Business Prospectus for GAPP

PROSPECTUS 2014 – 2015 Advancing Historic and Cultural Resource Preservation + Efficient Energy Exploration
PROSPECTUS 2014     2015 Advancing Historic and Cultural Resource Preservation    Efficient Energy Exploration
MISSION GAPP’s mission is to work collaboratively and pragmatically with both the energy industry and the preservation community to assist in the identification and proper management of historic and cultural resources while encouraging efficient exploration and development of energy reserves. We seek to devise, exchange, and help implement voluntary practices that facilitate development, manage risk, and yield positive outcomes for historic and cultural resources and the communities that value them. We welcome involvement from energy companies: • Shale gas producers • • • Utilities and transmission providers • “Gas Wells Threatening Region’s Archaeological Sites” Midstream companies (pipelines) Energy development is occurring with great speed and urgency in the U.S. and abroad. In the nine active shale plays in the U.S. alone, the Society for American Archaeology has estimated that 200,000 archaeological sites could be in the path of development, posing risks for energy companies and for the preservation community that wishes to learn from these sites. The vast majority of these sites have not been identified on maps and many likely contain human remains. Oil companies THE NEED Renewable energy developers And the preservation community: • • • —West Virginia Gazette, October 17, 2012 “Pipeline vs. preservation: Spectra route’s path through landmark sites ‘baffling,’ say stewards” —C-Ville.com, July 16, 2014 Cultural resource management consultants “Gas Firm to Pay for Bulldozed Logan County Cemetery” Local, statewide, and national NGOs —Herald-Standard, February 11, 2014 Professional associations of historians, archaeologists, and architects “Native American burials…cited as reason to deny gas pipeline in Lancaster County” —Lancaster Online, August 4, 2014 “Shale Gas Boom Closes Historic Bridge” —The Columbus Dispatch, October 4, 2013 2 3
MISSION  GAPP   s mission is to work collaboratively and pragmatically with both the energy industry and the preservation ...
MISSION GAPP’s mission is to work collaboratively and pragmatically with both the energy industry and the preservation community to assist in the identification and proper management of historic and cultural resources while encouraging efficient exploration and development of energy reserves. We seek to devise, exchange, and help implement voluntary practices that facilitate development, manage risk, and yield positive outcomes for historic and cultural resources and the communities that value them. We welcome involvement from energy companies: • Shale gas producers • • • Utilities and transmission providers • “Gas Wells Threatening Region’s Archaeological Sites” Midstream companies (pipelines) Energy development is occurring with great speed and urgency in the U.S. and abroad. In the nine active shale plays in the U.S. alone, the Society for American Archaeology has estimated that 200,000 archaeological sites could be in the path of development, posing risks for energy companies and for the preservation community that wishes to learn from these sites. The vast majority of these sites have not been identified on maps and many likely contain human remains. Oil companies THE NEED Renewable energy developers And the preservation community: • • • —West Virginia Gazette, October 17, 2012 “Pipeline vs. preservation: Spectra route’s path through landmark sites ‘baffling,’ say stewards” —C-Ville.com, July 16, 2014 Cultural resource management consultants “Gas Firm to Pay for Bulldozed Logan County Cemetery” Local, statewide, and national NGOs —Herald-Standard, February 11, 2014 Professional associations of historians, archaeologists, and architects “Native American burials…cited as reason to deny gas pipeline in Lancaster County” —Lancaster Online, August 4, 2014 “Shale Gas Boom Closes Historic Bridge” —The Columbus Dispatch, October 4, 2013 2 3
MISSION  GAPP   s mission is to work collaboratively and pragmatically with both the energy industry and the preservation ...
