2015 Annual Report MENA MDTF The Middle East and North Africa Multi Donor Trust Fund
2015  Annual Report  MENA MDTF  The Middle East and North Africa Multi Donor Trust Fund
THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA MULTI DONOR TRUST FUND 2015 ANNUAL REPORT Report Period: January, 2015 – November 30, 2015 The Middle East and North Africa Multi Donor Trust Fund (MENA MDTF) was established in 2012 to support the transition currently underway in many countries in the MENA region. Since then, it has provided over $13 million in technical assistance grants to almost 30 activities at both country and regional level. Despite being a relatively small trust fund of little less than $16 million, it has nonetheless played a catalytic role in helping to deliver reform. The MENA MDTF is financed by the governments of Denmark, Finland, Norway and the United Kingdom. It supports technical assistance for project preparation, analytical studies, capacity building and knowledge sharing in areas where there is a clear and urgent need for increasing capacity. The MENA MDTF is aligned with the World Bank Group’s MENA strategy, and therefore the activities funded demonstrate clear linkages to relevant current and future Bank-funded operations and programs on the ground.
THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA MULTI DONOR TRUST FUND 2015 ANNUAL REPORT Report Period  January, 2015     November 30, 2...
The Middle East and North Africa Multi Donor Trust Fund Annual Report 2015
The Middle East and North Africa Multi Donor Trust Fund Annual Report 2015
Contents Abbreviations ................................................................. GO Opening Statement:........................................................ GO Chapter One:............................................................................ GO MENA MDTF – Providing Catalytic Donor Support Chapter Two:........................................................................... GO Chapter Three:........................................................................ GO Chapter Four:.......................................................................... GO Chapter Five:........................................................................... GO Overview ................................................................................. MDTF Funding and Financial Status GO Annex:...................................................................................... GO Acknowledgements:................................................................ GO The MENA MDTF in Review MDTF activities and their outcomes MENA MDTF Aggregate Results Framework 8th Call for Proposals Communication Looking Ahead Delivery on Agreed Results.
Contents  Abbreviations .................................................................  GO         Opening Statement .....
Abbreviations AfDB African Development Bank CMU Country Management Unit CoP Community of Practice CRCs Citizen Report Cards CSO Civil Society Organization DFID DJ Department for International Development (United Kingdom) Djibouti DLA District Local Authority DNA Damage and Needs Assessment EBRD European Bank for Reconstruction and Development EG Egypt GoT Government of Tunisia GRM Grievance Redress Mechanism HMIS IDPs Health Management Information System Internally Displaced Persons IDSC Information and Decision Support Center IFI International Financial Institution IQ Iraq JO Jordan KPI Key Performance Indicators MA Morocco MDTF Multi Donor Trust Fund MENA Middle East and North Africa
Abbreviations AfDB     African Development Bank     CMU     Country Management Unit  CoP    Community of Practice  CRCs   ...
Abbreviations MoLA Ministry of Local Authorities MoSA MTR NGO NVSP Ministry of Social Affairs Mid-term Review Non-governmental Organization National Volunteer Service Program OECD Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development PAF Public Affairs Foundation PCU Program Coordination Unit PforR Program for Results PDNA Programmatic Damage and Needs Assesment RY Yemen SPF State and Peace-building Fund S-S South-South TA Technical Assistance ToR Terms of Reference TTL Task Team Leader TU Tunisia VC Virtual Convening WBG World Bank Group WBI World Bank Institute WHO World Health Organization
Abbreviations MoLA     Ministry of Local Authorities  MoSA    MTR   NGO   NVSP       Ministry of Social Affairs Mid-term R...
Foreword Hafez Ghanem Vice President for the Middle East and North Africa, The World Bank Group The magnitude of conflicts in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) is unprecedented. It has created regional and international humanitarian and development crises with global spillover effects. The Middle East is now the theater of the largest forced displacement crisis since World War II, with more than 15 million refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs). In parallel, recent terror attacks in Beirut, Paris, and San Bernardino have put the focus on the security agenda, and augmented tensions related to refugees in Europe. Against this adverse background, the World Bank Group has revised its regional strategy, with the aim of promoting economic and social inclusion to contribute to peace and stability. Four pillars underpin the new strategy: (i) renewing the social contract between citizens and the state to address the underlying causes of violence and extremism; (ii) promoting regional cooperation to advance economic interdependence and trust among countries of the region; (iii) strengthening the resilience of MENA societies to address the absorption of refugees and IDPs; and (iv) mobilizing recovery and reconstruction efforts to rebuild societies impacted by conflict and unrest. The new strategy was well received by our Board of Directors and endorsed at the World Bank Group Annual Meetings in Lima in October 2015. Our shareholders recognized that humanitarian assistance and development aid was a continuum, and that peace and stability in MENA were global public goods. Among the effective tools at hand, the Middle East and North Africa Multidonor Trust Fund (MENA MDTF) has extended support to countries in the region, which are still undergoing transition and reform. Administered by the World Bank, and currently financed by the governments of Denmark, Finland, Norway, and the United Kingdom, the MDTF supports technical assistance for project preparation, analytical studies, capacity building and knowledge sharing.
Foreword  Hafez Ghanem Vice President for the Middle East and North Africa, The World Bank Group  The magnitude of conflic...
Its activities are based on partnership and collaboration. Although modest in size, the MENA MDTF plays a catalytic role to support reforms in strategic sectors such as inclusion, governance and economic growth. Among the thirty-five projects financed under the MENA MDTF, special focus on education, youth employment, and entrepreneurship has often proven transformational. I am pleased to report that the recent Midterm Review, as well as DFID’s annual review, were all very encouraging. The catalytic effect and solid performance of the MENA MDTF, as well as its flexibility and the quality of its management, have been duly recognized. This is most promising and, moving forward, motivates us to pursue and seek further assistance from the contributing donors as well as engage with other potential donors. Building on the well-established rationale and relevance of the MENA MDTF, let us now ensure its sustainability and consolidate this partnership. “The MENA MDTF plays a catalytic role to support reforms in strategic sectors such as inclusion, governance and economic growth.” This Annual Report 2015 documents the results and achievements of the MENA MDTF this year. This report should help to gain a precise understanding of the MDTF’s activities and to spell out new perspectives. Thanks to the support of donors, the activities presented thereafter were possible and were delivered for the benefit of the people of the MENA region.
Its activities are based on partnership and collaboration. Although modest in size, the MENA MDTF plays a catalytic role t...
Message from one benefiting country Dr. Sahar Nasr Minister of International Cooperation of the Arab Republic of Egypt The MENA MDTF is a concrete step towards promoting economic and social inclusion in the region. I am pleased to introduce the 3rd Middle East and North Africa (MENA) MDTF Annual Report. The report presents the performance and results of the portfolio of the MENA MDTF in 2015. It gives a measure of how catalytic the MENA MDTF has been and how the benefiting countries made use of it, in close cooperation with the colleagues from the World Bank Group. The MENA MDTF has proven effective to accompany us in targeted strategic areas. I am convinced that the activities under the MENA MDTF should be further pursued and enhanced. The MENA MDTF is a concrete step towards promoting economic and social inclusion in the region. The World Bank has shared its capacity and experience in technical assistance, collaborating closely with Governments in the region to ensure transfer of knowledge. Many challenges remain. Reforms do not happen overnight and their success depends on all of us working together. The MENA MDTF has been an important partner in this process of change, providing the support when and where necessary. By continuing to work together, we are one step closer in promoting peace, stability and prosperity for the people of the MENA region.
Message from one benefiting country  Dr. Sahar Nasr  Minister of International Cooperation of the Arab Republic of Egypt  ...
Chapter One Providing Catalytic Donor Support The original objective of the Middle East and North Africa Multi-Donor Trust Fund (MENA MDTF) was intended to provide catalytic donor support to countries that are currently undergoing transition and reform. In the MENA region, donors and the Bank realize the need to address the challenge of fragility and tackle the economic, social and institutional causes of instability cutting across the region. The magnitude of the conflicts and unrest in the Middle East has created humanitarian and development crises with global spillover effects. This changed reality on the ground has prompted the World Bank Group to rethink its strategic engagement in the MENA region. There are at least two reasons for this shift in strategy: F irst, greater economic and social inclusion is needed to support the peace and stability. It is urgent to help the countries of the region reverse current trends and establish the conditions for accelerated and inclusive growth. S econdly, conflict and violence in MENA have spillover effects in the form of conflict, refugees, and terrorism. Peace and stability in MENA are therefore global public goods, which require a global coalition to achieve. The implementation of the strategy is the collective challenge. It will require the World Bank Group to engage in different ways with partners, push the envelope in its operational procedures and policies, and approach its traditional programs with a different mind-set. It will rely on tools and mechanisms to facilitate our presence on the ground and to increase the leverage effect. In close coordination with its donors, the MENA MDTF is flexible and effective enough to be such a tool. In consultation with partners, donors, and beneficiaries, the World Bank Group has elaborated a revised regional strategy that was largely endorsed at the WBG Annual Meetings in Lima, in October 2015. The new strategy will guide the WBG’s operational engagement, with the goal of anchoring economic and social inclusion to facilitate greater peace and stability. The strategy is divided into four pillars:
Chapter One  Providing Catalytic Donor Support  The original objective of the Middle East and North Africa Multi-Donor Tru...
