CONGRESS Congress 2015 Congress 2015 17th – 20th March 2015 www.iat.org.uk 2015 17th – 20th March 2015 Animal Technology – advancing comparative biology
CONGRESS  Congress 2015 Congress 2015  17th     20th March 2015  www.iat.org.uk  2015  17th     20th March 2015  Animal Te...
Contents General Information Contacts 2 Welcome from the Congress Committee 5 General Information 7 Animal Technology and Welfare Journal Prize 2014 13 Andrew Blake Tribute Award 2015 16 AAALAC International Fellowship Award 18 Sponsorship 20 IAT Annual General Meeting Agenda 23 25 Life and Honorary Members Education ‘Drop-In’ Session 26 AAALAC International Fellowship Award – UK Applications 29 Guide Dogs – West of Scotland Branch Charity 2015 30 Teenage Cancer Trust update – Midlands Branch Charity 2014 33 Index to Advertisers 61 Scientific Programme “At A Glance” Summary – Wednesday and Thursday 34 Platform Programme – Wednesday 37 Platform Programme – Thursday 48 Kevin Dolan Memorial Lecture 49 Poster Presentations 50 Poster Displays 54 Workshop Sessions 63 Social Programme Events and Entertainment 70 Trade Exhibition Exhibitors’ Index and Exhibition Plan Exhibiting Companies 72 74 Animal Technology – advancing comparative biology The IAT roundel logo is a registered trademark of the Institute of Animal Technology
Contents General Information  Contacts   2 Welcome from the Congress Committee  5 General Information  7 Animal Technology...
Congress 2015 Contacts During Congress the Committee can be contacted via the Congress Reception After Congress, contact should be made via email to: congress@iat.org.uk Registered Office: Institute of Animal Technology, 5 South Parade, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7JL, UK © Copyright Institute of Animal Technology 2015 All rights reserved; no part of this handbook may be reproduced, by any means without prior written permission of the Institute of Animal Technology and the Publisher. Reproduction in whole or part without the express written permission of the copyright holders is prohibited. This HANDBOOK is highly confidential. Please DO NOT leave it unattended during Congress. All information contained is correct at the time of going to press Published on behalf of IAT Congress 2015 by PRC Associates Ltd Designed and Printed in Great Britain Animal Technology – advancing comparative biology 2 General Information
Congress 2015 Contacts During Congress the Committee can be contacted via the Congress Reception After Congress, contact s...
Welcome Welcome from the Congress Committee Dear Congress Delegate Welcome to Congress 2015 in bonny Scotland. On behalf of the IAT we hope you have an enjoyable and rewarding time. This year’s event will take place in a purpose built conference centre but we will also be utilising nearby hotels for accommodation and evening functions. Please check this handbook or the full “At A Glance” Scientific Programme in the Notepad to confirm locations for the various events. Congress 2015 will follow the established broad format, starting with the Annual General Meeting at 18.00 hrs on Tuesday 17th March (agenda and details are on page 23). This will be held in the Argyll Suite at the Crowne Plaza hotel. Everyone will then make their way to the SECC Hall 1 for the Official Opening of the Trade Exhibition and dinner. The Trade Exhibition will be opened by the Lord Provost of Glasgow, or their representative. The wine reception is kindly sponsored by the Lord Provost’s Office and the IAT are extremely grateful for their support and assistance in organising Congress 2015. An Educational Stakeholders meeting has also taken place here at the Congress venue on Tuesday 17th March. This meeting was open to all those interested in the training of, and qualifications for, animal technologists. Topics included Apprenticeship, Further and Higher Education and the introduction of the College of Laboratory Animal Science & Technology (CLAST). The Congress Scientific Programme is a full and varied one. We would encourage delegates to make time to attend the presentations and workshops especially the First Time Presenters session to support the presenters making their debut. This year there are sponsored sessions by AAALAC celebrating their 50th anniversary and AS-ET in recognition of their 5th year formation. This latter session will include a paper on the Animal Technologist Apprenticeship pilot scheme. Please also support the Andrew Blake Tribute Award paper winner. If anyone has any questions relating to the IAT Educational provision, we are offering an Educational Drop-In session on the IAT stand during the morning coffee break on Thursday 19th March. If you would like to find out more about any of the IAT qualifications, come along to ask any questions you may have. We are delighted to offer the largest Trade Exhibition of its kind in the UK. The very popular Trade Exhibitors’ competition will run over the duration of Congress. You should have received a “Passport” in your delegate package, so just collect signatures from the participating companies to be in with a chance of winning an iPad. Full details of all events at Congress 2015 can be found within this Handbook but if you have any queries, or are not sure where to go, please ask at the Congress Reception. If you have any ideas or comments regarding any aspect of Congress, please contact a member of the Congress Committee, either in person via the Congress Reception, or by e-mail to: congress@iat.org.uk We wish you a very productive Congress 2015. IAT Congress Committee General Information 5
Welcome  Welcome from the Congress Committee Dear Congress Delegate Welcome to Congress 2015 in bonny Scotland. On behalf ...
General Information THE VENUE This year we will be utilising several hotels in the close vicinity of the SECC. Breakfast will be served in the individual hotels. Lunches will be served in Hall 1 at the SECC. Dinner will also be served in Hall 1 at the SECC on Tuesday evening and in the Argyll Suite at the Crowne Plaza hotel on Wednesday and Thursday evenings. Refer to the maps in the Notepad for locations at the SECC. CONGRESS RECEPTION On Tuesday, the Congress Reception will be located in the Argyll Suite foyer at the Crowne Plaza hotel. Opening hours: Tuesday 17th March 09.00 – 17.45 hrs On Wednesday and Thursday it will be located in the foyer of the Loch Suite at the SECC. Opening hours: Wednesday 18th March Thursday 19th March 08.00 – 17.00 hrs 08.00 – 13.00 hrs FIRST TIME AT CONGRESS? Or would you just like to know where you are going? Then come along to the Congress Reception and just ask! Ice breaker session: starting at 16.30 hrs from the Congress Reception on Tuesday 17th March where you can get to know fellow attendees and meet up with other technologists. Please join us. MEALS Breakfast 07.00 – 09.00 hrs Wednesday and Thursday 07.00 – 09.30 hrs Friday Buffet Lunch: 13.00 – 14.00 hrs Wednesday and Thursday On Tuesday evening dinner will be served in Hall 1 at 19.15 hrs. This is a sit down buffet dinner and will follow the official opening of the Trade Exhibition with a wine reception starting at 19.00 hrs. Dinner on Wednesday evening will be served at 19.30 hrs in the Argyll Suite at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. The Gala Dinner Dance on Thursday evening will start at 20.00 hrs in the Argyll Suite at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. Please note that the dress code is smart (no jeans or trainers please). Gentlemen must wear jackets and ties. General Information 7
General Information  THE VENUE This year we will be utilising several hotels in the close vicinity of the SECC. Breakfast ...
General Information AGM The 29th Annual General Meeting of the Institute of Animal Technology will be held in the Argyll Suite at the Crowne Plaza hotel at 18.00 hrs on Tuesday 17th March. A full Agenda appears on page 23 and attendance is open to ALL delegates. Gala Dinner Ticket You will find your ticket for the Gala Dinner INSIDE your Delegate badge. Exhibiting companies will sometimes invite you to join their table for the Gala Dinner and in this instance you should hand them your ticket so they can reserve a place for you. If you do not wish to join an exhibitor’s table, or if you have come to Congress on your own and are unsure of where to sit, please see a member of the Congress Committee who will be able to help you. Table plans for the Gala Dinner will be available at the Congress Reception from 11.00 hrs on Wednesday (coinciding with the morning coffee break). Please note that all tickets must be handed in to the Congress Reception no later than 12.00 hrs on Thursday. TEA AND COFFEE Refreshments will be served in the Trade Exhibition Hall at the following times: Wednesday Thursday 11.00 – 11.30 hrs 10.30 – 11.00 hrs and and 15.30 – 16.00 hrs 15.30 – 16.15 hrs TRADE EXHIBITION The Trade Exhibition is situated in Hall 2 at the SECC. Opening times Tuesday Wednesday Thursday are: 19.00 – 22.30 hrs (Official opening) 09.30 – 18.00 hrs 09.30 – 16.15 hrs Congress 2015 Trade Competition Not one BUT TWO CHANCES to WIN an iPAD See the instructions on page 104 and make sure you are CARRYING your PASSPORT AT ALL TIMES when you visit the EXHIBITION HALL. Good Luck! 8 General Information
General Information  AGM The 29th Annual General Meeting of the Institute of Animal Technology will be held in the Argyll ...
General Information LECTURES AND PAPERS The Platform Programme will be held in the Lomond Auditorium located in the Loch Suite at the SECC. Please refer to pages 34 to 48 within the Scientific Programme section for all information on the Paper Presentations. The Kevin Dolan Memorial Lecture will be given by David Anderson and Terry Thorpe on Thursday at 16.15 hrs. The abstract for their paper entitled “Changing lives – the guide dog story” can be found on page 49. Kevin Dolan 1926 - 2011 When Kevin Dolan died in 2011 at the age of 85, IAT Council wished to honour his memory in gratitude for the contribution he had made to animal technologists and the industry in general and therefore fittingly, the Special Guest Lecture given annually at Congress was renamed the Kevin Dolan Memorial Lecture. Kevin’s contributions to the IAT included services on Council and for several years he was Editor of the IAT Journal, only standing down on his retirement. He received his Fellowship in 1977 at the same time as attaining a Diploma in Law. He was also made a Vice-President of the IAT and latterly an Honorary Member. He also authored many distinguished books and articles on the subject of law and ethics using animals in science but it was as a teacher that Kevin had most impact. He taught on the Postgraduate Diploma/MSc course, the Medical Technology courses at City of Westminster and on Personal Licence Modular training courses. To paraphrase one of his students ‘Kevin was a great teacher because he was passionate about the subject he was dealing with and the people he was teaching to’. Despite joining the world of animal technology somewhat later in life after many years in the ecclesiastical domain, Kevin’s impact on our industry was outstanding. His was a life well lived in the service of others and in recognition is remembered at Congress. POSTERS Posters will be displayed on Wednesday and Thursday in the Trade Exhibition Hall. Once again, we are delighted to announce that LBS have agreed to sponsor an award for the best poster. (Further details under Prizes and Awards.) Meet the poster authors – all poster authors will be in attendance at their posters to answer questions during: Wednesday Thursday 12.30 – 13.00 hrs 15.30 – 16.15 hrs Six Poster Presentations will also take place on Thursday 14.00 – 15.30 hrs in the Alsh Room located in the Loch Suite at the SECC. A schedule and synopsis of each presentation appear on page 50 onwards. Abstracts of the other poster displays start on page 54. General Information 9
General Information  LECTURES AND PAPERS The Platform Programme will be held in the Lomond Auditorium located in the Loch ...
General Information WORKSHOPS Enquiries and registrations for all 5 workshops should be made at the Congress Reception. A timetable and review on each Workshop appears on page 63 onwards. All Workshops are IAT CPD credited. Workshop 1:  The scientific/animal research laboratory as a place to care for animals – Beth Greenhough, University of Oxford and Emma Roe, University of Southampton How to become involved with the Animal Welfare and Ethical Workshop 2:  Review Body (AWERB) – Penny Hawkins, RSPCA Workshop 3:  Assessing pain in animals using sheep as the main example – Katie Blackwell, Smith & Nephew Actual severity assessments: practical considerations – Steve Ryder, Workshop 4:  Animals in Science Regulation Unit and Sarah Lane, Imperial College, London Workshop 5:  Introduction to Named Persons – Ian Garrod, Learning Curve (Development) Ltd 10 General Information
General Information  WORKSHOPS Enquiries and registrations for all 5 workshops should be made at the Congress Reception. A...
General Information PRIZES AND AWARDS The First Time Presenter Paper The annual Jack Mundy Prize has previously been awarded at Congress for the best paper given by a Junior Technician but in 2004 the competition was opened up to include anyone who is making their debut presentation at Congress. Three First Time presenters will participate this year, starting at 16.00 hrs on Wednesday and thanks to the continued sponsorship from Marshall BKU, a generous monetary gift of £200.00 will be awarded to the winner after the Kevin Dolan Memorial Lecture on Thursday afternoon. Arthur Edward “Jack” Mundy FIAT was thought of by his peers as the founder of the Animal Technicians Association (ATA) in 1950. During the early years as Honorary Secretary, he worked very hard to make the Association work and raise the original membership of 200. By 1960, it had doubled to 400 members. When the Laboratory Animal Centre (LAC) discontinued their support of an annual Congress, it was Jack who petitioned for the ATA to take over and he organised the first one in Bangor with the help of his wife, Mimi. The following year, it was held at the Royal Veterinary College where he worked as Chief Technician and there were two exhibitors! When the organisation became too big for two people to manage, the Congress Committee was formed. On his retirement, Jack was awarded Life Membership of the IAT. Best Poster The award for Best Poster sponsored by LBS (Serving Biotechnology) Ltd will be presented after the Kevin Dolan Memorial Lecture on Thursday afternoon. A selection panel (nominated by the Congress Committee), judge according to the criteria of best content, clarity and quality of science. The prize itself is a generous cash award of £200.00 to the winner. General Information 11
General Information  PRIZES AND AWARDS The First Time Presenter Paper The annual Jack Mundy Prize has previously been awar...
General Information Journal Article – Marjorie (Sandiford) Whittingham Prize 2014 Animal Technology and Welfare Many congratulations to Nur Mazlan, Noelia LópezSalesansky, Charlotte Burn and Dominic Wells at The Royal Veterinary College for their winning 2014 paper selected by the Editorial Board, “Mouse identification methods and potential welfare issues: a survey of current practice in the UK” published in the April 2014 issue of Animal Technology and Welfare (Volume 13 No 1). About the principal author: Dr Nur Hidayu Mazlan graduated with a Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from Universiti Putra Malaysia in 2007. Following graduation she was offered a position on the teaching staff at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia. In 2010, she completed a Master’s degree in Veterinary Science (Laboratory Animal Science) at Utrecht University in The Netherlands. Based on her Master’s degree research on welfare impact of blood collection methods in mice, Nur was awarded the JALAS International Award by the Japanese Association of Laboratory Animal Science in 2010. LASA also awarded her a bursary to attend the conference on Laboratory Animal Science and Technology in Kyushu, Japan where the award ceremony was held. She is currently in her final PhD study year at The Royal Veterinary College, London. Her PhD project is looking at assessment of welfare consequences of different mouse identification methods. Nur has presented her research findings at several events including the UFAW Animal Welfare Conference (2012, 2014), NC3Rs Animal Technicians’ Symposium (2012) and the RSPCA/UFAW Rodent Welfare Meeting (2014). Marjorie (Sandiford) Whittingham was a late arrival on Council in 1966 serving 11 years until she retired from work in the late 1970s. For the 7 years prior to her retirement, she was Secretary to the Institute and was also a Member of the Exam Board for all of those 11 years. Marjorie’s husband, Dick Whittingham and Council set up the prize fund after her untimely death in Kenya where they had retired to. The enormity of the amount of work that Marjorie completed during that period made her shorter service even more exceptional. General Information 13
General Information  Journal Article     Marjorie  Sandiford  Whittingham Prize 2014  Animal Technology and Welfare Many c...
General Information AS-ET 5th Anniversary Silent Auction 2015 is the 5th anniversary of AS-ET. During this anniversary year, AS-ET are aiming to recruit new donors and raise funds. At Congress 2014 a Silent Auction was held, raising £800 for AS-ET funds. Following this success another Silent Auction will be held at Congress 2015. The Auction will take place on Tuesday evening, in the Trade Exhibition. Silent Auctions are run without an auctioneer. Bids are written down on a sheet of paper and at the end of the evening, as with any auction, the highest bids wins. Various trade exhibiting companies will be participating and auction ‘lots’ will include a wide range of items, from cuddly toys to electronic gadgets. Simply visit the stands, see what items are up for auction and place your bid. You can bid on as many lots as you like and as often as you like. If you are unsure on the evening exactly how to place a bid, or how the Silent Auction works, please ask any of the participating exhibitors. The funds raised will be used to educate technologists and scientists involved in animal research, so please bid generously. Happy bidding! General Information 15
General Information  AS-ET 5th Anniversary Silent Auction 2015 is the 5th anniversary of AS-ET. During this anniversary ye...
ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD 2015 ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD The Andrew Blake Tribute Award commemorates the work and life of Andrew Blake, who suffered from Friedrich’s ataxia, a hereditary condition described as one of the “worst of neurological diseases”. Andrew died in May 2002 aged 39. Andrew was passionate about the need to support scientists in their work and his commitment to speaking out against animal rights activists took up much of the last ten years of his life. He died shortly before he was to collect his MBE. The Andrew Blake Tribute Award is given to the animal technologist judged to have made the most significant contribution to improving standards in laboratory animal welfare over the previous twelve months. C Winner 2015 –  lare Sims BSc (Hons) Senior Animal Technologist, Bristol University, Dorothy Hodgkin Building, Whitson Street, Bristol BS1 3NY Refinements in action! Moving from head cap to harness for cannulating laboratory rats Clare will present her paper on Thursday at 12.30 hrs. She will receive an engraved glass plaque and a total cash award of £250.00 at the prize giving ceremony prior to the Close of Congress on Thursday afternoon. A full transcript of her paper appears in Animal Technology and Welfare April 2015 issue (Vol 14 No 1). ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD SPONSORED THIS YEAR BY IAT AND AS-ET 16 General Information
ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD 2015  ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD  The Andrew Blake Tribute Award commemorates the work and life...
ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD 2015 ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD About the author: Clare took a keen interest in animals, plants and all things associated with nature from a very young age. She spent countless summers when she was young catching and keeping bugs and pond life and learning all about them and their needs. Some of her earliest memories are of visiting her Dad’s workplace where he was an engineer for the Zoology Department at Oxford University and later worked at Oxford Scientific Films. Clare used to see and handle all sorts of creepy crawlies, snakes and strange creatures and she’s sure this is where her love for animals came from. Even her first pet was an ex-lab Syrian hamster! She was desperate to work with animals and when she was 15 she got her wish via a work experience placement in the pet department at a local garden centre in Oxfordshire and this led to her first ‘animal’ job, working at weekends for over 7 years. Clare learnt so much about animal care and husbandry of, not just fluffy pets, there was a large number of interesting birds, reptiles, fish and other species. In fact, she loved it so much that she continued to work there during the holidays when she came home from studying for a BSc in Environmental Biology at the University of the West of England in Bristol where she attained a 2.1. She struggled to find an animal job for a few years after graduating and after countless jobs (including Ann-Summers …!) she stumbled across an Animal Technician job at The University of Bristol in the local paper. Clare remembered her Dad saying a long time ago “you ought to get a job in the Uni looking after those animals” and that’s exactly what she did! Eight years’ on and Clare is a Senior Animal Technician running the animal facility in the Dorothy Hodgkin Building. The research carried out there is predominantly neuroscience and renal work. She has just two species (rats and mice) in the facility but it is a busy unit which has given her experience of transgenic breeding colonies, many different surgeries and post-operative care, behaviour experiments, diabetic models and neurodegenerative disease models, for example Motor Neurone Disease. During this time Clare has been studying and obtained her NVQ Levels 2 and 3 in Animal Technology and her IAT qualifications Levels 2, 3 and 4 graduating at the Babraham Institute last summer for her Level 4 qualification. She is currently studying for the IAT level 5 with just two modules to go. Clare feels that her chosen profession in Animal Technology is perfect for her as it encompasses her two main interests; science and animals. She is pleased and excited to be able to make constant contributions and improvements to the world of animal research and she has already proven this by being the proud winner of the First Time Presenter prize at Congress 2013 with her paper ‘The routine care and husbandry of the Motor Neurone disease mouse model’. General Information 17
ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD 2015  ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD About the author  Clare took a keen interest in animals, plant...
General Information AAALAC International Fellowship Award James ‘Robbie’ Champion BS CMAR LATG – 2015 USA Recipient We are very happy to welcome James ‘Robbie’ Champion to Congress as the recipient of the 2015 AAALAC International Fellowship Award. Robbie, as he prefers to be known, is the Director of the Morehouse School of Medicine Center for Laboratory Animal Resources where he is responsible for supervising and directing staff, establishing breeding programs, developing SOPs and serving as liaison between animal care and research staff. He is a Certified Manager of Animal Resources, with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from the University of North Florida. Prior to joining the Morehouse School of Medicine, Robbie was Program Manager for SoBran/Eastern Virginia Medical School. He has also served as Lead Research Specialist for Emory University’s Primate Research Center and as a Veterinary Technician for several animal hospitals and clinics. Robbie is an active member of AALAS and Team Leader for ILAM 2015. The AAALAC pin will be presented to him at the Presentation of Awards ceremony on Thursday afternoon in recognition of this honour. Robbie will then give a brief address on his experiences in the UK. 18 General Information
General Information  AAALAC International Fellowship Award  James    Robbie    Champion BS CMAR LATG     2015 USA Recipien...
General Information AAALAC International Fellowship Award Lynda Westall, BSc (Hons) DMS FIAT RAnTech - 2014 UK Recipient Lynda Westall is the Facilities Manager of the Research Support Facility at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Hinxton, Cambridgeshire. She is a Registered Laboratory Animal Technologist with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Animal Technology. Lynda has been employed at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute since 2000 and has a total of more than 40 years’ experience in the field of Laboratory Animal Science. Lynda is responsible for a facility that has a capacity of 23,500 cages and 5,000 tanks. Overseeing 17 different programmes of work and more than 250 researchers working under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act, 1986. She oversees training opportunities, is responsible for infection control programmes and is the Home Office Liaison Officer (HOLO). Lynda has delivered numerous presentations and posters on topics ranging from disaster planning to fish health and welfare. As a current member of the IAT Council, Lynda is involved as Branch Liaison Officer, a member of the Communications Group and also assists with Animal Technology and Welfare (the IAT Journal). She is also the past Chair for the Hertfordshire IAT Branch. Details on applying for the 2015 UK Award can be found on page 29. General Information 19
General Information  AAALAC International Fellowship Award  Lynda Westall, BSc  Hons  DMS FIAT RAnTech - 2014 UK Recipient...
