Students will be able to...

Week 1: Introduction Introduce yourself to each other! What do you expect from this
course? What are you excited about from this course? What are you nervous about from this
course?
A note about this course: There are no exams for this course. You will be assessed based on
coursework, including assignments, quizzes, and the final project. A final mark of at least
50% has to be obtained to pass the course. You may only submit each quiz and each
assignment one time. Do not submit more than once.
All quizzes and assignments should be uploaded on the course platform (under Assignments)
by the due date. Do NOT write a separate document and then “Attach.” You can write a
separate document in Word and then copy and paste the document (Ctrl V) onto the platform
box (where I can then Comment and Mark).
Assessment - 100% Continuous assessment
Week 2 Objectives:
-To review important terms related to English Digital Project
-To review what are the digital humanities?
-To review the basics of the internet
Week 2 Activity:
1. Complete quiz 1 which you will find under Week 2.
QUIZ 1: Inventory of your technology background
Write a one-page, single-spaced “technology inventory” by answering these five questions (a-
e)
(a) Inventory your current technology skills. What technology are you embarrassed about not
knowing more about?
(b) Inventory your past technology learning and practice history. What experience do you
have with technology?
(c) Inventory your current online technology persona (social networks, searchable web
pages). Where do you participate? What would you guess people think of your technology
expertise?
(d) Inventory your future technology needs. What kind of career are you interested in? What
technologies will you need to be familiar with?
(e) Finally, look at your answers to those four questions. How would you define the term
"technology" based on the answers you gave?
2. Read the requirements for Assignment 1, which is due week 7.
3. Listen to the Recorded Power Point Presentation, “EDP711S Unit 1”
4. In your own words, write the definition for each of the following words. (You do not need
to submit anything; this is for your own practice).
A Hypertext mark-up language (HTML)?
B Internet?
C Template?
D Blog?
E Podcast?
F Server?
G Internet service provider?
H Hyperlink?
I Web page?
J Website?
Week 3 Objectives
-To explore benefits of literary internet-based project work
-To analyse selected sample digital projects
Week 3 Activity:
1. Read the first half of Unit 2.
2. Listen to the Recorded Power Point Presentation, “EDP711S Unit 2A
3. Begin working on Assignment 1.
Week 4 Objectives
1. Learn more about the English digital project that you will create for this course.
2. Review a list of Namibian plays, poems and auto/biographies located in the NUST library.
Week 4 Activity
1. Read the second half of Unit 2.
2. Listen to the Recorded Power Point Presentation, “EDP711S Unit 2B”
3. Begin thinking about your project for this course. Read the requirements for Assignment 2
(Step 1 and Step 2)
4. Continue working on Assignment 1.
5. Complete Quiz 2 which you will find under Week 4.
QUIZ 2: Reading Response: Read the article, An Ethical Perspective on Political-
Economic Issues in the Long-Term Preservation of Digital Heritage.” (article is attached)
Write a 500-word summary of the article. You should briefly summarize the main argument
of the article, and then pose a question that you have at the end of your summary. Your
summary should include:
a brief description of the main topic of the article (what's it about?)
a brief summary of the main thesis of the article (what does it claim?)
background information on who the intended audience for the article was
(professionals or general readers?), usually based on where it was published
a brief description of how you can apply this article to your studies at NUST or your
future career after NUST. In other words, what did you learn from the article that you can
put into practice in your studies or career?
Pose 1 question that you have at the end of the summary.
Week 5 Objectives
1) Explore what makes good web design.
2) Evaluate the difference between creating and writing a web page and writing for a book or
newspaper.
Week 5 Activity
1) Read the first half of Unit 3.
2) Listen to the recorded Power Point Presentation “EDP711S Unit 3A”
3) Continue working on assignment 1 (questions 1, 2, 3).
4) Be thinking about assignment 2 (Step 1 and Step 2) and what type of project you will
create.
