordinator
Residential units for
commercial use
Private residential units
for personal use
Non Notiable
under CDM
Notiable under
CDM
Methods of Consturction comply
with health and safety regs.
Demolition of the old wall
Temporary support streel structure
Removal of the old load bearing double I-beam
Instalment of the
new load bearing
I-beam superstructure
Insulation
Timber spanning ceiling joist
BUILDING THE BUILDING
4
CHAPTER
BUILDING THE BUILDING
4
CHAPTER
56 57
179 Hammersmith Grove
London W6 0NL
Scope of Works
Chartered Practice Architects Ltd page 1 of 10
Spec. No.
NBS Ref: Room / Location / Description / Reference material:
PROVISIONAL
SUMS (Exc. V.A.T.)
CONTRACTOR'S
PRICES (Exc. V.A.T.)
1.0
Contract Preliminaries:.
Site supervision/management.
Scaffolding & temporary supports
Site set up and welfare facilities.
Travelling and parking.
Plant and small tools.
Waste disposals and skips.
2.0
Site Clearance, Excavating & Filling
Demolition & Stripping Out:
Allow for demolition and stripping out works as denoted on Demolition
Drawing. (Ref: 179HG_F1_410 Demolition Drawing)
Allow for removal of existing windows/ doors as per Demolition Drawing
Strip out redundant telephone lines, light fittings & power outlet boxes.
Carefully remove exitsing shutters to Unit 1, make good and refit post
works.
3.0
Excavation:
Allow for excavation for new below ground drainage to Contractors
Design
Allow for excavation of new infill foundations and slab as per Structural
Engineer's drawings & specification.
Allow for Damp Proof Survey and understake remedial work to address
damp issues
4.0
Concrete Foundations And Floors.
Foundations:
Allow for new foundations as per Structural Engineer's drawings and
specification.
Allow for new 215 x 215 brick pier to Unit 2 (between Lobby_04 &
Bathroom_05)
Allow for 450 x 450 x 500mm deep mass concrete pad foundation to
support above pier
Allow for 600 x 1000mm wide foundation to support box frame to Unit 2
Concrete Floor Slabs:
Allow for new infil floor slab to lower ground floor as per Structural
Engineer's drawings.
Engineered timber laid on ply on solid floor construction to be minimum
70mm reinforced screed on 500 gauge polythene separating layer on
70mm Celotex fast-R FF4070 floor insulation on 1200 gauge polythene
DPM on concrete floor slab (thickness as per Structural Engineers
specification) on sand blinded hardcore to achieve U-value of at least
0.22 to meet Part L1b of the Building Regulations. Celotex T-Break
TB4025 insulation to be laid around perimeter of screed
Insulation:
Allow for insulation to lower ground floor slab as per Building Regulations
notes.
5.0
Masonry Construction.
Masonry Walls:
Construct new masonry infill walls to Unit 2 (1Bed Unit) Living Room on
Lower Ground Floor in rendered solid brickwork to match existing as per
Architect's & Structural Engineer's drawings and specification incl.
parapet wall with coping detail
Construct new masonry infill wall at high level between Unit 2 Living
Room and Bedroom
Allow for making good to exitsing party wall with bricks to match existing
in LivingArea_06
Allow for making good to existing Unit 2 partition to Unit 1 with bricks to
match existing in LivingArea_06/ Bathroom_05
6.0
Structural Frames, Steel Beams And Posts
The main construction com-
pany is Quester Building
Limited. The main contractor,
Tom, has inherited the com-
pany from his father, Martin,
due to healthy issues, and
now runs it. He has all the li-
abilities and insurances. His
team is made up of 25 people.
Who is the Main contractor? How is the company set up? What are your personal thoughts on the performance of the main
contractor?
During tender, the project
received three main contrac-
tor responses to their scope
of works document. Out of
all three, Quester Building
Limited offered a quicker job
that could be started sooner.
Moreover, the main contrac-
tor company was also cho-
sen based on previous work
experiences together and set
relationships with the architect.
How was the main contractor selected for the project?
4.01
4.02
Quester Building Ltd
Main Contractor
Tom (Main Contractor)
The Team
Ron (Site Foreman)
Contractor A
Contractor B
Contractor B
Replied
Contractor A
Replied
Chosen for best time
management
Contractor C
Contractor C pulled
out of the job
We worked previously with
the main contractor Tom
The main contractor was very
busy as he also had other addi-
tional projects elsewhere. Only
getting to nally meet him in the
last site visit, I though that he
was enthusiastic, full of con-
dence and with an urge to learn
and improve. He listened and
took the architect’s ideas on
board, whilst additionally shar-
ing his own point of view and
knoweledge of the trade with
the architect, which I found very
interesting and educational.
Overall I think the main contrac-
tor did a good job, as there were
no issues between him and the
architect, regarding the project.
Martynas’ Opinion
The main contractor team
seemed very relaxed and they
enjoyed doing their work. We
didn’t see any clashes in opin-
ions or instructions that result-
ed into heated arguments be-
tween the main contractor and
his team. They seemed to work
well in sync. Since it was a very
small site, workers (usually 3 -
4 on site) would be doing a dif-
ferent part of a task to cover as
much as possible. Another point
of advantage was that they
kept the site tidy and organ-
ised around them, which made
movement and work easier.