ADVANTAGES OF VOLUNTARY PRACTICES OUR APPROACH GAPP has convened four working groups to develop a set of voluntary practices that energy companies can adopt to manage risk to their operations and to protect significant historic and cultural resources. Our voluntary practices are designed to give companies better information on which to base their decisions and to be fully integrated into business practices, yielding efficiencies and cost-savings over time. GAPP’s voluntary practices provide energy developers the opportunity to: • Manage risk (to social license, public relations, and legal liability if human remains are involved) with an efficient approach supported by the preservation community; • Benchmark across the industry and improve practices through information exchange over time; • Generate community goodwill and demonstrate leadership through corporate social responsibility; and • Raise awareness of the culture and history of the communities in which companies work. Our approach includes: • A GIS-based screening tool that will put in one place all available data about known archaeological sites, historic properties, and cemeteries, and then use a predictive model to assess whether areas slated for development are high risk, medium risk, or low risk • A significance model to help companies determine whether a particular site in the path of development is significant enough to warrant avoidance GAPP’s voluntary practices offer the preservation community the opportunity to: 4 • Identify previously unknown historic and archaeological resources; • Innovate preservation practice beyond the regulatory model by working with energy companies in a collaborative, mutually beneficial way; and • A user manual to guide implementation of the approach and to advise field workers on chance finds • Recommend avoidance, minimization, or mitigation of development impacts to significant sites; • Raise public awareness of the value of cultural and historic resources to improve our knowledge of the past. 5
ADVANTAGES OF VOLUNTARY PRACTICES  OUR APPROACH  GAPP has convened four working groups to develop a set of voluntary pract...
ADVANTAGES OF VOLUNTARY PRACTICES OUR APPROACH GAPP has convened four working groups to develop a set of voluntary practices that energy companies can adopt to manage risk to their operations and to protect significant historic and cultural resources. Our voluntary practices are designed to give companies better information on which to base their decisions and to be fully integrated into business practices, yielding efficiencies and cost-savings over time. GAPP’s voluntary practices provide energy developers the opportunity to: • Manage risk (to social license, public relations, and legal liability if human remains are involved) with an efficient approach supported by the preservation community; • Benchmark across the industry and improve practices through information exchange over time; • Generate community goodwill and demonstrate leadership through corporate social responsibility; and • Raise awareness of the culture and history of the communities in which companies work. Our approach includes: • A GIS-based screening tool that will put in one place all available data about known archaeological sites, historic properties, and cemeteries, and then use a predictive model to assess whether areas slated for development are high risk, medium risk, or low risk • A significance model to help companies determine whether a particular site in the path of development is significant enough to warrant avoidance GAPP’s voluntary practices offer the preservation community the opportunity to: 4 • Identify previously unknown historic and archaeological resources; • Innovate preservation practice beyond the regulatory model by working with energy companies in a collaborative, mutually beneficial way; and • A user manual to guide implementation of the approach and to advise field workers on chance finds • Recommend avoidance, minimization, or mitigation of development impacts to significant sites; • Raise public awareness of the value of cultural and historic resources to improve our knowledge of the past. 5
ADVANTAGES OF VOLUNTARY PRACTICES  OUR APPROACH  GAPP has convened four working groups to develop a set of voluntary pract...
GET INVOLVED IN THE NEWS “Pittsburgh to host first summit partnering energy and cultural preservation” —Pittsburgh Business Times, March 5, 2014 “I thought this was the perfect opportunity to show that the development of domestic energy and preservation of cultural heritage can coexist,” said Mark Boling, president of V+ Development Solutions at Southwestern Energy. GAPP seeks new members to help pilot our voluntary approach and encourage adoption throughout the energy industry and the cultural resources community. GAPP invites: —Herald Standard, March 10, 2014 “Representatives of the energy industry and preservation community are combining resources to identify and manage historic and cultural sites, including archaeological, that could be impacted by shale gas development.” “The Converging Roads to Energy Independence and Heritage Preservation” —Preservation Leadership Forum Blog, Feb. 24, 2014 “Many natural gas energy executives love and want to preserve our shared history. And preservation professionals understand the need for the development of sustainable sources of fuel.” “Drillers try adjusting to cultural concerns” —Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 21, 2014 “Birthplace of USS New Jersey Saved by Shale Production” —Bloomberg.com, May 29, 2014 6 “The Gas and Preservation Partnership is not for absolutists. It’s not for archaeologists who think any cultural resource should remain unbothered. And it’s not for oil and gas companies that rely on a lack of regulation to drill through whatever cultural grounds may lie below.” • Financial Contributions: A 2014-2015 goal of $1M will support the Ohio pilot program and scale operations nationally. GAPP is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, and contributions are tax-deductible. “Bridging the GAPP: Energy industry/ preservation officials come together” • Expertise: GAPP’s working groups welcome new members, especially energy industry professionals responsible for siting and supervising construction projects, to help craft voluntary practices that align with their existing project management protocols. • Help To Spread the Word: GAPP’s voluntary practices will only have an impact if companies adopt them. Thank you for: - Forwarding this prospectus to your colleagues - Viewing and sharing the GAPP video at www.gasandpreservation.org - Joining GAPP communities on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter Groundbreaking collaboration In March 2014 GAPP convened a conference in Pittsburgh, in the heart of the Marcellus shale. A capacity crowd of 130 came together to exchange insights into energy exploration and heritage resource preservation practices, to find common ground, and to chart a forward course. Elizabeth Bradshaw, global cultural heritage lead for Rio Tinto, shared how one of the world’s largest mining companies has adopted a proactive cultural heritage approach that has been fundamental to managing risks and creating significant business value. 7
GET INVOLVED  IN THE NEWS     Pittsburgh to host first summit partnering energy and cultural preservation       Pittsburgh...