General Information MOBILE PHONES AND PAGERS Out of courtesy to speakers and other delegates, pagers and mobile phones must be switched off or put on non-audible alerts BEFORE entering the main lecture theatre and the areas hosting the posters and workshops. Mobile phones and mobile phone cameras MUST NOT be used in any of the scientific sessions at Congress. This includes the paper sessions, trade exhibition, workshops and poster rooms – the latter whether poster authors are in attendance or not. Use of personal cameras is permitted at social functions, although not please, where these take place in the trade exhibition areas. A photographer will be available if you wish certain pictures to be taken. Ask at the Congress Reception for information. SPONSORSHIP The Congress Committee wish to thank all the companies that have supported Congress by Exhibiting and/or Advertising in this Handbook. The following companies and organisations are especially thanked for their further sponsorship: AAALAC Paper Session Allentown Europe Bags Andersons Bedding Products, Institute of Animal Technology, S3 Science and Surrey Diagnostics Notepad AS-ET Paper session Harlan Laboratories UK Ltd Mug Institute of Animal Technology and Animals in Science – Education Trust Andrew Blake Tribute Award IPS Product Supplies Ltd Badge LBS Best Poster Award Marshall BKU First Time Presenter Award R C Hartelust BV Pen 20 General Information
General Information  MOBILE PHONES AND PAGERS Out of courtesy to speakers and other delegates, pagers and mobile phones mu...
General Information CONGRESS BADGES It is important that you wear your badge at all times within the conference venue. You will not gain access to the exhibition hall, papers, posters, workshops if you are not wearing it. Please also make sure you are wearing it at meal times and for all of the social events. If you are not wearing it admittance will be refused. We do however recommend you remove your badge when you leave the conference venue but please remember it for evening functions. If you lose your badge, please report your loss immediately to a member of the Congress Committee. ENQUIRIES Delegates are advised to contact the Congress Reception if they have any queries or comments regarding Congress.
General Information  CONGRESS BADGES It is important that you wear your badge at all times within the conference venue. Yo...
Notice of AGM TWENTY NINTH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE INSTITUTE OF ANIMAL TECHNOLOGY To be held on Tuesday 17th March 2015 AGENDA 1. Apologies for absence Minutes of the 28th Annual General Meeting of the Institute of Animal 2.  Technology held on 8th April 2014 3.  Matters arising from the Minutes, which were published in full on the Members’ section of the IAT website and in abridged form in the Bulletin Vol 50 No 6, June 2014 4. Correspondence 5. Annual Report / Council Objectives 6. Financial Report 7. Appointment of the Auditor 8. Election of Officers: (i) President (ii) Vice-Presidents (iii) Council 9. Proposals for Honorary and Life Membership 10. Presentation of Life and Honorary Memberships 11. Any other business Linda Horan, Honorary Secretary Steve Owen, Chair of Council THE AGM IS OPEN TO ALL DELEGATES Voting rights are restricted to voting members only Please attend at 18.00 hrs in the Argyll Suite at the Crowne Plaza hotel COUNCIL ELECTIONS 2015 As there were only ten nominations for the ten vacancies on Council, no ballot took place and therefore the following were elected to serve on Council for a three year term as from May 2015. 1 Cathy Godfrey 6 Matthew Bilton 2 Sarah Lane 7 Sam Jameson 3 Norman Mortell 8 Theresa Langford 4 Allan Thornhill 9 Carole Wilson 5 Nicky Gent 10 Adrian Woodhouse General Information 23
Notice of AGM  TWENTY NINTH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE INSTITUTE OF ANIMAL TECHNOLOGY To be held on Tuesday 17th March ...
IAT LIFE AND HONORARY MEMBERS LIFE MEMBERSHIP Life Membership is the highest accolade awarded by the Institute and is given in recognition of especially long and valuable service to the Institute. Council may elect any person but only one Life Member is created in any calendar year. Cathy Godfrey FIAT RAnTech Cathy has been an elected member of Council for over 25 years, holding a number of demanding senior positions including Honorary Secretary and Membership Secretary. During her time on Council she has continuously promoted further education and CPD for animal technologists. She served for many years on the Board of Education and as an examiner at all three membership levels. Cathy is currently Chair of the Board of Moderators and serves on the Registration and Accreditation Board. Currently, she is the Manager of the Biomedical Research Facility at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, having worked in various academic research establishments within the UK. It is also fitting to mention with our AAALAC colleagues participating in the scientific programme at Congress this year, that Cathy was the first UK winner of the prestigious AAALAC International Fellowship Award ten years ago in 2005. (A full biography was published in the February 2014, 50.2 issue of the IAT Bulletin.) HONORARY MEMBERSHIP IAT Council may nominate any person as an Honorary Member who in its opinion, has substantially furthered the interests of the Institute. The award is subject to approval at the Annual General Meeting. The period of election is five years. Terry Priest MIAT RAnTech Terry has been involved in animal technology for 52 years, starting as a trainee animal technician at the Christie Hospital back in 1963 at the age of 15, where he immediately joined the local branch of the ATA (which became the IAT of course). After 5 years he moved to Ciba Geigy (now Novartis) where he was encouraged to study for ATA Associateship which was quite a challenge as no proper courses existed in that area for him to attend. In 1974 he moved on to the University of Manchester and he progressed his career, becoming the Director of the BSF. He is particularly proud that he became a RAnTech in 1992. Terry’s commitment to educating, training and endorsing animal welfare and husbandry to IAT standards has been both influential and tireless by promoting animal technology and how important the role of an Animal Technologist is in the care of laboratory animals today. (A full biography was published in the February 2015, 51.2 issue of the IAT Bulletin.) Trevor Richards BEM MIAT Trevor began his career at the Wellcome Research laboratories in 1967 and after a couple of years as a research technician realised his real interest was in the laboratory animal field and duly moved to the Royal College of Surgeons, running their primate facility. From there he worked at Oxford University, Southampton University, had a short spell at a commercial company and then moved to Cambridge University as Director of Central Biomedical Resources for the School of Clinical Medicine. During the whole of his professional life, he has been a supporter of the IAT and in the past helped to form the then known Wessex Branch becoming Chair for three years. He has also been the Trade Manager for Congress for a number of years and was Honorary Secretary. As Honorary Secretary he was instrumental in working with the Council members at that time in the design and eventual incorporation of the IAT Coat of Arms. Trevor has always been a strong advocate for animal technicians as being the best skilled and experienced they can be, ensuring that the welfare of the animal was always seen as first priority. (A full biography was published in the February 2015, 51.2 issue of the IAT Bulletin.) We are delighted to welcome Cathy, Terry and Trevor who will collect their awards at the AGM starting 18.00 hrs on Tuesday 17th March in the Argyll Suite at the Crowne Plaza hotel. Please come along and show them your support for their achievements working in our industry. General Information 25
IAT LIFE AND HONORARY MEMBERS LIFE MEMBERSHIP Life Membership is the highest accolade awarded by the Institute and is give...
General Information Education ‘Drop-In’ Session Thursday 19th March 10.30 – 11.00 IAT FE and HE Qualifications Do you have any questions about the IAT FE and HE qualifications? Do you want to find out more about what qualifications are available and how to take them? Perhaps you have a query about exemptions, or what the next step is for you? Then please come along to this Drop-In Session taking place at the IAT stand (situated in the Trade Exhibition Hall) during the coffee break on Thursday morning and speak to Cathy Godfrey, Chair of the Board of Moderators and Brian Lowe who is the IAT Educational Consultant. An Educational Stakeholders’ meeting was held prior to Congress and an update from this meeting will be available. R C artelust bv H P.O.Box 2170 5001 CD Tilburg The Netherlands Tel: + 31 13 4555189 Fax: + 31 13 4550175 E-mail: info@hartelust.net Macaca fascicularis Macaca mulatta Beagle dogs Purpose bred for research use Health screened for a range of organisms Quarantined before shipment Full documentation with every delivery Direct delivery in own vehicle Prices and terms request 26 General Information
General Information  Education    Drop-In    Session Thursday 19th March 10.30     11.00 IAT FE and HE Qualifications Do y...
Call for nominations now open for the popular 2015 AAALAC International Fellowship UK Award If you are an IAT Registered Technologist (RAnTech) apply today! (Deadline is 1 June 2015) The AAALAC International Fellowship recognises two outstanding individuals—one IAT Registered (RAnTech) and one AALAS Registered (RALAT, RLAT, RLATG, CMAR)—who have made (or have the potential to make) significant contributions to the field of laboratory animal care and use. This fellowship is valued at more than £3,000. In the Autumn of 2015 the UK winner will enjoy a week-long visit to a leading biomedical research facility in the USA. They will also enjoy complimentary attendance at the National AALAS Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona. This is the USA’s largest laboratory animal science and technology meeting (registration, travel and accommodation expenses are included in the award, plus a generous daily allowance for meals and out-of-pocket expenses). Phoenix is the State Capital of Arizona. Arizona was a true part of the wild west boasting the Gunfight at the OK Corral in Tombstone, Yuma state Penitentiary known as “The Hellhole of the West” and the famous Apache warriors Chochise and Geronimo. Phoenix enjoys a year round warm subtropical desert climate and is home to Phoenix Zoo which enjoys an international reputation for animal conservation. There is also the wonderful Phoenix Botanical Gardens and a wide selection of restaurants and bars. TO APPLY: 1.  rite a brief letter nominating yourself (or have someone write this letter on your W behalf). I 2. nclude a 500-word written statement describing why you should be selected. 3. Include a copy of your CV. 4. Include no more than three letters of support. TIPS: You should consider these points in your application package: l  hat have you done to encourage animal welfare and refinement in your W workplace? (e.g., membership of AWERB, training others, advising on refinement, etc.) l  hat have you done to promote animal welfare and refinement outside of your W workplace? (e.g., IAT activities, school visits, public presentations, etc.) l  ow have you shared your knowledge of laboratory animal care with others? (e.g., H lectures, posters, workplace projects, etc.) l f you are selected, how will this award benefit your career and your associates? I l  ow will you disseminate your AAALAC Fellowship experience back to your H workplace and other colleagues? l  oes your package include evidence of leadership or leadership potential and wider D participation? (e.g., with posters, presentations or publications?) l  ave you participated in overseas meetings in the past? H l  hat other meetings have you participated in and how did you benefit? W Awardees will be expected to share their experiences by preparing a brief written report for AAALAC International and a full report to be published in a future issue of the IAT Bulletin. Awardees will also be expected to communicate their experiences to others by presenting at a local or national conference e.g., talk or poster at an IAT Branch meeting or Congress. Mail, fax or email your application materials by 1 June 2015: AAALAC International c/o The International Fellowship Committee 5283 Corporate Drive, Suite 203 Frederick, MD 21703, USA Fax: +301.696.9627 Email: fellow@aaalac.org For complete details and a list of selection criteria, visit www.aaalac.org/about/fellowship. cfm. Receipt of application will be confirmed by email to candidates by 5 June 2015. If you have not received confirmation or have any questions about this award, please call +301.696.9626 or email fellow@aaalac.org. left to right: Mark Gardiner, Jose (Pepe) Figueroa, President of Priority One Services Inc, sponsors and Dr Christian E Newcomer, Executive Director of AAALAC Martin Heath, the 2012 award winner holding the attractive inscribed crystal globe Stuart Stevenson BSc FIAT RAnTech won in 2013 The AAALAC International Fellowship Award is presented by the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC) International, in part, through grants by Priority One Services, Inc. and Datesand Group Ltd in cooperation with AALAS, IAT, the Medical Research Council and the National Institutes of Health. Don’t delay get your application in now! Lynda Westall BSc (Hons) DMS FIAT RAnTech the current 2014 UK winner
Call for nominations now open for the popular  2015 AAALAC International Fellowship UK Award If you are an IAT Registered ...
2015 CHARITY NOMINATED BY THE WEST OF SCOTLAND BRANCH Guide Dogs life changers For over 80 years now, guide dogs have been used throughout the UK to bring mobility and independence to more than 30,000 people who are blind and partially sighted. During that time, Guide Dogs as a charity has grown from providing four dogs from a lock up garage in Merseyside, to being the world’s largest breeder and trainer of working dogs. Today, we have a clear mission to ensure that blind and partially sighted people have the same freedom of movement as everyone else, and we will not rest until that is the case. To make that happen, we offer a range of services that includes not only guide dogs, but also sighted guiding by specially trained volunteers – My Guide – and Buddy Dogs, for visually impaired children and young people. We campaign for blind and partially-sighted people to enjoy better access to goods, services, public transport and raise awareness of the dangers of obstacles in the street and ‘shared street’ designs. We also provide funding for research into eye disease and canine health, welfare and behaviour. We currently breed around 1300 puppies each year at our National Breeding Centre, Leamington Spa. We use several different breeds on the Breeding Programme so that we can produce a wide and diverse range of guided dogs to suit all the needs of our clients. Labradors, Golden Retrievers and German Shepherds have been and remain our most common pure breeds on the programme. Historically the Golden Retriever crossed with the Labrador has produced the most successful guide dog of all, combining many of the great traits of both breeds. During a puppy’s first year they go to live with their volunteer puppy walker who introduces them to the sights, sounds and smells that they will encounter in everyday life. Puppies are taken onto buses and trains, into shops, and along busy streets. They are taught to walk on the lead and to obey simple commands such as sit, stay and come. They are also taken to puppy classes to mix with other people and dogs. At 12 months old the puppy goes to Guide Dogs Training School for the next part of their important training. 30 General Information Registered Charity Nos: (England and Wales) 209617 (Scotland) SC038979
2015 CHARITY NOMINATED BY THE WEST OF SCOTLAND BRANCH  Guide Dogs  life changers For over 80 years now, guide dogs have be...
There, the pups learn the skills they need to guide a visually impaired person. They learn to walk in a straight line, avoiding obstacles and not turning corners unless told to do so; to stop at kerbs and wait for the command to cross or turn left or right; and to judge height and width so that its owner does not bump their head or shoulder. They also learn to deal with traffic, although it is up to the guide dog owner to decide when it is safe to cross the road. Matching a guide dog and an owner takes a lot of skill and experience and there is a lot to be taken into account. The length of the owner’s stride, their height and the lifestyle they lead all need to be considered very carefully when finding a match with a suitable dog. Once a match has been made, the owner and guide dog spend another four weeks of intensive training together. Once qualified the blind or visually impaired person hands over 50 pence for their dog and the guide dog exchanges its brown training harness with a white one. This life-changing work is paid for solely by public donation as Guide Dogs receives no Government funding. Two out of three guide dogs are paid for by gifts in Wills and the remainder by dedicated volunteer fundraisers and donors. But what price can you put on the independence that a guide dog brings? As guide dog owner Matthew Brown says: “I am just a young lad. There are still things I want to do, there are still things I want to experience and my guide dog Ike can help me do that.” Why we need your support: • Every hour another person goes blind • There are currently 180,000 blind or partially  sighted people in the UK who rarely leave home alone • • W  e’re training around 780 guide dogs each year, but to help meet the demand for new guide dogs we desperately need to create a third more guide dog partnerships by 2020 H  alf of the dogs we train are needed to replace dogs who have retired • Training  a guide dog costs around £34,000 and takes around 24 months • T  he guide dog service receives no government funding and we rely solely on donations www.guidedogs.org.uk Please buy lots of raffle tickets for a chance to win the super prizes on offer. Thank you. • • • • Sign up for email updates Subscribe to news updates Facebook Twitter twitter.com/guidedogs www.facebook.com/guidedogsUK www.youtube.com/user/GuideDogsUK General Information 31
There, the pups learn the skills they need to guide a visually impaired person. They learn to walk in a straight line, avo...
General Information Midlands Branch Nominated Thank you! The Midlands Branch wishes to thank everybody who contributed to the raffle in aid of Teenage Cancer Trust last year and through your generosity £1,300 was raised. General Information 33
General Information Midlands Branch Nominated  Thank you  The Midlands Branch wishes to thank everybody who contributed to...
Scientific Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH VENUE: LOMOND AUDITORIUM Time 09.15 - 09.20 09.20 - 09.50 09.50 - 10.20 10.20 - 11.00 11.00 - 11.30 11.00 - 13.00 11.30 - 12.00 12.00 - 12.30 Event Opening of Congress 2015 Alan Graham Chair Congress Committee Assessing the welfare of genetically altered mice - how does this fit with severity scoring? Lynn McLaughlin Do sub-strain differences have an impact on phenotype? Michelle Stewart Assisted reproductive technology in laboratory animals: application for endangered species Philip Damiani COFFEE WORKSHOP SESSIONS Location and full details on page 63 onwards The scientific/animal research laboratory as a place to care for animals Beth Greenhough and Emma Roe From historical ignominy to modern day glory - tracking the path of the lowly invertebrate in the laboratory Mikaella Bennie 12.30 - 13.00 Changes at the University College London fish facility over the last 15 years Carole Wilson 13.00 - 14.00 14.00 - 16.00 LUNCH WORKSHOP SESSIONS Locations and full details on page 63 onwards AAALAC SPONSORED SESSION AAALAC expectations on housing, husbandry and management Javier Guillén Imperial College London - preparing for AAALAC accreditation Rob Floyd Covance Harrogate - what AAALAC accreditation has meant for our establishment Chris Lawrie 14.00 - 14.30 14.30 - 15.00 15.00 - 15.30 15.30 - 16.00 16.00 - 16.20 16.20 - 16.40 16.40 - 17.00 34 Scientific Programme TEA FIRST TIME PRESENTERS - sponsored by Marshall BKU Improving husbandry routines for mice housed in IVCs Sarah Lucas The A Team - I love it when a plan comes together Emma Bartlett A balancing act - implementation and management of the procedure support team - The P Team Stuart Hamilton
Scientific Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH VENUE  LOMOND AUDITORIUM Time 09.15 - 09.20 09.20 - 09.50  09.50 - 10.20 10.20 -...
Scientific Programme THURSDAY 19th MARCH VENUE: LOMOND AUDITORIUM Time 09.00 - 11.00 09.00 - 10.00 10.00 - 10.30 10.30 - 11.00 11.00 - 13.00 11.00 - 11.30 11.30 - 12.00 12.00 - 12.30 12.30 - 13.00 13.00 - 14.00 14.00 - 15.30 15.30 - 16.15 16.15 - 17.00 17.00 - 17.20 Event WORKSHOP SESSIONS Locations and full details on page 63 onwards ASRU - ‘our work and what it means for you’ Sue Houlton and Will Reynolds Journeys to openness: the Concordat in 2015 Bella Williams10.30 - 11.00 COFFEE COFFEE WORKSHOP SESSIONS Locations and full details on page 63 onwards AS-ET SPONSORED SESSION How different is it being an animal technologist in the USA? David Smith The animal technology apprenticeship pilot scheme - a report to date Alan Palmer and Mark Gardiner Shared ageing research models (ShARM) - sharing resources to accelerate research into ageing Adele Duran and Mark Gardiner ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD - sponsored by Institute of Animal Technology and Animals in Science Education Trust Refinements in action! Moving from head cap to harness for cannulating laboratory rats Winner: Clare Sims LUNCH POSTER PRESENTATIONS - sponsored by LBS Alsh Room - Loch Suite Full details on page 50 onwards TEA KEVIN DOLAN MEMORIAL LECTURE CHANGING LIVES - THE GUIDE DOG STORY David Anderson and Terry Thorpe - abstract features on page 49 Presentation of Awards First Time Presenter 2015 - sponsored by Marshall BKU Best Poster 2015 - sponsored by LBS Journal Article 2014 - Animal Technology and Welfare (Marjorie (Sandiford) Whittingham Memorial Prize) Andrew Blake Tribute Award 2015 - sponsored by IAT and AS-ET AAALAC International USA Fellowship Award 2015 Close of Congress: Steve Owen Chair Institute of Animal Technology Scientific Programme 35
Scientific Programme THURSDAY 19th MARCH VENUE  LOMOND AUDITORIUM Time 09.00 - 11.00 09.00 - 10.00 10.00 - 10.30 10.30 - 1...
36 Scientific Programme Scientific Programme
36  Scientific Programme  Scientific Programme
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH VENUE: Lomond Auditorium 09.15 Opening of Congress 2015  Alan Graham MA FIAT Chair Congress Committee  Chair: Jan-Bas Prins Dr lr  Chair Laboratory Animals Ltd (LAL) and Past President of FELASA 09.20  Assessing the welfare of genetically altered mice - how does this fit with severity scoring? Lynn McLaughlin BSc (Hons) MSc PhD  BSU Manager, Liverpool University, Ronald Ross Building, 8 West Derby Street, Liverpool L69 7BE  Recombinant DNA technology generated a surge in transgenic and knockout mouse models and has led onto the Knock Out Mouse Project (KOMP) which aims to disrupt the first exon in every mouse gene for distribution to the scientific community. Genetically Engineered Mouse Models (GEMMs) have the potential to cause pain, distress and lasting harm for the animals produced and every line of GEMMs needs to have a monitoring system in place for early detection of potential welfare issues. In 2006 the animal procedures committee produced a report on ‘assessing the welfare of GA mice’ with a simple but effective monitoring system that could be used for any GA colony.  This system has been used in Liverpool University and this presentation reviews the use of the recommendations with particular emphasis on the assessment of severity. 09.50  sub-strain differences have an impact on phenotype? Do Michelle Stewart BSc  Experimental Ward Manager, Mary Lyon Centre, Medical Research Council Harwell, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD  With the increase in the use of transgenic mice, it is inevitable that mice carrying the same genetic mutation will not always be bred on the same background strain or sub-strain. It has become clear that there are substantial differences between the phenotypes and genotypes of sub-strains, even relatively closely related strains such as C57BL/6N and C57BL/6J.  Reproducibility of mouse work is a contentious issue at the moment and the mouse community is striving to reduce the variability of phenotypes between mice carrying the same mutation. At least part of this variability could be due to differences in the sub-strain the mutant is held on. It is not always possible to use the same sub-strain as other groups but it is important to be aware of these differences and control for them when possible. 10.20 Assisted reproductive technology in laboratory animals: application for endangered species Philip Damiani PhD BSc  Global Embryological Sciences and Transgenic Support Research Models Head of and Services, Harlan Laboratories UK Limited, Dodgeford Lane, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE12 9TE  Extinction threatens a large portion of species and given current trends, many rare or endangered vertebrate species will be soon be lost despite efforts to maintain Scientific Programme 37
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH VENUE  Lomond Auditorium 09.15  Opening of Congress 2015     Alan Graham MA FIAT C...