However, I noticed that not all
of the workers dressed appro-
priately for the job, which could
result in some serious injury!
Shaden’s Opinion
Ref (9)
56 57
179 Hammersmith Grove
London W6 0NL
Scope of Works
Chartered Practice Architects Ltd page 1 of 10
Spec. No.
NBS Ref: Room / Location / Description / Reference material:
PROVISIONAL
SUMS (Exc. V.A.T.)
CONTRACTOR'S
PRICES (Exc. V.A.T.)
1.0
Contract Preliminaries:.
Site supervision/management.
Scaffolding & temporary supports
Site set up and welfare facilities.
Travelling and parking.
Plant and small tools.
Waste disposals and skips.
2.0
Site Clearance, Excavating & Filling
Demolition & Stripping Out:
Allow for demolition and stripping out works as denoted on Demolition
Drawing. (Ref: 179HG_F1_410 Demolition Drawing)
Allow for removal of existing windows/ doors as per Demolition Drawing
Strip out redundant telephone lines, light fittings & power outlet boxes.
Carefully remove exitsing shutters to Unit 1, make good and refit post
works.
3.0
Excavation:
Allow for excavation for new below ground drainage to Contractors
Design
Allow for excavation of new infill foundations and slab as per Structural
Engineer's drawings & specification.
Allow for Damp Proof Survey and understake remedial work to address
damp issues
4.0
Concrete Foundations And Floors.
Foundations:
Allow for new foundations as per Structural Engineer's drawings and
specification.
Allow for new 215 x 215 brick pier to Unit 2 (between Lobby_04 &
Bathroom_05)
Allow for 450 x 450 x 500mm deep mass concrete pad foundation to
support above pier
Allow for 600 x 1000mm wide foundation to support box frame to Unit 2
Concrete Floor Slabs:
Allow for new infil floor slab to lower ground floor as per Structural
Engineer's drawings.
Engineered timber laid on ply on solid floor construction to be minimum
70mm reinforced screed on 500 gauge polythene separating layer on
70mm Celotex fast-R FF4070 floor insulation on 1200 gauge polythene
DPM on concrete floor slab (thickness as per Structural Engineers
specification) on sand blinded hardcore to achieve U-value of at least
0.22 to meet Part L1b of the Building Regulations. Celotex T-Break
TB4025 insulation to be laid around perimeter of screed
Insulation:
Allow for insulation to lower ground floor slab as per Building Regulations
notes.
5.0
Masonry Construction.
Masonry Walls:
Construct new masonry infill walls to Unit 2 (1Bed Unit) Living Room on
Lower Ground Floor in rendered solid brickwork to match existing as per
Architect's & Structural Engineer's drawings and specification incl.
parapet wall with coping detail
Construct new masonry infill wall at high level between Unit 2 Living
Room and Bedroom
Allow for making good to exitsing party wall with bricks to match existing
in LivingArea_06
Allow for making good to existing Unit 2 partition to Unit 1 with bricks to
match existing in LivingArea_06/ Bathroom_05
6.0
Structural Frames, Steel Beams And Posts
The main construction com-
pany is Quester Building
Limited. The main contractor,
Tom, has inherited the com-
pany from his father, Martin,
due to healthy issues, and
now runs it. He has all the li-
abilities and insurances. His
team is made up of 25 people.
Who is the Main contractor? How is the company set up? What are your personal thoughts on the performance of the main
contractor?
During tender, the project
received three main contrac-
tor responses to their scope
of works document. Out of
all three, Quester Building
Limited offered a quicker job
that could be started sooner.
Moreover, the main contrac-
tor company was also cho-
sen based on previous work
experiences together and set
relationships with the architect.
How was the main contractor selected for the project?
4.01
4.02
Quester Building Ltd
Main Contractor
Tom (Main Contractor)
The Team
Ron (Site Foreman)
Contractor A
Contractor B
Contractor B
Replied
Contractor A
Replied
Chosen for best time
management
Contractor C
Contractor C pulled
out of the job
We worked previously with
the main contractor Tom
The main contractor was very
busy as he also had other addi-
tional projects elsewhere. Only
getting to nally meet him in the
last site visit, I though that he
was enthusiastic, full of con-
dence and with an urge to learn
and improve. He listened and
took the architect’s ideas on
board, whilst additionally shar-
ing his own point of view and
knoweledge of the trade with
the architect, which I found very
interesting and educational.
Overall I think the main contrac-
tor did a good job, as there were
no issues between him and the
architect, regarding the project.
Martynas’ Opinion
The main contractor team
seemed very relaxed and they
enjoyed doing their work. We
didn’t see any clashes in opin-
ions or instructions that result-
ed into heated arguments be-
tween the main contractor and
his team. They seemed to work
well in sync. Since it was a very
small site, workers (usually 3 -
4 on site) would be doing a dif-
ferent part of a task to cover as
much as possible. Another point
of advantage was that they
kept the site tidy and organ-
ised around them, which made
movement and work easier.
However, I noticed that not all
of the workers dressed appro-
priately for the job, which could
result in some serious injury!
