Curriculum

LINCOLN CHRISTIAN COLLEGE AND SEMINARY Course Map Kimberli Sams Summer, 2014
LINCOLN CHRISTIAN COLLEGE AND SEMINARY  Course Map Kimberli Sams Summer, 2014
Course Map Comparing Syllabus Styles Task-Based Negotiated/Student-Led Theory “Assumes that the grammatical or structural aspects of language form are the most basic or useful” (Rajaee, Abbaspour, & Zare, 2012, p. 65). Structural “…assumes that speaking a language is a skill best perfected through practice and interaction” (Jehan, 2014, p. 19). Focus Grammatical forms Communicative language and problem solving Formed by teacher. “…a social and problem-solving model for syllabus design, in which the learner plays the main role and where negotiation is a key concept” (Rajaee, Abbaspour, & Zare, 2012, p. 70). Learner needs and communicative language Discussed and formed by agreement between teacher and students. Variety of possible sequencing criteria. “…instructor uses a pre-arranged syllabus as a guide, but the learners create and modify the syllabus increasing interest and motivation to develop language skills” (Howell, 2013, p. 7). -Directly connected to the wants and needs of learners. -Learners “own” the syllabus which greatly increases motivation. -Negotiation itself requires progress in and use of the language. Formation Formed by teacher or organization (top down). Sequence Increasing structural complexity of grammar forms. “…highly controlled, tightly structured, and sequenced pattern practice drills” (Mohseni, 2008, cited in Howell, 2013, p. 5). Tasks and topics, what is necessary for real-life communication. The instructor defines a problem to be worked through by students. Learnercentered, but guided by the teacher. Positives -Content is easy to describe. -Structural knowledge is easy to measure. -Generally value and culture-free. Negatives -Not always directly relevant to the learner’s needs. -Only addresses one aspect of language—grammar—and ignores the others. -Information about a language learned rather than how to use it. -Connects language to real life. -Can easily teach other content as well as language. -Helps learners, “…to acquire language rather than learning it” (Rajaee, Abbaspour, & Zare, 2012, p. 76). -Ignores metalinguistic knowledge (Rajaee, Abbaspour, & Zare, 2012, p. 76). -May be difficult to accurately measure learners’ knowledge of the language through completion of tasks. -Requires a lot of creativity and flexibility from the teacher. Structure Lincoln Christian University -Possible lack of structure. -Sequencing may be difficult…ensuring that knowledge builds on prior knowledge. -Requires a lot of autonomy on the part of students. Page 1
Course Map Comparing Syllabus Styles Task-Based  Negotiated Student-Led  Theory     Assumes that the grammatical or struct...
Course Map Choosing a Syllabus Style -For my syllabus, I have chosen a hybrid of process-oriented styles which are analytical (Rajaee, Abbaspour, & Zare, 2012). -The syllabus will be task-based and negotiated. -The over-arching task will be to formulate a handbook for other internationals entering the community, and to share in an oral presentation various aspects of the handbook. -A needs assessment, as well as interviews, will be administered before classes begin. -These needs assessment tools will help determine possible topics/chapters for the handbook. -Further negotiation of topics/chapters will occur during the first sessions of class. Lincoln Christian University Page 2
Course Map Choosing a Syllabus Style -For my syllabus, I have chosen a hybrid of process-oriented styles which are analyti...