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH biodiversity via habitat and wildlife conservation. Even when a species is not endangered or threatened, the loss of biological diversity may lead to extinction of subspecies or other valuable genetic populations. The current method of preserving genetic diversity of endangered species in captivity is through a series of captive propagation programmes. However, these programmes are not without limitation, which include limited physical space for animals, problems with animal husbandry and general reproductive failure of the animals.  Recent advances in Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART), such as superovulation, ovarian and embryo transfer, sperm and embryo cryopreservation and in vitro fertilisation, have allowed for the further propagation of many domestic laboratory animals. These techniques have now become so routine in their use that many facilities have devoted resources for in-house capabilities to ensure the propagation of their valuable lines. Success in producing new individuals with the help of ART requires, as the first step, a greater knowledge in the basic aspects of reproductive biology. The use of laboratory animals allows many scientists, who work with endangered species, to have an excellent model which allows the gainful knowledge of basic reproductive biology for these wild counterparts.  Most recently, there is a growing scientific and public interest in advancing ART to facilitate the rescue of endangered species. This presentation will not only discuss some basic and advanced assisted reproductive technologies of many common laboratory animals, it will show how many of these ARTs in laboratory animals can serve as models for their critically endangered cousin species. It is the hope that the basic knowledge gained from routine ART used in domestic and laboratory species can be eventually transferred to the critically endangered species and that these technologies can be an additional tool in the ‘toolbox’ for their survivability. 11.00 COFFEE/TEA (served in the Trade Exhibition Hall) 11.00 WORKSHOP SESSIONS Venues, timings, running orders and details appear on page 63 onwards. Chair: Wendy Jarrett MA (Hons) Oxon  Vice President Institute of Animal Technology 11.30 The scientific/animal research laboratory as a place to care for animals Beth Greenhough MSc BSc PhD1 and Emma Roe BSc PhD2 1  Associate Professor of Human Geography, Oxford University Centre for the Environment, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QY 2 in Human Geography, University of Southampton, University Road, Lecturer Southampton SO17 1BJ  This paper will draw on new Wellcome Trust funded ethnographic research exploring the relationships between junior animal technologists and the laboratory animals they care for. We are interested in understanding the work involved in performing high standards of animal care and welfare in the context of scientific research. Contrary to popular imaginations, many of those who work with laboratory animals are driven by a deep personal attachment to animals, expressed as a love or fondness for animals commonly developed through growing up with pets. Once working in the animal facility, animal technologists may form close, sympathetic relationships with the animals they work with. Many learn and will continue to learn, to become attuned to and affected by the animals in their care and in so doing place themselves ‘at risk’ of experiencing emotional and social responses to the procedures these animals may be used for. For example, in their work they are expected to care and sympathise with the animal(s), which they then 38 Scientific Programme
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH biodiversity via habitat and wildlife conservation. Even when a species is not end...
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH may have to euthanise. The animals too may develop unique relationships with their caretakers and in some circumstances become trained research participants whose efforts contribute to the success of experimental procedures.  this paper we explore ethics as something which takes place not only in the In abstract discussions of the Animal Welfare and Ethical Review Body (AWERB) but also as something which is carried out daily through the care provided by animal technologists and their relationships with the animals in their care. 12.00  From historical ignominy to modern day glory - tracking the path of the lowly invertebrate in the laboratory Mikaella Bennie BSc MSB  Senior Animal Technician, Venomtech Limited, 2nd Floor South Pod, Discovery Park House, Discovery Park, Sandwich, Kent CT13 9ND  Historically the physiology of the invertebrate and the implications of this physiology for biomedical advancement has long been overlooked. The fact is invertebrates represent not only excellent novel biomedical models, their pharmaceutical, ecological and economic values are also of immense importance.  From humble beginnings in the late 1800s, invertebrate research has contributed to some of the greatest breakthroughs in modern science today. The discovery of the giant squid axon changed the face of neurobiology enabling researchers to gain an unparalleled insight into neurone function; green fluorescent protein (GFP) isolated from jellyfish is helping scientists understand how cancer cells spread and how the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) progresses; and migratory locusts have proven exceptional study models for blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to central nervous system (CNS)-targeted compounds.  However, these advances also signal a need for a better understanding of potential suffering in invertebrates as well as an enhanced awareness of what constitutes appropriate maintenance in a laboratory setting for these creatures. Moreover, working with invertebrates raises a series of questions: how can research with invertebrates be ethically carried out? How can invertebrate nociception and pain be evaluated? But most importantly, should invertebrates be given protection and what level is appropriate?  Studies have shown that anemones and leeches exhibit protective responses to noxious stimuli; terrestrial slugs have the ability to acquire odour-aversion memories; and cephalopods are renowned for their cognitive abilities. Legislative progress has been made with Octopus vulgaris initially included under the ASPA in 1986 with a revision encompassing all cephalopods under the Act in early 2013 but there is still significant ground to cover. As invertebrate models increasingly replace their vertebrate counterparts, it is advisable to operate under the precautionary principle and therefore recognise and (potentially) re-evaluate invertebrate sentience, welfare and euthanasia. Reviewing the progress already made, it is clear that unlocking the doors of the invertebrate world has significant implications for many areas in the laboratory environment. 12.30 MEET THE POSTER AUTHORS - Trade Exhibition Hall 12.30 Changes at the University College London fish facility over the last 15 years Carole Wilson MIAT BSc  Head of Fish Facility, Division of Biosciences, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT  After the mouse, the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is the second most used animal model for bioscientific research in the world. Its rise in popularity has been great over the last 15 to 20 years, leading to a situation where its husbandry and welfare Scientific Programme 39
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH may have to euthanise. The animals too may develop unique relationships with their...
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH requirements have not kept pace with its popularity as a bioscientific model. This has resulted in a lack of understanding of the true husbandry and welfare requirements of Zebrafish leading to some diverse husbandry practices between different facilities.  this paper, some of the changes in husbandry and welfare practice at the In University College London fish facility over the last 15 years will be examined, especially those practices that relate to the 3Rs, including larval rearing and the establishment of both a stock centre and cryopreservation programme.  The paper will also examine some of the future husbandry and welfare paths the fish facility intends to take, including the introduction of extensive biosecurity, health monitoring and the application of some of the FELASA-EUFishBioMed draft guidelines at the University College London. 13.00 LUNCH (served in Hall 1 - SECC) 14.00 WORKSHOP SESSIONS Venues, timings, running orders and details appear on page 63 onwards. Chair: Cathy Godfrey FIAT RAnTech  Life Member Institute of Animal Technology AAALAC SPONSORED SESSION 14.00 AAALAC expectations on housing, husbandry and management Javier Guillén DVM  Senior Director and Director of Europe and Latin America, AAALAC International, 5283 Corporate Drive, Suite 203, Frederick, Maryland 21703, USA  Animal housing, husbandry and management is one of the areas evaluated during an Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC) International site visit.  AAALAC has produced a position statement summarising the expectations on cage/ pen size (www.aaalac.org/accreditation/positionstatements.cfm#space). National/ Regional regulations, policies and guidelines as well as funding conditions are expected to be met. The performance standards are paramount when evaluating the space provided to animals.  Social housing is considered by AAALAC International as the default method of housing unless otherwise justified based on social incompatibility resulting from inappropriate behaviour, veterinary concerns regarding animal well-being, or scientific necessity approved by the oversight body (in the case of the UK, the AWERB). Exceptions for single housing should be reviewed on a regular basis and approved by the oversight body (www.aaalac.org/accreditation/positionstatements. cfm#social). Scientific Programme 41
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH requirements have not kept pace with its popularity as a bioscientific model. This...
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH  environmental enrichment programme is expected to obtain accreditation. It An should be appropriate to the species; implemented in a consistent manner; approved by the oversight body and researchers to ensure that, while beneficial to animal well-being research, goals are not affected; and that it is included in the training programme for personnel (www.aaalac.org/accreditation/faq_landing.cfm# C3). The use of performance standards is also essential to evaluate environmental conditions such as temperature, humidity or ventilation.  AAALAC expects emergency care can be provided at all times. This is dependent upon daily observation of animals. Therefore, a procedure that ensures daily observation of animals and provision of emergency care by appropriate personnel when needed, is expected for accredited animal care and use programmes.  AAALAC’s expectations on other aspects of animal housing, husbandry and management will be also described. 14.30 Imperial College London - preparing for AAALAC accreditation Rob Floyd BSc (Hons) FIAT RAnTech  AAALAC Project Manager, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ  all like to think we have a comprehensive and high quality animal care We programme but how often is it reviewed and tested and against what standards?  The AAALAC accreditation process guides you through a thorough review of your current animal care programme assessing against three primary standards as well as current UK and European legislation.  The AAALAC programme description is the key document which is completed by the organisation applying for accreditation and is used by the council on accreditation to evaluate your animal care and use programme. It is a very comprehensive document which covers all aspects of your work. The degree of work involved and the impact for an organisation preparing for accreditation can be varied and wide ranging and depends on the structure of the organisation, whether a single facility, multiple facilities on one site or as in Imperial’s case multiple sites and individual designated rooms spread across a number of campuses and most importantly how they are operated in regards to shared practices and documentation.  The benefits of achieving AAALAC accreditation are well documented but there are also less talked about benefits: the impact and improvements that can be made on operational management, internal communications, teamwork and increased knowledge and understanding of your organisation’s operations.  this presentation I will show you some of the benefits of the accreditation process In that can impact your organisation and how we are going about the programme review at Imperial College. 15.00 Covance Harrogate - what AAALAC accreditation has meant for our establishment Chris Lawrie BSc (Hons)  Research Assistant, Covance Laboratories Limited, Otley Road, Harrogate, North Yorkshire HG3 1PY  Covance has been AAALAC accredited since 2005. Within this time we have been re-assessed on three occasions and maintained our accreditation.  Since my employment our establishment has always been AAALAC accredited therefore many staff would not know ‘life’ without AAALAC’s benefits. We try to explain to every staff member that AAALAC accreditation is an outward representation to our clients that our animal care programme is of the highest standard. Re-assessment occurs every three years and within this time many new employees may have started their careers with Covance Harrogate so it is vital to convey the importance of our institute’s AAALAC accreditation. Training sessions are 42 Scientific Programme
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH    environmental enrichment programme is expected to obtain accreditation. It An s...
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH extremely beneficial prior to inspection as this brings all staff up to speed with the AAALAC programme, the benefits of the scheme, the criteria we are assessed by and areas we need to focus on.  The main body of work prior to inspection is updating our programme description and assessing the current state of the facility against this and local regulation. It is important to remember that for such a large site there are often many departments that will require to be looked at and not just the animal areas such as formulations, dispensary, necropsy, etc.  There can also be some confusion with staff members between GLP guidelines and AAALAC accreditation. It is important to remember that GLP is responsible for the accuracy and accountability of data produced, whereas AAALAC is concerned with assessment of a facility’s animal care programme and suitability to conduct research. We strive to ensure the differences are understood in the aforementioned training sessions.  Within this presentation, I will try to convey what AAALAC accreditation has meant to Covance, how we maintain our accreditation and how AAALAC differs from GLP guidelines. 15.30 TEA/COFFEE (served in the Trade Exhibition Hall) Chair: Will Reynolds BSc (Hons) MPhil FIRST TIME PRESENTERS – sponsored by Marshall BKU Head of Policy and Administration, Animals in Science Regulation Unit (ASRU) 16.00 Improving husbandry routines for mice housed in IVCs Sarah Lucas Technician, University College London, Royal Free Campus, Comparative Animal Biology Unit, Rowland Hill Street, Hampstead, London NW3 2PF  This paper will give a brief overview of the biological services unit (BSU) and the reasons why we decided to review our mouse husbandry routines.  We analysed the effects of cage changing and frequency on the mice concentrating on how mice communicate using olfaction. We also considered research currently in place with regard to cage changing frequencies. Then, using the information gained from this review, I will present an outline of the changes we made to our husbandry routines and the potential effects this may have, highlighting the benefits of changing the routines. 16.20 The A Team - I love it when a plan comes together Emma Bartlett RVN CertEd  Level Manager, Department of Biomedical Services, University of Oxford, The Old Observatory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RQ  This presentation will cover how our Anaesthesia Team (A Team) training programme was implemented to enable our animal technologists to assist, advise and provide high quality, standardised, peri-operative support to the primate research groups at Oxford and how this has allowed the skills to be maintained at a consistently high level, ensuring the most refined methods were carried forward as the research evolved. Historically, scientific researchers would complete training to learn specialised skills specific to the research they were involved in, invariably once a project was completed they would move on taking the skills with them. This turnover of researchers made it difficult to maintain consistently high standards within a research Scientific Programme 43
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH extremely beneficial prior to inspection as this brings all staff up to speed with...
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH group and harmonise protocols between different research groups. We found that the introduction of the A Team technologist training addressed these problems. Alongside the progression of the A team we are implementing a Procedure Support training programme (P Team) for the multi species technologists, with the aim of harmonising the high standard of care given to any animal undergoing procedures. In addition to the potential animal welfare benefits we are finding that such training enables technologists to expand and evolve their roles and responsibilities. 16.40  balancing act - implementation and management of the procedure support team A - The P Team Stuart Hamilton  Technical Manager, Department of Biomedical Services, University of Oxford, The Old Observatory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RQ The implementation of the procedure support training programme for technologists, at the University of Oxford has offered animal technologists the opportunity to develop their role, responsibilities and to expand their knowledge of procedural support. When devising the training programme it was important to ensure inclusivity, and the opportunity for development of roles for animal technologists both with and without personal licenses.  This presentation will cover the day to day management of the procedure support team training and detail some of the challenges faced, whilst balancing the standard animal technology duties with development and expansion of their role. 44 Scientific Programme
Platform Programme WEDNESDAY 18th MARCH group and harmonise protocols between different research groups. We found that the...
Platform Programme THURSDAY 19th MARCH VENUE: Lomond Auditorium Chair: John Gregory BSc (Hons) FIAT CBiol FSB RAnTech Life Member Institute of Animal Technology 09.00 WORKSHOP SESSIONS Venues, timings, running orders and details appear on page 63 onwards. 09.00 ASRU – ‘our work and what it means for you’ Sue Houlton MA BVSc DVR DVC MRCVS1 and Will Reynolds BSc (Hons) MPhil2 1 Chief Inspector, Animals in Science Regulation Unit, Home Office, 2 Marsham Street, London SW1P 4DF 2 Head of Policy and Planning, Animals in Science Regulation Unit, Home Office, 2 Marsham Street, London SW1P 4DF  The Animals in Science Regulation Unit (ASRU) has, in recent times, significantly changed and improved its ways of working.  These changes include: the implementation of new regulations introduced through the EU Directive and transposed into ASPA, with the subsequent publication of Operational Guidance, the Code of Practice and various Advice Notes; our phased roll out of e-licensing through ASPeL; a review of the efficiency and effectiveness of our inspection processes and outcomes; and our programme of work to improve openness and transparency which includes the review of Section 24.  These are just some of the many initiatives we are taking forward.  this session, we will provide updates, status reports and a forward look on our In key activities as we enter the second quarter of 2015. Moreover and importantly, we will explain how we have developed our key policies, how we are delivering them and what they mean for you. 10.00  Journeys to openness: the Concordat in 2015 Bella Williams BSc (Hons) DPhil MIKE  Head of Engagement, Understanding Animal Research (UAR), Hodgkin Huxley House, 30 Farringdon Lane, London EC1R 3AW  The Concordat on openness on animal research in the UK was launched in May 2014, following 18 months of development. Over 80 organisations are now signed up to the Concordat and have pledged to meet the standards of openness and transparency around animal research that it highlights. How successful has this initiative been? Has it really made the expected changes, or has real change yet to be realised? What are the challenges and roles technologists have in building a culture of greater openness?  This session will reflect on developments and learning since the launch of the Concordat and allow discussion about what greater openness means for those working with the animals. 10.30 COFFEE/TEA (served in the Trade Exhibition Hall) 11.00 WORKSHOP SESSIONS Venues, timings, running orders and details appear on page 63 onwards. Scientific Programme 45
Platform Programme THURSDAY 19th MARCH VENUE  Lomond Auditorium  Chair    John Gregory BSc  Hons  FIAT CBiol FSB RAnTech L...
Platform Programme THURSDAY 19th MARCH Chair: Professor Sir Richard Gardner MA PhD FSB  Immediate Past President Institute of Animal Technology Hon FIAT FRS AS-ET SPONSORED SESSION 11.00 How different is it being an animal technologist in the USA? David Smith FIAT Site Head, Pfizer, 600.1 610 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA  a junior technician, my career expectation was to attain Fellowship of the As Institute of Animal Technology (FIAT) and once achieved I set my sights on a supervisory position. I joined Pfizer in the UK in 1984 and by 2011 was Site Head for the comparative medicine team. It was then that I was unexpectedly offered an opportunity to relocate to Cambridge, Massachusetts as the Site Head for a new vivarium. This presentation will detail my journey of the past four years and explain some of the differences of living and working in animal technology in the USA. 11.30 The animal technology apprenticeship pilot scheme - a report to date Alan Palmer MIAT HNC1 and Mark Gardiner MIAT RAnTech2 1  and Training Manager, Biological Services, National Institute of Medical Technical Research, (NIMR), The Ridgeway, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA 2 Operations, Mary Lyon Centre, Medical Research Council Harwell, Harwell Head of Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD  Since October 2011, the Medical Research Council (MRC), as a leader in animal welfare and staff development, has led a project for the creation of a specific animal technology apprenticeship from scratch. This project has been driven forward by Mark and Alan with full support from MRC Human Resources, The Institute of Animal Technology, Cambridge Regional College and LANTRA (National Training Organisation for the Land Based Industries).  The MRC employs approximately 400 animal technicians and technologists, at various levels, who provide an essential and specialised animal care and procedural service. The apprenticeship scheme will enable the MRC and other employers, to recruit and train animal technicians to the highest possible standard and support future progression within the industry.  The Level 2 Apprenticeship in Animal Technology has been set up through the Cambridge Regional College (CRC) who applies for the funding and provides the functional skills for the award. The Institute of Animal Technology Level 2 qualification at MRC Harwell is provided by Venture Forward and at the NIMR is provided in-house and accredited by The Learning Curve. Both the MRC Harwell and the NIMR provide the essential in-house training for the apprentices and help them to produce the portfolio and evidence to gain the apprenticeship award in 15 to 18 months.  The Animal Technology Apprenticeship provides apprentices with training and background education to enable them to competently provide high quality animal husbandry, basic science support tasks and maintenance of high welfare standards to a range of small laboratory species.  This presentation will describe the recruitment process, funding and day to day management of apprentices including time management, mentoring and building relationships and report on our experiences to date with the pilot scheme. 46 Scientific Programme
Platform Programme THURSDAY 19th MARCH     Chair  Professor Sir Richard Gardner MA PhD FSB   Immediate Past President Inst...
Platform Programme THURSDAY 19th MARCH 12.00  Shared ageing research models (ShARM) - sharing resources to accelerate research into ageing Adele Duran PhD BSc MIST RSci1 and Mark Gardiner MIAT RAnTech2 1acility Coordinator, ShARM, University of Sheffield, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, F South Yorkshire S19 2RX 2 ead of Operations, Mary Lyon Centre, Medical Research Council Harwell, Harwell H Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0RD  ShARM is a not for profit organisation, funded by Wellcome Trust, created to facilitate the sharing of tissues and information from aged mice to accelerate research into ageing without the need for additional mice.  Research is urgently needed to gain a better understanding of the biology of ageing and to identify new interventions to manage the rise in life expectancy and the subsequent increase in age related diseases. Mice are important models of ageing, however, the time and cost needed to rear ageing colonies can limit research outputs. To ensure maximum research capacity is achieved from each aged mouse, ShARM collects surplus tissues that are either flash frozen or formalin fixed and paraffin embedded. Tissues are stored in the bio-repository and information available online allows researchers to select appropriate samples for purchase. For bespoke collections, an online database of live ageing colonies provides details of living colonies which can be accessed by researchers upon request.  Since launching in July 2012, ShARM has attracted more than 90 members, collected over 17,000 tissues and has in excess of 1,000 mice registered in live ageing colonies. ShARM has supplied approximately 200 tissues to investigators who have used data from these samples in publications such as Aging Cell and to generate preliminary data for grant applications.  ShARM also provides MICEspace; an online, collaborative environment, for discussion and knowledge exchange on topics such as the welfare of aged mice. ShARM aims to expedite the creation of guidelines to ensure best practice and develop consensus on humane end points. This will ensure the very highest standards of welfare are achieved for aged animals.  bringing together the collective resources, knowledge and experience of By individuals, we can reduce the number of animals used in research, improve animal welfare and allow more research to be undertaken on current cohorts of mice 12.30 ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD – sponsored by IAT and AS-ET Presentation of the 2015 Winning Paper  Refinements in action! Moving from head cap to harness for cannulating laboratory rats Clare Sims BSc (Hons)  Senior Animal Technologist, Bristol University, Dorothy Hodgkin Building, Whitson Street, Bristol BS1 3NY  is often necessary to take samples from and administer substances to laboratory It rats over an extended period of time whilst they are conscious. The most effective and pain free way of doing this is via implanted cannulae. This technique is particularly useful for measuring the amount of certain hormones present in the circulating blood by taking small blood samples via an automated blood sampling (ABS) system; in this case the stress response hormone corticosterone. Scientific Programme 47
Platform Programme THURSDAY 19th MARCH 12.00   Shared ageing research models  ShARM  - sharing resources to accelerate res...
Platform Programme THURSDAY 19th MARCH  This presentation will aim to explain how the academic staff and the animal technologists have worked together to facilitate the refinement of an existing protocol, moving from using a head cap to a harness as a means of anchoring the implanted cannulae. Previously cannula were implanted directly into the jugular vein and exteriorised through a scalp incision and fed through a protective spring which is anchored in place by screws in the skull. Dental cement is then applied to form the head cap. The refinement involves the cannula exiting the body further back from the head and the protective spring being fixed in place by a vascular access harness which fits around the body of the rat. Although this refinement has vastly improved the protocol in many ways in terms of animal welfare, including a large reduction in the time animals are under anaesthesia, it has not been without its teething problems. This paper will outline those problems and how we have managed to overcome them and still gain good scientific results. 13.00 LUNCH (served in Hall 1 - SECC) Chair: Gail Thompson RLATG Vice President Institute of Animal Technology 14.00 POSTER PRESENTATIONS - sponsored by LBS  Alsh Room - Loch Suite Running order and details on page 50 onwards. 15.30 MEET THE POSTER AUTHORS - Trade Exhibition Hall 15.30 TEA/COFFEE (served in the Trade Exhibition Hall) Chair: Steve Owen FIAT RAnTech Chair Institute of Animal Technology 16.15 KEVIN DOLAN MEMORIAL LECTURE  CHANGING LIVES - THE GUIDE DOG STORY Anderson BVMS MVM MRCVS1 and Terry Thorpe2 David 1Superintendent Inspectorate Home Office (Retired) and Veterinary Adviser, Pentland  Management Systems, Milton Bridge, Nr Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0BA 2Guide Dog Mobility Instructor, Guide Dogs Scotland, Glasgow Mobility Team, 12  Auchingramont Road, Hamilton ML3 6JT 17.00  resentation of Awards: P  irst Time Presenter 2015 - sponsored by Marshall BKU F Best Poster 2015 - sponsored by LBS  Journal Article 2014 - Animal Technology and Welfare Marjorie (Sandiford) Whittingham Memorial Prize - Nur Mazlan, Noelia LópezSalesansky, Charlotte Burn and Dominic Wells (Winners) Andrew Blake Tribute Award 2015 - sponsored by IAT and AS-ET Clare Sims (Winner)  International USA Fellowship Award 2015 - James ‘Robbie’ Champion AAALAC (Winner) 17.20 Close of Congress 2015 Steve Owen FIAT RAnTech Chair Institute of Animal Technology 48 Scientific Programme
Platform Programme THURSDAY 19th MARCH    This presentation will aim to explain how the academic staff and the animal tech...