Shaden’s Opinion
Ref (9)
58 59
The only specialist sub contrac-
tor on the project was Dry Wa-
terproong Limited company
which offered the damp proof-
ing works. They are based in
central London and specialise
in traditional damp proong and
waterproong in buildings, and
in particular structural water-
proong of below ground struc-
tures such as basements cellars
and under pavement vaults.
Who are the specialist sub-contractors?
4.03
Dry Waterproong Ltd
Specialist Subcontractors
Darryl
Lee
Injection Treatment
In the students’ opinion, has the work of the contractor and specialist sub contractors been satisfactorily interfaced, and if not
what could have been improved?
4.04
I think that Tom’s (the main
contractor) work of managing
the team of tradesmen around
the two units well has resulted
in productivity and quality. The
choice of materials was a sig-
nicant factor in the quality of
the outcome, however the skill
of assembly is always needed
to achieve the best results. The
experienced team was able to
provide the satisfactory ser-
vices as proven by the number
of succesful ttings that I en-
countered during my site visits.
Though on the other hand I
think, due to the project type,
and the aim to achieve a blank
canvas for new renting occu-
pants to move in, the achieved
level of quality was obligatory.
Martynas’ Opinion
It was evident with every visit
how well the contractors ad-
hered to the architect’s draw-
ings. We’ve entered the project
mid-way,so just after the damp
proong company nished their
job. However, from the photos
we’ve seen provided by the ar-
chitect of the units before and
after damp proong, it was evi-
dent the amount of work that
needed to be done to x the
situation. Fortunately for every-
one, the site offered two units.
This, in my opinion, really helped
two trades work together with-
out clashing in which they could
alternate spaces of work.
Shaden’s Opinion
58 59
The only specialist sub contrac-
tor on the project was Dry Wa-
terproong Limited company
which offered the damp proof-
ing works. They are based in
central London and specialise
in traditional damp proong and
waterproong in buildings, and
in particular structural water-
proong of below ground struc-
tures such as basements cellars
and under pavement vaults.
Who are the specialist sub-contractors?
4.03
Dry Waterproong Ltd
Specialist Subcontractors
Darryl
Lee
Injection Treatment
In the students’ opinion, has the work of the contractor and specialist sub contractors been satisfactorily interfaced, and if not
what could have been improved?
4.04
I think that Tom’s (the main
contractor) work of managing
the team of tradesmen around
the two units well has resulted
in productivity and quality. The
choice of materials was a sig-
nicant factor in the quality of
the outcome, however the skill
of assembly is always needed
to achieve the best results. The
experienced team was able to
provide the satisfactory ser-
vices as proven by the number
of succesful ttings that I en-
countered during my site visits.
Though on the other hand I
think, due to the project type,
and the aim to achieve a blank
canvas for new renting occu-
pants to move in, the achieved
level of quality was obligatory.
Martynas’ Opinion
It was evident with every visit
how well the contractors ad-
hered to the architect’s draw-
ings. We’ve entered the project
mid-way,so just after the damp
proong company nished their
job. However, from the photos
we’ve seen provided by the ar-
chitect of the units before and
after damp proong, it was evi-
dent the amount of work that
needed to be done to x the
situation. Fortunately for every-
one, the site offered two units.
This, in my opinion, really helped
two trades work together with-
out clashing in which they could
alternate spaces of work.
Shaden’s Opinion
60 61
In your opinion, is the architectural vision as represented in the architect’s drawings being made manifest through the work of
the builders on site?
4.06
The most signicant and ob-
vious design transformations
of the units were the addition
of a slanted kitchen/bathroom
wall and the extension of the
living room in second unit .
This was properly executed
during construction with no
changes. There wasn’t much
change to the architecture
of the units, however much
renovation to the structure
was needed, which was com-
pleted to very high standards.
Shaden’s Opinion
The changes of use as iden-
tied from the begining of
the project were obvious and
clear. To achieve what the cli-
ent wanted (two units for
rental), it was necessary that
the design had to be followed
through and built accordingly
to drawings. Therefore I think
that architect’s vision, which
he presented in formal draw-
ings, was read clearly by the
contractor and consultants
and applied on site thoughtfully.
Martynas’ Opinion
Proposal Drawing
In conclusion, what have you learnt by following the site diary project on site?
4.07
Following this site diary, I’ve
learnt the challenges that even
a small architecture project can
raise. Sometimes it may not al-
ways be about the design as the
project has shown. Getting the
space function and needs can
eventually create your design,
whilst site related restrictions
and risen problems can create
various of effects that could
potentially alter use of space or
the design once again. In addi-
tion this project has opened my
eyes to see the broad reality of
the industry and how much pa-
perwork and behind the scenes
documentation there is to be
processed before anything can
happen on site. Not only the
documentation of proposal and
planning submission, but con-
tracts, time management and
budget allocation all comes into
consideration eventually, which
can take the architect’s atten-
tion from the design. Another
learnt element is the amount of
It has been a very interesting
and fruitful experience for me.