Promoting Peace and Stability for Development in MENA R enewing the social contract: The first pillar attempts to address the underlying causes of violence and extremism by renewing the social contract between citizens and the state. The Arab Spring showed that the old social contract, where the state provided jobs, free health care and education, subsidized food and fuel, in return for limited voice of and accountability to citizens, was broken. In the context of complicated transitions, unemployment and the quality of public services have worsened. This pillar is aimed at strengthening citizens’ ability to hold the state accountable – for example, in promoting private-sector jobs and improving public services – and ultimately in conferring benefits to the MENA countries and enhancing stability and prosperity. R efugees and Resilience: The second pillar seeks to strengthen the resilience of MENA societies. Several countries have been hit with the exogenous shock and have to absorb millions of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs). In Lebanon and Jordan, Syrian refugees now represent between 20 and 30 percent of the population. As refugees attempt to cross into Europe, tensions are increasing. There is a need to support both the hosting communities/countries as well as refugees. Humanitarian assistance and development aid should be seen as a continuum, including vis-à-vis refugees and IDPs, while working with the host countries to develop programs that permit them to build assets. R egional cooperation: Considering that MENA is one of the least integrated regions in the world, it is all the more essential to promote regional cooperation. It would serve, not only for the economic benefits that crossborder trade, finance and investments confer, but also because it helps build trust among countries and could provide a platform for greater prosperity. R ecovery and reconstruction when the conflicts subside. This pillar is aimed at preparing the recovery and reconstruction program, including its financing. Inasmuch as a conflict-free MENA is a global public good, preparing such a recovery and reconstruction plan should involve all the stakeholders, including the international community. The Four Pillars of MENA Strategy
Promoting Peace and Stability for Development in MENA  R  enewing the social contract   The first pillar attempts to addre...
What we are The MDTF is designed as a World Bank-implemented programmatic trust fund that supports technical assistance for project preparation, analytical studies, capacity building and knowledge sharing. “Soft” activities such as capacity building and knowledge sharing are the glue that holds together reform programs and provide the critical underpinnings for broad participation and sound institutions, yet these are often not funded through “hard” financing and investments. The MDTF contributes funding for these very activities, ensuring that the Bank and the broader donor community are helping governments, service providers and citizens “do different things and do things differently”. In addition to working closely with country counterparts, the MENA MDTF requires that all proposed activities have been discussed with key partners working on the ground (e.g. bilateral donors, international financial institutions or IFIs, in particular the African Development Bank or AfDB, and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development or EBRD) to help ensure appropriate leveraging and synergies of activities, and to avoid duplication of effort and donor resources. Our Approach The MDTF finances a broad array of activities to support the thematic drivers of the trust fund and the Bank’s regional strategy to enhance shared prosperity in the region, including for example: • Project preparation, including project design, to adapt best practice to local and country circumstances for greatest effectiveness, including timely and transparent delivery of results. • Institutional strengthening and capacity building, including expert advisory services, training, and human resource or organizational development. This could also include the actual contracting of partners (e.g. training agents, auditors, NGOs, local governments) during initial stages of implementation of new procedures/reforms, alongside which government agencies and public service providers can receive “on-the-job” training. • South-South (S-S) knowledge exchange, in particular with countries that have undergone transition. • Landmark conferences and workshops on the thematic components or sub-components. • Outreach activities that provide a platform for dialogue between key stakeholders (e.g. CSOs, youth groups, media, religious groups, NGOs) and also that enable the capture and dissemination of good practices, using a variety of communication/media tools. • Twinning arrangements (e.g. between institutions in MENA and in OECD countries). • Research and analysis produced into user-friendly and implementation-oriented studies/policy notes. This could include data collection (e.g. surveys) to help fill knowledge gaps and to inform policy interventions and program/project design. Release of new data is expected to yield a wealth of information that when analyzed, can help guide policy. • Design of management information systems. • Design of monitoring systems and impact evaluations of government/donor-funded programs.
What we are  The MDTF is designed as a World Bank-implemented programmatic trust fund that supports technical assistance f...
Steering A Program Council, chaired by the Bank’s Regional Vice President or the Director of Strategy and Operations and at which donors committing to a contribution of $1 million have a seat, is the governing body of the MDTF. The Program Council provides strategic guidance on the overall MENA MDTF policy framework; reviews implementation progress/impact of activities; reviews and approves changes in scope of MENA MDTF activities; and, reviews issues referred by the Program Coordination Unit (PCU). The PCU comprises the Program Manager of the MDTF, an analyst, a communications expert, and a Resource Management Specialist, and receives cross-support from the Bank’s MNA Results Team . A World Bank Review Committee is chaired by the Director of Regional Programs and is supported by the Program Manager, and includes representatives from relevant country units, the MNA Chief Accounting Officer, and the regional trust funds, quality and results coordinators/managers. The review committee meets two to four times a year to select proposals generated by a Call for Proposals. Activity Selection Process All applications requesting MDTF funding are submitted as part of a Call for Proposal. A World Bank Technical Review Committee chaired by the MNA Director of Regional programs and supported by the Program Manager of the MDTF meets at least twice a year but not more than quarterly to select proposals generated by a Call for Proposals. To date, there have been eight calls for proposals for the MENA MDTF, with the last one in November 2015. Donors Denmark Finland Norway UK DFID
Steering A Program Council, chaired by the Bank   s Regional Vice President or the Director of Strategy and Operations and...
The results of 2015 activities in a snapshot 5,684 29 people trained, including 54% women dialogue and knowledge sharing events organized. 31 technical assistance activities facilitated 45 Analytical products produced
The results of 2015 activities in a snapshot  5,684  29  people trained, including 54  women  dialogue and knowledge shari...
The MENA MDTF in Review Chapter Two The MENA MDTF is a well-established trust fund with activities that reflect demand from beneficiaries to respond quickly and flexibly to regional development needs. Their overall objective is to provide catalytic donor support to countries in the region that are currently undergoing transition and reform. While the activities vary in maturity - some of them still being in development stage and some of them already closed - they all contribute to development and integration in the region and are delivered for the benefit of the people of the MENA region: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Capacity and Design for Inclusive Groundwater Management in Morocco Communication for Policy Reforms in Tunisia Djibouti Qat Consumption Enhancing Microfinance Outreach among Women and Youth Enhancing Participatory Monitoring and Community Engagement in Egypt Expanding the Engagement of Youth Inclusion and Peace Building in Iraq Governance and Accountability in the Moroccan Health System Land Acquisition in Egypt Mainstreaming Beneficiary Feedback in Egypt Parliamentary Strengthening in Tunisia and Morocco Promoting Social Entrepreneurship in MENA Service Delivery in Jordan’s Health and Education Sectors Sharing Know-How and How To in Subsidy Reform Implementation SIRI - Regional Syrian Damage and Needs Assessment Strengthening Accountability for Improved Education Services in Jordan Strengthening Financial Oversight Capacity of the Lebanon Parliament Transforming the Road Sector in Tunisia Transition Support to Yemen (former TA to Yemen for PNDT) Tunisia PforR Service Delivery Support Youth Employability in Lebanon The activities described in this chapter cover the period from their start to November 2015. A more detailed way of reporting on progress on outcomes was the main reason why the PCU decided to also show pre-2015 outcomes. The activities which closed in 2014 and earlier are not included in this chapter, but their overall delivery on agreed results can be found in the Annex.
The MENA MDTF in Review Chapter Two  The MENA MDTF is a well-established trust fund with activities that reflect demand fr...
CAPACITY AND DESIGN FOR INCLUSIVE GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT IN MOROCCO Starting date: 10 October 2014 Execution: Recipient Executed Activity status: Ongoing Beneficiary Countries: Morocco Funding: $800.000 Objectives With the involvement of and in consultation with stakeholders, design and establish inclusive groundwater management contracts for aquifers in the Oum Er Rbia Basin. Stakeholders will be consulted on the selection of two strategic aquifers and the key performance indicators for a climate risk assessment of the Oum Er Rbia Basin. Outcomes Knowledge on risk management deepened: • Discussions are ongoing with the Ministry of Water, the meteorological service, and the hydraulic basin agency on current information (modeling, climate change projection, and existing activities) to reach a final agreement on methodology and the role of each institution. • Consultations and workshops on climate risk assessment are being agreed on with the Ministry of Water and Hydraulic agency. Two aquifers in which groundwater abstraction is regulated by an aquifer agreement in Oum Er Rbia Basin are underway: • A short list for the firms to support the Hydraulic Basin Agency in the design of the groundwater contract, which will regulate groundwater abstraction in two groundwater aquifers, has been approved and the request for proposals is being reviewed. Management of water improved: • A workshop on solar pumping was organized in May 2015. It focused on raising awareness on the risk of overuse of groundwater. Discussions were also held on the change of behavior of individual farmers to use as much water as possible, to a collective and planned use of groundwater, including the planning of an exit strategy in the case of over-use of groundwater.