KEVIN DOLAN MEMORIAL LECTURE Changing lives – the guide dog story Dr David Anderson and Terry Thorpe Guide Dogs has been transforming lives for over 80 years. The Charity’s vision is for a society in which people who are blind or partially sighted enjoy the same freedom of movement as everyone else. There are around 5000 guide dog partnerships in the UK and Guide Dogs trains over 800 new partnerships each year. Guide Dogs makes a lifetime promise to provide our guide dog owners with a guide dog for as long as they will benefit from one and can provide for their dog’s needs. In addition to the guide dog service, Guide Dogs provides a range of mobility services tailored to meet individual needs and in 2013 delivered an estimated 1.8 million days of support to blind or partially sighted people. The presentation will provide an overview of the organisation and the services it provides. This will include information on dog breeding, health and welfare practices, training methods and on the impact of our dogs transforming lives. David Anderson David is a Vice President of the IAT and a Trustee for Guide Dogs, a role which he finds hugely rewarding. He is a veterinary surgeon with over thirty years’ experience in practice, academia and government service. He worked initially in a university teaching environment where he developed an interest and expertise in veterinary reproduction and was Named Veterinary Surgeon under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act. Until 2010 he worked in the UK Home Office, in the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Inspectorate and advised on the care and use of animals in scientific procedures and was involved in the development of improved practices in welfare, accommodation and care of animals used in scientific procedures throughout the UK and Europe. He is at present working as a veterinary advisor for Pentlands Management Systems where his main role is to provide technical support to the European Commission during transposition of the new European Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes. In his ‘spare’ time, he continues to enjoy curling and golf. Terry Thorpe Originally from a dairy farming family in Essex, Terry joined Guide Dogs in 1977, starting work as an Apprentice Guide Dog Mobility Instructor at the Forfar training centre. Since then, he has worked in a variety of roles, including training c150 guide dogs and trainee instructors before heading up Guide Dogs’ technical training department. Terry has undertaken a number of management roles in the last 15 years and his current position is Mobility Team Manager for the Glasgow Mobility Team, responsible for all aspects of Guide Dogs’ activities in the western side of Scotland, from Gretna to Shetland. In 2005, Terry became an Assessor for the International Guide Dog Federation, a role which has taken him to several countries in the last decade. This is an interesting though sometimes challenging role, in which schools are assessed against a series of standards to enable them to become members of this international body. Although work seems to absorb more of his life than is probably healthy, when time allows, Terry enjoys a wide range of interests from bird watching to reading, from socialising with friends and family and, of course, walking his “failed” guide dog, Bracken. Scientific Programme 49
KEVIN DOLAN MEMORIAL LECTURE  Changing lives     the guide dog story Dr David Anderson and Terry Thorpe Guide Dogs has bee...
Poster Presentations THURSDAY 19th MARCH ALSH ROOM - LOCH SUITE 14.00 – 15.30 hrs Ten minutes is allocated to each participant with adequate time to follow to address questions that may arise Each abstract appears on the following pages in the running order as below Pruritic aged C57BL/6J mice Sally Carpenter Could reproductive technologies reduce farm animal numbers in medical research? Susannah Parkin Use of hydrophobic sand in collection of analytical urine samples Jason Smith The tail prick technique: a refinement for blood sampling for a genetically modified mixed background strain Caroline Zverev The development and refinement of bioluminescent/fluorescent orthotopic xenografts models to reduce harm and improve animal welfare Alison Ritchie Comparison of PCR with traditional methods in the detection of Syphacia obvelata and Pasteurella pneumotropica Andy Dickinson 50 Scientific Programme
Poster Presentations THURSDAY 19th MARCH ALSH ROOM - LOCH SUITE  14.00     15.30 hrs  Ten minutes is allocated to each par...
Poster Presentations POSTERS Chair: Gail Thompson RLATG Vice President Institute of Animal Technology Pruritic aged C57BL/6J mice Sally Carpenter The Roslin Institute and R(D)SVS, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Midlothian EH25 9RG Mice may start to itch for many different reasons. Scratching will cause even more skin irritation than the initial problem thus causing mice to scratch even more, which causes more irritation and more scratching. This itch/scratch cycle is a never ending cycle that is hard to break as it quickly becomes a habit, sometimes even if the initial problem has gone. Once this habit has taken effect it is very hard to break. It is our job as technicians to introduce a different variety of enrichment into the environment of the mouse to try and take their mind off the irritation. We have also introduced nail clipping over the past few months resulting in a reduction of mice having the ulcerative dermatitis. Could reproductive technologies reduce farm animal numbers in medical research? Susannah Parkin The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ A total of 45,790 sheep were used in regulated procedures in the United Kingdom in 2013, a 7% increase on the previous year (Home Office 2014). Given this increase, it may be useful to consider whether the number of sheep used in medical research might be reduced using reproductive technologies (RT). The use of sheep in orthopaedic research may be taken as a case study. If cross bred sheep are used in such studies, there are likely to be significant variations in relevant traits. Using purebred sheep and RT may give rise to animals with more consistent bone structures, enabling experimental group numbers to be reduced. Once the technologies have been developed to a stage where they can be used repeatedly and consistently, RT could be used to reduce the number of farm animals in some studies. Scientific Programme 51
Poster Presentations POSTERS Chair     Gail Thompson RLATG  Vice President Institute of Animal Technology  Pruritic aged C...
Poster Presentations Use of hydrophobic sand in collection of analytical urine samples Jason Smith GlaxoSmithKline, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage, Hertfordshire SG1 2NY Metabolic cages are used to collect rodent urine for analytical samples. This method however has disadvantages which include causing stress and possible faecal contamination of urine. We therefore wanted to find an alternative method which would cause less stress to the animal without compromising study results. We found a commercially available hydrophobic sand based product used to collect pet cat urine samples. The sand repels urine causing droplets to form allowing easy collection. The investigator places the mouse in a cage which has a thin layer of sand; this removes the need for housing in a metabolic cage and gives the mouse a more familiar environment. At set intervals the cage bases are checked and any urine is removed using a clean syringe. Hydrophobic sand may never completely replace metabolic cages for urine collection. However this study has shown it can significantly reduce the amount of times metabolism cages are required and have a likely positive impact on animal welfare The tail prick technique: a refinement for blood sampling for a genetically modified mixed background strain Caroline Zverev Cancer Research UK, Clare Hall Laboratories, Blanche Lane, South Mimms, Potters Bar, Hertfordshire EN6 3LD For an ongoing aging study of a genetically modified mixed background mouse strain there is a need to perform a licensed procedure, under the Animal (Scientific Procedures) Act, 1986 to collect a small blood sample to determine if there is any variation in the components of blood between mutant, heterozygous and wild type mice and to ascertain whether this is linked to their phenotype. The mutant animals for this particular strain exhibit fused vertebrate in their tails making the current tail vein method unsuitable as this often resulted in little or no sample that can be analysed. The Tail Prick technique shown on the NC3Rs’ website was then suggested as a solution. After consultation, this technique was introduced to see if it could produce good quality samples for analysis, as well as, reducing overall stress levels for the animals. 52 Scientific Programme
Poster Presentations  Use of hydrophobic sand in collection of analytical urine samples Jason Smith GlaxoSmithKline, Gunne...
Poster Presentations The development and refinement of bioluminescent/fluorescent orthotopic xenografts models to reduce harm and improve animal welfare Alison Ritchie Division of Cancer Biology, D Floor, West Block, Queen’s Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH As a pre-clinical research facility, we constantly strive to improve our xenografts models to more accurately reflect the patient situation, whilst also refining techniques and reducing animal numbers to improve welfare in line with the 3Rs principles. To this end, we have developed a number of transduced xenograft cell lines, whose growth and development can be imaged in real-time using the Intravital Imaging System (IVIS) Spectrum, which allows us to monitor cell viability, as well as parameters including apoptosis and hypoxia. We have employed this system in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenografts. Examples of orthotopic models developed include lung, prostate and colon, a breast model which develops lung and liver metastases and a brain model which metastasises to the spine. By monitoring growth in real-time, we reduce animal numbers and we can also identify scientifically appropriate end points at an earlier stage before the onset of adverse effects, thus improving welfare, while still providing valid experimental data. Comparison of PCR with traditional methods in the detection of Syphacia obvelata and Pasteurella pneumotropica Andy Dickinson Surrey Diagnostics Ltd, PO Box 156, Cranleigh, Surrey GU6 8ZU Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) methodologies are increasingly used for routine health monitoring in laboratory animal colonies. We compared PCR on faecal material with ‘traditional’ techniques in detecting Pasteurella pneumotropica and Syphacia obvelata to highlight that, in some cases, PCR may not be the most appropriate method. We found that on comparing PCR versus culture in detecting Pasteurella pneumotropica there was good correlation using the Kappa test. For PCR versus anal imprint and direct examination of caecal contents for Syphacia obvelata there was poor correlation using the Kappa test. We propose that PCR on faeces is a good alternative to culture where culture is not possible, i.e. limited animal stock. However, PCR will not tell you whether the DNA detected is from a live or dead organism. In the case of Syphacia obvelata we would advise that the PCR test is used with caution due to a high probability that positive animals could be missed. Scientific Programme 53
Poster Presentations  The development and refinement of bioluminescent fluorescent orthotopic xenografts models to reduce ...
Poster Displays Welfare first: how good is your induction programme? Mathew Sanderson Agenda Resource Management Ltd, PO Box 24, Hull, Yorkshire HU12 8YJ With over 100 animal technologists working in more than 25 different locations throughout the United Kingdom with a shared responsibility for health and safety, under the Health & Safety at Work Act 1974, between our clients and ourselves it is vital that we ensure all of our technologists receive a thorough induction at the start of a new placement. To assist in our understanding we surveyed 20 research facilities about their induction processes. The welfare of the people who care for animals is at the centre of Agenda Resource Management’s welfare first programme as we believe that great animal welfare depends upon well trained and dedicated individuals who care passionately about animals and welfare. One of the key areas in the welfare first programme is training and development which starts from the very first day a new employee starts work. Delivering great animal welfare depends upon well trained and dedicated individuals who care passionately about animal care and welfare. This poster outlines some of the key findings of the survey and also covers some of the key points that are vital to ensure a smooth induction programme and a quick integration into the facility. Supraglottic airway devices in rabbits: how we implemented this technique to improve animal welfare and health and safety for staff Emma Tozer Smith & Nephew Plc, Research Centre, York Science Park, Heslington, York YO10 5DF In the past, rabbit anaesthesia has been delivered via a facemask/scavenging system. This type of system is not only uncomfortable for the animals but also presents an exposure risk to the theatre technician due to poor scavenging. We have made several attempts intubating rabbits using a variety of methods however none have been successful and/or provided confidence that the tube is inserted correctly. This poster looks at the steps we took for the successful implementation of the supraglottic airway device and the issues we encountered during the development of this technique. The husbandry of Xenopus: ensuring good care of Xenopus tropicalis and Xenopus laevis Chris Turnbull Department of Biology, University of York, Wentworth Way, York YO10 5DD There are two species of frog used as animal models for research, Xenopus tropicalis and Xenopus laevis. Each species offer researchers distinct advantages therefore maintaining both types of frogs allows researchers to undertake a wider range of experimental approaches. X.laevis is a longstanding model used for studies in developmental biology and cell cycle research, while X.tropicalis was introduced in 1999 as a model organism fit for genetic studies. The biology department at the University of York maintains both species of frog and while some of the regimes used are suited for both, there are some important differences in their husbandry. Our experience in maintaining both species will be presented and we will report on the regimes we use for enrichment, feeding and maintaining water quality to ensure two healthy Xenopus colonies. 54 Scientific Programme
Poster Displays  Welfare first  how good is your induction programme  Mathew Sanderson Agenda Resource Management Ltd, PO ...
Poster Displays Evaluation of a novel rat/gerbil nesting house with stereotypical behaviour, body weights and food consumption Gordon Melville The Roslin Institute and R(D)SVS, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Midlothian EH25 9RG To test if a purpose built nesting box, made from autoclavable stainless steel and a transparent, autoclavable polypropylene top, present in the home cage, enriched the quality of life for rats. This was determined by closely monitoring and recording the rats’ body weight and food consumption and observing any changes in their stereotypical behaviour. Confidence of a positive finding is high as a similar study previously conducted had already tested this design of nesting house on gerbil breeding pairs and found that there was a noticeable size difference in weanlings that had use of the nesting house. The gerbil weanlings that had the nesting house were larger than the weanlings without the nesting house. The coat condition of the animals was also markedly better and they were less agitated. The use of hypoxic chambers with large animals Craig Forest University of Cambridge, 307 Huntingdon Road, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire CB3 0JX Hypoxic chambers are fairly common in animal units these days, all of varying sizes and capabilities, most are only made to house rodents and are easily maintained. However, there are a few that have been custom made and purpose built for large animals, such as sheep. These have all the same configuration and adjustability, if not more so than the standard but trying to adapt a simple idea into a fully working model throws up a few problems which need to be overcome. There are now four fully working and operational large animal chambers within the University that have the ability to carry a single foetus to term, making it a very good human model. Study of the use of platforms for guinea pigs Victoria Wood Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL), Building 04/C49, Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 0JQ At DSTL we investigated whether male Dunkin Hartley Guinea pigs (HsdDhl:DH) would use a shelf/platform in their home cage. Currently there is no compatible platform for the cage type, so a 3D printed prototype was designed and produced with our engineering department to trial. The study consisted of observing the usage of the platform within our existing enriched cage environment, which includes plastic tubes and hay. Any adverse impacts on the animals welfare was monitored using bodyweight and by the use of 24hr CCTV to monitor for any aberrant behaviours. Once the investigation was completed we were able to conclude that the animals do use the shelf/platform with no welfare implications measured by weight and behaviour. Scientific Programme 55
Poster Displays  Evaluation of a novel rat gerbil nesting house with stereotypical behaviour, body weights and food consum...
Scientific Programme Guiding principles for behavioural laboratory animal science: a new resource for better science and animal welfare Penny Hawkins Research Animals Department, RSPCA, Wilberforce Way, Southwater, West Sussex RH13 9RS A resource setting out Guiding Principles for Behavioural Laboratory Animal Science was published in November 2013, with input from over 50 experts representing a wide range of stakeholders including animal technologists. The project was supported and funded by the Laboratory Animal Science Association (LASA), the British Association for Psychopharmacology (BAP), the British Neuroscience Association (BNA) and the European Courses in Whole Animal Pharmacology (ESSWAP Foundation). The guiding principles are designed to help make informed decisions about studies of animal behaviour in biomedical experiments, with respect to ensuring that work is justified, implementing the three Rs and improving scientific validity. They are intended for anyone involved in behavioural laboratory animal science, including researchers, named persons, animal technologists and AWERB members. There are seven sections: l the 3Rs and ethical evaluation l justifying studies of laboratory animal behaviour l choosing the procedure l training l the animal l the environment l the experiment and analysis of the data Improving rat housing and enrichment Colette Mottram-Hunt National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC), Blanche Lane, South Mimms, Potters Bar, Hertfordshire EN6 3QG Whilst much effort is put into improving conditions for larger laboratory animals such as primates, dogs and rabbits, small rodents often miss out. The goal at NIBSC was to create a whole new environment (including a new style caging and environmental enrichment) that would significantly improve the welfare of our rats; by providing them with more space and the opportunity to practise a wider range of natural behaviours. 56 Scientific Programme
Scientific Programme  Guiding principles for behavioural laboratory animal science  a new resource for better science and ...
Poster Displays Keep them calm and carry on Daniel Sturgiss Harlan Laboratories UK Ltd, Station Road, Blackthorn, Bicester Oxon OX25 1TP DBA/1 Mice are highly active mice but can exhibit stress related behaviours when disturbed. This can make them difficult to handle and cause further unnecessary stress for the animals. The purpose of this project was to investigate two parameters implicated in causing stress to the animals. Cage cleaning was investigated to see if changing cages for freshly washed ones every week caused more stress to the animals than scraping the cages clean and returning the animals to the same cage. The practise of using the constant sound of radios to mask intermittent noise made by technicians was also investigated, to see whether masking these sounds would help reduce stress in the animals, or whether the increased constant noise level would increase levels of stress in this particular strain. These investigations were carried out with a view to reducing the level of stress suffered by the animals during routine cleaning tasks. The naked mole rat - husbandry and maintenance Haley Forrest Combined Facility, Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB In an industry dominated by rats and mice it is not often one has the opportunity to work with something a little bit different. The naked mole rat is a fascinating animal which has very different husbandry requirements from most other rodents. As a technician it is very important to understand the full requirements of the animals’ maintenance and care in order to ensure their welfare. The animals are very sensitive to their environment, which makes it much more difficult when it comes to feeding, cleaning and maintaining the colony. Breeding is also much more complicated when it comes to naked mole rats due to their asocial nature and their sensitivity to disturbances. Although they are quite complicated to keep they have special adaptations which make them good models for various scientific studies. Scientific Programme 57
Poster Displays  Keep them calm and carry on Daniel Sturgiss Harlan Laboratories UK Ltd, Station Road, Blackthorn, Biceste...
Poster Displays The care and attention of Biozzi mice Sarah Bright Harlan Laboratories UK Ltd, Station Road, Blackthorn, Bicester, Oxon OX25 1TP The Biozzi AB/H mouse was first developed in 1970 by Guido Biozzi. In 1972 he selectively bred these mice to study the immunopathological mechanisms underlying polygenic diseases. This strain of mouse became important for the study of human inflammatory neurological diseases. It was first brought to Harlan in 1994 and has been bred within the company ever since. Whilst working with this strain it became apparent that they required a lot more care and attention than that of any other colony we have within our barrier. They are very temperamental and do not tolerate change. Any change to the personnel or environment has detrimental effects on their breeding performance. The purpose of this project was to investigate ways to reduce the stress these mice experienced in order to improve their welfare and breeding performance. During this project we looked at several areas for improvement. Food intake: does the cage matter? Reece Williams Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN The aim of this study was to show the weight gain between two separate caging systems using two different rat species. The two separate caging units have different parameters in terms of cleaning schedule and food amounts. The study was carried out over two five week periods with the rats’ weight being recorded. Career pathway for animal technologists Kenneth Applebee Department of Biological Services, School of Biomedical Sciences, King’s College London, Guy’s Campus, London SE1 1UL Dr Judy MacArthur Clark CBE MRCVS Head, Animals in Science Regulation Unit commented on the IAT Career Pathway “This Laboratory Animal Science & Technology Career Pathway will importantly enable animal facility staff, both in industry and academia, to achieve high standards of competence and professionalism within Home Office licensed establishments. The Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act, 1986 and the EU Directive 2010/63 both identify the need for laboratory animal care personnel to be formally recognised as being professionally qualified, including Higher Education Qualifications at Levels 4 to 6. All these qualifications will therefore build on that need. They will deliver the knowledge to enable individuals to achieve a full and sustainable career pathway. For some, this may include the entry into Master’s Degree programmes and to aspire to ever more senior positions. I am confident that graduates from these courses will be able to make a very significant contribution in influencing the application of high standards of animal welfare, care and use in the UK Life Sciences. This will importantly include promoting and implementing the 3Rs (Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal use) in research facilities throughout the UK – something which the Government strongly advocates”. (December 2014) 58 Scientific Programme
Poster Displays  The care and attention of Biozzi mice Sarah Bright Harlan Laboratories UK Ltd, Station Road, Blackthorn, ...
Poster Displays Recommendations for environmental enrichment to enhance the welfare of mice in oncology research Gemma Willoughby CrownBio UK, Hillcrest, Dodgeford Lane, Belton, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE12 9TE Environmental enrichment is the process of providing stimulating environments for research animals in order for them to demonstrate their species-typical behaviour, to allow them to exercise control or choice over their environment and to enhance their well-being. Enrichment provides a number of positive refinements to promote natural behaviours and interaction with the environment such as nesting, gnawing, exploring and finding cover. Evidence suggests that environmental enrichment may reduce or prevent stereotypical behaviours such as bar mouthing, cage circling, back flipping and barbering. It has also been noted that environmental enrichment may reduce conflict situations and fighting in male mice. Take a load off - an assessment of a drawer style cage system Victoria Hurlow Sequani Ltd, Bromyard Road, Ledbury, Herefordshire HR8 1LU At Sequani with many different study types to accommodate we wanted to find a single solid bottomed cage type that was capable of fulfilling differing study housing requirements. We have several types and sizes of solid caging. The larger gang-housed rat caging has proven to be unpopular with technologists because of the physical challenges associated with moving cages housing gangs of larger rats. Our desire was to find a solid bottomed cage that could compare to a much favoured drawer style cage. Animal technicians: the good, the bad and the ugly Sophia Bullock University of Aberdeen, Medical Research Facility, Foresterhill, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire AB25 2ZB The use of animals in scientific experiments in the UK began around the 17th century. Since then animals have been a keystone feature in the unfolding of vital information about the human and animal life processes. This information aides the advancement of pathological knowledge as well as the development of pharmaceuticals and diagnostic tools which help alleviates the suffering of both man and animal. Previously, researchers at commercial and government laboratories not only carried out experiments but also tended to the daily husbandry of the animals they used. As science and legislation has evolved animal technicians have replaced the scientist in the daily care and welfare needs of the animals. Technologists have moved from people who learned about animal husbandry on the job with minimal supervision or instruction to professionals who are recognised as the backbone of the entire animal research program. An animal technician’s job is comprised of many different responsibilities such as animal care and welfare and performing regulated procedures. While researchers can benefit from technologist’s skills the animal technicians are often emotionally invested in the animals in their care. This compassion has been shown to have a positive impact on the animal’s well-being, as well as on the science but it can also add a darker side to the role. Scientific Programme 59
Poster Displays  Recommendations for environmental enrichment to enhance the welfare of mice in oncology research Gemma Wi...