I’ve learned that research is
important, as we went on site
the rst time and we were ab-
solutely clueless to what the
architect was telling us. I’ve
also learned that communica-
tion is key, whether it was with
the contractors, consultants, or
clients; communication allows
for in depth understanding of
situations which results in well-
rounded solutions. Moreover,
when problems are encoun-
tered, it always best to discuss
them in an orderly manner. Of
course, everything must be
recorded, in order not to step
on anyone’s rights. These are
some of the mannerisms I’ve
noticed while observing the
architect. Additionally, I’ve re-
alised that the small details of
everyday use are just as impor-
tant as the over all architectural
design; evidently everything
contributes to the quality of
attention that the architect has
to pay to even the smallest of
details, whether it be on draw-
ings or the construction on site.
Communication skills are also
vital and extremely inuencing
in the construction and design
industries, as learnt from the
project; poor communication
can lead to misunderstandings
or wrong ideas, which can lead
to the delays and unnecessary
nes and money loss. The bad
communication may not always
come from the people working
on the project; clients are ex-
tremely prone to this due to the
lack of knowledge and experi-
ence in the eld. However in this
project, the client didn’t want to
be involved and was very hands
off with the project, therefore
no problems were encountered
relating to poor communication.
Martynas’ Conclusion
the nal product. I found it very
interesting and a quite helpful
technique when the architect
performed some ‘acid tests’ to-
wards completion. This method
identies the small details that
could make or break the user’s
experience, for instance when
the architect identied the short
height of the shower heads.
Furthermore and aside from the
physical and visual aspects of
construction and architecture,
I was surprised by the amount
of paperwork needed and cre-
ated to do anything. However,
the most important lesson I’ve
learned is to always perform
a job correctly and in the best
way possible, just so that it lasts
against time. Do it right the rst
time, cost less in the long run.
Shaden’s Conclusion
60 61
In your opinion, is the architectural vision as represented in the architect’s drawings being made manifest through the work of
the builders on site?
4.06
The most signicant and ob-
vious design transformations
of the units were the addition
of a slanted kitchen/bathroom
wall and the extension of the
living room in second unit .
This was properly executed
during construction with no
changes. There wasn’t much
change to the architecture
of the units, however much
renovation to the structure
was needed, which was com-
pleted to very high standards.
Shaden’s Opinion
The changes of use as iden-
tied from the begining of
the project were obvious and
clear. To achieve what the cli-
ent wanted (two units for
rental), it was necessary that
the design had to be followed
through and built accordingly
to drawings. Therefore I think
that architect’s vision, which
he presented in formal draw-
ings, was read clearly by the
contractor and consultants
and applied on site thoughtfully.
Martynas’ Opinion
Proposal Drawing
In conclusion, what have you learnt by following the site diary project on site?
4.07
Following this site diary, I’ve
learnt the challenges that even
a small architecture project can
raise. Sometimes it may not al-
ways be about the design as the
project has shown. Getting the
space function and needs can
eventually create your design,
whilst site related restrictions
and risen problems can create
various of effects that could
potentially alter use of space or
the design once again. In addi-
tion this project has opened my
eyes to see the broad reality of
the industry and how much pa-
perwork and behind the scenes
documentation there is to be
processed before anything can
happen on site. Not only the
documentation of proposal and
planning submission, but con-
tracts, time management and
budget allocation all comes into
consideration eventually, which
can take the architect’s atten-
tion from the design. Another
learnt element is the amount of
It has been a very interesting
and fruitful experience for me.
I’ve learned that research is
important, as we went on site
the rst time and we were ab-
solutely clueless to what the
architect was telling us. I’ve
also learned that communica-
tion is key, whether it was with
the contractors, consultants, or
clients; communication allows
for in depth understanding of
situations which results in well-
rounded solutions. Moreover,
when problems are encoun-
tered, it always best to discuss
them in an orderly manner. Of
course, everything must be
recorded, in order not to step
on anyone’s rights. These are
some of the mannerisms I’ve
noticed while observing the
architect. Additionally, I’ve re-
alised that the small details of
everyday use are just as impor-
tant as the over all architectural
design; evidently everything
contributes to the quality of
attention that the architect has
to pay to even the smallest of
details, whether it be on draw-
ings or the construction on site.
Communication skills are also
vital and extremely inuencing
in the construction and design
industries, as learnt from the
project; poor communication
can lead to misunderstandings
or wrong ideas, which can lead
to the delays and unnecessary
nes and money loss. The bad
communication may not always
come from the people working
on the project; clients are ex-
tremely prone to this due to the
lack of knowledge and experi-
ence in the eld. However in this
project, the client didn’t want to
be involved and was very hands
off with the project, therefore
no problems were encountered
relating to poor communication.
Martynas’ Conclusion
the nal product. I found it very
interesting and a quite helpful
technique when the architect
performed some ‘acid tests’ to-
wards completion. This method
identies the small details that
could make or break the user’s
experience, for instance when
the architect identied the short
height of the shower heads.
Furthermore and aside from the
physical and visual aspects of
construction and architecture,
I was surprised by the amount
of paperwork needed and cre-
ated to do anything. However,
the most important lesson I’ve
learned is to always perform
a job correctly and in the best
way possible, just so that it lasts
against time. Do it right the rst
time, cost less in the long run.