Course Map Course Title: ESL Stage One Course Description: This course is for adult students of various proficiency levels (mainly developing and expanding) who have immigrated to the UK. It will explore the English language through an examination of British culture. The course will take place over four weeks, meeting five days a week for three hours each day, for a total of 60 hours. Learning will primarily take place through communicative task-based activities. The culminating task/project will be: -A written handbook for international newcomers to New Malden/the UK; -An oral presentation of the student’s/group’s topic within the handbook. Prior to the class, a Needs Assessment Questionnaire has been given, as well as individual interviews. Goals and topics have been determined as a result of the necessities and wants indicated through these tools. These topics will be further negotiated during the early class sessions. Goals: Students will study English in order to: a. Communicate effectively in everyday situations to meet the demands of society; b. Develop the ability to express themselves imaginatively and creatively; c. Develop a sensitivity to, and an appreciation of, English and the cultures it reflects, and to use this knowledge to communicate appropriately and considerately. (adapted from Richards, 2001) Organization: The units of progression for the class are idea topics, specifically focusing on learner survival needs, interesting facts, and culture (Nation & Macalister, 2010, p. 78). The class is sequenced in a spiral linear organization: -Topics presented in brief with focus on various grammar language points; -Topics explored in depth with tasks requiring use of grammar points; -Individual and group research of topics with focus on informing others; -Formation and presentation of written and oral projects focused on topics with proper use of grammar. Lincoln Christian University Page 3
Course Map  Course Title  ESL Stage One Course Description  This course is for adult students of various proficiency level...
Course Map Objectives: Listening: 1. The student will demonstrate the ability to select, compare, and contrast oral information. (Discussion, Venn Diagram) 2. The student will follow multi-step oral instructions in order to analyze and apply oral information. (KWS charts, Final project) 3. The student will be able to categorize and sequence oral information. (Final project) Speaking: 1. The student will retell stories and discuss issues and concepts. (Case studies, Discussion) 2. The student will be able to state an opinion, make a prediction, and offer a solution to a problem. (KWS, What should we include?) 3. The student will give an oral report. (Final project) Reading: 1. The student will be able to infer and make generalizations from written text, and interpret information or data. (Case Studies, Research) 2. The student will be able to identify the main idea and find supporting details. (Research) 3. The student will be able to follow multi-step written instructions. Writing: 1. The student will be able to compare and contrast information. (Venn Diagram) 2. The student will summarize information and develop a topic. (Final Project) 3. The student will edit and revise writing. (Final Project) Grammar: 1. The student will demonstrate an ability to use regular verb structures consistently, and to use irregular structures with increasing consistency, in both productive skills. 2. The student will recognize, use, and respond to complex grammar conventions of speech—idioms. 3. The student will be able to edit both spoken and written language for grammar. Adapted from WIDA Resource Guide, 2007, p. 57, “Can Do Descriptors.” Retrieved from http://www.wida.us/standards/Resource_Guide_web.pdf and State of Washington, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, 6-8 Language Proficiency Levels, 2009. Retrieved from http://www.k12.wa.us/MigrantBilingual/pubdocs/ELD/6-8PROFICIENCYLEVELS.pdf Lincoln Christian University Page 4
Course Map  Objectives  Listening  1. The student will demonstrate the ability to select, compare, and contrast oral infor...
Course Map Week 1 Objective(s) Addressed S1: L1: R1: G1: G2: W1: Lincoln Christian University Types of Resources -Case studies of internationals adjusting to the UK (both written and video) -Graphic Organizer—Four Block Notes (http://freeology.com/wpcontent/files/blank4box.pdf) -Graphic Organizer— Thematic Web (http://freeology.com/wpcontent/files/thematicweb.pd f) -Common UK Idioms 1— worksheet (close activity). Developed using http://www.usingenglish.com /reference/idioms/country/bri tish+english.html and http://www.englishclub.com/r ef/Idioms/British/index.htm -Graphic Organizer—Venn Diagram (http://freeology.com/wpcontent/files/largevenn.pdf) -New Interchange, Units 1 & 4 Assignments/Activities 1. Class discussion regarding difficulties in adjusting to the UK (Building Background). (L1, S1) 2. Class will view the video case studies (2), and read the written case studies (2), filling in the blocks on the GO with important details. (L1, R1, W1) 3. Review of past tense(s) and irregulars (New Interchange, Units 1 & 4), (Review Activity). (G1) 4. Pairs will discuss the case study details, using past tense(s) and irregulars (practice activity). (G1) 5. Class will brainstorm topics which would be helpful to know in adjusting to life in the UK. (building background) 6. Pairs will choose two topics and create 2 word webs using the GO. (S1, R1) 7. Class discussion regarding differences between British culture and home cultures (building background). (L1, W1) 8. Common UK Idioms 1, discussion and worksheet (vocabulary). (G2) 9. Individuals will choose a topic and create a Venn Diagram comparing and contrasting British Culture with their home culture (building background). (W1) 10. Class will narrow down topics, choosing 5 to research and use as chapters in the Handbook. (L1, S1) Assessments -Teacher observation of individual participation. -Common UK Idioms 1 Worksheet. -Venn Diagram Page 5
Course Map  Week 1  Objective s  Addressed S1  L1  R1  G1  G2  W1   Lincoln Christian University  Types of Resources -Case...