Poster Displays Automated CO2 euthanasia system: an evaluation Robert Stewart Comparative Biology Centre, The Medical School, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH Carbon Dioxide (CO2 ) is widely used as a method of laboratory animal euthanasia in rodents. Fixed flow chambers offer a method of home cage CO2 euthanasia of rodents that is automated thus eliminating operator error, is easy to operate and is safe for users. One such fixed flow chamber was evaluated over a number of weeks, for a number of factors, by a range of users including research staff, technicians and veterinary surgeons. As well as scoring a range of factors, from 1-5, the users were also encourage to record any comments they may have had. Trials and tribulations of setting up a germ free facility in a Specific Pathogen Free (SPF) environment Selina Hopkins Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA New investigations at our establishment required the use of germ free mice and we were tasked with finding a suitable location within our SPF barrier facility to house the animals and maintain the health status of this vulnerable mouse model. Once the location had been selected, a working group determined the processes required in supporting a fully functioning germ free facility. This poster explains the process of establishing and maintaining a successful germ free facility with in the SPF area and the factors which influenced our decisions and choices. Processes for preparing the various items required by the mice and moving these to the room were put in place. Similarly procedures for moving other mice, consumables and soiled equipment passed the germ free room were implemented to ensure minimal risk to the germ free status. 60 Scientific Programme
Poster Displays  Automated CO2 euthanasia system  an evaluation Robert Stewart Comparative Biology Centre, The Medical Sch...
Poster Displays An updated ‘road map’ towards ending severe suffering Penny Hawkins Research Animals Department, RSPCA, Wilberforce Way, Southwater, West Sussex RH13 9RS Any level of suffering experienced by animals is a concern but ending severe suffering is a top #63 priority for both ethical and scientific reasons - it is widely acknowledged that good quality science goes hand in hand with good welfare. The revised Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act, 1986 requires researchers to record and report the actual level of suffering that animals experienced during each procedure. This presents an excellent opportunity for all staff, including animal technologists, to work together in reviewing the sources and nature of suffering within the procedure (to perform a ‘severity audit’), to evaluate the effectiveness of current refinement practices and to research and implement more effective ways of avoiding or minimising suffering. Fundamental to the success of such an initiative are a receptive institutional culture, wellsupported staff and a robust and challenging ethical review process. This poster outlines a ‘road map’ process that establishments can use to reduce suffering for all animals and work towards ending severe suffering. INDEX TO ADVERTISERS Page 3Rs LAB IBC Page LBS OBC Allentown Inc 14 LEEC Ltd 40 Allentown Inc 24 Learning Curve (Development) Ltd 69 Bell Isolation Systems Ltd 36 North Kent Plastics 32 Charles River Laboratories 28 Pro-active Security Solutions 10 R C Hartelust BV 26 Contec® 62 Datesand Ltd 3 SAFE 27 Datesand Ltd 22 Scanbur 15 IMPEX Services International Ltd 21 Special Diets Services Instem 44 IPS Product Supplies Ltd 12 Sychem Ltd UNO Roestvaststaal BV 6 IFC 4 Scientific Programme 61
Poster Displays  An updated    road map    towards ending severe suffering Penny Hawkins Research Animals Department, RSPC...
Workshops Each course is CPD accredited Animal Technologists – advancing comparative biology Five workshops will take place over two days and attendance is subject to availability. It is therefore important for you to register at the Congress Reception as soon as possible on your arrival. CPD certificates will be issued to all attendees at the end of each Workshop. WEDNESDAY 18th March Time Workshop/Venue 11.00 - 11.30 COFFEE in Trade Exhibition Hall 11.00 - 13.00 WORKSHOP 4 Actual severity assessments: practical considerations Alsh Room - Loch Suite 13.00 - 14.00 LUNCH in Hall 1 - SECC 14.00 - 16.00 WORKSHOP 1 The scientific/animal research laboratory as a place to care for animals Carron Room - Loch Suite 14.00 - 16.00 WORKSHOP 2 How to become involved in the Animal Welfare and Ethical Review Body (AWERB) Alsh Room - Loch Suite THURSDAY 19th March Time Workshop/Venue 09.00 - 11.00 WORKSHOP 3 Assessing pain in animals using sheep as the main example Carron Room - Loch Suite 10.30 - 11.00 COFFEE in Trade Exhibition Hall 11.00 - 13.00 WORKSHOP 5 Introduction to Named Persons Carron Room - Loch Suite 13.00 - 14.00 LUNCH in Hall 1 - SECC A map showing locations can be found in the Notepad. Scientific Programme 63
Workshops  Each course is CPD accredited  Animal Technologists     advancing comparative biology Five workshops will take ...
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 63 for timings and the venue 2 HOURS CPD CREDIT Workshop 1 The scientific/animal research laboratory as a place to care for animals Presented by Beth Greenhough MSc BSc PhD1 and Emma Roe BSc PhD2 1Associate Professor of Human Geography, Oxford University Centre for the Environment, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QY 2Lecturer in Human Geography, University of Southampton, University Road, Southampton SO17 1BJ We will present some key findings from our study of the experiences of junior laboratory animal technologists (LATs). We will then invite discussion in small groups to share experiences and to identify how these findings could inform the institutional and professional support offered by animal technologists including codes of practice for following the 3Rs. Topics include: l familiarising animals with handling and experimental procedures l carrying out procedures l favouritism and speciesism l killing/euthanasia We will ask the groups to reflect on how their experiences can demonstrate the role played by personal responsibility, animal welfare concerns and the 3Rs in relation to each of these topics. Beth Greenhough Dr Beth Greenhough has a MSc in Society & Space from the University of Bristol and completed a PhD from the Open University in 2003. She has also held a postdoctoral fellowship at the Open University and worked as a lecturer at Keele University and Queen Mary University of London. Beth’s research in her present position focusses on exploring the social, cultural and ethical issues surrounding the use of humans and animals as experimental subjects for biomedical research. Emma Roe Over the last ten years, Dr Emma Roe has developed an expertise in humananimal relationships through studying food animal welfare in supply chains and more recently animal care practices in research facilities. Her work has received research funding from the UK Economic and Social Research Council, UK Arts and Humanities Research Council, European Commission, British Academy, Animal Welfare Foundation, University of Southampton and The Wellcome Trust. She has written numerous peer-reviewed journal articles, book-chapters, reports and short articles and has presented findings both nationally and internationally to academic and non-academic audiences including laboratory animal technicians, the food industry, farm veterinary professionals and the arts/design community. Beth and Emma are currently undertaking a two-year project funded by The Wellcome Trust (2013-2015) which explores how Animal Technologists put ethics into practice through their work in animal care and welfare. 64 Scientific Programme
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 63 for timings and the venue  2 HOURS CPD CREDIT  Workshop 1 The scien...
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 63 for timings and the venue 2 HOURS CPD CREDIT Workshop 2 How to become involved in the Animal Welfare and Ethical Review Body (AWERB) Presented by Penny Hawkins PhD BSc Deputy Head, Research Animals Department, RSPCA, Wilberforce Way, Southwater, West Sussex RH13 9RS This workshop aims to encourage animal technologists to become involved with the Animal Welfare Ethical Review Body (AWERB) at their establishment, whether they already have an interest in participating or just want to find out more about the committee and the way it works. It will also be of interest to those who already sit on an AWERB and would like to contribute more actively. The major tasks of the AWERB include advising staff on matters related to the welfare of animals, in relation to their acquisition, accommodation, care and use; and advising on the application of the 3Rs, keeping staff informed of relevant technical and scientific developments. Animal technologists and care staff are ideally placed to help the AWERB fulfil all of these tasks, which is reflected in the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act’s requirement that the AWERB must include at least one Named Animal Care and Welfare Officer (NACWO) as a full member, with active engagement from other Named Persons, including Named Information Officers (NIOs) and Named Training and Competency Officers (NTCOs). Membership however is not just for Named Persons – Animal Technologists with a range of roles are able to make valuable contributions with respect to providing information, applying ‘local’ values to the AWERB’s discussions and judgements and broadening the range of perspectives that can be brought to bear. With the input from a Home Office Inspector and an Animal Technologist active on their local AWERB, we will discuss delegates’ experiences of the AWERB at their establishments. We will also review some anonymised project licence applications, to explore the kinds of issues that animal technologists usually identify, discuss and help to improve as AWERB members. The workshop will conclude with a short discussion on training needs, to identify any areas where people would like more support. Topics include: l promoting awareness of animal welfare and the 3Rs l providing a forum for discussion and development of ethical advice l supporting named persons and other staff dealing with animals on animal welfare l helping to promote a ‘Culture of Care’ within the establishment and as appropriate in the wider community Penny Hawkins Dr Penny Hawkins is the Deputy Head of the RSPCA Research Animals Department, which works to achieve a more effective ethical review of animal use and implementation of the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). She joined the RSPCA 18 years ago and her main areas of work relate to promoting refinement, for example reducing severe suffering, improving housing and care, assessing welfare, the use of animals in fundamental physiology research, telemetry and humane killing. The implementation of new UK and European regulations controlling animal use, including effective harmbenefit assessment and ethical review, is also a current priority. Penny is a member of the UK Animals in Science Committee (ASC), the independent body that advises the regulator and local AWERBs on the implementation of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act, 1986. She is an active member of the ASC’s AWERB sub-committee and currently sits on two AWERBs as a lay member. Scientific Programme 65
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 63 for timings and the venue  2 HOURS CPD CREDIT  Workshop 2 How to be...
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 63 for timings and the venue 2 HOURS CPD CREDIT Workshop 3 Assessing pain in animals using sheep as the main example Presented by Katie Blackwell MIAT RAnTech PTLLS Senior IVB Theatre Technologist, Smith & Nephew, Research Centre, Heslington, York YO10 5DF Sheep can tolerate severe discomfort without showing overt signs of pain or distress. This workshop aims to provide animal technologists with an opportunity to discuss and learn how to recognise signs of pain in a species they may not be familiar with and different ways of managing the pain. Topics include: l signs of pain in familiar species i.e. rats, mice and rabbits l signs of pain in sheep l recording signs of pain in sheep l how we manage pain in our facility l changes to improve pain management Katie Blackwell Katie Blackwell has experience in running a busy theatre, routinely anaesthetising sheep, rabbits and rodents. She also takes part in pre- and post- operative care as well as surgical support. She works closely with the Named Veterinary Surgeon to constantly review and update current practice and is responsible for the welfare of the animals as a NACWO. Katie has completed PTLLS training and routinely trains new members for the team and assists with the IAT qualifications. In addition, she teaches various techniques and is one of the NTCOs within the facility. 66 Scientific Programme
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 63 for timings and the venue  2 HOURS CPD CREDIT  Workshop 3 Assessing...
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 63 for timings and the venue 2 HOURS CPD CREDIT Workshop 4 Actual severity assessments: practical considerations Presented by Steve Ryder MA VetMB CertVR PhD MRCVS1 and Sarah Lane MSc FIAT RAnTech2 1Inspector, Animals in Science Regulation Unit, Home Office, 2 Marsham Street, London SW1P 4DF 2CBS Quality Assurance and 3Rs Programme Manager, CBS, Imperial College London, Room G05, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ Following its amendment in 2012, the assessment of the actual severity of all procedures carried out under Animals Scientific Procedures Act, 1986 (ASPA) has since 2014, been required for the annual return of procedures and whenever re-use of animals is considered. An overview of actual severity assessment will be given together with a review of the principles of how severity assessments should be made and recorded. A workshop discussion will follow covering some common scenarios to help clarify areas of difficulty. Topics include: l what to include and what not to include in severity assessments l prospective versus actual severity l severity and re-use l severity and the regulated breeding of GA animals l what if the protocol severity has been exceeded? Steve Ryder Dr Stephen Ryder holds degrees in Natural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine with a PhD in Experimental Neuropathology. He spent eight years in veterinary practice and seven years in full time research studying pathology and pathogenesis of spongiform encephalopathies before joining the Home Office in 2004 as an Inspector under the Animal (Scientific Procedures) Act. He has a particular interest in the collection and presentation of statistical data on animal use in the UK and Europe. Sarah Lane Sarah Lane has been an animal technologist since the age of 16 working in a number of establishments both private and academic, with a range of species. She has now joined Imperial College London where she has taken up the post of Quality and 3Rs Programme Manager. This position supports both the animal facility and the academics in implementing the 3Rs at the College. Sarah has been an active member on IAT Council and sits on a number of subgroups including the Board of Educational Policy and the Registration Board where she regularly performs interviews for those applying to become Registered Animal Technologists (RAnTechs). Also, for her sins, she is the Editor of the IAT Bulletin. Scientific Programme 67
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 63 for timings and the venue  2 HOURS CPD CREDIT  Workshop 4 Actual se...
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 63 for timings and the venue 2 HOURS CPD CREDIT Workshop 5 Introduction to Named Persons Presented by Ian Garrod FSB CBiol MBPharmacolS CPD and Training Manager, Learning Curve (Development) Ltd, PO Box 140, Ware, Hertfordshire SG9 0ZN This workshop will examine in depth what ASPA and the Guidance say about the different Named Persons’ roles and look at how they are developing under the amended regulations. Topics include: l Named Animal Care and Welfare Officer (NACWO), Named Information Officer (NIO), Named Training and Competency Officer (NTCO) l working in groups we will explore the key roles and responsibilities l how do these roles cross over and complement each other? l look at ways we can meet these roles and responsibilities l discuss issues raised and explore what help is needed to carry out these new roles and responsibilities Ian Garrod Ian Garrod has extensive experience working within academia and the pharmaceutical industry in Regulatory Compliance, with education, training and personal development his other main area of expertise. A significant proportion of Ian’s expertise includes the construction, provision and execution of the Home Office Modular courses. He is a member of the Society of Biology Accreditation Board and this makes him the ideal person to ensure the course content is first class and up-to-date. Ian also visits schools and works with Understanding Animal Research (UAR), informing children and the public about animal care and welfare in medical science. Having previously managed the Pfizer school speaker programme, this makes Ian an important link between science and the people who use medication for health reasons. Ian is committed to developing and extending current and new training courses, workshops and seminars offered by the Learning Curve. 68 Scientific Programme
Workshop Sessions Please refer to the Table on page 63 for timings and the venue  2 HOURS CPD CREDIT  Workshop 5 Introduct...
“TLC’s ethos is to encourage, help, guide and teach technical, behavioural and ethical competency to the highest possible standard to those working in laboratory animal science.” Is it time to give your employees a little more TLC? Training Learning Competency TLC offers continued professional development over a wide range of disciplines for animal technologists, in vivo scientists and support staff by highly qualified mentors. TLC continually aims to raise awareness of laboratory animal welfare for those who pursue a career in medical science. We have your future at heart email: info@learningcurvedevelopment.co.uk www.learningcurvedevelopment.co.uk Our courses are accredited by the Society of Biology (SoB) and the Institute of Animal Technology (IAT) as well as providing CPD credits from the Institute of Animal Technology (IAT) and Laboratory Animals Science Association (LASA)
   TLC   s ethos is to encourage, help, guide and teach technical, behavioural and ethical competency to the highest possi...
Social Programme Tuesday 17th March ICE BREAKER 16.30 Never attended Congress before or have come on your own and don’t know many people ... Then join us at the Congress Reception for an Ice breaker session and meet fellow technologists WINE RECEPTION TO OFFICIALLY OPEN THE TRADE EXHIBITION 19.00 (being held in Hall 1 at the SECC followed by DINNER) 19.15 We are delighted to welcome the Lord Provost of Glasgow who will perform the official opening and whose office has kindly sponsored this wine reception TRADE RECEPTION until 22.30 The Trade Reception always gets Congress off to a great start so come along and mix around the stands meeting our industry colleagues – as it’s St Patrick’s Day expect to see some visiting leprechauns around the hall! Wednesday 18th March DINNER 19.30 Served in the Argyll Suite at the Crowne Plaza hotel Smart casual dress is required please Followed by the marvellous Innovation Roadshow With a break for a non-traditional Ceilidh! Science Ceilidh Dancing a ceilidh is purely for enjoyment, so why not grab a partner and join other couples on the dance floor! Thursday 19th March Smart dress, jackets and ties are required (No jeans, t-shirts, trainers or fancy dress please – however traditional Scottish kilts will be very welcome!) GALA DINNER & DANCE 20.00 - 02.00 Served in the Argyll Suite at the Crowne Plaza hotel During dinner, the unique NORTH will entertain us Followed by the marvellous ATLANTIC PROJECT Innovation Roadshow For those who wish a quieter evening to chat and relax, the Foyer Bar will remain open during the whole evening Congress Badges must be worn by EVERYONE 70 Social Programme
Social Programme  Tuesday 17th March ICE BREAKER  16.30  Never attended Congress before or have come on your own and don  ...
Social Programme GALA DINNER and DANCE NORTH ATLANTIC PROJECT Who describe themselves as American girl plays harp in mostly Scottish way, with Scottish guy who plays dobro in mostly American way! Combining tunes, songs and the styles from Scotland, old-time Appalachian and Bluegrass music; Cheyenne Brown and Dave Currie create a unique musical sensation. AS-ET 5TH ANNIVERSARY SILENT AUCTION For one night only at the Official opening of the Trade Exhibition Please bid what you can afford on the selection of items to see on the exhibiting companies’ stands and make this a successful fund-raising evening for AS-ET. Happy bidding! Many thanks to ALL of the companies who are participating SCIENCE CEILIDH Fancy a ceilidh like you’ve never had before? Ever thought that science works really well through a ceilidh? The Science Ceilidh Band have rejigged all the favourite dances with a twist of science. It will be loads of fun! Very lively and energetic!! Social Programme 71
Social Programme  GALA DINNER and DANCE NORTH ATLANTIC PROJECT Who describe themselves as American girl plays harp in most...
Trade Exhibition Exhibitors’ Index Exhibitors 1st Biotech Ltd LBS (Serving Biotechnology) Ltd 3Rs LAB Learning Curve (Development) Ltd Afos LEEC Ltd Agenda Resource Management Ltd Lomir Biomedical Inc Allentown Europe Ltd Marshall BKU Andersons Bedding Products MMM Medical Equipment UK Ltd Animal Care Systems MSE Henderson Biomedical Aquaneering/Fairfield Controlec Ltd North Kent Plastics Arrowmight Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems AS-ET Plexx BV a-tune software AG Pro-active Security Solutions AW Anaesthesia Services Ltd Rees Scientific Biochrom Ltd / Harvard Apparatus S3 Science Charles River SAFE Clinipath Ltd SCANBUR Contec Inc Science Equip Ltd Datesand Ltd Scionics Computer Innovation GmbH Edstrom Inc (Europe) Special Diets Services Ellegaard Göttingen Minipigs Steel Line Ltd Fisher Scientific Surrey Diagnostics Ltd Harlan Laboratories Ltd Sychem Ltd IMPEX Services International Ltd Tecniplast UK Ltd Instem The Cube Ltd Institute of Animal Technology Thoren Caging International Medical Supplies Transnetyx Inc IPS Product Supplies Ltd UNO Roestvaststaal BV Laboratory Animal Science Association (LASA) Vet-Tech Solutions Ltd LANTRA Williton Box Company Animal Technology – advancing comparative biology 72 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition  Exhibitors    Index Exhibitors  1st Biotech Ltd  LBS  Serving Biotechnology  Ltd  3Rs LAB  Learning Curv...
Trade Exhibition Allentown Marshall BKU Lomir Agenda LASA ACS Inc Science Equip Edstrom IMS Ltd The Cube Williton Box MMM Safe Diets Contec UNO BV AFOS 3Rs Lab Impex Biochrom /Harvard Trans netyx Ellagaard Thoren Caging Anderson Pentair MSE Henderson IAT AS-ET Datesand Scanbur a-tune Rees Scientific LBS Ltd Surrey Diags S3 Science Main Entrance via Hall 1 Sychem Steel Line Scionics Vet-Tech 1st Biotech Learning Curve Arrowmight Exhibition Plan IPS Ltd Harlan Charles River NKP Instem LANTRA Fisher Scientific SDS Tecniplast Plexx BV Clinipath Leec AW Anaesth Aquan/ Proactive Fairfield Security Trade Exhibition 73
Trade Exhibition  Allentown  Marshall BKU  Lomir Agenda LASA  ACS Inc  Science Equip  Edstrom  IMS Ltd  The Cube  Williton...
Trade Exhibition The Publisher and the IAT accept no responsibility for any claims made by companies in the following entries. 1st Biotech Ltd 1st Biotech is a family business, manufacturing and supplying bespoke laboratory clothing for over 40 years. Our clothing comes in a lightweight and mid-weight fabric, with many colour choices and can be manufactured in any of your chosen styles. We can personally visit your premises to discuss the clothing you may require and advise on sizing and styles. All orders are manufactured bespoke to your requirements, exactly as you want them. For example you can choose from stud cuff or elasticated cuff, short sleeve or long sleeve, leg pockets, etc. The choices are endless! Our range of products has greatly expanded over the years and we are authorised distributors of brands such as 3M, Moldex, Segre, Marigold, Ansell, Anistel, Primeguard, Toffeln, Pal, etc. As authorised stockists of these brands we are able to offer great pricing, please ask for a ‘no obligation’ quote and put us to the test! As stockists of all disposable items, including facemasks, overshoes, oversleeves, mob caps, disposable coveralls, visitor coats, gloves, etc, we can offer next day delivery, direct from our warehouse. Our offices are open daily with professional staff on hand to answer any question or enquiry you may have. In addition to our office staff, Luke and Sadie, our Sales Team are available too and would be happy to speak with you and/or arrange to visit you. Contact us at: 1st Biotech Ltd, Unit 10 Tovil Green Business Park, Tovil, Maidstone, Kent ME15 6TA T / F: +44 (0) 870 300 9554 E: sales@1stbiotech.co.uk www.1stbiotech.co.uk 3Rs LAB Unique laboratory animal bedding recycled • refined • remarkable Products: 3Rs LAB Basic 3Rs LAB Premium 3Rs bedding is made from >99% recycled paper and utilises no virgin material and no additives or chemicals. As a recycled product, it saves landfill space, saves energy, reduces pollution and uses less resource than virgin material. Findings from facilities overseas and more recently from laboratory animal facilities within the UK have demonstrated outstanding performance of both products with the following benefits: l proven cost savings  l animal welfare benefits l longer intervals between cage changes l significant odour control l minimal dust l lower levels of coliform and endotoxins than other laboratory bedding forms l easy to use, clean and dispose l biodegradable l product available ex stock 74 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition The Publisher and the IAT accept no responsibility for any claims made by companies in the following entr...