Shaden’s Conclusion
62 63
What do you think about the Design of the building? Would you make any changes?
4.08
The design is quite restricted
since the building is already an
existing building and also since
the two units of the projects
are at the lower ground oor
of the house. There is very
little space for extravagant big
designs or major alteration to
the architecture. However, the
architect did well in develop-
ing the second unit and adding
more functional spaces to it.He
erected a wall that divided
the space into a kitchen, living
room, and bathroom. He also
opened up the space by utilis-
ing the back of the building to
create a modest terrace ac-
cessed through the living room.
Moreover, I thought the archi-
tect responded very well to the
client’s requests in which he
wanted to save money as much
as possible. This was evident
in his choice of material, for
example white tiles for the bath-
room to be easily replaced and
I found the brief interesting and
spatially challenging. The Archi-
tect’s design is clear and well
thought through. He has valid
reasons for the decisions that
he made, which I agree on. Nev-
ertheless, couple of layout re-
lating details has stimulated my
mind. Firstly in the studio unit,
the kitchen layout and place-
ment seemed reasonable from
the architect’s points, however
I though that it limited the furni-
ture layout to just a handful of
variations for the newly occu-
pying residents to choose from.
Secondly I was not a huge fan
of the level raise in the unit 2
leading up to the main living
area. I found a single step too
big for comfort and would of
preferred to of had two steps.
Martynas’ Opinion
Thoughts raised by
the proposed design
Thoughts raised by
the proposed design
cleaned if needed, as well as
the use of dark grout between
the tiles to avoid dirt showing.
Shaden’s Opinion
What materials, building processes and /or technologies have you observed that you may wish to incorporate in your own
projects in the future?
4.09
During the site visits we got
introduced to hardwearing ma-
terials, like gloss coated tiles
and thick timber oorboards.
The architect chose to use
such materials, due to the fact
that both units were going to
be rented out, therefore the use
of hardwearing materials was
logical as they need less main-
tenance. I think this is a smart
move, which I may consider in
some of my future designs. On
another note, this once again
proves that the Architect has to
consider every tiny detail of the
design and have logical reasons
behind the made decisions.
Martynas’ Observation
The project is very small; it’s a
change of use of two units into
a studio and a one bedroom at.
Regardless, I’ve picked up on
some details the architect made
to make a difference for the end
user. For instance, the architect
placed the radiators under the
windows, to allow for a cur-
rent to ow through the rooms
spreading the heat evenly. I’ve
also liked how the architect
thought about the materials
he used to accommodate the
client’s main request, to save
money as much as possible,
and opted for white glazed hard-
wearing tiles for easy mainte-
nance. The attention for detail
is an important skill to improve
designs and deliver projects to
the best standards possible.
Shaden’s Opinion
Ref (4)
62 63
What do you think about the Design of the building? Would you make any changes?
4.08
The design is quite restricted
since the building is already an
existing building and also since
the two units of the projects
are at the lower ground oor
of the house. There is very
little space for extravagant big
designs or major alteration to
the architecture. However, the
architect did well in develop-
ing the second unit and adding
more functional spaces to it.He
erected a wall that divided
the space into a kitchen, living
room, and bathroom. He also
opened up the space by utilis-
ing the back of the building to
create a modest terrace ac-
cessed through the living room.
Moreover, I thought the archi-
tect responded very well to the
client’s requests in which he
wanted to save money as much
as possible. This was evident
in his choice of material, for
example white tiles for the bath-
room to be easily replaced and
I found the brief interesting and
spatially challenging. The Archi-
tect’s design is clear and well
thought through. He has valid
reasons for the decisions that
he made, which I agree on. Nev-
ertheless, couple of layout re-
lating details has stimulated my
mind. Firstly in the studio unit,
the kitchen layout and place-
ment seemed reasonable from
the architect’s points, however
I though that it limited the furni-
ture layout to just a handful of
variations for the newly occu-
pying residents to choose from.
Secondly I was not a huge fan
of the level raise in the unit 2
leading up to the main living
area. I found a single step too
big for comfort and would of
preferred to of had two steps.
Martynas’ Opinion
Thoughts raised by
the proposed design
Thoughts raised by
the proposed design
cleaned if needed, as well as
the use of dark grout between
the tiles to avoid dirt showing.
Shaden’s Opinion
What materials, building processes and /or technologies have you observed that you may wish to incorporate in your own
projects in the future?
4.09
During the site visits we got
introduced to hardwearing ma-
terials, like gloss coated tiles
and thick timber oorboards.
The architect chose to use
such materials, due to the fact
that both units were going to
be rented out, therefore the use
of hardwearing materials was
logical as they need less main-
tenance. I think this is a smart
move, which I may consider in
some of my future designs. On
another note, this once again
proves that the Architect has to
consider every tiny detail of the
design and have logical reasons
behind the made decisions.
Martynas’ Observation
The project is very small; it’s a
change of use of two units into
a studio and a one bedroom at.