5) Complete quiz 3. QUIZ 3: Reading Response: Read the article, Preservation in the
Age of Google: Digitization, Digital Preservation, and Dilemmas.” (article attached)
Write a 500-word summary of the article above. You should briefly summarize the main
argument of the article, and then pose a question that you have at the end of your
summary. Your summary should include:
a brief description of the main topic of the article (what's it about?)
a brief summary of the main thesis of the article (what does it claim?)
background information on who the intended audience for the article was
(professionals or general readers?), usually based on where it was published
a brief description of how you can apply this article to your studies at NUST or your
future career after NUST. In other words, what did you learn from the article that you can
put into practice in your studies or career?
Pose 1 question that you have at the end of the summary.
Week 6: Continue working on Assignment 1 (Questions 1, 2, and 3). Assignment 1 is due
next week. Assignment 1 is below.
ASSIGNMENT 1
QUESTION 1 You must use at least 3 different sources (references) to define the following
terms. You must write in your own words, and cite the author and text from where you found
the information. You must list the 3 references at the end of the page (APA style). Do not
copy and paste from another source or from the internet.
[50 marks, 5 marks per sub-question]
Define the following terms with regard to the internet:
A Hypertext mark-up language (HTML)?
B Intranet?
C Digital Humanities?
D Blog?
E Podcast?
F Server?
G Internet service provider?
H Hyperlink?
I Buffering?
J Resolution?
QUESTION 2 [25 marks]
It has been argued that the digital humanities have allowed historically disadvantaged
people’s stories, histories and art to reach a much wider audience. Write an essay on this with
reference to ONE of the examples mentioned in the readings, the study guide for this subject,
or that you observed in your coursework. Aim to write 1500 to 2000 words of text. You must
use 5 different sources and list the references at the end of the page (APA style reference).
QUESTION 3 [25 marks, see below for marks for sub- questions]
A. Find the website of a Namibian organisation (business, government department,
university, parastatal body, charity, etc). Write down the full URL (‘web address’) of their
home page [1 mark]
B. List and explain what is good and what is bad about the design and visual qualities of the
website? [8 marks]
C. List and explain what is good and what is bad about the writing (the written content) of the
website? [8 marks]
D. Write a letter to the CEO of the organisation that owns the website, listing at least five tips
for improving their website. [8 marks]
You should aim to write about 500 words for each of B, C, and D. TOTAL MARKS:
100
Week 7 Assignment 1 is due. Begin thinking about and working on Assignment 2.
Before starting your project, you must email me your ideas/plan and I will either “approve”
of your plan or I will ask you for more information. Email me through Zarafa, not through
the course web page. Email address: kcarter@nust.na
Week 8 Learning Objectives:
1.Define important design principles.
2. Begin to think about and apply the 14 guidelines on writing for the web to your project for
the course.
Week 8 Activity:
1. Read again Assignment 2 and begin thinking about your project.
2. Continue reading the rest of Unit 3.
3. Listen to the recorded Power Point Presentation, “EDP711S Unit 3B.”
4. After gaining a full understanding of the 14 guidelines, complete the activity below.
In normal essay writing, we provide the background, supporting information and concluding
points. In writing for the web, we write according to the inverted pyramid. We put the most
important information first, followed by supporting details, and the background comes last.
Apply the inverted pyramid to the text below. Write in your own words. Do not copy from a
website or someone else’s work. As you apply the inverted text below, remember and apply
the 14 tips above. For example, your text should be concise, clear, with simple language.
Text:
For the last ten years the University has endeavoured to meet the aims and objectives set out
in the strategic plan written in 2012 and covering the period 2013 2016. These included an
objective to enhance the student experience through better communication which is being
spearheaded by student services.
In the last 12 months, the department has been engaged in a piece of work designed to
enhance the student experience by providing better web resources for the entire student body.
The culmination of this work is a written report entitled Enhancing the Student Experience
that can be found at www.sheffield.ac.uk/ssd/report
Malcom Roberts, the Student Communications Coordinator, has led the project and will give
a presentation on the report at the next staff briefing being held in the Jessop West Exhibition
space on 10 October at 4 pm. All staff are encouraged to attend.