CAPACITY AND DESIGN FOR INCLUSIVE GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT IN MOROCCO Starting date  10 October 2014 Execution  Recipient Ex...
COMMUNICATION FOR POLICY REFORMS IN TUNISIA Starting date: 22 January 2013 Activity status: Closed on 31 Aug2015 Execution: Recipient Executed Beneficiary Countries: Tunisia Funding: $725.000 Objectives To foster greater awareness and understanding of key structural challenges facing the Tunisian economy, and their importance to broader development goals; To actively engage Tunisian citizens in dialogue and debate on key issues, and build consensus around the best ways to enact change and reform; Outcomes Awareness of policy issues increased: • 19 TV shows called Meli Melek, a Tunisian expression meaning “My money, your money” have been aired. The shows were aired on a private TV channel between November 2014 and April 2015 and focused on topics such as labor markets and competition. • After the broadcasts, the TV station received feedback in the form of phone calls and written correspondence from senior executives of the Tunisian government and the private sector regarding topics being discussed in the emissions. Evaluations of focus groups showed that viewers appreciated the quality and content of the show, but also asked for suggestions on how to concretely address the economic issues presented. Awareness and understanding of policy issues increased: • 10 university debates were held between November 2014 and May 2015 at 10 different universities in four cities. The aim was to raise interest of students on economic issues and allow them to interact with experts on the topics discussed. Surveys show that on average almost two thirds of the students reported an increased understanding of policy issues. Monitoring of website indicators conducted: • YouTube videos of the town halls amounted to almost 67,600 views. • 826 YouTube followers. • 106 videos published.
COMMUNICATION FOR POLICY REFORMS IN TUNISIA Starting date  22 January 2013  Activity status  Closed on 31 Aug2015  Executi...
DJIBOUTI QAT CONSUMPTION Starting date: 2 February 2015 Execution: Bank Executed Activity status: Ongoing Beneficiary Countries: Djibouti Funding: $363.000 Objectives To improve youth wellbeing and opportunities through reducing Qat consumption by: 1) raising awareness of the impacts of Qat and 2) building capacity of young women and men in employable and life skills. Outcomes Increased awareness of negative impacts and reduced consumption of Qat among targeted youth: • Information and education sessions have been developed and are ongoing. The sessions are held in selected community development centers (CDCs), centers that have been established, equipped and staffed by the Ministry of Youth with community workers. The activities focus on participatory advocacy, awareness, information, education and communication against Qat. Targeted youth have received capacity and vocational training in employable and life skills: • A consultant has been hired to deliver life skills training. • Vocational training of 200 youth is ongoing. The aim of the training is to build the capacity of young women and men in order to enable job or internship insertion. Monitoring and Evaluation is done on each activity: • Monitoring of activities is ongoing.
DJIBOUTI QAT CONSUMPTION Starting date  2 February 2015 Execution  Bank Executed  Activity status  Ongoing Beneficiary Cou...
ENHANCING MICROFINANCE OUTREACH AMONG WOMEN AND YOUTH Starting date: 27 December 2012 Activity status: Closed on 30 June 2015 Execution: Recipient Executed Beneficiary Countries: MENA Regional Funding: $600.000 Objectives To improve the financial literacy of youth and women in Egypt to address a key impediment to accessing financial services. Build capacity of financial service providers to serve women and youth better. Complete a demand-side analysis that captures key constraints to accessing and using formal and informal financial services in Egypt, Tunisia, and Morocco. Outcomes Activity beneficiaries’ access to financial services increased: • A financial curriculum training was developed and adapted for trainings in Egypt, Tunisia and Morocco together with activity partners, in particular Centre Mohammed VI based in Casablanca and Mercy Corps and International Youth Foundation in Tunisia. Volume and frequency of savings increased: • Financial literacy trainings were held in Tunisia, Morocco and Egypt, focusing on women and youth. Training on entrepreneurship, via a partnership with a CAWTAR project financed by the International Youth Foundation and DFID, was held in Tunisia. • An e-learning course was launched. A video on financial education was produced. • A training of trainers was held for youth from across the MENA region and Sudan with specific focus on integrating tech-based learning tools into training methodologies. Knowledge on financial inclusion deepened: • A large-scale conference on financial education was organized in Tunisia in April 2015. The conference was the first large-scale peer learning event on financial education in the MENA region. Client capacity increased with respect to demand-side analysis and tools which allow them to expand financial access to women and youth: • Financial Inclusion Diagnostic Report completed and Financial Education Diagnostic Report - Snapshot of financial education in Tunisia completed. • Video explaining microfinance and development benefits in Tunisian context with a key focus on household level microeconomic support completed. • Study on mobile money and innovation landscape in Tunisia completed.
ENHANCING MICROFINANCE OUTREACH AMONG WOMEN AND YOUTH  Starting date  27 December 2012  Activity status  Closed on 30 June...
ENHANCING PARTICIPATORY MONITORING AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT IN EGYPT Starting date: 11 May 2015 Execution: Bank Executed Activity status: Ongoing Beneficiary Countries: Egypt Funding: $185.000 Objectives To promote a new social contract for the Egyptian people that empowers and engages citizens and civil society actors to become equal partners in the policy-making process and furthers Egypt’s democratic transition. In particular: Support the Equitable Development Observatory (EDO), which is focusing on poverty monitoring and targeting in relationship to the Government’s priority social protection programs for the poor. Outcomes Strategy informed – developing a diagnostic analysis with key recommendations for the IDSC: • A lead consultant has been hired to conduct research studies and diagnostic analysis of the IDSC’s Equitable Development Observatory and current M&E system strengths and weaknesses. The consultant will initiate the work once recently introduced additional clearances have been obtained. • Terms of Reference for the diagnostic assessments are being prepared. • The Public Affairs Foundation (PAF) in Bangalore, India has been contracted to lead a training on Citizen Report Cards (CRCs). The workshop will be finalized once the IDSC confirms the content and timing of the events.
ENHANCING PARTICIPATORY MONITORING AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT IN EGYPT  Starting date  11 May 2015    Execution  Bank Execut...
EXPANDING THE ENGAGEMENT OF YOUTH INCLUSION AND PEACE BUILDING IN IRAQ Starting date: 12 January 2015 Execution: Bank Executed Activity status: Ongoing Beneficiary Countries: Iraq Funding: $220.000 Objectives The activity seeks to develop the design of a new operation to support Iraqi youth. The operation will focus on confidence building measures that provide access to opportunities for positive engagement and sustainable livelihoods through community development approaches. Outcomes Development of the design of project scale-up ongoing: • A project proposal for the operation to support Iraqi youth was prepared and submitted to the World Bank’s State and Peace- Building Fund (SPF) in September 2015. The proposal was informed by an assessment of drivers of youth radicalization. A rapid assessment of the Ministry of Youth and Sports was conducted during a mission to Baghdad in August 2015. The proposal did not receive SPF approval. A new proposal is being prepared and will be submitted to the Japanese Social Development Fund.
EXPANDING THE ENGAGEMENT OF YOUTH INCLUSION AND PEACE BUILDING IN IRAQ  Starting date  12 January 2015 Execution  Bank Exe...
GOVERNANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN THE MOROCCAN HEALTH SYSTEM Starting date: 14 October 2013 Execution: Bank Executed Activity status: Closed on 30- Sept- 2015 Beneficiary Countries: Morocco Funding: $365.000 Objectives Foster good governance and accountability of the Moroccan health system through the development of a nationally integrated and transparent Health Management and Information System (HMIS). The activity seeks to improve the quality of and access to health services in Morocco, particularly for women, the poor, and rural populations. Outcomes HMIS Mater Plan developed: • The HMIS Master Plan was developed by February 2015. The plan defined the key components of HMIS and how they relate to each other. Knowledge deepened: • Health case studies focusing on governance related to quality of care have been completed. The case studies collected data on service delivery at the facility level and on how routine data is currently collected, entered and on the capacity and training needs at various levels of the health system. • The four case studies were published in the MENA Governance flagship report: Trust, Voice, and Incentives: Learning from Local Successes in Service Delivery in the Middle East and North Africa (Brixi, Lust, Woolcock, eds) Client capacity increased: • A joint WB/WHO conference was held, with co-financing from WBI, in September 2015. The conference theme was Universal Health Coverage and Health Management Information Systems. Participants included a wide range of stakeholders from 26 different organizations including ministries of health, finance, social economy and solidarity and jobs and social affairs; public and private insurers; the chamber of commerce; health workers; civil society; development partners; the EU; the right-to-health collective; and the president’s office. A legal framework for national charts and statistics developed: • Data dictionary and coding standards have been developed. • National chart of accounts and statistics has been developed.
GOVERNANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN THE MOROCCAN HEALTH SYSTEM  Starting date  14 October 2013 Execution  Bank Executed  Acti...