Regardless, I’ve picked up on
some details the architect made
to make a difference for the end
user. For instance, the architect
placed the radiators under the
windows, to allow for a cur-
rent to ow through the rooms
spreading the heat evenly. I’ve
also liked how the architect
thought about the materials
he used to accommodate the
client’s main request, to save
money as much as possible,
and opted for white glazed hard-
wearing tiles for easy mainte-
nance. The attention for detail
is an important skill to improve
designs and deliver projects to
the best standards possible.
Shaden’s Opinion
Ref (4)
64
How has the Site Diary experience informed your possible career direction in architecture?
4.10
Having visited a smaller practice
and studied a smaller project, I
think I’ve learnt and understood
more aspects better, than what
I believe I would’ve been able to
achieve from a bigger project. I
think that getting to know the
inside out of the basic rules
and scenarios of construc-
tions and design that can en-
counter, is much more valuable
than vaguely looking into many
complex details. My aims of
becoming an architect, haven’t
changed, in contrast I found the
site visits and meetings with the
architect inspiring and motivat-
ing. Additionally I’m still ada-
mant to explore and learn more
things relating to architecture
and I’m sure that I will benet
from this experience in the fu-
ture and my personal career.
Martynas’ Opinion
The site diary was a very edu-
cational and enjoyable experi-
ence. I’ve really enjoyed how
small the site was. It showed
a strong relationship between
the architect and everyone
who works on site. The archi-
tect’s practice is quite small as
well and they’re very hands on
their projects. I’d like to start
my career working for a small
architecture rm only because
it seems like there would be
more opportunities to get very
involved in a project and learn
more about how the reality of
day to day work is It would
seem to be a better choice to
start with smaller projects, as it
proved from our site diary proj-
ect that small projects can be
as rewarding as larger projects.
I am not looking forward to
writing up all that paper work
but it’s worth it to nally get
on site and see your designs
come true. In the end, I do aim
to design and build new build-
ings, as I’m sure these kinds
of projects will offer different
challenging experiences. It’s
a constant learning journey,
especially with the contracts
and regulations being con-
stantly changed and updated!
Shaden’s Opinion
64
How has the Site Diary experience informed your possible career direction in architecture?
4.10
Having visited a smaller practice
and studied a smaller project, I
think I’ve learnt and understood
more aspects better, than what
I believe I would’ve been able to
achieve from a bigger project. I
think that getting to know the
inside out of the basic rules
and scenarios of construc-
tions and design that can en-
counter, is much more valuable
than vaguely looking into many
complex details. My aims of
becoming an architect, haven’t
changed, in contrast I found the
site visits and meetings with the
architect inspiring and motivat-
ing. Additionally I’m still ada-
mant to explore and learn more
things relating to architecture
and I’m sure that I will benet
from this experience in the fu-
ture and my personal career.
Martynas’ Opinion
The site diary was a very edu-
cational and enjoyable experi-
ence. I’ve really enjoyed how
small the site was. It showed
a strong relationship between
the architect and everyone
who works on site. The archi-
tect’s practice is quite small as
well and they’re very hands on
their projects. I’d like to start
my career working for a small
architecture rm only because
it seems like there would be
more opportunities to get very
involved in a project and learn
more about how the reality of
day to day work is It would
seem to be a better choice to
start with smaller projects, as it
proved from our site diary proj-
ect that small projects can be
as rewarding as larger projects.
I am not looking forward to
writing up all that paper work
but it’s worth it to nally get
on site and see your designs
come true. In the end, I do aim
to design and build new build-
ings, as I’m sure these kinds
of projects will offer different
challenging experiences. It’s
a constant learning journey,
especially with the contracts
and regulations being con-
stantly changed and updated!
Shaden’s Opinion
5
VISIBLE PROGRESSION
CHAPTER
5
VISIBLE PROGRESSION
CHAPTER
68 69
5.01
Before Construction : Exterior Facade
Front Facade
Side and Back Facades
Entrance
1.
3.
2.
1.
2.
3.
68 69
5.01
Before Construction : Exterior Facade
Front Facade
Side and Back Facades
Entrance
1.
3.
2.
1.
2.
3.
70 71
5.02
Before Construction : Back View of Unit 2
Demolished Wall
Demolished Walls
Extent of daming on exterior walls
1. 3.2.
1.
2.
3.
70 71
5.02
Before Construction : Back View of Unit 2
Demolished Wall
Demolished Walls
Extent of daming on exterior walls
1. 3.2.
1.
2.
3.
72 73
5.03
Before Construction : Interior Condition of Unit 1
Extent of damping indoorsChange from shutter windows to sash windows
1.
3.
2.
1.
2.
3.
72 73
5.03
Before Construction : Interior Condition of Unit 1
Extent of damping indoorsChange from shutter windows to sash windows
1.
3.
2.
1.
2.
3.
74 75
5.04
1.
Site Visit 1 - 18.02.2015 Site Visit 2 - 13.03.2015 Site Visit 3 - 15.04.2015
New sash windowsCorrection of mistake: Ceiling raisedMistake: Ceiling too low covering window
1.
74 75
5.04
1.
Site Visit 1 - 18.02.2015 Site Visit 2 - 13.03.2015 Site Visit 3 - 15.04.2015
New sash windowsCorrection of mistake: Ceiling raisedMistake: Ceiling too low covering window
1.