Trade Exhibition 3Rs bedding is produced in a custom built facility in the UK dedicated to the production of quality, absorbent animal bedding by a manufacturer with 20 years’ experience. Contact us at: 3Rs LAB T: +44 (0) 800 6121619 E: info@3rsbedding.com www.3rsbedding.com Agenda Resource Management Ltd Looking for novel solutions to staffing? Agenda provides quick and cost effective solutions to all of your staffing requirements by supplying staff at all levels whether you need permanent recruitment support, short term temporary cover or one of our experienced contract animal technologists. Agenda Resource Management provides a highly skilled, friendly yet professional tailor made service to clients throughout the industry regardless of your resourcing needs. Our service includes: l full range of resourcing options available from permanent recruitment or local  temporary staff to contract staff for short or long term placements l experienced, friendly and professional recruitment consultants  l comprehensively security screened job candidates and contract staff  l fully matched, interviewed and pre-selected job candidates.  Staff available at all  levels from cage wash operatives to research directors, often within 24 hours l the largest database of research facility job seekers available  Other services available from Agenda Resource Management include: l facilities management  l consultancy  l staff training and development  Looking for new opportunities? Agenda has a team of highly experienced, highly successful recruitment specialists with strong links to leading employers throughout the UK and Europe to help you find the perfect career move – completely free of charge. Contact us at: Agenda Resource Management Ltd, PO Box 24, Hull HU12 8YJ T: +44 (0) 8456 445545 / International: + 44 (0) 1964 671791 F: +44 (0) 8456 445547 E: stuartl@agenda-mc.co.uk www.agenda-rm.co.uk Allentown Europe Ltd Allentown has been developing and producing patented, innovative animal housing products for 43 years. We assist our clients through facility design and layout, installation, training and post-occupancy service. Our products include IVC systems, bio-containment IVC systems, biological work stations, animal transport units, multi species housing, wireless IVC monitoring and RFID animal census solutions and a wide variety of HVAC integration and air flow control accessories. Trade Exhibition 75
Trade Exhibition 3Rs bedding is produced in a custom built facility in the UK dedicated to the production of quality, abso...
Trade Exhibition Large animal housing: Allentown started manufacturing sturdy, reliable large animal housing over 43 years ago and offers a wide variety of custom solutions for non-human primates, dogs, rabbits, swine and other species all in accordance with the latest International and European guidelines. Facility integrated airflow solutions (FIAS): Allentown is the industry leader in the design, implementation and service of custom designed interstitial HVAC solutions for ventilated rodent rooms. Allentown’s vivarium design services department offers full service assistance in the planning and design of animal holding rooms, as well as a comprehensive selection of innovative products designed to enhance the performance of your facility. Contact us at: Allentown Europe Ltd, PO Box 3056, Reading, Berkshire RG1 9UY T: +44 (0) 845 0450243 E: info@AllentownInc.com www.AllentownInc.com Andersons Bedding Products Andersons Bedding Products is the manufacturer of quality bedding, nesting and enrichment products. The Andersons have been manufacturing corn cob bedding specifically for the laboratory animal industry since 1962. The Andersons have expanded their line of bed-o’cobs bedding products to meet today’s enrichment and bedding needs. The innovative new bedding products include bedding and enrichment in one bag along with nesting material and post-surgical recovery pads. All the Andersons’ innovative products are available exclusively through The Datesand Group. Contact us at: Andersons Bedding Products, 521 Illinois Avenue, Maumee, Ohio 43537, USA T: +1 419 8976700 F: +1 419 8916539 E: coborders@andersonsinc.com www.AndersonsLabBedding.com Animal Care Systems Animal Care Systems manufactures the only motor-free rodent caging system in the industry. Combining ‘twice the mice’ density with our unique carousel design, our caging provides a microenvironment that is free of noise, vibration and ultrasound, creating a variable-free environment. We have established a stellar reputation for our superior customer service and product support. Our mission is to provide innovative rodent caging systems that save energy and protect animals, their caretakers and the environment. Animal Care Systems established in 1997, is the first caging systems company in the industry founded by a veterinarian with experience in directing AAALAC accredited animal care and use programmes. Dr Germain Rivard’s experience with animal facility planning, design and management produced the construction of the first Gene Transfer Technologies Training Center and Rodent Barrier Facility for genetically altered mouse colonies. 76 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Large animal housing  Allentown started manufacturing sturdy, reliable large animal housing over 43 years...
Trade Exhibition Contact us at: Animal Care Systems, 7086 South Revere Parkway, Centennial, Colorado 80112, USA T: +1 720 2830177 E: info@animalcaresystems.com www.animalcaresystems.com Aquaneering / Fairfield Controlec Ltd Fairfield Controlec Ltd are the UK representatives for Aquaneering Inc, designers and manufacturers of high quality aquatics systems. Aquaneering’s aquatics systems range in size from small stand-alone bench top racks for Zebrafish and Xenopus, up to extremely large systems with dedicated centralised water treatment (over 33,000 Zebrafish tanks is the largest so far). In all cases, Aquaneering’s expertise in water treatment ensures that animals are held in the very highest quality of water and full training in system operation is provided for technicians and end users. Systems can be equipped with full critical parameter monitoring systems, with alarm outputs including mobile phone SMS messaging, email, landline and BMS options. Fairfield Controlec Ltd provide installation, full service support and emergency backup, including spare parts stocks for Aquaneering’s systems. Our staff has a collective experience of over 50 years of design, installation, maintenance and support of aquatics systems and include marine biologists and control system engineers. We can also provide service, support and spare parts for most makes of aquatic systems and also offer training and consultancy in all aspects of system operation and troubleshooting. Contact us at: Aquaneering / Fairfield Controlec Ltd, London House, King Edward Street, Grimsby, Lincolnshire DN31 3LA T: +44 (0) 1472 268141 F: +44 (0) 1472 243049 E: graham.willoughby@fairfield-controlec.co.uk www.aquaneering.com Arrowmight Arrowmight have been a premier supplier of design and build housing for large species for over 30 years and we continue to invest in the development of innovative products designed specifically for the biomedical research sector. We have unrivalled experience in the design, manufacture, installation and servicing of equipment specifically for the laboratory animal industry. Our range of isolators has expanded to cover speciality units and bespoke designs, utilising the very best materials and the most robust twin-fan system in the marketplace. Our ventilated cabinet (AVC) system provides a clean environment for the housing of a variety of rodent species, whilst offering containment and protection to the operator, environment and animal. The Arrowmight Maxiseal IVC System offers unrivalled protection for staff and animals, with unique cage level HEPA filtration ensuring that the airway plenums do not become contaminated with cage debris. The Arrowmight Argus environmental monitoring system offers secure and time saving wireless monitoring and management of your facility and equipment. Argus can be quickly installed into existing facilities at minimum expense. Arrowmight is the exclusive UK distributor for the Better Built range of cagewashers, Trade Exhibition 77
Trade Exhibition Contact us at  Animal Care Systems, 7086 South Revere Parkway, Centennial, Colorado 80112, USA T   1 720 ...
Trade Exhibition bedding disposal stations and automatic bedding dispensers. Better Built’s Activ™ range of automated solutions specifically meet the challenges facing washing facilities in the animal research industry. Arrowmight – Innovation through partnership Contact us at: Arrowmight, Campwood Road, Rotherwas Industrial Estate, Hereford HR2 6JD T: +44 (0) 1432 379111 F: +44 (0) 1432 344960 E: salesadmin@arrowmight.com www.arrowmight.com AS-ET Animals in Science – Education Trust The Animals in Science - Education Trust is a charity registered under the UK Charities Act 1993. Our objectives are the advancement of education and the promotion of excellence in the care and welfare of animals used in science. Congress 2015 is a special meeting for AS-ET as it marks five years since our formation. We are arranging several events to celebrate our anniversary, including an AS-ET sponsored platform event on Thursday morning starting at 11.00 hrs in the Lomond Auditorium with three presenters contributing and are again delighted to be sponsoring the Andrew Blake Tribute Award with the IAT. In September we will be holding the AS-ET Fund Raising Ball. Visit our stand to find out about our other birthday events. During our first five years we have distributed over £63,000 in bursaries to support education and welfare activities. Of course we can only distribute money other people have given us. Our income comes from corporate sponsors, official supporters and from fund raising activities. If we are to continue to support education and promote excellence in the care and welfare of animals used in science we need your help. We have set ourselves a target to increase the number of official supporters to 500. To become a supporter you need to complete a standing order form to donate a minimum of £12.00 a year. If you do so before the end of June 2015 you will be entered into a prize draw to win two tickets to the AS-ET Ball including a one night stay at the hotel. Visit the AS-ET stand to talk to us about bursaries and special travel annual travel bursary competition. Find out about our 5th Anniversary Celebration events and most importantly come to sign up as an official sponsor. Contact us at: E: contact@as-et.org.uk www.animalsinscienceeducationtrust.org.uk a-tune software AG tick@lab is the software solution for the management of animal research facilities including management of protocols, meetings, inspections, animal orders, capacity management, stock and facility management, veterinary records, breeding, cost accounting, reporting and statistics. 100% web technology, easy to learn, easy to use, easy to integrate! a-tune software AG is a medium sized, financially stable, independent German software vendor and a trusted partner for long lasting and stable co-operation with its customers mainly within the pharmaceutical industry. “Make IT simple” is both a-tune’s motto and the measure of all its activities, including the key focuses: l data management research and development in life sciences  78 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition bedding disposal stations and automatic bedding dispensers. Better Built   s Activ    range of automated ...
Trade Exhibition l task and project management  Objectives we provide: l optimisation of work and data flows  l creation of transparency for users  l guarantee of governance, compliance and best practices  l lowering expenses and risks  Competitively priced, a-tune’s products, project solutions and professional services make these goals a reality. Contact us at: a-tune software AG, Julius-Reiber-Strasse 15, 64293 Darmstadt, Germany T: +49 6151 951310 F: +49 6151 9513129 E: sales@a-tune.com www.a-tune.com AW Anaesthesia Services Ltd Products: l anaesthetic machines, all types, also custom designed to your specification  l oxygen concentrators  l vaporisers  l ventilators  l low flow breathing circuits and masks  l induction chambers  l heated tables  l temperature monitors  l reconditioned equipment  l waste gas management solutions  l medical gas supply and installation  l pollution monitoring  l CPD and training  l annual on-site servicing and calibration checks for all types of anaesthetic machines  and associated equipment, also includes CO2 chambers and full service reports With over 35 years’ experience as a biomedical engineer specialising in anaesthesia in the NHS, veterinary and laboratory industries, AW Anaesthesia Services Ltd provides a reliable, affordable and quality service for all your anaesthesia requirements. Our equipment is manufactured using high quality materials and components and usually supplied with extended warranty as standard. The low flow breathing circuits help to conserve oxygen and anaesthetic agent; this reduces pollution as well as your revenue budget. Oxygen concentrators are also becoming popular as an alternative to cylinders. However, they may not be suitable for all applications and some modifications to your equipment may be required. Please contact us for free advice. Contact us at: AW Anaesthesia Services Ltd, 11 Cranmore Grove, Aston Lodge Park, Stone, Staffordshire ST15 8XD M: +44 (0) 7961 957992 E: albwalk@yahoo.co.uk Trade Exhibition 79
Trade Exhibition l task and project management    Objectives we provide  l optimisation of work and data flows   l creatio...
Trade Exhibition Biochrom Ltd / Harvard Apparatus Harvard Apparatus has now merged with our sister company, Biochrom Ltd based in Cambridge (both divisions of Harvard Bioscience Inc., NASDAQ HBIO) to provide additional support and enhanced product offerings to our customers. We are a global developer and manufacturer of a broad range of specialised products, primarily scientific instruments. Harvard Apparatus products are used to accelerate drug discovery and aid research at pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, universities and government laboratories worldwide. The Harvard Bioscience family of companies supplies the bioresearch community with such a broad line of specialised products for neuroscience, physiology, pharmacology, toxicology and more that we truly are a one-stop shop. We continually expand our product line through invention and acquisition. We have sales and manufacturing operations worldwide. Contact us at: Biochrom Ltd, 22 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0FJ T: +44 (0) 1223 423723 E: orders@biochrom.co.uk / support@biochrom.co.uk www.harvardapparatus.co.uk Charles River Charles River continues to be the world’s largest producer of laboratory animals. Our globally standardised research models include mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters and gerbils. As the exclusive UK distributor for The Jackson Laboratory, we provide access to over 5000 strains of JAX® mice including the highly immunodeficient NSG mouse. For nearly 25 years, Charles River has delivered genetically engineered models and services to biopharmaceutical companies, academic institutions and a host of government agencies. Services include: customised breeding programmes, quarantine space, genetic testing, rederivation, cryopreservation, IVF and proof of concept studies. Rather than just identifying the problem, Charles River 360 Diagnostics™ is the only comprehensive partner that can offer solutions from prevention to resolution. Through the development of innovative solutions like the LTM™, EZ-Spot® and PRIA panels, our goal is to help you manage your programme effectively and efficiently. Charles River provides high-quality training and CPD courses including Home Office modules for licence applicants (rodents, fish and farm animals). Our new eLearning platform, Charles River Campus, provides convenient and cost-effective online training for anyone working in the field of laboratory animal science. We supply ALZET® osmotic infusion pumps, catheters and wound clips. Our surgical teams can provide ‘study ready’ animals with a range of surgical alterations. Contact us at: Charles River UK Ltd, Manston Road, Margate, Kent CT9 4LT T: +44 (0) 1843 823575 E: margate.enquiries@crl.com www.criver.com 80 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Biochrom Ltd   Harvard Apparatus  Harvard Apparatus has now merged with our sister company, Biochrom Ltd ...
Trade Exhibition Clinipath Ltd Supplying leading edge equipment of tomorrow at unrivalled value today Clinipath Ltd is a distribution and service company for laboratory supplies and equipment with a focus on biomedical research and laboratories. The primary markets that we supply are universities, hospitals, biotechnology and pharmaceutical research and development. Our mission is to provide quality products at competitive prices with timely deliveries and our goal is to become one of your valued suppliers. We support advances in the technology of science, while respecting the impact on our environment. We provide problem solving solutions, quality products, superior customer service and support to our clients through the complete understanding of their business objectives and needs. The company mission involves constant product scouting in the international marketplace to supply the latest technology advancements to the scientific community. Clinipath Ltd will evaluate through a strict quality assurance system and on-site testing of all new products to guarantee the reliability of the goods supplied to our customers. Our business and our sales will grow in direct response to our drive, our clients’ support, our commitment to provide state-of-the-art products and to offer the best price quality ratio. We also differentiate ourselves from the competition through our vast selection of products covering a wide range of activities. Clinipath’s core values - Integrity, professionalism, enthusiasm and a commitment to excellence Contact us at: Clinipath Ltd, PO Box 523, Hull HU9 9HD www.clinipathequipment.com Contec Inc Speciality cleaning products for laboratory animal facilities Protect the investment you have made in research, with cleaning products which minimise contamination risks to your animals. Contec’s innovative equipment is designed to meet the specific requirements of laboratory animal facilities. Contec is the leading supplier of critical cleaning products to the global life science market. Disinfectants and cleaning solutions: Contec ProChlor V is a fast-acting, powerful disinfectant ideally designed for laboratory animal facilities. Bactericidal, fungicidal, virucidal and sporicidal in 1 minute, it has proven efficacy against mouse and canine parvo virus. Contec ProChlor V is also approved under DEFRA General Orders. Uniquely, Contec ProChlor V will also eliminate 95% of Syphacia spp pinworm eggs in 10 minutes. With no hazard classification, Contec ProChlor V has good operator acceptability and material compatibility. Also available, Contec HydroPure has no residue and can be used in combination with Contec ProChlor V. Sterile and filtered 70% alcohol solutions complete the product range. Mops and Cleaning Systems: Contec’s mops can increase cleaning effectiveness, improve ergonomics for operators, minimise cleaning time and reduce overall costs. Lightweight and easy-to-manoeuvre, with broad surface coverage and low operator fatigue, Contec’s polyester mops are lighter weight than traditional cotton or rayon mops and can be cleaned in most cage wash systems up to fifty times. Mops are colour-coded so specific mops can be designated to specific areas. Pre-saturated and Dry Wipes: Contec’s range of pre-saturated wipes PROSAT and SATWipes enable effective cleaning while Trade Exhibition 81
Trade Exhibition Clinipath Ltd  Supplying leading edge equipment of tomorrow at unrivalled value today Clinipath Ltd is a ...
Trade Exhibition reducing VOC’s (Volatile Organic Compounds). Available in different sizes and formats there is a cost effective option for every facility. Contec’s wide range of dry wipes offer excellent abrasion resistance. They are compatible with a wide range of chemicals and maintaining high strength when wet, are ideal for the application of disinfectants and cleaning solvents. Tack Wipes and Mops: TaxFre surface and floor wipes effectively remove and minimise the spread of pinworm eggs, dust and dirt due to their excellent capacity to trap and retain contaminants. Contact us via our distributor in the UK, Andrew Aston. Contact us at: T: +44 (0) 871 918 1640 E: info@aston-pharma.com www.contecinc.com Datesand Ltd The Datesand Group has been in business for over 30 years and is still a family run, friendly and reliable company. Datesand have diversified over the past three decades and now offer consumables, technologies and environmental divisions. Within these divisions, Datesand are committed to offering the widest range and highest quality of products. Consumables: l the widest range of quality bedding and nesting materials including Tapvei Aspen,  UK produced softwood beddings and The Andersons’ corn cob range l Europe’s widest range of enrichment products  l Nestpaks - exclusive 3 in 1 bedding, nesting and enrichment l PPE l chemicals and cleaning equipment l exclusive ranges including ClearH2O hydration and nutrition, FresH2O pouched  water and NSET (non-surgical embryo transfer device) l new and exclusive Bed-r’Nest – portioned naturalistic nesting material  Technologies: l UK manufactured and exclusive to Datesand; Mini-Thermacage and Mark III  Thermacage for animal warming l working in an exclusive partnership with TBJ Inc to offer ventilated workstations,  bedding dispensers, surgery and necropsy tables and water bottle fillers l servicing and maintenance contracts  Environmental: l unique super absorbent polymer products for liquid to gel applications  Datesand is now working in partnership with Harlan to offer streamlined diet and consumable product deliveries. Datesand – Caring for those who care for others Contact us at: Datesand Ltd, PO Box 45, Manchester M11 1XD T: +44 (0) 161 2741080 F: +44 (0) 161 2741089 E: sales@datesand.com www.datesand.com 82 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition reducing VOC   s  Volatile Organic Compounds . Available in different sizes and formats there is a cost e...
Trade Exhibition Edstrom Inc (Europe) Edstrom Inc is the world-leading designer and manufacturer of automated watering systems for animals in the pharmaceutical, academic and government vivarium, for over 45 years. We protect animal health and valuable research through automated animal drinking water systems, water purification and environmental monitoring. Edstrom automated watering systems deliver purified water on demand, 24 hours a day, eliminating ergonomic injuries and reducing the costs associated with bottle cleaning, filling and manipulation. Our A160 valve technology is the most reliable on the market. The addition of Edstrom FloSense® adds monitoring down to the rack level. Edstrom water purification and treatment systems help achieve consistent water quality with Reverse Osmosis (RO) water purification, clean system design principles and automated flushing. Edstrom recommends RO water for all transgenic rodents. Edstrom Pulse CMC® provides real-time data readings, alarming and reporting through an intuitive user interface that puts you in total control of your facility’s data. Monitor and control your automated watering system and so much more. From room and freezer temperatures, to differential pressure, airflow, humidity and light levels. Customisable reports and alarm limits ensure your facility’s animals are safe. Our light control system allows for high, low, off, emergency and red light status and easy control and verification of reverse day night cycles, etc. All data is time date stamped, recorded and available in graphical and CSV format. For more information please contact our UK and Ireland representative, Gemma Marshall. Contact us at: Edstrom Inc (Europe), PO Box 13, Hereford, HR1 4ZU M: +44 (0) 7794 251331 E: uk@edstrom.com www.edstrom.com Ellegaard Göttingen Minipigs Ellegaard Göttingen Minipigs (EGM) is the exclusive breeder of genetically well-defined Göttingen Minipigs and has supplied the scientific community for more than thirty years. The company has been AAALAC accredited since 1998 and has a high standard of minipig health. Göttingen Minipigs are fully accepted by the regulatory authorities such as EMA and FDA and should always be considered when choosing your non-rodent model for pharmacology or toxicology as they are often the scientifically correct research model. Animal models for human diseases have been developed in this species and used in the safety assessment of many marketed drugs. EGM also provides biological specimens from Göttingen Minipigs for in vitro research as well as courses in husbandry, handling, dosing, sampling techniques and training of Göttingen Minipigs. Clean pigs for clear results. Contact us at: Ellegaard Göttingen Minipigs, Soroe Landevej 302, DK-4261 Dalmose, Denmark T: +45 5818 5818 E: ckt@minipigs.dk Fisher Scientific Fisher Scientific is the leading supplier of laboratory chemicals, safety products and equipment. Fisher Scientific distributes own label and branded products to 40,000 Trade Exhibition 83
Trade Exhibition Edstrom Inc  Europe   Edstrom Inc is the world-leading designer and manufacturer of automated watering sy...