LAND ACQUISITION IN EGYPT Starting date: 8 April 2015 Activity status: Ongoing Execution: Bank Executed Beneficiary Countries: Egypt Funding: $397.800 Objectives Land Acquisition in Egypt seeks to help the Government of Egypt adopt more transparent and accountable land acquisition rules and systems. By reforming and institutionalizing land acquisition rules and systems, as well as strengthening capacities of key public agencies involved in land acquisition, the Government will be able to improve business climate and enhance investor confidence. Outcomes Multilevel dialogue convened and client capacity increased: • Awareness of key decision makers raised with regard to key challenges in land acquisition in Egypt. A number of consultation meetings have been carried out with line ministries to refine the topics and scope to be covered by the diagnostic analysis. Consultants have been mobilized and the diagnostic analysis is ongoing. • A comprehensive desktop review for laws, procedures and practices is ongoing. • Planning of a study tour to India, focusing on experience sharing with regard to how to deal with social risks involved in land acquisition, is ongoing. Increasing the social inclusion of disadvantaged groups through consultations: • A consultant has been mobilized to develop a transparent methodology for determining the compensation standards of land acquisition. Transparent and accountable measures in handling land acquisition issues: • Dialogue has started with the Government on the sectors that will need to develop guidelines. The sectors that expressed interest include: energy (electricity and gas), water and wastewater, agriculture, transport, and local development. Adopting simplified institutional arrangements for land acquisition: • Diagnostic analysis work has started, in full collaboration and consultation with the concerned entities, to look at the key recommendations and rooms for reform. The results of the diagnostic analysis will form the basis of a Policy Note on land acquisition.
LAND ACQUISITION IN EGYPT Starting date  8 April 2015  Activity status  Ongoing  Execution  Bank Executed  Beneficiary Cou...
MAINSTREAMING BENEFICIARY FEEDBACK IN EGYPT Starting date: 26 May 2015 Execution: Bank Executed Activity status: Ongoing Beneficiary Countries: Egypt Funding: $325.000 Objectives This activity seeks to strengthen the capacity of national and local institutions to design and implement effective sectoral grievance redress systems in health, energy and rural sanitation sectors. Channels for beneficiary feedback will aim at giving voice to service users, beneficiaries and citizens more broadly; at promoting greater accountability of service providers and government agencies; and enabling evidence-based corrective actions achieving better service delivery outcomes. Outcomes Knowledge deepened and client capacity increased: • Work is ongoing on three Sector-Specific Diagnostic Studies. The studies will provide a diagnosis of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges for designing, strengthening, and implementing Grievance Redress Mechanisms (GRMs) in the three select sectors. The aim is to increase the awareness of the intended beneficiaries of project information and project supported investments in the three sectors, with lessons for other sectors and dissemination to other countries in the region with similar contexts.
MAINSTREAMING BENEFICIARY FEEDBACK IN EGYPT Starting date  26 May 2015 Execution  Bank Executed  Activity status  Ongoing ...
PARLIAMENTARY STRENGTHENING IN TUNISIA AND MOROCCO Starting date: 12 May 2014 Execution: Bank Executed Activity status: Ongoing Beneficiary Countries: Morocco Funding: $360.000 • • Objectives In Tunisia, the activity will support the National Constituent Assembly and its successor parliamentary administration in developing and implementing proper citizen engagement, transparency and budget oversight processes. The aim is to help secure the successful implementation of the new constitution and a more open and engaged legislature. In Morocco, the activity will support capacity building activities for parliamentary staff in line with the new roles and responsibilities attributed to Parliament in the area of access to information and budget oversight, public petitions, and public consultations. Outcomes Knowledge deepened on the different methods and tools necessary to engage effectively: • A capacity review of the Moroccan (MA) Parliament has been completed. The review aims to identify challenges and constraints to the existing parliamentary practices relating to transparency, oversight and public engagement processes. • A Tunisia (TU) desk review assessing parliamentary bylaws and existing information on parliamentary capacity has been completed. Client capacity increased - Budget formulation and implementation; International experiences: In MA, training modules on budgeting, report writing and macro-fiscal forecasting have been developed and delivered by international experts from the French Ministry of Finance and the Lebanese International Finance Institute. • In TU, training modules have been developed on budget analysis and access to budget data. • A ToT program on budget analysis, performance based budgeting, report writing and petitions was developed for MA and will be delivered and adopted as an institutionalized training program, ensuring sustainability beyond the duration of the activity. • In TU, a ToT program for Parliament on access to budget data and budget analysis for MPs and administrative staff launched in September 2015. • In MA, TA trainings for administrative staff and parliamentarians on aspects of financial oversight were delivered. Training on performance based budgeting is being rolled out. • Representatives from the TU and MA Parliaments participated in a Regional Parliamentary Conference coorganized by this MENA MDTF activity, the Westminster Foundation, and the Arab Institute for Parliamentary Training and Legislative Studies, including the Parliaments of Lebanon Iraq and Algeria. The event was based in Beirut and took place in April 2015.
PARLIAMENTARY STRENGTHENING IN TUNISIA AND MOROCCO Starting date  12 May 2014 Execution  Bank Executed  Activity status  O...
PROMOTING SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUSHIP IN MENA Starting date: 18 Sept 2013 Execution: Bank executed Activity status: Closed on 1 Dec2015 Beneficiary Countries: MENA region Funding: $350.000 Objectives Promoting Social Entrepreneurship in MENA seeks to increase awareness and build the capacity of targeted high skilled youth to identify and develop social enterprises. The long term objective is to increase the quality of life of the most vulnerable segments of the population through improved social services and create employment for high-skilled youth. Outcomes Knowledge on entrepreneurship deepened among high-skilled individuals: • An international Social Enterprise forum was held in Casablanca. • A blog on Social entrepreneurship agenda in Morocco was released on the World Bank Maghreb portal. • An awareness raising campaign to promote social entrepreneurship among associations and young entrepreneurs has been completed. Events were organized by associations’ partners in universities and networking labs to promote social entrepreneurship and social enterprise competition and workshops were organized to present the application to the competition. • A call for proposal to identify innovative social entrepreneurship ideas on provision of employment and inclusion services to youth has been completed. The call was launched jointly together with the British Council. A concept note on social enterprise business plan competition has been produced and an Operations Manual on social enterprise business plan competition has been produced. • A Boot camp was organized by the World Bank and the British Council to train candidates on elaborating business plans and pitches. The boot camp has been training 30 candidates with 30 different business ideas on provision of employment and inclusion services to youth in regions of Casablanca and Rabat. • Tailored coaching and mentoring was provided to 10 selected candidates to implement their business ideas from March to September 2015. The candidates also participated in a study tour to London to meet with stakeholders operating in relevant sectors. • The organization of a MENA region Forum/Workshop to disseminate the results of the Moroccan Social Enterprise Pilot and launch a public policy dialogue on the Social Enterprise Agenda in the MENA region is currently being planned.
PROMOTING SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUSHIP IN MENA Starting date  18 Sept 2013 Execution  Bank executed  Activity status  Closed on ...
SERVICE DELIVERY IN JORDAN’S HEALTH AND EDUCATION SECTORS Starting date: 29 January 2014 Execution: Bank Executed Activity status: Ongoing Beneficiary Countries: Jordan Funding: $448.000 Objectives The key objectives of the proposed activity are to assess the quality of public health and education services in Jordan and to better understand how local governance in those sectors impacts the quality of service delivery. The assessment will help fill knowledge gaps and inform policy interventions. The ultimate goal of the activity is improved service delivery by strengthening accountability and promoting transparency. Outcomes Client capacity increased - Improved ability to measure service delivery performance in health and education sectors; Broad participation from key stakeholders ensured: • A Technical Advisory Committee has been established, with members from the Ministry of Health, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation, and Ministry of Interior, to review the project design, providing comments, etc. The Committee has provided their full endorsement of the design of the instruments used to measure accountability and quality. • Workshops to promote learning about measuring and promoting service delivery performance and its governance determinants in health and education sectors have been completed. Participants included members of the Technical Advisory Committee. Evidence base for improving governance practices with a positive impact on social service delivery is strengthened: • Education case studies have been completed. The studies will be incorporated in a comprehensive report that examines the link between accountability and quality of service delivery in the education sector. • Fieldwork for two Governance and Service Delivery studies has been completed and submitted for analysis.
SERVICE DELIVERY IN JORDAN   S HEALTH AND EDUCATION SECTORS  Starting date  29 January 2014 Execution  Bank Executed  Acti...