78 79
5.05
Site Visit 1 - 18.02.2015 Site Visit 2 - 13.03.2015 Site Visit 3 - 15.04.2015
1.
1.
Leveling of the oor Erection of bathroom/kitchen wall Kitchen unit installed
78 79
5.05
Site Visit 1 - 18.02.2015 Site Visit 2 - 13.03.2015 Site Visit 3 - 15.04.2015
1.
1.
Leveling of the oor Erection of bathroom/kitchen wall Kitchen unit installed
80 81
5.06
1.
1.
Site Visit 1 - 18.02.2015
Site Visit 2 - 13.03.2015 Site Visit 3 - 15.04.2015
Before the erection of
bathroom/kitchen wall
Installation of bathroom appliances after erection of wall
80 81
5.06
1.
1.
Site Visit 1 - 18.02.2015
Site Visit 2 - 13.03.2015 Site Visit 3 - 15.04.2015
Before the erection of
bathroom/kitchen wall
Installation of bathroom appliances after erection of wall
84 85
5.07
Site Visit 1 - 18.02.2015 Site Visit 2 - 13.03.2015 Site Visit 3 - 15.04.2015
1.
1.
Kitchen/bathroom space before
erection of seperating wall
Erection of bathroom/kitchen wall
Kitchen unit installed
84 85
5.07
Site Visit 1 - 18.02.2015 Site Visit 2 - 13.03.2015 Site Visit 3 - 15.04.2015
1.
1.
Kitchen/bathroom space before
erection of seperating wall
Erection of bathroom/kitchen wall
Kitchen unit installed
6
REFERENCES
CHAPTER
6
REFERENCES
CHAPTER
90 91
PRELIMINARY
TOWN PLANNING
BUILDING CONTROL
TENDER
CONSTRUCTION
purpose of issue
PARTY WALL
FOR COMMENT
project title
drawing title
proj. no.
scale @ A3date
dwg. no.
drawn by
CPA Architects Ltd.
Askew Studio
159 Askew Road
London W12 9AU
Tel. 020 8743 9535
Fax. 020 8743 4875
info@cparchitects.com
www.cparchitects.com
revision
rev
checked
date:
DO NOT SCALE FROM THIS DRAWING.
ALL DIMENSIONS SHOWN ARE IN MILLIMETRES UNLESS STATED
OTHERWISE.
THIS DRAWING IS ONLY ISSUED FOR THE PURPOSES INDICATED.
THE CONTRACTOR SHALL VERIFY ALL DIMENSIONS AND LEVELS ON
SITE AND ANY ERRORS OR DISCREPANCIES DISCOVERED SHALL BE
REPORTED TO THE ARCHITECT BEFORE THE WORK IS PUT IN HAND.
THIS DRAWING IS TO BE READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH ALL OTHER
RELEVANT DOCUMENTS.
THIS DRAWING IS THE COPYRIGHT OF THE CHARTERED PRACTICE
ARCHITECTS LIMITED AND SHALL NOT BE REPRODUCED BY THIRD
PARTIES WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF CPA LTD.
179HG
WH
1:50
23/06/14
Minor revision to demolition to Studio Unit
Ground Floor units to179 Hammersmith
Grove, London W6 0NL
03/11/14
A
MH
checked by
MH
by
WH
410
Proposed Ground Floor Demolition Plan
!
Extent of demolition
Holes cut in extg.
bk'wk to suit
Extract / Vent
positions
MH
MH
300 min. 300 min.
new ss
1760
1720
75
75
1050
UNIT 2 UNIT 1
950
Ground works in
connection with below
ground drainage
connections t.b.c. on
site & proposals
submitted to Architect
for approval
new rwp
New stud partitions
MH
project title
drawing title
proj. no.
scale @ A3date
dwg. no.
drawn by
CPA Architects Ltd.
Askew Studio
159 Askew Road
London W12 9AU
Tel. 020 8743 9535
Fax. 020 8743 4875
info@cparchitects.com
www.cparchitects.com
revision
rev
checked
date:
DO NOT SCALE FROM THIS DRAWING.
ALL DIMENSIONS SHOWN ARE IN MILLIMETRES UNLESS STATED
OTHERWISE.
THIS DRAWING IS ONLY ISSUED FOR THE PURPOSES INDICATED.
THE CONTRACTOR SHALL VERIFY ALL DIMENSIONS AND LEVELS ON
SITE AND ANY ERRORS OR DISCREPANCIES DISCOVERED SHALL BE
REPORTED TO THE ARCHITECT BEFORE THE WORK IS PUT IN HAND.
THIS DRAWING IS TO BE READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH ALL OTHER
RELEVANT DOCUMENTS.
THIS DRAWING IS THE COPYRIGHT OF THE CHARTERED PRACTICE
ARCHITECTS LIMITED AND SHALL NOT BE REPRODUCED BY THIRD
PARTIES WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF CPA LTD.
179HG
WH
1:100
12/12/13
-
-
-
-
checked by
MH
by
-
300
Existing & Proposed Site Layout Plans
Rear Ground Floor unit to179
Hammersmith Grove, London W6 0NL
PRELIMINARY
TOWN PLANNING
BUILDING CONTROL
TENDER
CONSTRUCTION
purpose of issue
PARTY WALL
Pendant light.