Course Map Week 2 Objective(s) Addressed L2: S2: W2: R2: G1: G2: Types of Resources -Graphic Organizer— KWS Chart (http://www.eduplace.com /graphicorganizer/pdf/kws .pdf) -New Interchange, Units 5 &6 -Common UK Idioms 2— Worksheet. Developed using http://www.usingenglish.c om/reference/idioms/coun try/british+english.html and http://www.englishclub.co m/ref/Idioms/British/index. htm -pamphlets, booklets, books etc. regarding British culture. Lincoln Christian University 11. Class will be divided into 5 groups, one for each topic. 12. Groups will begin to discuss (using word webs and Venn diagrams) their topic. (L1, S1) Assignments/Activities 1. Students will work in their groups to fill in KWS Charts about their chosen topic (cooperative learning). (L2, S2, W2) 2. Review of Future tense and two-part verbs (New Interchange), (review activity). (G1) 3. Groups will discuss what they will include in their chapter regarding their topic (using future and two-part verbs), (practice activity). (G1) 4. Groups will assign portions of the topic to each member for research, and discuss how the research will be completed (KWS charts), (cooperative learning). (L2, S2) 5. Common UK Idioms 2—Worksheet (Predicting meanings), (vocabulary). (G2) 6. Students will examine the two Idiom worksheets, and choose any idioms which would be useful in context of their topic. (G2) 7. Class discussion of how idioms might be used/useful in the Handbook and/or oral presentations. (G2) 8. Groups will examine pamphlets, booklets, and books (provided by teacher) regarding British culture and determine which might be useful for their research (supplemental materials). (R2) 9. Research begins. 10. Teacher will meet with each group in Assessments -Teacher observation -Common UK Idioms 2— Worksheet -KWS Charts Page 6
Course Map  Week 2  Objective s  Addressed L2  S2  W2  R2  G1  G2   Types of Resources -Graphic Organizer    KWS Chart  ht...
Course Map Week 3 Week 4 Objective(s) Addressed L2: L3: S2: S3: R1: R2: R3: W2: Types of Resources -Handout: Handbook and Oral Presentation Objective(s) Addressed L3: S3: R3: W2: W3: G1: G2: G3: Types of Resources -Peer Review Sheet (written chapter) -Peer Review Sheet (oral presentation) Lincoln Christian University -Laptop with projector -Internet resources ((YouTube, http://www.projectbritain.c om/ , http://www.learnenglish.d e/britishculture.html , http://learnenglish.britishc ouncil.org/en/uk-culture) turn to discuss the KWS GO, research plan, and to make suggestions. Assignments/Activities 1. Class discussion regarding the final project—both written and oral. (L2, R3) 2. Groups will discuss and note questions they have regarding the project, and discuss with teacher. (L2, S2) 3. Research of print media continues. (R2) 4. Introduction of internet resources (YouTube, http://www.projectbritain.com/, http://www.learnenglish.de/britishculture.html , http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/ukculture), (supplemental materials). (R2) 5. Internet research begins. (R2) 6. Groups begin to summarize information for Handbook. (W2) 7. Writing of group chapter of handbook begins. (W2) 8. Groups begin discussing oral presentation. (S3) Assignments/Activities 1. Groups will finalize/edit their chapter of the Handbook (specifically concentrating on edit of verb tenses, irregulars, and idioms). (G1, G2, G3, W3) 2. Teacher will meet with each group to suggest additional revisions. 3. Groups will present final written/print Handbook chapter. (W2) 4. Groups will present oral presentation of their chapters. (S3, G3) 5. Each student will peer review one written chapter. (R3) 6. Each student will peer review two oral presentations. (L3) Assessments -Teacher observation. Assessments -Peer Reviews. -Teacher rubric: Written -Teacher rubric: Oral Page 7
Course Map  Week 3  Week 4  Objective s  Addressed L2  L3  S2  S3  R1  R2  R3  W2   Types of Resources -Handout  Handbook ...