SHARING KNOW-HOW AND HOW TO IN SUBSIDY REFORM IMPLEMENTATION Starting date: 25 Jan 2013 Activity status: Closed on 28 Feb 2015 Execution: Bank Executed Beneficiary Countries: MENA region Funding: $350.000 Objectives The activity seeks to support subsidy reform efforts in several MENA countries, by providing strategic advisory services that help shape and inform reform processes and by facilitating knowledge-sharing within the region and South-South learning from other developing countries with successful subsidy reform experience. Outcomes Knowledge deepened and capacity increased on subsidy reform and efficient safety net design, and road maps for subsidy reform developed: A regional workshop was held in Jordan. It was the culmination of collaborative knowledge-sharing initiatives in Djibouti, Egypt, Jordan, Morocco, Tunisia, and Yemen. The workshop was dedicated to readying government energy and social protection systems for price reform in a changing political context. The participating countries presented current experiences with subsidy reform, challenges, and anticipated courses of action on subsidies. Three Virtual Convenings (VC) were completed: “Developing more efficient Social Assistance Systems to mitigate the impact of Fuel Price Increases”, which highlighted the experience of the Dominican Republic; “Developing National Unified Registries and Subsidy Cash Compensation Schemes “which highlighted the experience of Jordan in reforming Fuel Subsidies and introduction of a cash compensation program based on administrative data for targeting beneficiaries; and one VC discussing the experience of the Philippines in compensating business for Fuel price increases. A series of advisory support were provided to the Government of Egypt, with a focus on international best practices on fuel subsidy reform and using modern technologies. The advisory support included a mission to Cairo to discuss Social Safety Net reform; a workshop entitled “A Unified Database in Service of Egyptian Families”; technical assistance to the Government of Egypt to discuss targeting and building a Unified Registry; bilateral meetings and learning sessions were developed for the new Minister of Social Solidarity; participation of Egyptian counterparts to IMF-Middle East Center for Economics and Finance (CEF) Course on “The Design and Implementation of Effective Social Safety Nets”; Finance Participation of Egypt delegation in South-South Forum in Rio, Brazil; and Finance participation of Egyptian Counterparts to Colombia SISBEN Program (Bogota, Colombia).
SHARING KNOW-HOW AND HOW TO IN SUBSIDY REFORM IMPLEMENTATION  Starting date  25 Jan 2013  Activity status  Closed on 28 Fe...
SIRI – REGIONAL SYRIAN DAMAGE AND NEEDS ASSESSMENT Starting date: 8 July 2014 Execution: Bank Executed Activity status: Closed on 30 Sept 2015 Beneficiary Countries: MENA regional Funding: $500.000 Objectives The key objective of the Damage and Needs Assessment of the communities affected by the Syrian crisis is to take preliminary stock of, and broadly estimate, the impact of the crisis on the population, physical assets and infrastructure. The assessment will also identify recovery needs that will have to be addressed to create conducive conditions for the return of refugees and the internally displaced. Outcomes Damage and Needs Assessment for Syria to prepare the country for post-conflict, and set the stage for a longer-term inclusive recovery and reform agenda concluded: • A Damage Assessment for critical sectors, including health, transport, housing, water and sanitation, energy, education, and agriculture has been completed for six Syrian cities: Aleppo, Dar’a, Homs, Hama, Idlib, and Latakia. The damage assessment results are also available on a geo-referenced portal that helps to spatially visualize and cross reference results. Through incorporating technological expertise of the private sector and partnerships with international organizations, a cost effective and replicable model for the damage assessment was produced. The model has since been used in Iraq and is currently being used in Yemen. • A Needs Assessment has been completed for the same critical sectors. An analysis was undertaken to provide insight on drivers and enabling conditions that will influence the return of displaced populations to cities within post-crisis Syria. The cities of focus were Dar’a, Aleppo, and Homs.
SIRI     REGIONAL SYRIAN DAMAGE AND NEEDS ASSESSMENT Starting date  8 July 2014  Execution  Bank Executed  Activity status...
STRENGTHENING ACCOUNTABILITY FOR IMPROVED EDUCATION SERVICES IN JORDAN Starting date: 24 October 2014 Activity status: Ongoing Execution: Recipient Executed Beneficiary Countries: Jordan Funding: $817.000 Objectives The activity will seek to support the Jordan Ministry of Education’s efforts to improve the quality of education by establishing an accountability and quality assurance mechanism that will incentivize stakeholders in the system to improve learning in Jordan’s public schools. The Quality Education Unit will strengthen the governance of the education sector by ensuring that decentralization efforts are coupled with adequate quality monitoring mechanisms. Outcomes Strengthened accountability and quality assurance functions: • Operational guidelines, including structure, staffing, and roles and responsibilities, have been developed and finalized. • Training modules for professional development have been developed. • Work is ongoing on staffing, structure, roles and responsibilities. Capacity increased within the Ministry of Education with regard to quality assurance systems: • Training of professionals is ongoing to carry out the tasks of the Quality Education Unit. Increased awareness among clients of new accountability structure in the education sector: • A high level meeting on the goals and activities of the Quality Education Unit was held during the National Education Conference in August 2015. • Workshops for Ministry of Education staff are under preparation. The terms of reference for a communications campaign have been developed and a communications brief is under preparation.
STRENGTHENING ACCOUNTABILITY FOR IMPROVED EDUCATION SERVICES IN JORDAN  Starting date  24 October 2014  Activity status  O...
STRENGTHENING FINANCIAL OVERSIGHT CAPACITY OF THE LEBANON PARLIAMENT Starting date: 1 April 2015 Execution: Bank Executed Activity status: Ongoing Beneficiary Countries: Lebanon Funding: $320.000 Objectives The objective of the activity is to support the strengthening of the parliamentary financial oversight capacity in Lebanon by increasing the technical expertise capacity of the Finance and Budget Committee. The Parliament Advisory Unit, which provides technical expertise to all parliamentary committees, will receive technical expertise support in the key challenging areas that the Finance and Budget Committee is facing, in particular on issues such as economics, budget and legislative drafting. Outcomes Client capacity increased and knowledge deepened: • A capacity baseline review of key parliamentary financial oversight challenging areas has been completed. The capacity review will be used as a baseline against which progress will be measured. • Terms of Reference for experts to conduct various analytical reviews of proposed laws and other specialized matters have been completed and the contracting of experts has been initiated. The analytical reviews will focus on economic, legal and financial challenges that the Budget and Finance Committee is facing. • Knowledge exchange activities, including a learning visit to a country with established good committee support system, are in their planning stage.
STRENGTHENING FINANCIAL OVERSIGHT CAPACITY OF THE LEBANON PARLIAMENT Starting date  1 April 2015 Execution  Bank Executed ...
TRANSFORMING THE ROAD SECTOR IN TUNISIA Starting date: 9 October 2014 Activity status: Ongoing Execution: Recipient Executed Beneficiary Countries: Tunisia Funding: $909.000 Outcomes The Road Transport Corridor Project was approved by the Board in July 2015. Effectiveness is expected by end of December 2015. The TA activity is expected to start once effectiveness is in place. Objectives The activity seeks to improve efficiency and sustainability of publicexpenditure in the road sector in Tunisia through a transformational approach to its management. This includes: • Facilitating the design and implementation of decision-making tools to better plan maintenance and public expenditure, including in lagging regions. • Reviewing the role of public and private sector in the management of the sector. • Providing capacity building on road asset management and performance based contracts. The activity is linked to the World Bank Road Transport Corridor project, financed by a $200 million IBRD loan. The project will finance equipment purchase that will enable the Ministry of Equipment to improve data collection and quality control, which would support the change in approach to road asset management.
TRANSFORMING THE ROAD SECTOR IN TUNISIA Starting date  9 October 2014  Activity status  Ongoing  Execution  Recipient Exec...
TRANSITION SUPPORT TO YEMEN Technical Assistance to Yemen for Post National Dialogue Transition Starting date: 1 Sept 2012. Reallocation of funds on 3 Sept 2015 Activity Status: Ongoing (Paused) Execution: Bank Executed Beneficiary Countries: Yemen Funding: $450.000 • • • • Objectives Support the Yemen DNA through analytical work to better understand the onthe-ground service delivery challenges at the local level. Analyze the performance of District Local Authorities (DLAs) across Yemen. Inform on the importance of bottom-up institutional building in Yemen in key documents. Gain understanding of the operational and functional performance of select DLAs to identify the institutional challenges of providing urgent service delivery and immediate reconstruction in post-conflict Yemen (when fieldwork is possible again). Outcomes In-depth understanding of operational and functional performance of DLAs increased: • An in-depth analysis of the Ministry of Local Authorities (MoLA) database to better understand the operational and functional performance, including the degree of access, capacity, resources, and functioning, of the DLAs is ongoing. • Re-formatting and cleaning the dataset to allow for cross-sectional analyses is ongoing. • Preliminary analysis of the description of the data has been completed. Recognition of the importance of bottom-up, local institutions for State building increased: • Technical input to two Yemen Strategic Country Diagnostic seminars has been provided. • Formatted MoLA dataset as an input to the Programmatic Damage Needs Assessment has been provided. • A technical short note to the Country Engagement Note is being prepared. Note: In response to the deteriorating security situation in Yemen the World Bank has suspended all disbursements to projects and activities in Yemen. During the suspension period, the task teams have been advised to conduct Bank-executed analytical work to enable a quick and effective re-engagement once the political and security environment improves. In the meantime, the Country Management Unit (CMU) has initiated a remotely-conducted Damage and Needs Assessment (DNA) to better inform rapid post-conflict reconstruction and recovery support. Despite a promising start, most of the proposed activities of the TA to Yemen for Post National Dialogue Transition had to be paused. To quickly and flexibly respond to the new situation, the MENA MDTF management agreed to reallocate the funds and extend the activity deadline to support the forthcoming DNA. Out of the total grant amount of $450.000, $76.000 was spent on TA to Yemen for Post National Dialogue Transition. The remaining $374.000 has been re-allocated to the new activity.
