A Newsletter Full of Ideas to Help Your
Child Become a Better Reader and Writer
Parent Connection
Play “I’m Thinking of an Object. This
game may be played while driving in
a car, eating breakfast, or just about
any time you have a few moments.
 
The questioner may ask up to 10
questions to figure ou tthe object.
The questions must be answered with
“yes” or “no.
Examples
Is it alive?
Can you find it in a house?
Is it bigger than a car?
 
If the questioner can guess the object
in 10 questions or less, s/he receives
a point. Oncethe 10 questionsare
asked, repeat the game with the
other player thinking of an object.
 
This activity is great for building
vocabulary.
 
Reading game instructions is a
terrific way to get your child
reading difficult material. You
can try out a new game that
you have never played before,
or ask your child to verify a
rule about something you are
unsure of in a game you have
played many times. Either way,
your child must read and
understand the rules.
Here is a collection of six
websites where children
can hear and read books.
www.storylineonline.net
 
 
Asking your child to give you a play-by-
play is an effective way to improve
vocabulary. It also helps your child
practice with skills needed to become a
good reader such as summarizing and
sequencing events.
 
Focusing on one event makes this a
manageable activity. After your child
has been to a party, sports event, seen
a movie, or played a game is a great
time to give this a try.
 
Be sure to . . .
Ask questions to guide your child
through the sequence of events.
Repeat portions of what your child
says using new and interesting
words.
Praise your child for explaining
the situation well or using fascinating
words.