Trade Exhibition customers in the British Isles, Republic of Ireland and selected overseas markets. Our plant and headquarters in Loughborough employs 450 people. Our comprehensive safety product range offers a one-stop shop for all your requirements and is designed to meet the needs of a demanding market. With over 200,000 product lines and working closely with our suppliers, we provide everything from your day-to-day needs to the most innovative modern technological products required by a world class market. Our company shop window is a dynamic, fully interactive web catalogue that provides real-time stock availability and a considerable range of customer oriented features. This is supported by a series of catalogues covering the entire breadth of general laboratory activity. In the UK, we list over 170,000 products. Contact us at: Fisher Scientific, Bishop Meadow Road, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 5RG T: +44 (0) 1509 231166 E: fisheruk.quotations@thermofisher.com www.fisher.co.uk Harlan Laboratories Ltd Harlan Laboratories is a leading provider of essential, pre-clinical and non-clinical contract research, research models, animal diets and services to the pharmaceutical, biotech, medical device, agrochemical and chemical industries, as well as universities, government and other research organisations. The company’s focus is on providing customers with products and services to optimise the discovery and safety of new medicines and compounds. Our key strength is the diverse range of interrelated research tools we offer. These include laboratory animals, standard and customised diets, technical services (such as health and genetic monitoring and transgenic services), biological products and services, contract breeding, projects and containment solutions. Contact us at: Harlan Laboratories Ltd, Station Road, Blackthorn, Bicester, Oxfordshire OX25 1TP T: +44 (0) 1869 243241 F: +44 (0) 1869 246759 E: Isotec@harlan.com www.harlan.com IMPEX Services International Ltd IMPEX Services International Ltd have been serving the research industry for 15 years with Europe’s largest independent fleet of specially equipped and designed DEFRA registered vehicles. Our dedicated team work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to offer a complete handling and shipping service for all laboratory animals, bio samples and equipment regardless of your shipping needs. Our complete global coverage guarantees you a secure, efficient, door-to-door service to or from any destination worldwide. Our budget shipping options for smaller consignments offer clients a cost effective alternative, with the same excellent level of service and commitment within the UK and across the European continent. With a range of vehicles from our eco-friendly Minis, to large trucks, IMPEX really do offer you ‘total logistics solutions’. We are confident you will be delighted with our services. 84 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition customers in the British Isles, Republic of Ireland and selected overseas markets. Our plant and headquar...
Trade Exhibition Contact us at: IMPEX Services International Ltd, PO Box 187, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE28 4JF T: +44 (0) 8456 021662 F: +44 (0) 8456 021663 E: info@impex-uk.com www.impex-uk.com Instem ACIS, Instem’s Animal Care Information System, is the complete animal management software solution - efficiently managing the requisition, procurement and reporting of animal usage within research establishments. ACIS is a global solution that supports IACUC workflows and European Directive 2010/63/EU. Key benefits: l automates and streamlines regulatory compliance and year end reporting; saving  time and preventing errors by reducing manual processes l enables efficient requisition and procurement of animals alongside optimising  overall laboratory capacity l efficiently manages ethical review and IACUC workflow processes; improving visibility  across the facility and ensuring adherence to local standards, laws and guidelines l integrated personnel training and competency tracking to support compliance  management l intuitive, user-friendly software; access from any location, any time via SaaS  deployment model enables quick deployment and rapid ROI Why not visit our booth to learn more about how ACIS can streamline processes and enhance regulatory compliance at your animal facility. Be sure to ask for details of our new Home Office reports too! Contact us at: Instem, Stone Business Park, Stone, Staffordshire, ST15 0SD T: +44 (0)1785 825600 E: info@instem.com www.instem.com Institute of Animal Technology The Institute of Animal Technology (IAT) was founded in 1950 and its purpose is to advance knowledge and promote excellence in the care and welfare of animals in science The IAT recognises and supports the benefits arising from research involving animals and its members are committed to the principle that excellence in animal care and welfare is essential for excellence in science. Representing animal technologists both within the United Kingdom and around the world, the IAT has over 2500 members, which includes the vast majority of the UK’s Named Animal Care and Welfare Officers (NACWOs). Education and qualification for animal technologists is the primary role of the IAT. The IAT is recognised by Ofqual as the Awarding Organisation for its FE and HE Levels 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 qualifications in laboratory animal science and technology. During 2014 the IAT, in conjunction with the Medical Research Council, established the Level 2 Apprenticeship in Animal Technology. During 2015 the IAT will work towards establishing a Career Pathway for Animal Technologists, Trade Exhibition 85
Trade Exhibition Contact us at  IMPEX Services International Ltd, PO Box 187, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire PE28 4JF T   44  ...
Trade Exhibition to which Dr Judy MacArthur Clark CBE MRCVS Head, Animals in Science Regulation Unit recently stated, “This Laboratory Animal Science and Technology Career Pathway will importantly enable animal facility staff, both in industry and academia, to achieve high standards of competence and professionalism within Home Office licensed establishments. Since 2011 the IAT as a member of the Biosciences Coalition has commented on the transposition of the EU Directive 2010/63 EU into UK Legislation. Also, under the auspices of the European Federation of Animal Technologists (EFAT), the IAT has contributed into a number of the Expert Working Groups in Brussels, which is looking at various aspects of how the new Directive will be implemented throughout Europe as from January 2013. Contact us at: Institute of Animal Technology, 5 South Parade, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7JL T: +44 (0) 800 0854380 E: admin@iat.org.uk www.iat.org.uk International Medical Supplies International Medical Supplies (IMS Euro) is a well-established, international medical supplies company and have been supplying medical consumable products to laboratory, veterinary and healthcare markets since 1992. All our products are manufactured to the highest possible European standards and are subject to stringent inspections of materials and manufacturing. IMS now offer a comprehensive range of premium surgical instruments solely manufactured in Germany. All surgical instruments come with a 5 year manufacturers defect warranty. IMS is confident that you will save money without sacrificing quality! We operate a ‘try before you buy’ policy so feel free to request samples for trial. Contact us at: International Medical Supplies, Unit 46 Europa Business Park, Bird Hall Lane, Cheadle Heath, Stockport SK3 0XA T: +44 (0)161 4281440 E: info@imseuro.co.uk www.imseuro.co.uk IPS Product Supplies Ltd IPS has been supplying biomedical research facilities with industry leading brands for over ten years. We are exclusive European distributors of LabDiet® and TestDiet® and also produce speciality diets such as DIO High Fat Range, AIN Series, Tamoxifen, Fenbendazole in our modern TestDiet® Europe facility here in the UK. The LabDiet® and TestDiet® formulations have evolved as research models have developed and now more and more researchers are relying on the LabDiet® and TestDiet® products for their studies. IPS is also proud to represent Benchguard®, Lignocel Bedding and other high quality products that compliment your research. Contact us at: IPS Product Supplies Ltd, BCM IPS Ltd, London WC1N 3XX T: +44 (0) 870 6001616 E: customers@ipsltd.biz www.ipsltd.biz 86 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition to which Dr Judy MacArthur Clark CBE MRCVS Head, Animals in Science Regulation Unit recently stated,    T...
Trade Exhibition Laboratory Animal Science Association (LASA) To advance scientific understanding and knowledge of the use, care and welfare of laboratory animals and promote refinement, reduction and replacement LASA persues its aims in a number of ways: Promoting the interchange of information through meetings, lectures, discussions and publications. LASA has six sections, which together provide a forum to discuss the latest developments in the areas of specialised scientific interest. Every year the scientific sections hold section meetings. The Annual Winter Meeting is a three-day scientific meeting covering a wide range of topics in platform presentations and workshops. The meeting also offers great opportunities to network with Trade Exhibitors. LASA encourages and facilitates education and training in laboratory animal science. This takes place through workshops and the publication of proceedings and best practice guides. We welcome applications of membership from individuals, institutions and students Contact us at: LASA, PO Box 524, Hull HU9 9HE T: +44 (0) 8456 711956 F: +44 (0) 8456 711957 E: info@lasa.co.uk www.lasa.co.uk LANTRA Lantra’s Bioscience Skills Manager is an online software system for the recording, assessment and monitoring of the training and competence records for bioscience. Key features include: l centrally located electronic training and competency records accessible online  l comprehensive list of techniques and procedures for personal licence holders,  editable for project requirements or non-regulated tasks l competence and level of supervision is set, reviewed and endorsed by designated  persons, such as project licence holders or named persons l personal licence holders are able to review and self-assess their competence and level  of supervision against agreed techniques relevant to the project l holds records of training, qualifications and Continued Professional Development  (CPD) l allows uploading of evidence in support of competence and training  l external audits supported by reporting options and through the optional feature of  remote auditing by sampling l use of SSL for maximum security and Tier 3 hosted solution with leading UK provider  l available online 24/7 via a separate internet domain name  l all connections between a user’s computer and the server are encrypted in transit  Please visit our stand to see the system in action. Contact us at: Lantra, Lantra House, Stoneleigh Park, Coventry CV8 2LG T: +44 (0) 2476 696996 www.lantra.co.uk Trade Exhibition 87
Trade Exhibition Laboratory Animal Science Association  LASA   To advance scientific understanding and knowledge of the us...
Trade Exhibition LBS (Serving Biotechnology) Ltd As a company, heritage and tenacity runs through the very veins and DNA of LBS. It has played no small part in its success as a leading supplier of diet, bedding, consumables and services to the biotech industry for the past 46 years. Whilst the company takes immense pride in its heritage we recognise that it is only through a relentless and a consistent focus on meeting and exceeding the requirements of our domestic and international customers in the biotechnology industry that we maintain this position. We offer a combination of tried and tested products and through a continual process of product development, new innovative product solutions. All of this is backed through our commitment to ISO 9001:2008 quality assurance, customer service and logistics management. This is further underpinned and developed through a process of working closely with and understanding our customers’ needs at which, we aim to excel. Visit our stand for information and advice on: l research and zoo diets  l environmental enrichment products  l research bedding and nesting material  l extensive choice of small and large hay bale products  l water resistant protective clothing and safety footwear  l disinfectants and allied products  l bespoke irradiated packaging and supplies  l transit and transport boxes  l specialist vacuum/floor care products  l broad range of specialist equipment and products for animal technologists  Contact us at: LBS (Serving Biotechnology) Ltd, PO Box 431, Surrey RH6 0UW T: +44 (0) 1293 827940 F: +44 (0) 1293 782235 E: sales@lbs-biotech.com www.lbs-biotech.com Learning Curve (Development) Ltd The Learning Curve provides high quality training and CPD for animal technologists, scientists and support staff. Training that significantly enhances professional competence is more important than ever. The Learning Curve has an impressive and dedicated team, brought together for the purpose of creating and maintaining a high level of theoretical and practical competence in science. We intend to give our customers the knowledge and skills required for a competent and ethical science based career. The Learning Curve delivers its courses at venues across the UK, allowing us to account for local procedures and to customise courses to meet establishment needs. Courses include: l Home Office modular training 1 – 4  l licensee refresher training  l introduction to necropsy  l IAT L2 and L3  l aseptic techniques  l NACWO  88 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition LBS  Serving Biotechnology  Ltd  As a company, heritage and tenacity runs through the very veins and DNA ...
Trade Exhibition l introduction to technical procedures  l training, assessment and competence in the workplace  l support staff workshop  l GLP and AAALAC awareness  Contact us at: Learning Curve (Development) Ltd, PO Box 140, Ware, Hertfordshire SG9 0ZN T: +44 (0) 1763 272588 E: info@learningcurvedevelopment.co.uk www.learningcurvedevelopment.co.uk LEEC Ltd LEEC provides state-of-the-art protection with maximum flexibility Large and small animal solutions. Products include: l downdraught and backdraught tables: surgery, necropsy, perfusion, downdraught pods  l warming cabinets  l pass-through hatch and step over barriers  l lifting trolleys  l CO2 euthanasia chambers  l incubators: CO2  Formalin and anaesthetic exposure is hazardous – control and reduce your exposure. LEEC ventilated laboratory and necropsy tables will reduce your exposure to formalin to below 0.5ppm and anaesthetics gas to below 2ppm, creating a protective environment for your animals as well as your researchers. LEEC is your specialist for necropsy, surgery, perfusion tables and barrier containment equipment. Using downdraught, backdraught, re-circulating airflow with the silent air handling systems, as well as non-ventilated equipment solutions. In the laboratory, LEEC CO2 incubators provide a reliable, efficient and controlled environment for germination/cultivation of cells and microorganisms. LEEC provide a bespoke service, examining all aspects of your working laboratory, ergonomics, containment, hazardous vapour control and odour, setting standards and performance levels to build a protective barrier. Contact us at: LEEC Ltd, Private Road No. 7, Colwick Industrial Estate, Nottingham NG4 2AJ  T: +44 (0) 115 9616222 E: sales@leec.co.uk www.leec.co.uk Lomir Biomedical Inc Established in Canada in 1989 with head office and manufacturing facilities based in Quebec, Lomir Biomedical Inc is one of the world’s leading brands in the design and manufacture of animal jackets for all laboratory animal species, infusion systems for rodents and large animals, collars, restraints, animal handling and enrichment products. Recognised as a design innovator and manufacturer of high quality, durable and easy-touse equipment for biomedical and research applications, Lomir is the supplier of choice for Trade Exhibition 89
Trade Exhibition l introduction to technical procedures   l training, assessment and competence in the workplace   l suppo...
Trade Exhibition private contract organisations, pharmaceutical companies, research institutes, universities, teaching hospitals, biotechnology companies and government institutions. Lomir’s commitment to pioneering design, continuous product improvement, technical excellence and customer satisfaction is matched only by their people’s dedication to and respect for the wellbeing of research animals. The Company’s range of animal jackets incorporates carefully chosen materials and special features that increase comfort for the subject. Lomir’s infusion, testing and restraint equipment is designed to facilitate ease of use for the handler, minimising animal discomfort and stress levels and ultimately protecting the integrity of the procedure. Lomir strives to deliver effective and affordable solutions to virtually any challenge it is presented with by its customers. For UK enquiries please contact our UK Sales Representative on +44 (0) 7824 861583 Contact us at: Lomir Biomedical Inc UK Office: Agenda Resource Management Ltd, PO Box 24, Hull HU12 8YJ T: +44 (0) 8456 445545 E: stuartl@agenda-mc.co.uk Marshall BKU B&K Universal is a division of Marshall BioResources Inc. Our UK breeding and holding facility is located in East Yorkshire. B&K offer supplies of Marshall Beagles® from our UK holding near Hull. We are also pleased to announce that we recently opened a new barrier facility for the production of SPF ferrets (‘flu-free). We also breed the IFNAR type 1 and type 2 KO mice (A129 and AG129) which are in demand for research into vaccines and therapies for Dengue Fever and Ebola infection. Our SPF Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs have the highest health status available in the UK (being free of CMV and PI3). We can also supply New Zealand white rabbits. Our scientific services team offers a highly regarded health screening service and our specialist microbiologist will be on our stand to advise you. We are able to carry out health screening at your site or, using our collection service, your sentinels can be tested in Grimston. Biological matrices from a range of donors (rodents, Marshall Beagles®, rabbits, humans, NHPs and farm animals) are also available. We offer a very quick turnaround of your orders for whole blood, plasma, serum, tissues and many other bioproducts. You can also contact us for help with your imports or exports of animals as well as for supplies of animal bedding and enrichment products. Contact us at: Marshall BKU, The Field Station, Grimston, Aldbrough, Hull HU11 4QE T: +44 (0) 1964 527555 E: roys@bku.com www.bku.com MMM Medical Equipment UK Ltd Sterilisation, steam generator and disinfection equipment manufacturers MMM Medical Equipment UK Ltd are a subsidiary of MMM GmbH, one of the largest European manufactures of sterilisers and disinfection systems with a workforce of over 1000 employees and responsible for many innovations in sterilisation technology. The sterilisers we manufacture have a very long life expectancy, with reliability playing a major part in the design; our strength is our whole life cycle support. 90 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition private contract organisations, pharmaceutical companies, research institutes, universities, teaching hos...
Trade Exhibition We can offer single door or pass through double door sterilisers, with loading heights of 625mm, 390mm or floor level for ease of loading. Our standard chamber sizes suit all common IVC and cage racks. MMM steriliser chambers are manufactured in-house from top grade materials, in a range of sizes from 316 litres to 6292 litres, plus bespoke units to customers’ requirements. We also offer air tight double skinned barriers for optimum sound and heat insulation (very important in animal house situations). We have our own project management, planning and installation teams based in our UK office and work with architects, design teams and planning departments from the initial concept through to final installation, commissioning and validation. We can incorporate H2O2 (VHP) generators as part of an automated process cycle as an option on MMM sterilisers. Contact us at: MMM Medical Equipment UK Ltd, Units 2 & 3 Gateway Drive Business Park, Gateway Drive, Yeadon, Leeds LS19 7XY T: +44 (0) 113 3910717 F: +44 (0) 113 3910503 E: sales@mmm-group.co.uk www.mmm-group.co.uk MSE Henderson Biomedical MSE Henderson Biomedical is a leading British manufacturer and service provider of laboratory centrifuges, ultrasonic disintegrators, vented animal cabinets, class II laminar flow safety cabinets and class III isolators. MSE Henderson Biomedical is split into two distinct branches. Our manufacturing arm is MSE, an international company which exports its products to over 60 countries around the world, whilst Henderson Biomedical is our service and repair division. Both companies are based at our site in South East London. MSE has been manufacturing laboratory equipment since the 1930s and supplies products to a wide range of customers in clinical research, education and industry both here in the UK and abroad. Our Pro Air™ animal research range can allow you to protect the user from pathogenic samples and keep your specimens safe in an isolated environment. Henderson Biomedical was established in 1987 and has a team of highly qualified and experienced engineers covering the whole of the UK. Our engineers can not only service and repair your equipment at competitive prices but also calibrate your instruments to ensure that your laboratory complies with the latest ISO standards. We also offer a range of reconditioned laboratory equipment at a fraction of the cost of new. Henderson Biomedical share close business ties with a multitude of prominent organisations such as PHE Porton Down, Cambridge University, the Medical Research Council and Huntingdon Life Sciences. MSE Henderson Biomedical is committed to supplying laboratories involved in animal research with the equipment they need and also to ensure their instruments are serviced, repaired and calibrated in line with the latest ISO standards. Regardless of your requirements, you can be sure that you will receive a friendly service every time from a company with nearly 80 years’ experience in the life sciences sector. Contact us at: MSE Henderson Biomedical, Worsley Bridge Road, Lower Sydenham, London, SE26 5AZ T: +44 (0) 20 8663 4610 E: info@mseuk.co.uk www.mseuk.co.uk Trade Exhibition 91
Trade Exhibition We can offer single door or pass through double door sterilisers, with loading heights of 625mm, 390mm or...
Trade Exhibition North Kent Plastics The new NKP Following the re-launch in 2012 of the NKP brand, we have firmly established the company as a major supplier of animal housing systems to the life science industry. Also, NKP now offer flexible isolator systems and servicing through our partnership with Harlan Laboratories UK Ltd. Manufacturers and suppliers of the following: Cages: l all existing NKP cages are still available in polypropylene, polysulfone,  polycarbonate and polyclear for all species l stainless steel lids  l aluminium or stainless steel cages for rabbits, guinea pigs, cats and marmosets  l metabolism cages, all styles  l floor pens and enclosures for large animals  l bespoke design service for all projects  Racking: l racking for all NKP cages is made in aluminium and stainless steel  Trolleys: l trolleys are made to individual design specifications  Flexible isolators: l full stainless steel framed flexible isolator systems  l comprehensive technical services department to carry out all servicing requirements  Other equipment: l a variety of drinking bottles, rubber bungs, nozzles and melamine tops  l mouse nest boxes in various colours  l filter tops for the NKP cage range  l food bins and dollies  l food hoppers  l animal carrying cases and enrichment products  l drug security cabinets  l allergen containment enclosures  l cleansing stations  Contact us at: North Kent Plastics, PO Box 10131, Coalville, Leicestershire LE67 0DZ T: +44 (0) 800 1123047 E: info@northkentplastics.co.uk www.northkentplastics.co.uk Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems At Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems, we tailor our laboratory systems to meet the specific needs of individual species and we specialise in turnkey systems that are secure, efficient and virtually fail-safe. Our mission is to support the success of your research now and for years to come. As biologists and engineers, we understand and appreciate the complexity of aquatic life. As a result, we tailor our laboratory systems to meet the specific needs of individual species 92 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition North Kent Plastics  The new NKP Following the re-launch in 2012 of the NKP brand, we have firmly establi...
Trade Exhibition including Zebrafish and Xenopus. Our goal is to equip you with the finest systems and support available for engineering, project management, system commissioning, training, husbandry and more. With any research project, it is essential for habitats to promote optimal animal health, while being flexible enough to meet a variety of requirements. Our Aquatic Habitats custom and turnkey systems are secure, efficient and virtually fail-safe. Depend on Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems for state-of-the-art aquatic housing that is easy to use. We have been designing large-scale aquatic research facilities since 1997 and continue to lead the industry in quality of equipment and service. You will get flexible options regarding tank sizes, shelf configurations, rack widths and heights, everything. No facility design is too complicated. If you envision it, we can make it a reality. Aquatic Habitats’ systems require minimal upkeep; our multi-rack system designs do not require daily, weekly or even monthly service. You will save money on labour and replacement consumables and you will not have to worry about constant maintenance. We want you to focus on your research; you can leave the rest to us. Contact us at: Pentair Aquatic Eco-Systems, 2395 Apopka Blvd, Apopka, Florida 32703, USA T: +1 407 8867575 E: PAES.Habitats@Pentair.com www.pentairAES.com Plexx BV Plexx BV is the sole European representative for BioMedic Data Systems, Lab Products Inc and E-Z Systems/Euthanex. With nearly 30 years’ experience in the pharmaceutical and biomedical industry, we have a proven track record of providing high quality products and outstanding customer service. Animal identification: Injectable transponders give the option to programme unique identification codes as well as reading body temperature. Individually ventilated micro isolator systems: Protect both your staff and animals with our positive cage in a negative rack design. Ask about our unique OneCage and the SuperMouse750/1800™. Econo-cage® disposable system: The Econo-cage® is a completely disposable caging system that has been designed to fit with the SuperMouse750 ventilated racks. Hydropac: Innovative delivery of water to rodents using on-site produced pouches and drip-free single use valves. Anaesthesia equipment: The E-Z anaesthesia systems offer user friendly, simple operation equipment with a level of precise automation that minimises operator error. Automated home cage euthanasia systems: The Euthanex product range offers automated home cage euthanasia with CO2 for small, medium and large numbers of cages at the press of a button. Metabolic cages: Simple and easy to use as it is made up of only eight parts. Conventional caging: Cages are available from stock and can be used interchangeably with your existing European cages. These can be supplied in polycarbonate or polypropylene. Trade Exhibition 93
Trade Exhibition including Zebrafish and Xenopus. Our goal is to equip you with the finest systems and support available f...