TRANSITION SUPPORT TO YEMEN Technical Assistance to Yemen for Post National Dialogue Transition Starting date  1 Sept 2012...
TUNISIA PforR SERVICE DELIVERY SUPPORT Starting date: 10 October 2014 Execution: Bank Executed Activity status: Ongoing Beneficiary Countries: Tunisia Funding: $490.000 Objectives The key objective is to Support the “Urban Development and Local Governance Program for Results” (PforR), which aims to strengthen local governments’ performance to deliver municipal infrastructure, and to improve access to services in targeted disadvantaged neighborhoods. The activity provides Technical Assistance on critical activities to facilitate the Urban Development and Local Governance Program. Specifically through an innovative and integrated Governance Performance Assessment System, and the delivery of Participatory Planning and Budgeting toolkits, including Outcomes Client capacity increased through the use of the Participatory Planning and Budgeting manuals: • A Participatory Planning and Budgeting Manual has been developed and integrated into the Program Operations Manual. Guidance and templates for participatory planning have been prepared and adopted in the Program Operations Manual. In addition, a guide on local level grievance redress mechanisms was prepared and adopted for use by municipalities. Knowledge deepened through the development and use of a local governance e-platform: • A beta version of the Tunisia local government e-portal was developed and made publicly accessible in June 2015. The first round of local government data has been uploaded to the site. Baseline measurement of indicators under the Performance Assessment System ongoing: • A local government performance assessment system was developed. The system manual was informally approved in June 2015 by the GoT. • The Government is in the process of formally establishing the Performance Assessment system and corresponding legislation is expected to be issued by the end of 2015. The Government will receive support to operationalize the system, including a pilot run in 2016. Client capacity increased and knowledge deepened: • Training workshops for local governments to implement the Program have been held. The training sessions focus on decentralization reforms in Tunisia, and innovations in participatory governance, performance assessment, transparency, and municipal finance. • A study tour to Turkey for technical staff from key ministries and agencies is expected to take place in December 2015. • A system of TA for local governments to provide on-the-job and on-demand training to the local governments, in particular those with the least capacities is being prepared.
TUNISIA PforR SERVICE DELIVERY SUPPORT  Starting date  10 October 2014 Execution  Bank Executed  Activity status  Ongoing ...
YOUTH EMPLOYABILITY IN LEBANON Starting date: 2 April 2015 Execution: Bank Executed Activity status: Ongoing Beneficiary Countries: Lebanon Funding: $350.000 Objectives The overall objective of this activity is to improve youth employability amongst the National Volunteer Service Program (NVSP) participants and to promote knowledge sharing and capacity building of the implementing agency, the Ministry of Social Affairs (MoSA). Specifically, the activity seeks to strengthen NVSP soft skills training component and share best practices of volunteerism amongst the MoSA staff. Outcomes Employability of participating youth increased; • A soft-skills Training of Training (ToT) curriculum adapted to the Lebanese context has been developed. The International Youth Foundation (IYF) was selected to develop and carry out a series of ToT sessions for MoSA and NGOs staff and provide technical support during the implementation of their projects. 35 one-hour modules were selected to be adapted to the Lebanese context. A hard copy of the chosen training curriculum, which includes a trainer’s guide and trainee handbook and assessment tools, was provided to all participating MoSA and NGO staff. • NVSP selected 22 projects implemented by 22 different NGOs for financing. Of these, 7 projects have completed the training on soft-skills to participating volunteers, benefiting a total of 366 youths (46% female). The remaining 15 projects are ongoing, and have yet to finish the training component. These projects are expected to provide soft-skills training to an additional 750 youths. Improved design of the soft-skills training: • The planning of a knowledge sharing activity on an international best practice of a volunteering program is ongoing. A mission to Beirut is planned for December 2015 to define the type, scope and the date of the activity.
YOUTH EMPLOYABILITY IN LEBANON  Starting date  2 April 2015 Execution  Bank Executed  Activity status  Ongoing Beneficiary...
MENA MDTF Aggregate Results Framework Results Chain Indicators Doing different things: Cumulative number of person days of employment (Tier II) Outcome Total number of beneficiaries across Bank projects: Of which labour market programmes Of which safety net programmes (Tier II) World Bank MENA Portfolio focused on promoting economic and social inclusion and is developed in ways that responds effectively to needs Number of countries with WB supported programs on Open Government OR PFM reform (Tier II) Doing different things/doing things differently: Cumulative number of pieces of technical and analytical work that informed strategy/policy and stimulated public debate on (but not limited to): gender inclusion, governance, energy and consumption subsidy reform, social protection, youth inclusion, job creation, labour markets (Tier II) Percentage of projects linked to MDTF with gender informed design
MENA MDTF Aggregate Results Framework  Results Chain  Indicators Doing different things  Cumulative number of person days ...
MENA MDTF Aggregate Results Framework Baseline 2012 Dec 2015 4,903,853 (2011) 44,000,000 (July 2015) Outcome N/A 12,830 3,597,157 (2011) 2 (2011) 223,000 7,900,000 4 40 (2011) 51 N/A 55% Target 2015 50,000,000 N/A 8,000,000 4 51 75% Source World Bank reporting against MENA Regional Results Frameworks World Bank reporting against MENA Regional Results Frameworks World Bank reporting against MENA Regional Results Framework (noting the combination of two different indicators: Open Gov + PE/FM activities) World Bank reporting against MENA Regional Results Frameworks (although does not exactly equal total of individual figures to avoid double counting) MDTF Progress Reports and Activity Descriptions
MENA MDTF Aggregate Results Framework  Baseline 2012  Dec 2015  4,903,853  2011   44,000,000  July 2015   Outcome  N A 12,...
MENA MDTF Aggregate Results Framework Results Chain Cumulative number of high quality analytical products produced with resources from MDTF (policy notes, survey work, evaluations, reports) that demonstrate the good use of analysis with clear recommendations, with potential policy implications, targeted at policymakers or for project preparation Cumulative number of high quality technical assistance activities (project design, capacity building, guidelines) carried out through MDTF that provide clear and practical recommendations for practical and policy implementation, with positive client feedback Cumulative number of high quality dialogue and knowledge and knowledge sharing events (S-S exchange, conferences, focus group/Community of Practice general meetings, etc.) leading to clear policy conclusions in focus areas, using resources from the MDTF Output Strengthened project preparation, technical assistance, seed funding, policy analysis, dialogue and knowledge sharing through World Bank MENA Trust Fund 80% Indicators Cumulative number of people trained directly through MDTF (and % of which women) e.g. through targeted workshops, training-oriented S-S exchange, certification programs, innovative learning programs, etc Direct support provided to beneficiaries through World Bank MENA Trust Fund 20% Cumulative number of businesses provided with support directly through MDTF Cumulative number of results stories produced which demonstrate the catalytic effect of the MDTF (particularly on women and youth) Outcome results are from July 2015, except for italicized figures which are from July 2014. A new results framework for the new regional strategy for the MENA region is under development and will be available in February 2016. Hence no new outcome results are available for December 2015. Outcome data are not directly attributable to the MENA MDTF, but the MDTF is a contributing factor to the achievement of the stated outcomes.
MENA MDTF Aggregate Results Framework Results Chain  Cumulative number of high quality analytical products produced with r...
MENA MDTF Aggregate Results Framework Baseline Dec 2015 2012 Target 2015 79 20 0 49 20 MDTF progress reports with random sample quality assured by DFID advisers 0 86 22 MDTF progress reports with random sample quality assured by DFID advisers 0 8,753 (45%) 500 (175) MDTF progress Reports 0 820 300 MDTF progress Reports 0 6 6 MDTF progress Reports Output 0 MDTF progress reports with random sample quality assured by DFID advisers
MENA MDTF Aggregate Results Framework     Baseline  Dec 2015  2012  Target 2015  79  20  0  49  20  MDTF progress reports ...
8th Call for Proposals The MENA MDTF 8th call for proposals was held in November 2015. During a Technical Review Committee (TRC) meeting on December 15, seven new activities were selected and approved. These activities will be awarded the remaining available balance of the MENA MDTF. The 8th call for proposals is the last under this phase of the MENA MDTF. It follows the previous thematic pillars of the World Bank MENA strategy, but is also consistent with the new regional strategy, with clear linkages to areas such as governance and inclusion. The 8th call for proposals was a USD2 million round, with many high quality submissions and a strong focus on institution-building and youth. Looking ahead, the focus on social and economic inclusion may be strengthened as it is directly in line with the mission and objectives of the MENA MDTF. • Djibouti: Support to Parliament • Egypt Youth Engagement • Jordan On-the-Job Program • Promoting Social Cohesion through Early Childhood Development and Private Sector Engagement for Education Sector in Iraq/KRG • Strengthening Accountability and Oversight Institutions in Tunisia • Strengthening Delivery of Health Services to Vulnerable Populations in MENA: Using Data to Inform Decision Making • Upper Egypt Governorates Development Technical Assistance Program
8th Call for Proposals The MENA MDTF 8th call for proposals was held in November 2015. During a Technical Review Committee...