Course Map Textbook Comparison New Interchange 2 Theoretical Methodological Communicative Language Teaching Communicative Language Teaching -Grammar/Structural Syllabus -“Integrated syllabus…multi-skills that links topics, functions, and grammar” (p. v.) -Grammar/Structural Syllabus -Systematic presentation of grammar -“Comprehensively integrates life skills, workplace communication…grammar-based program” (preface). -“International Edition” (cover) -Illustrations are multi-cultural -However, topics are North American-based (map of US, mentions US states in readings). -Some additional “global” information included. -Linear -Grammar-based -Each unit presents multiple grammar topics and a few language functions. Culture(s) -“International content…(for) homogeneous and heterogeneous classes” (p. v.) -Multi-cultural photos -Compares and contrasts cultures in topics/activities Organization -Linear -“This level builds on the foundations for accurate and fluent communication already established in prior levels…” (p. iv.). -“The syllabus is carefully graded, with a gradual progression of teaching items” (p. v.). -Each unit presents two main topics (grammar) and two language functions. Unit 3 My Students… -Suit background?—Yes -Suit needs?—Yes, includes review of previous grammar points and language functions -Suit learning goals and objectives?—Yes, practical communicative focus -Suit proficiency level?—Yes, level 2 seems to be equal to a mid-intermediate proficiency level -Appropriate number of exercises?—Too many, but good variety of choices. Good balance of L,S,R,W -What would you leave out?—I would probably tend to leave out the conversation and practice Lincoln Christian University Side by Side Book 2 Unit 3 -Suit background?—Yes, traditional practical topics -Suit needs?—The inclusion of life skills is good, but it is definitely North American language rather than “international” as it claims (use of vocabulary such as “supermarket,” “yard,” “dollars,” and “french-fries”). -Suit learning goals and objectives?—Yes, focus on life skills and communicative language. -Suit proficiency level?—Maybe a little too easy, entering-intermediate level. -Appropriate number of exercises?—Good variety of L,S,R,W, but not enough. Would require supplemental. Page 8
Course Map Textbook Comparison New Interchange 2 Theoretical Methodological  Communicative Language Teaching  Communicativ...
Course Map activities. These are based mostly on mimicry. Layout/Visual Aids Authenticity of Language -Excellent, colorful pictures and interesting blocks of progressive activities. -Easy to use, self-explanatory -Very authentic, appropriate for international instruction -What would you leave out?—This is hard to answer. I could not find a sample of the Teacher’s Edition anywhere online, so I’m not exactly sure how some of the activities are meant to be used/completed. -Colorful illustrations -Sometimes cramped—too much on each page. Not easy to tell where one activity ends and the next begins. -Not easy to use, not self-explanatory -Somewhat authentic, appropriate mostly for US or Canadian instruction For the course I’m planning for this class, I would not choose either textbook as a primary text. The course will not be text-based. I would consider using both texts as supplemental material in the course. The class will require some comparing and contrasting of cultures, and New Interchange has some units dealing with this as a topic. Side by Side has some topics regarding shopping, eating in restaurants, and clothing which might be useful in introducing vocabulary for comparing these skills in cultural terms. If I were planning a course that was to be grammar-based I would definitely prefer the New Interchange Text. I’ve used it before and find it covers all the bases in regards to speaking, listening, reading, and writing, and is a great springboard for providing individualized ideas for instruction. References Molinsky, S.J., and Bliss, B. (2001). Side by Side, International Edition, Book 2. White Plains, NY: Pearson Education. Richards, J. C., (1998). New Interchange 2. U.S.: Cambridge University Press. Lincoln Christian University Page 9
Course Map activities. These are based mostly on mimicry.  Layout Visual Aids  Authenticity of Language  -Excellent, color...