GET INVOLVED IN THE NEWS “Pittsburgh to host first summit partnering energy and cultural preservation” —Pittsburgh Business Times, March 5, 2014 “I thought this was the perfect opportunity to show that the development of domestic energy and preservation of cultural heritage can coexist,” said Mark Boling, president of V+ Development Solutions at Southwestern Energy. GAPP seeks new members to help pilot our voluntary approach and encourage adoption throughout the energy industry and the cultural resources community. GAPP invites: —Herald Standard, March 10, 2014 “Representatives of the energy industry and preservation community are combining resources to identify and manage historic and cultural sites, including archaeological, that could be impacted by shale gas development.” “The Converging Roads to Energy Independence and Heritage Preservation” —Preservation Leadership Forum Blog, Feb. 24, 2014 “Many natural gas energy executives love and want to preserve our shared history. And preservation professionals understand the need for the development of sustainable sources of fuel.” “Drillers try adjusting to cultural concerns” —Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 21, 2014 “Birthplace of USS New Jersey Saved by Shale Production” —Bloomberg.com, May 29, 2014 6 “The Gas and Preservation Partnership is not for absolutists. It’s not for archaeologists who think any cultural resource should remain unbothered. And it’s not for oil and gas companies that rely on a lack of regulation to drill through whatever cultural grounds may lie below.” • Financial Contributions: A 2014-2015 goal of $1M will support the Ohio pilot program and scale operations nationally. GAPP is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, and contributions are tax-deductible. “Bridging the GAPP: Energy industry/ preservation officials come together” • Expertise: GAPP’s working groups welcome new members, especially energy industry professionals responsible for siting and supervising construction projects, to help craft voluntary practices that align with their existing project management protocols. • Help To Spread the Word: GAPP’s voluntary practices will only have an impact if companies adopt them. Thank you for: - Forwarding this prospectus to your colleagues - Viewing and sharing the GAPP video at www.gasandpreservation.org - Joining GAPP communities on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter Groundbreaking collaboration In March 2014 GAPP convened a conference in Pittsburgh, in the heart of the Marcellus shale. A capacity crowd of 130 came together to exchange insights into energy exploration and heritage resource preservation practices, to find common ground, and to chart a forward course. Elizabeth Bradshaw, global cultural heritage lead for Rio Tinto, shared how one of the world’s largest mining companies has adopted a proactive cultural heritage approach that has been fundamental to managing risks and creating significant business value. 7
GET INVOLVED  IN THE NEWS     Pittsburgh to host first summit partnering energy and cultural preservation       Pittsburgh...
NEXT STEPS Photo by Kip May GAPP plans to pilot our approach in eastern Ohio, where Utica shale development is occurring near world-class archaeological sites and where the risk to companies and to our knowledge of the past is heightened. We aim to build a screening tool, significance model, and user guide for eastern Ohio in the coming months that will demonstrate the value of the GAPP approach—for companies, for local communities, and for all of us who care about history. After a successful pilot, GAPP plans to promote adoption of its voluntary standards in shale plays nationwide. Simultaneously, we hope to explore adaptation of the GAPP approach to other energy sectors, including, for example, solar and wind. Gas and Preservation Partnership GAPP’s Board of Directors is comprised of both energy industry and preservation leaders, including representatives from Shell, Southwestern Energy, Hess, and the Society for American Archaeology. Four working groups are comprised of experts including engineers, risk managers, cultural resource management strategies, archaeologists and historians, GIS data specialists, and public affairs professionals, among others. GAPP is managed by Cultural Heritage Partners, PLLC, with the support from its allied firm The Heritas Group. 151 Walton Ave., Lexington, KY 40508 703.489.6059 info@gasandpreservation.org | www.gasandpreservation.org
NEXT STEPS Photo by Kip May  GAPP plans to pilot our approach in eastern Ohio, where Utica shale development is occurring ...