Trade Exhibition Environmental enrichment: Special diets, treats and toys for all laboratory animal species. Contact us at: Plexx BV, PO Box 86, 6660 AB Elst, The Netherlands UK Office: T: +44 (0) 800 228 9460 E: uk@plexx.eu www.plexx.eu Pro-active Security Solutions Our core business is pre-employment screening and over the years we have been adopting new procedures to enable us to keep abreast and ensure compliance with existing and proposed legislation as set out by the Home Office which could affect recruitment procedures. Proven experience in dealing with prevention and disruption of extremist activity has led to Pa-SS offering a wealth of other services to organisations to protect their integrity and be secure in the knowledge that risks have been greatly minimised. We monitor social media sites globally from blogs to social networks covering real time activities in order to analyse current trends and views of those involved in Extremism. Passextranet system: Our secure web based portal that has been designed to fit all our customers’ needs. Functions include: l allowing the customer to both input their screening requests and also to view the  progress of checks that are ongoing l he retrieval of information by specific user(s) or; if so required a generic email t address, thus allowing other members of your team to check the progress of screening requests l all entries are time and date stamped with the system being fully auditable l individual replies sent for every request submitted l a report facility Contact us at: Pro-active Security Solutions, BCM PASS, London, WC1N 3XX T: +44 (0)1954 261392 E: info@pa-ss.com Rees Scientific Rees Scientific specialise in monitoring temperature in refrigeration, freezing and incubation, lighting, humidity as well as providing automated watering for animal laboratories. Rees Scientific provides automated environmental monitoring to a limitless number of applications in pharmaceutical and laboratory animal research making us the standard by which other monitoring systems are judged. As an ISO 9001:2000 company and fully FDA 21 CFR 11 compliant, Rees Scientific is constantly upgrading policies, procedures and protocols to comply with today’s highly regulated environments. Automated daily printouts, alarm notification, audit trails and complete data encryption are just a few of the standard features that help you meet your AAALAC, FDA, MHRA and Home Office regulations. 94 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Environmental enrichment  Special diets, treats and toys for all laboratory animal species. Contact us at...
Trade Exhibition Contact us at: Rees Scientific, 1007 Whitehead Road Ext., Trenton, New Jersey 08638, USA M: +44 (0) 7748 185307 E: jtelfer@reesscientific.com www.reesscientific.com S3 Science We are the largest supplier of animal technologists in the life sciences sector, since we opened our doors in 2002. Our success is simple; a highly skilled recruitment team that pulls together over 20 years’ recruitment experience and a mission statement at the forefront of all we do: that all great companies are only as good as their staff. Our priority is to source the right candidate with the right skills for your organisation. We have become the preferred or sole recruitment agency to many of the UK’s leading scientific organisations and aim to work with many more over the coming years. Whatever the level of staffing from auxiliary, licensed technicians to managers we know that today’s placement will be a part of tomorrow’s success for our clients. Talk to us today and find out how we can provide you with permanent, temporary or contract animal sciences staff. We want to be a key part of your success and hope you can share in our goal of recruitment excellence. Contact us at: S3 Science, BCM Box 1899, London WC1N 3XX T: +44 (0) 844 8844696 E: info@s3science.com www.s3science.com SAFE SAFE (Scientific Animal Food and Engineering) designs, formulates and produces diets and custom diets for the international research community. With more than 45 years’ experience and partnerships with the foremost research institutes, SAFE is an undisputed international reference. The SAFE site is unique. It is certified ISO 14001 (environment), ISO 9001, Codex alimentariusHACCP and GLP and GMP compliant. Entirely dedicated to the life sciences, it has a total product and packaging traceability system based on a baby food manufacturing process. SAFE receives daily support from a group world leader in nutrition and animal health and is strongly involved in research and development activities. We are at the heart of the research process Contact us at: SAFE, Route de Saint Bris, 89290 Augy, France T: +33 3 86 53 76 90 F: +33 3 86 53 35 96 E: info@safe-diets.com www.safe-diets.com Trade Exhibition 95
Trade Exhibition Contact us at  Rees Scientific, 1007 Whitehead Road Ext., Trenton, New Jersey 08638, USA M   44  0  7748 ...
Trade Exhibition SCANBUR It is our mission to successfully and innovatively develop, produce and sell equipment for in vivo medical research and medical clean-room production globally and hence contribute to preventing and curing diseases. We strive to improve the welfare of animals and humans, based on SCANBUR’s fundamental principles: l animal welfare l allergy control l ergonomics l disease control ScanFlow ECO, triple protection: HEPA laminar air flow cabins ensuring protection of animals, staff and environment. The walk-in LAF cabin enables unhindered, efficient and safe working practices. Low noise level. Multi-purpose cabin; cage change, cage cleaning, procedures, etc. Airshowers: High-powered HEPA filtered airshowers for efficient access control between different areas. Laboratory animal unit specifications. Extensive documentation. ScanClime Mini ECO: A mobile and compact unit which offers plug and play air- handling and humidification for animal housing systems. Optimal cage climate promotes better animal welfare and consistent research results and, in parallel, management will be pleased with a cost reduction on humidification of up to 80%! Patent pending. Scantainer: Renowned ventilated cabinet. Our classic secure cabinet gives protection to both animals and staff. Warming cabinets: Range of advanced temperature controlled cabinets - safe, uniform and stable temperature. Operating tables: Downflow benches/tables with water-heated Corian® surface. Contact us at: SCANBUR, 16-18, DK-2690 Karlslunde, Denmark T: +45 5686 5600 E: cs@scanbur-technology.eu www.scanbur-technology.com Science Equip Ltd Science Equip Ltd is a medical, laboratory and veterinary supplies company meeting the very latest end-user requirements for equipment, consumables and veterinary medicines with no-compromise procurement. Through professional and confidential end-user relationships, Science Equip endeavours to provide an accessible, reliable and versatile service to the laboratory animal sector. With the established buying power that comes with being a member of the UK’s biggest buying group of medical consumables, Science Equip can supply market-leading brand names at the lowest possible price. Furthermore, many products in our vast catalogue benefit from low ‘unit of order’, so you only order what you need. Science Equip is also licenced with a Wholesaler Dealers Authorisation from the Veterinary 96 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition SCANBUR  It is our mission to successfully and innovatively develop, produce and sell equipment for in vi...
Trade Exhibition Medicines Directorate so we can supply the full range of veterinary medicinal products, from anaesthetics to wormers. Science Equip seeks to provide the field of laboratory animal science with a consistent source of prescription-only veterinary medicines. As a family owned and run company, Science Equip offers our clients the best of both worlds: an experienced, friendly and informed customer service and a confidential, flexible and reliable business relationship Contact us at: Science Equip Ltd, 34 Stonegate, Hunmanby, Filey, North Yorkshire, YO14 0NS T: +44 (0) 1732 891981 E: enquiries@science-equip.co.uk www.science-equip.co.uk Scionics Computer Innovation GmbH Scionics is a scientific IT service provider with more than ten years’ experience working in scientific research environments. We are best known for our product PyRAT, a web based laboratory animal management software application, used by animal facilities around the world to manage their animal facility data. Some features of PyRAT include history tracking, cage card printing, breeding management, genotyping, pedigrees, authorisation tracking, animal ordering, budgeting and invoices and more. Ask for a demonstration and free trial installation, products@scionics.com Contact us at: Scionics Computer Innovation GmbH, Löscherstrasse 16, 01309 Dresden, Germany T: +49 351 202 707 00 F: +49 351 202 707 04 E: products@scionics.com www.scionics.com/pyrat Special Diets Services Special Diets Services, registered to ISO 9001:2008 and GMP+, is the largest supplier of laboratory animal diets in Europe and the only dedicated manufacturer in the UK. For over four decades, SDS has been supplying research establishments and breeders worldwide and we have gained an international reputation for the quality of our diets and manufacturing and storage facilities. As research diets are our core business, SDS has the formulations, packaging and flexibility to suit all your requirements. We have a global network of distributions so local supply is an option. SDS has a professional technical team who are experts in the field of research animal nutrition. Contact us at: Special Diets Services, PO Box 705, Witham, Essex CM8 3AD T: +44 (0) 1376 511260 F: +44 (0) 1376 511247 E: info@sdsdiets.com www.sdsdiets.com Steel Line Ltd Established in 1979, Steel Line is a Sheffield based UK manufacturer of stainless steel tables for the medical, veterinary and laboratory research markets. Trade Exhibition 97
Trade Exhibition Medicines Directorate so we can supply the full range of veterinary medicinal products, from anaesthetics...
Trade Exhibition Initially designed for hospitals and public mortuaries, the company has adapted these designs to meet the needs of laboratory animal science and veterinary managers/technologists and during 2007 fulfilled its first contracts for two major research organisations in the UK. Although based on generic designs, Steel Line custom builds its products to each client’s requirements. They can be made for small rodent work or even take up to horse size. The products include but are not limited to: l perfusion sinks  l surgery tables l necropsy tables l euthanasia tables l in vitro procedure tables l EEG ante tables l any other table design required by the customer All tables are ventilated, usually downdraught or backdraught if the customer prefers. Fixed or adjustable height tables are also available and sinks, spray hose and wash down (sparge) facilities are fitted as specified. Contact us at: Steel Line Ltd, 415 Petre Street, Sheffield S4 8LL T: +44 (0) 114 2317330 F: +44 (0) 114 2560330 E: colin.campbell@steelline.co.uk www.steelline.co.uk Surrey Diagnostics Ltd Surrey Diagnostics Limited (SDL) specialises in providing independent screening services for laboratory animal health monitoring. Our staff have a wealth of experience in: microbiology, serology, molecular biology and veterinary pathology. Through this expertise, SDL can provide consultancy services in all aspects of laboratory animal science. SDL understand the importance of developing and maintaining a comprehensive health monitoring programme for laboratory animals and recognise that it is a fundamental part of successful research. We also aim to provide customer service that is second to none and continually review and improve this. Our aim is to give customers the best possible, scientifically accurate health monitoring service on the market at a fair price. We use the latest appropriate and proven technologies, such as multiplex serology and real-time PCR to achieve this. SDL has also recently installed a laboratory information management system (LIMS) to further increase customer confidence in results reported. Our enviroscreen service offers a full environmental monitoring service including surfaces, air, water, consumables and laboratory animal allergen (LAA) monitoring. One recent addition to our range of environmental monitoring equipment is the Speedy Breedy® which enables customers to conduct their own microbiological screening or sterility testing in house, in a fraction of the conventional timeframe, with minimal microbiological knowledge. The latest additions to our portfolio of environmental cleaning products are our activated water systems, both portable and static for cleaning surfaces, floors or providing animals with clean pathogen free water plus many, many other uses. All at the fraction of the cost of traditional disinfection and cleaning products! We also offer a range of air quality management options through technologies, which 98 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Initially designed for hospitals and public mortuaries, the company has adapted these designs to meet the...
Trade Exhibition are proven to reduce allergens, odours, micro-organisms, volatile organic compounds and dust in the environment. SDL is the distributor for the latest generation of proven photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) technologies in the UK and Ireland. Please call +44 (0) 1483 266533 or email marks.sdl@btconnect.com for further information. Surrey Diagnostics Ltd is an ISO 9001 accredited company and an approved supplier to Research Councils UK. Contact us at: Surrey Diagnostics Ltd, PO Box 156, Cranleigh, Surrey GU6 8ZU T: +44 (0)1483 268300 F: +44 (0)1483 266537 E: alistair.sdl@btconnect.com E: andy.sdl@btconnect.com M: +44 (0) 7778 010184 M: +44 (0) 7870 534617 www.sdl.uk.net Sychem Ltd Disinfection and sterilisation equipment specialists Sychem are specialists in the supply, installation and maintenance of disinfection and sterilisation equipment and chemical used within biomedical facilities. Offering a wealth of knowledge and experience, Sychem ensure our customers receive innovative and competitive solutions. Cage and bottle washer range: l AC8000  – cage and rack washer ‘high efficiency/automatic door’ l AC7000  – cage and rack washer ‘high efficiency’ l AC7000 NHP – primate cage and rack washer  l AC1400  – cage and bottle washer ‘cabinet style’ l AC1300  – cage and bottle washer ‘slim line cabinet style’ l AC1200  – aquatic tank washer l AC500  – bottle washer ‘under counter’ l AC3500  – tunnel washer Bottle processing – de-capping, washing, refill and re-capping: l MITO 2B  – semi-automatic bottle processing station l MITO FB  – fully-automatic bottle processing station l MITO PT  – pass through bottle washer l de-capper  – automatic cap remover and emptying station l re-capper  – automatic filling and re-capping station l re-capper  – semi automatic recapping station Fanuc robotics and integration: l fully automated cage and bottle processing solutions l symphony – integration systems l UK based manufacturer support Autoclaves: l floor/IVC loading bulk autoclaves l cabinet style autoclaves l Elara  – medical and laboratory bench top autoclaves ‘pre’ and ‘post’ vac PPM and validation services: l planned and preventative maintenance l emergency response l validation l insurance inspections l team of UK based engineers Trade Exhibition 99
Trade Exhibition are proven to reduce allergens, odours, micro-organisms, volatile organic compounds and dust in the envir...
Trade Exhibition Clean bedding handling: l BD9000us – ultrasonic bedding dispenser l Clarion system – mechanical drag system ‘clean bedding delivery’ Chemicals – used in facilities for over 30 years: l cage, bottle washing detergents l floor and surface detergents / sanitisers l change station hand sanitiser l general cleaning products Contact us at: Sychem Ltd, Highcove House, Victory Close, Chandlers Ford, Hampshire SO53 4BU T: +44 (0) 845 6446824 E: sales@sychem.co.uk www.sychem.co.uk Tecniplast UK Ltd Over 60 years of perfect partnership for your laboratory animal equipment With a passion for innovation, Tecniplast have been at the heart of housing solutions for laboratory animals for over 60 years! The team continues with their commitment to the industry forming the perfect partnership for all of your laboratory animal equipment needs. The key factors of Tecniplast’s international success are an acute awareness of the continuous evolution of housing facility needs and the capability to design, develop and integrate products in-house. Our constant investment in tooling, technologies, automation, production capability, stock availability, staff recruitment and training, together with the ISO certified quality and environment management systems, stand clearly in favour of a company that has led the field since the early 1950s. The range consists of: l  nimal caging for all laboratory species including IVCs and conventional caging a l aquatics solutions, now including a truly innovative ‘Tritone’ automated fish feeding  l laminar airflow technology, products include; cage changing stations, bio-safety  stations, downflow booths, bedding disposal systems and air showers l washing, disinfection and logistics equipment ranging from bottle washers and  fillers, rack washers, cabinet washers and tunnel washers, decontamination locks l automation, from partial to fully automated systems to assist with ergonomics,  standardisation of procedure and throughput l customised solutions, all specific to your facility  l servicing of equipment - helping you to keep the equipment in your facility up and  running Tecniplast, founded in 1949 remains Europe’s premier manufacturer of specialist laboratory animal equipment. Be sure to visit us at our stand to view our latest innovation products. Contact us at: Tecniplast UK Ltd, BCM Box 3058, London WC1N 3XX T: +44 (0) 845 0504556 F: +44 (0) 845 0504557 E: info@tecniplastuk.com www.tecniplastuk.com 100 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Clean bedding handling  l BD9000us      ultrasonic bedding dispenser l Clarion system      mechanical dra...
Trade Exhibition The Cube Ltd The aim of Cube Clean Tech or CCT is to work with researchers and industry professionals to provide support for the development and delivery of sustainable and energy efficient laboratories and biomedical research facilities. CCT is based in Cambridge and Dublin and partners with leading industry specialists and suppliers to provide a global service. CCT is a specialist company with extensive experience in delivering sustainable laboratories and research facilities. We have extensive experience with clients in the university, government, CROs, pharmaceutical and biotech biomedical research sectors to deliver quality buildings and services that support research and science in the UK and internationally. Our philosophy as a business emphasises competence, reliability and sustainability in infrastructure and supporting technology. We focus our efforts on producing high quality low carbon labs and animal facilities. We are passionate about this sector and deeply involved in the development and regulation of the industry. With our experience we work as leaders, encouraging and inspiring moves towards a more sustainable future through demonstration and education. Our business culture encourages open and candid discussion with our clients and stakeholders to generate practical options with the widest possible support base. At the core of our approach is our commitment to evidence based modelling (EBM). This process enables CCT to capture quantitative and qualitative data and information to inform better decision making at every level. CCT has developed a process we call low carbon labs with evidence based methodologies to enable clients to achieve significant reductions in total energy usage of the order of 30 – 40% and greater for current facilities without compromising safety or reducing standards. This includes savings in electrical energy used to drive the HVAC systems and thermal energy generated by Natural Gas of LPG for example for heating and hot water. Contact us at: The Cube Ltd, St John’s Innovation Park, Cowley Road, Cambridge CB4 0WS T: +44 (0) 1223 420252 E: info@thecube.eu.com www.cctech.eu Transnetyx Inc Transnetyx provides affordable, fast and accurate genotyping using its fully automated genotyping process that utilise qPCR for detecting transgenic, knock-out, knock-in, conditional and single base mutations. Transnetyx works with laboratories around the world enabling biotechnology, pharmaceuticals and research institutions the ability to better devote their resources to their research goals. Having performed nearly 40 million successful reactions on more than 5 million samples at 99.998% accuracy, Transnetyx not only guarantees turnaround times but also the accuracy of its genotyping results. Highlights of our service include: l 24 and 72 hour turn-around times l easy online secure order submission (average time to place an order: Less than 5  minutes) l printable results reported via our secure website l real-time PCR processing with QC l 99.998% accuracy (based off of nearly 40 million reactions on more than 5 million  samples) Transnetyx Inc will be available throughout the event and will be offering an IAT Congress exclusive 50 FREE Sample offer for all new customers who register during the event or at www.transnetyx.com Simply use the promotion code: “IATCongress” when setting up your account. Trade Exhibition 101
Trade Exhibition The Cube Ltd  The aim of Cube Clean Tech or CCT is to work with researchers and industry professionals to...
Trade Exhibition Contact us at: Transnetyx Inc, 8110 Cordova Road, Cordova, Tennessee 38016, USA T: +42 072400 2070 E: dporteous@transnetyx.com www.transnetyx.com UNO Roestvaststaal BV The identification of individual laboratory animals has become more and more important. Until recently it was very expensive to introduce the use of RFID transponders into your facility, this has now changed! UNO can offer you three types of transponders and matching readers, all at very reasonable costs. Our programme also includes a number of readers varying from a simple hand held reader that just shows you the transponder number to a sophisticated reader and software combination to introduce not only the transponder number but also a number of observations codes, etc. Last but not least we are happy to introduce our caliper system, which allows you to introduce data like ID-number, weight and f.i. measured tumour growth into a data sheet. More information on this is available on request. UNO is a well-known supplier of a wide range of housing products for the laboratory animal market. Next to our standard line of housing products, UNO has a very successful engineering department, which is constantly working to improve the quality of the products and integrating specific customer needs into ‘standard’ products. The demand for anaesthesia equipment that can be used for small laboratory animals has increased substantially. Following this trend, UNO has been and still is actively involved in the design and manufacturing of complete anaesthesia systems even for the smallest animals. We aim to not only supply the products but make sure that once the product arrived at your facility the know-how about setting up and using the system are also available! UNO provides a wide range of products and services to help you as a laboratory researcher to obtain the most suitable and fitting infusion set up for your goal. A range of handling, restraint and capture equipment is available in order not only to safeguard personnel while handling animals but also to handle the animal in a safe and secure way. Contact us at: UNO Roestvaststaal BV, PO Box 15, NL-6900 AA Zevenaar, The Netherlands T: +31 316 524451 F: +31 316 523785 E: info@unobv.com www.unobv.com Vet-Tech Solutions Ltd Welcome to Vet-Tech Solutions; the company that prides itself in going that extra mile for its valued customers. We have a dedicated in-house team to help you with design concepts and bespoke solutions. We are specialists in stainless steel, acrylics, Perspex, Polycarbonate and Trespa; and manufacture all equipment to customer requirements. Our team work with 3D CAD and provide all the necessary drawings for customer approval prior to ordering. A wide range of anaesthetic equipment is offered from basic to more advanced systems; whether gas is supplied via in-house gas lines, stand-alone cylinders or the latest concept of 102 Trade Exhibition
Trade Exhibition Contact us at  Transnetyx Inc, 8110 Cordova Road, Cordova, Tennessee 38016, USA T   42 072400 2070 E  dpo...
Trade Exhibition oxygen concentrators, which provide a cleaner way to working. Vet-Tech can accommodate them all. We were the innovators of the very first home cage euthanasia systems following Home Office guidelines. Each system is built to include either an anaesthetic and CO2 cycle or CO2 only. In addition to the Vet-Tech anaesthesia and euthanasia concepts, we also supply a wide range of other products including: l bench top autoclaves l Optilia HD camera systems, an alternative to microscopes l Dycem a contamination system for floors l Esco laboratory and cleanroom equipment such as air showers, laminar flow hoods,  safety cabinets, CO2 incubators and minus 80 freezers l Marston Engineering downdraught tables which can be customised with  anaesthetics, CO2 or warming areas l CurVet Rat Simulator Training Aid l Delta Med range of cannula (cannula produced to ISO 80 clean room conditions) l RapID tags an identification range of tags which are MRI compatible Add to this a vast array of surgery items and consumables and you have the VTS range of products. Contact us at: Vet-Tech Solutions Ltd, Unit 17, Daneside Business Park, Congleton, Cheshire CW12 1UN T: +44 (0) 1260 274333 F: +44 (0) 1260 278822 E: info@vet-tech.co.uk www.vet-tech.co.uk Williton Box Company Williton Box Company manufactures and supplies animal transportation boxes to customers within the UK and internationally. We are able to supply, from our comprehensive range of styles and sizes, a shipping container to satisfy most requirements. Whilst our boxes remain suitable for all land based travel we have produced a range of boxes that conform to the guidelines set out by the International Air Transport Association making them suitable for shipping by air. Our ranges of containers are manufactured from twinwall polypropylene and corrugated cardboard and represent a secure environment and an economical method for the movement of animals. Contact us at: Williton Box Company, Egrove Way, Williton Industrial Estate, Williton, Taunton, Somerset TA4 4TB T: +44 (0) 1984 632538 F: +44 (0) 1984 633050 E: admin@willitonbox.co.uk www.willitonbox.co.uk Trade Exhibition 103
Trade Exhibition oxygen concentrators, which provide a cleaner way to working. Vet-Tech can accommodate them all. We were ...
CONGRESS Congress 2015 Congress 2015 17th – 20th March 2015 www.iat.org.uk 2015 17th – 20th March 2015 Animal Technology – advancing comparative biology
CONGRESS  Congress 2015 Congress 2015  17th     20th March 2015  www.iat.org.uk  2015  17th     20th March 2015  Animal Te...