Chapter Four
Chapter Four
Expanding knowledge & possibilities Communication was one of the top priorities for the MENA MDTF in 2015. Believing that proactively communicating with internal and external stakeholders is vital for knowledge sharing, transparency, and strengthening the impact of activities, the trust fund revitalized its efforts in communication on several interconnecting fronts. The new steps were based on recommendation by the MDTF donor countries. As part of this effort, the MDTF team has focused its efforts on four overarching and interlocking pillars of communication – strategy, culture, brand, and action. Strategy as the backbone of the MENA MDTF communication: The team has crafted a new communication strategy, which aims to achieve the trust-fund’s objectives and, ultimately, the objectives of the World Bank MENA strategy. The new strategy enables the MDTF to engage effectively with stakeholders – particularly donor countries, partners and beneficiaries – and to demonstrate the success of its activities, paving the way for fundraising and ensuring that the wider public understands the impact of the MDTF’s work. The new strategy identifies audiences, shapes key messages, and lays out clear methods and tactics to share information about MDTF activities. Increasing brand awareness: The MENA MDTF is administered by the World Bank Group, and it supports the Bank’s overall strategy for the MENA region. Although in its structure, the trust-fund is part of the wider WBG, it is unique in the way it provides catalytic and technical assistance to countries in the MENA region that are working towards reform and development. The MDTF team is poised to promote the uniqueness of the trust fund in all its communication products. Online presence: Being associated with the Bank comes with numerous advantages, as the trust fund is able to use all Bank’s existing online platforms, such as the corporate and MENA region websites and social media networks, including Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, LinkedIn, blogs, and Instagram among others. These networks are followed by millions of people across the globe, providing the MDTF a way for broad dissemination and outreach. The MDTF employs these channels to highlight the work of the MDTF and the impact its projects have on the ground— always maintaining the unique character of the MDTF and its distinctive methods to catalyze change.
Expanding knowledge   possibilities Communication was one of the top priorities for the MENA MDTF in 2015. Believing that ...
New website: As the world moves towards greater and greater digitalization, the MDTF team is committed to using new methods, best practices, and technologies to share information with stakeholders. Accordingly, the MDTF has revamped its website and migrated its content, which was given a refreshed look and feel. The website, which has compatibility with mobile devices, is a step forward in removing barriers between people and information, and making content more easily searchable. Planning carefully thought out actions and tactics: To increase the visibility of the MDTF and share the success stories of its activities, the communication team is preparing to unleash a series of online multimedia products, including blogs, result stories, feature stories, and videos. These products, which provide information about MDTF projects and share lessons learned, are being showcased on the MDTF website. In order to expand dissemination of MDTF communication items, the team is also closely working with the World Bank MENA communication team to publish MDTF communication products through their website and social media networks. Bolstering the culture of communication: In order to have a successful communication strategy, it is important that all staff members fully commit to its implementation. In line with the objective of instituting a culture of communication, new steps have been taken to increase and build the relationships between the MDTF team and operational staff. For instance, a new template was developed for result stories that streamlines the process through which Team Task Leaders (TTLs) contribute to a variety of communication products, multimedia outputs, and Monitoring and Evaluation documents.
New website  As the world moves towards greater and greater digitalization, the MDTF team is committed to using new method...
Addressing root causes of public grievances in MENA Highlights • Over 1,000 women and youth in Tunisia, Morocco, and Egypt took part in three-day Financial Literacy Trainings, in which the participants learned debt management, financial negotiation, savings and budgeting. • As a result of the financial literacy trainings, the financial inclusion (access to formal financial system) increased from 26 percent that was measured before the project to 32 percent. • Some 25 percent of the beneficiaries already reported that they employing budgeting and financial negotiation to achieve objectives, while on average 25 percent of financial literacy participants reported increased volume and frequency of savings.
Addressing root causes of public grievances in MENA  Highlights      Over 1,000 women and youth in Tunisia, Morocco, and E...
N early five years since the start of public uprisings in several countries in the Middle East and North Africa, the winds of unrest still sweep through many counties in the region. While some countries emerged from the “revolutions” with better and more functioning governments, many of the key drivers that prompted the MENA people to take to streets, still linger in those states. While MENA is a middle-income region in the world, a recent World Bank report: Inequality, Uprisings, and Conflict in the Arab World, suggests that it was more the citizen frustrations with a shortage of quality jobs in the formal sector, poor quality public services, and governance issues that caused the uprisings. In general, underdeveloped private and financial sectors cut to the heart of many challenges facing countries in the region. MENA suffers from the lowest levels of financial inclusion in the world, with only 9 percent of the women holding an account at a formal financial institution, making the financial exclusion for women the highest in the world. To put the severity of the financial inclusion issue in wider context, an Arab is less likely to have a bank account than anyone else in the world, according to the Global Findex Data. Only 14 percent of adult Arabs have a bank account (24 percent male and 13 percent female). This compares to 24 percent of adult Sub-Saharan Africans and 32 percent of adult South Asians. Microfinance outreach – particularly relevant to low-income borrowers excluded from the formal economy – is the worst of any global region. Microfinance borrowers are estimated at between 2.5 to 3 million (within a region wide population of around 380 million). This compares with over 20 million micro finance borrowers in Bangladesh (with a population of 160 million). Realizing the financial inclusion’s critical role in generating income, creating job opportunities, and helping vulnerable households manage economic shocks; the World Bank launched a project in September 2013 to Enhance Microfinance Amongst Women and Youth across Morocco, Tunisia, and Egypt (Watch project overview). The project brought together some 150 participants from Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia for a regional qualitative landscape study on financial behavior and constraints. The project, which was carried out in cooperation with the Center for Arab Women for Training and Research (CAWTAR), aimed at promoting inclusive finance in the MENA region, including enhancing microfinance access and usage amongst women and youth. The $600,000 project was financed by MENA Multi-donor Trust Fund, which draws funds from Britain, Denmark, Finland, Norway and the World Bank Group. It worked across three main pillars, which includes producing high quality analytical tools, working directly with vulnerable women and youth, and promoting South-South learning on financial education and microfinance sector development. (Read Implementation Status & Results Report) Unfulfilled demands W hile today Tunisia has emerged from turmoil with a “democratic state”, it is still in transition and many of the “postrevolution” demands, including reducing
N  early five years since the start of public uprisings in several countries in the Middle East and North Africa, the wind...
unemployment, social and political inclusion, and the rising cost of living, have yet to be fulfilled. As part of its efforts to produce high quality analytical tools, the MENA MDTF project helped produced (Tunisia financial inclusion snapshot , Tunisia Digital Finance Study and MENA financial education diagnostic in a bid to address knowledge gaps and to advance policy dialogue. The project brought together some 150 participants from Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia for a regional qualitative landscape study on financial behavior and constraints. Over 1,000 women and youth in Tunisia, Morocco, and Egypt took part in three-day Financial Literacy Trainings, in which the participants learned debt management, financial negotiation, savings and budgeting. Some 80 of the participants were trained to become trainers, while E-learning modules, radio spots, and cartoons developed to ease the learning process and better serve the beneficiaries. As a result of the financial literacy trainings, the financial inclusion (access to formal financial system) increased from 26 percent that was measured before the project to 32 percent. Some 25 percent of the beneficiaries already reported that they employing budgeting and financial negotiation to achieve objectives,while on average 25 percent of financial literacy participants reported increased volume and frequency of savings. Finally, the project promoted South-South learning on financial education and microfinance sector development in an effort to mobilize highlevel support amongst public authorities, such as Ministry of Finance and Central Bank, and to better coordinate amongst service providers, including NGOs, and foundations. While the project was successful on many levels, it is a drop in the ocean, and there are still needs for further investment to turn MENA into an adequate financial inclusive region. In the financial literacy field, there is need for further integration of government actors in national financial education efforts, and expanding scope, scale and targeting of the project among other channels.
unemployment, social and political inclusion, and the rising cost of living, have yet to be fulfilled. As part of its effo...