(Source: Writing for the Web: Training Notes (Student Services Information Desk:
University of Sheffield) https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/polopoly_fs/1.501204!/file/writing-for-
the-web-notes.pdf
Your answer (Inverted Pyramid) (most important information first, followed by supporting
details, and the background comes last).
My answer:
Enhancing the student experience: a briefing
Jessop West Exhibition Space
10 October
4pm
All staff are encouraged to attend
This presentation is the result of a project led by Malcolm Roberts. The project was designed to
enhance the student experience through the provision of better web-based resources.
The project was conceived in response to the aims and objectives of the University’s strategic plan
2013 16.
If you are unable to attend the briefing or wish to read Malcolm’s report in advance you can find it at:
www.sheffield.ac.uk/ssd/report
Source: Writing for the Web: Training Notes (Student Services Information Desk: University of
Sheffield) https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/polopoly_fs/1.501204!/file/writing-for-the-web-notes.pdf
For more information about writing for the web, download the article on “Interactivity and
the Writer.” (The article is attached).
Week 9 Learning outcomes
1) Explore the importance of preservation
2) Review different types of digitisation projects in the humanities
Week 9 Activity
1) Read the first half of Unit 4.
2) Listen to the Recorded PowerPoint Presentation, “EDP711S Unit 4A.”
3) Complete Quiz 4. (below)
4) View the 3 different types of digitisation projects in the humanities:
1.The Shakespeare Quartos Archive http://www.quartos.org/
2.The Biodiversity Heritage Library http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/
Travels in the interior of Southern Africa published in 1822
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/100911#/summary This book documents the
4 year expedition of a British explorer who covered more than 7000 kilometers throughout
Southern Africa in the early 1800s.
3. Mapping the Republic of Letters http://republicofletters.stanford.edu/
Mapping the Republic of Letters is a collaborative, international project which started at
Stanford University. The purpose of the project was to produce a map of this network through
the development of sophisticated visualization tools. It also aimed to establish a source
documenting early scholarship or early research. Some questions this project sought to
answer were: What did this network look like? Was it as extensive as we believe? How did
this network evolve over time? By combining the geographical data, historical events,
personal relationships and social data, this project showed how ideas travelled across the
world. For example, you can read up about John Locke and his networks of correspondence.
John Lock was an English philosopher and doctor, and regarded as one of the most influential
of Enlightenment thinkers.
In the 17
th
century, Locke wrote over 3000 letters to individuals throughout England, France,
the Netherlands and other countries. He wrote about medicine, education, psychology and
news of the day. Mapping the Republic of Letters shows the communities that Locke
communicated with and shows the connections within those communities. Locke wrote to
religious leaders, scientists, doctors, astronomers and just about anyone else.
Week 9 Quiz 4:
The Atlantic Slave Trade in Two Minutes
The Atlantic Slave Trade in Two Minutes gives details about the 12.5 million Africans who
were forcefully taken, transported and then forced into slavery in Europe and the Americas
from 1500 until 1870. This fascinating project presents maps that have detailed information
including: how many slaves were sold; where they were taken; length of the journey, etc.
This animation illustrates the journeys of nearly 20,528 voyages within a 315 year time
frame, within 2 minutes!
http://www.slate.com/articles/life/the_history_of_american_slavery/2015/06/animated_intera
ctive_of_the_history_of_the_atlantic_slave_trade.html
Click on the project and read through the web page. Click Pause (at the top). Move your
computer mouse to a country in West Africa which was involved in the Slave Trade. For
example, the Portuguese ship, The Ligeiro, left Nigeria in 1820 with 389 slaves and arrived in
Brazil with 353 slaves. We can imagine what happened to those 36 slaves. For example, The
NS da Regla left Cacheu (today’s Guinea-Bissau) in 1608 with 236 slaves and arrived in the
Spanish West Indies (today’s Cuba, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico) with 167 slaves.