Wall light.
One way light switch.
2 way light switch.
Mech. & Elec. Symbols
Timer Control.
Shaver socket.
2
5 amp
5 Amp light socket outlet.
Power outlet with switched
spur.
Metres
Feet
1 2 3 4 50
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 160
6 7 8 9 10
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33
LGF plan
Front garden
Rear passage
MH
MH
MH
Existing Proposed
Front garden
Rear passage
MH
MH
MH
Bedroom 2
(10.4 sq.m.)
Bathroom
Hallway
Storage
Storage
Storage
Kitchen / Living
(21.4sq.m.)
Refuse &
Re-cycling
store
Cycle
Store
Area
1700
1400
1700
1400
Ø 1500
Ø 1500
Extent of Proposal
Ø 1500
800
Private External
Space = 15.5 sq.m.
new rwp
Extent
of
additional
footprint
=
4
.2
sq
.m
.
Communal Private
External Space =
12.0 sq.m.
Proposed Gross Internal
Floor Area: 46.6 sq.m.
Existing Gross Internal
Floor Area: 40.0 sq.m.
Ref (1)
Left:
Existing &
Proposed
Site Layout
Plan
Right:
Proposed
Ground
Floor
Demolition
Plan
Refer to
pages 3, 46,
47, 69, 71,
73, 75, 77,
79 & 81.
90 91
PRELIMINARY
TOWN PLANNING
BUILDING CONTROL
TENDER
CONSTRUCTION
purpose of issue
PARTY WALL
FOR COMMENT
project title
drawing title
proj. no.
scale @ A3date
dwg. no.
drawn by
CPA Architects Ltd.
Askew Studio
159 Askew Road
London W12 9AU
Tel. 020 8743 9535
Fax. 020 8743 4875
info@cparchitects.com
www.cparchitects.com
revision
rev
checked
date:
DO NOT SCALE FROM THIS DRAWING.
ALL DIMENSIONS SHOWN ARE IN MILLIMETRES UNLESS STATED
OTHERWISE.
THIS DRAWING IS ONLY ISSUED FOR THE PURPOSES INDICATED.
THE CONTRACTOR SHALL VERIFY ALL DIMENSIONS AND LEVELS ON
SITE AND ANY ERRORS OR DISCREPANCIES DISCOVERED SHALL BE
REPORTED TO THE ARCHITECT BEFORE THE WORK IS PUT IN HAND.
THIS DRAWING IS TO BE READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH ALL OTHER
RELEVANT DOCUMENTS.
THIS DRAWING IS THE COPYRIGHT OF THE CHARTERED PRACTICE
ARCHITECTS LIMITED AND SHALL NOT BE REPRODUCED BY THIRD
PARTIES WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF CPA LTD.
179HG
WH
1:50
23/06/14
Minor revision to demolition to Studio Unit
Ground Floor units to179 Hammersmith
Grove, London W6 0NL
03/11/14
A
MH
checked by
MH
by
WH
410
Proposed Ground Floor Demolition Plan
!
Extent of demolition
Holes cut in extg.
bk'wk to suit
Extract / Vent
positions
MH
MH
300 min. 300 min.
new ss
1760
1720
75
75
1050
UNIT 2 UNIT 1
950
Ground works in
connection with below
ground drainage
connections t.b.c. on
site & proposals
submitted to Architect
for approval
new rwp
New stud partitions
MH
project title
drawing title
proj. no.
scale @ A3date
dwg. no.
drawn by
CPA Architects Ltd.
Askew Studio
159 Askew Road
London W12 9AU
Tel. 020 8743 9535
Fax. 020 8743 4875
info@cparchitects.com
www.cparchitects.com
revision
rev
checked
date:
DO NOT SCALE FROM THIS DRAWING.
ALL DIMENSIONS SHOWN ARE IN MILLIMETRES UNLESS STATED
OTHERWISE.
THIS DRAWING IS ONLY ISSUED FOR THE PURPOSES INDICATED.
THE CONTRACTOR SHALL VERIFY ALL DIMENSIONS AND LEVELS ON
SITE AND ANY ERRORS OR DISCREPANCIES DISCOVERED SHALL BE
REPORTED TO THE ARCHITECT BEFORE THE WORK IS PUT IN HAND.
THIS DRAWING IS TO BE READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH ALL OTHER
RELEVANT DOCUMENTS.
THIS DRAWING IS THE COPYRIGHT OF THE CHARTERED PRACTICE
ARCHITECTS LIMITED AND SHALL NOT BE REPRODUCED BY THIRD
PARTIES WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF CPA LTD.
179HG
WH
1:100
12/12/13
-
-
-
-
checked by
MH
by
-
300
Existing & Proposed Site Layout Plans
Rear Ground Floor unit to179
Hammersmith Grove, London W6 0NL
PRELIMINARY
TOWN PLANNING
BUILDING CONTROL
TENDER
CONSTRUCTION
purpose of issue
PARTY WALL
Pendant light.
Wall light.
One way light switch.
2 way light switch.
Mech. & Elec. Symbols
Timer Control.
Shaver socket.<