Course Map Supplemental Materials Grammar (For accommodations if necessary): Beginner: Swick, E. (2005). Practice Makes Perfect; English Grammar for ESL Learners, Beginner Level. U.S.: The McGraw-Hill Companies. Early Intermediate: Molinsky, S.J., and Bliss, B. (2001). Side by Side, Book 2, International Edition. White Plains, NY: Pearson Education. Folse, K. S. (2012). Clear Grammar 2: Keys to Grammar for English Language Learners. U.S.: The University of Michigan Press. Mid-Late Intermediate: Richards, J. C. (1998). New Interchange: English for International Communication 2. U.S.: Cambridge University Press. Advanced: Lester, M. (2011). Practice Makes Perfect; Advanced English Grammar for ESL Learners. U.S.: The McGraw-Hill Companies. British Culture: Websites: http://www.projectbritain.com/ http://www.learnenglish.de/britishculture.html http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/uk-culture YouTube Videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NL66NfKUWDE&index=3&list=PLFT01amlq1QtlUxVSmHCBZr7RyvA9UXtH (General Culture) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vSi18Cm4Xy0&list=PLFT01amlq1QtlUxVSmHCBZr7RyvA9UXtH&index=9 (Jobs) Lincoln Christian University Page 10
Course Map Supplemental Materials Grammar  For accommodations if necessary   Beginner  Swick, E.  2005 . Practice Makes Pe...
Course Map Supplemental Materials, Cont. YouTube Videos, Cont.: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrDOUd5Vabw&list=PLFT01amlq1QtlUxVSmHCBZr7RyvA9UXtH&index=13 (sports) British Idioms: http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/country/british+english.html http://www.englishclub.com/ref/Idioms/British/index.htm Graphic Organizers: http://www.eduplace.com/graphicorganizer/ http://freeology.com/graphicorgs/ Case Studies: YouTube Videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1naOVXeJA4 (American moves to Britain) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VS2xJ7PhxJQ (International Relocation, 4 case studies) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ha5T-tGGOkE (Am I Korean?, A Korean family living in the UK) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTOM6Qd7v00 (Korean and Western cultural differences) Lincoln Christian University Page 11
Course Map Supplemental Materials, Cont. YouTube Videos, Cont.  http   www.youtube.com watch v GrDOUd5Vabw list PLFT01amlq...
Course Map References Howell, J. (2013). “Syllabi in English Language Teaching.” Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/karenochea/syllabiinenglishlanguageteaching-111106200612phpapp02 Jehan, M. (2014). “Syllabus and Curriculum Design Development.” Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/MudasarJehan/syllabus-design-for-med-mphil-linguistics-and-curriculum-designers Nation, I.S.P., & Macalister, J. (2010). Language Curriculum Design. New York, NY: Routledge. Rajaee, M., Abbaspour, E., & Zare, J. (2012). “A Critical Review of Recent Trends in Second Language Syllabus Design and Curriculum Development.” International Journal of Research Studies on Language Learning. Vol. 2, No. 2. Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/ehsanabbaspour/a-critical-review-of-recent-trends-in-second-language-syllabus-design-and-curriculumdevelopment Richards, J. C. (2001). Curriculum development in language teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. State of Washington, Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, 6-8 Language Proficiency Levels, 2009. Retrieved from http://www.k12.wa.us/MigrantBilingual/pubdocs/ELD/6-8PROFICIENCYLEVELS.pdf WIDA Resource Guide, 2007, p. 57, “Can Do Descriptors.” Retrieved from http://www.wida.us/standards/Resource_Guide_web.pdf Lincoln Christian University Page 12
Course Map References Howell, J.  2013 .    Syllabi in English Language Teaching.    Retrieved from http   www.slideshare....