Choose a ship, a country, and a year. Write a paragraph on what you found (Name of ship,
country of departure and country of arrival, number of slaves at departure and number of
slaves at arrival and any other detailed information you can find). What do you think
happened to the slaves during the long journey? Then, reflect on your learning by answering
these questions: What is your opinion about this website? Describe your thoughts as you
were reading and collecting information on slavery. How could this project be implemented
in Namibia? How would you go about it? You are only allowed to submit 1 time per quiz.
Week 10 Learning outcomes
1) Evaluate advantages and disadvantages of digitisation projects
2) Describe the importance of preservation and strategies in preservation.
Week 10 Activity
1) Read the second half of Unit 4.
2) Listen to the Recorded PowerPoint Presentation, “EDP711S Unit 4B.”
3) Continue working on your Digital Project, which is Assignment 2. (Step 1 and Step 2).
Before starting your project, you must email me your ideas/plan and I will either
“approve” of your plan or I will ask you for more information. Email me through Zarafa, not
through the course web page. Email address: kcarter@nust.na
Week 11: Vacation School
We will look at examples of digital projects that you may choose from to complete
Assignment 2. Please come with questions that you may have about Assignment 2. You
may show me your plan for your project, or what you have done so far.
Week 12: Revision of your project
Week 13: Revision of your project
Week 14: Your project is due (Assignment 2)
ASSIGNMENT 2 [100 marks]
Your assignment is to create a digital project of your choosing. This is the main product and
project of the course. This should be related to the English language in Namibia, either
English literature (including oral literature transcribed into English) in Namibia, or the
linguistic structure of English as spoken in this country.
Step 1: You must conduct research which will involve analysis. For example, you may
wish to:
read a book of Namibian poetry, and analyse the themes, metaphors and
rhythms in the work. You could then produce a blog to analyse the poems.
Interview someone and ask how they relate to or connect with those poems.
Or you may wish to look at several Namibian plays and examine what they
appear to say about Namibian society during the period they were written. You
could then produce a blog to analyse the plays. Interview someone and ask how they
relate to or connect with those plays.
Perhaps you want to research the literary output of a key group in Namibian
society, for example Namibian youth or women. You could then produce a blog to
analyse the literary work. Interview someone and ask how they relate to or connect
with the literary work.
Maybe you could look at some of the peculiarities of English as it is spoken in
Namibia, possibly in cooperation with NUST’S ICENAM project. Your project must
reflect your own work in uncovering new understandings about English in Namibia.
After reading Walking the Boeing 707, for example, you might interview 3 people
who were in exile. Ask them about their experience before and after exile. After
giving them an opportunity to read the book, you would also ask them how they relate
to or connect with the book.
Step 2: Creating a product. How do I present the research I have conducted?
After you conduct the research, you need to think about how you will organise and present
the information that you have collected. Below are some examples of what the project could
take the form of:
1) Create your own multimedia poster
Express your ideas by combining images, graphics, audio, video and text on a digital canvas.
http://edu.glogster.com/ Choose the “Free Basic” option. Read the Glogster Overview to
help get you started.
2) Create a journal
Penzu is a free web based journal tool. Journals are kept private. Pictures can be included in
your entries and journal entries can be shared through email. https://penzu.com/
Create a photo documentary series (with appropriate text
annotation/captions/introductions)
3) Create a booklet or e-book
http://simplebooklet.com/index-sb.php
Write a booklet. Click Create and insert text, images, url, upload files, and music. You can
add multiple pages to the booklet and click publish when complete. Books can be shared by
URL, email or be made public or private.
4) Create Maps
http://www.scribblemaps.com/
5) Create timelines
http://www.timetoast.com/
This website allows you to combine images and text to make timelines. Completed projects
can be transferred to a class web site or blog. Make a history timeline of document
someone’s life.
6) A podcast (which could be uploaded to an audio sharing site like SoundCloud).
7) A text based blog possibly uploaded onto sites like Flickr or Instagram.
Or you may choose any other electronic product that can be uploaded onto the internet for
public viewing. Before starting your project, you must email me your ideas/plan and I will
either “approve” of your plan or I will ask you for more information. Email address:
kcarter@nust.na
**For more ways of presenting your research findings, go to:
http://edtechteacher.org/tools/
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