Qat consumption, unemployment represents a Catch-22 in W hen the sun hits its peak, sweltering, above the arid desert, Moustapha Osman Ali, a resident of Djibouti city, kicks off his daily habit. It is not the second half of his daily job, nor his afternoon siesta. It isn’t even the cycle of prayers - common in the Islamic world - but rather chewing a flowering and tender green leaf known as qat. Sometimes the practice lasts up to 14 continuous hours a day. While it is mostly ill-advised to spend that much time on any social pastime, it is alarming when the indulgence is harmful to one’s health. Qat, also pronounced Khat in some areas in the region, contains alkaloids, which are structurally related to amphetamine. These leaves, which need to be consumed within 48 hours of their harvest, have a stimulating effect and cause euphoria and hyperactivity for those who chew it. While some Djiboutians chew qat as they go about their daily work, others like the 29-year-old Ali, resort to this mild narcotic to have “quality time” during social gatherings. Although the World Health Organization (WHO) does not consider qat to be a “serious addictive drug”, it says that qat affects sleep and causes persistent hallucinations among its users, leading to rebound effects such as late awakening, decreased productivity, and daytime sleepiness. Ali, a high school graduate, has been looking for a job for quite a while now, but it would be difficult for him to compete in any job market while spending most of his days under the influence of qat. Unfortunately he is not alone, his own three brothers, most of his friends, and around 50 percent of males in this Horn Africa nation consume qat on daily basis. Impacting household economy A lmost every morning massive shipments of fresh qat arrive – mostly by trucks – from Ethiopia and are delivered to retailers across the country. By lunch time, a considerably large number of Djiboutian men retreat inside homes or under the shade of walls to gnaw gently on ball-sized pieces of the plant in the sides of their cheeks. Qat consumption not only reduces employability and negatively impacts productivity among users in this poverty-stricken country, but it is also a huge drain on the economy. Despite low incomes, it is estimated that 20 to 30 percent of a family budget is spent on qat D jibouti has a population of a little less than 900,000, 23 percent of whom who live in extreme poverty. Despite low incomes, it is estimated that 20 to 30 percent of a family budget is spent on qat, with food being the only higher expense. Additionally, qat consumers run the risk of contracting illnesses such as diabetes, obesity, tooth decaying, and high blood pressure. To mitigate the negative effects of qat, the World Bank has begun a project to help reduce qat consumption among youth by raising awareness, as well as improving employability.
Qat consumption, unemployment represents a Catch-22 in  W  hen the sun hits its peak, sweltering, above the arid desert, M...
The project, carried out by the Middle East and North Africa Multi-donor Trust Fund, is financed by Britain, Denmark, Finland, Norway a n d the World Bank. The MDTF team based in Djibouti City, Ali Sabieh, and Obock works with young people through face-to-face activities, including discussions with community and religious leaders, sports competitions, dictation and drawing competitions and theater plays to raise awareness about the negative effects of qat on people’s lives. When asked about how raising awareness can help cut qat consumption, Fatou Fall, Senior Social Development Specialist at the World Bank, says that by conducting awareness and outreach sessions, her team tries to “inform and sensitize youth on various impacts” that qat consumption entails. The project’s outreach team has so far reached over 5,500 young males and females since the start of the project in June 2015. The initial objective was to reach 3,000 youth. Spreading among women and children M en are not the only consumers; qat chewing among women, including young girls, is on the rise. Surveys show that qat consumption among women jumped from 3 percent in 1996, to 7 percent in 2006 and 14 percent in 2010. Fozia Djibril Ahmed, 50, is one of the women who attended a MDTF organized session in November. Ahmed, who has chewed qat for the past 12 years on average 7 hours daily, uses the green leaf to help her sleep. She is prepared to quit her age-old habit, but only after “I find a job.” Increasingly, teenagers are also resorting to this social lubricant. While recent data is not available, based on estimates by UNICEF in 2008, 4.7 percent of children use qat every day and another 7.4 percent indulge once per week. Consumption among children aged 15 and under, who makes up around 35 percent of the population, is also disturbingly becoming more common. Abdourahman Moussa Said is only 17 years old, but he has been a regular qat consumer for the past one year. He, too, has come to a MDTF activity, seeking help. Said receives a meager monthly stipend from his older brother, and spends most of it to purchase qat and chew with his friends “for pleasure”. He dropped out of school after grade 6 and similarly conditions quitting his habit on finding a job. Fatou, who is MDTF’s Task Team Leader for this project, says that her colleagues have held numerous sessions in the three community development centers in order to raise awareness among children. The team has also employed specialized consultants, who help MDTF beneficiaries in gaining employable and life skills, as well as finding jobs and internships.
The project, carried out by the Middle East and North Africa Multi-donor Trust Fund, is financed by Britain, Denmark, Finl...
Chapter Five
Chapter Five
Looking Ahead Three years after its creation, the MENA MDTF has proved to be a timely and efficient tool to address specific needs in the MENA region. The results of this modest trust fund in size are eloquent: targets have been exceeded, other resources have been leveraged, and tailored TA solutions have contributed to its success. The MENA MDTF-funded activities have built on the momentum in the region and continue to provide support where necessary. At times, a customized approach has been taken, given the diversity across the countries of the region. The teams have also sought partnerships with existing programs for a greater impact. The success of the activities has contributed to a strong demand for the MENA MDTF. The MENA MDTF has proven flexible and nimble and it is well received by our partner countries. The MENA MDTF is seen as a vehicle for helping clients as well as the Bank itself “do things differently” and “do different things”. For most teams, the MENA MDTF has been the catalyst for much larger activities and programs which are of a longerterm nature. Therefore, the MDTF has been available to help support clients and task teams while the window of opportunity is open – as policies and laws are shaped, and as citizens are still demanding change. The demand is clearly greater than the MDTF is able to satisfy, especially of Bank-executed grant funding. The MENA MDTF has also faced some challenges. The uncertainty and turmoil often lead to the requirement of markedly large amounts of time for consensus building, and relatedly, significant delays in decisionmaking. Some MENA MDTF activities have therefore faced related delays or had to undergo changes to their initially-planned course of action to deliver support as quickly and effectively as possible given the circumstances. Another challenge, related both to local capacity issues as well as Bank procedural requirements, has been the difficulty of moving recipient-executed grants forward at a desirable speed. Donors recognized this challenge and, at the Program Council Meeting in Washington, DC, in April 2015, decided to change the requirement from 50% of Bank Executed (BE) and Recipient Executed (RE) activities respectively, to a more flexible arrangement, where the review committee should choose RE if they find that the activity would be best implemented as RE. With the implementation of the revised regional strategy, one of the key challenges will be to anchor economic and social reforms, ultimately contributing to greater stability and prosperity in the MENA region. This is precisely the strategic objective of the MENA MDTF. As per its Operating Principles, the MENA MDTF should be fully aligned with the MENA strategy. In this respect, and in close cooperation with donors, partners and stakeholders, the MENA MDTF can serve to further deepen and facilitate economic and social inclusion. More than ever, the MENA MDTF seems relevant and timely, especially through an enhanced focus on economic and social inclusion. This should strengthen its impact on the ground. In this respect, the continued support of donors will be essential.
Looking Ahead Three years after its creation, the MENA MDTF has proved to be a timely and efficient tool to address specif...
MENA MDTF Mid-term Review In June 2014, MENA MDTF donors requested a review of MENA MDTF performance to date and consideration of the strategy going forward. An independent consultant was hired for this task and completed the MENA MDTF Mid-term Review (MTR) by February 2015. The MTR found that the MENA MDTF is an efficiently governed and well managed multi donor trust fund. It has provided effective support to World Bank operations and its grants have been well aligned with the World Bank’s strategy in the region. A rigorous approach to the evaluation of grant proposals has been adopted, to ensure grants are consistent with country and regional strategies, and to select grants that are innovative and likely to help the World Bank “do different things and to do things differently”. Furthermore, the MENA MDTF has contributed to reaching the overall targeted results of the MENA regional strategy. Interviews with donors revealed that the MDTF’s Results Framework is considered to provide a useful and acceptable set of indicators for the Fund, and the detailed monitoring arrangements in the individual grant progress reports provide an impressive level of information on the progress of each activity against its intended results. Two key strengths of the Fund have been its flexibility and the speed of its operations. The fund has been able to support grants throughout the region and in any sector, subject to contributing to the objectives of the main pillars and cross-cutting themes of the MENA regional strategy. The MTR also found that the grant approval process has been speedy and disbursements have been rapid, in line with the objectives of the MDTF. The Review also discussed lessons learned, noting that some of the activities have been struggling to gain traction. The deteriorating security situation in the region has had a direct impact on some of the activities, for example in Yemen. At the same time, new opportunities are arising and there are chances to scale up activities in other countries, for example in Egypt. Many activities are implemented by WB staff and the MDTF is a valuable source of funds for advisory work from World Bank professionals. In this regard, one qualitative programme weakness was found to be the difficulty of gaining traction when technical advice is delivered from remotely based staff. This could become an obstacle to translating these activities and outputs into outcomes and impact. Lastly, the MTR found that some sectors, such as support to entrepreneurship and small business start-ups, are crowded in countries where other partners are already promoting such initiatives. The MDTF could be better placed to advise on the best form of delivery of SME advisory support. The MTR also provided a set of recommendations for the MDTF. Where actionable, the recommendations have been completed, while the remaining have been agreed on.
MENA MDTF Mid-term Review In June 2014, MENA MDTF donors requested a review of MENA MDTF performance to date and considera...
Overview of MENA MDTF Funding and Financial Status The MENA MDTF is financed by contributions from the Governments of Denmark, Finland, Norway and UK/DFID, and is implemented by the World Bank. Since the MENA MDTF’s establishment in 2012, total contributions have amounted to US$15.5 million. As of November 30, 2015 all the contributions have been paid in. Table 1 provides an overview of contributions for years 2012-2015 and a breakdown of resources contributed per donor. Table 1: CONTRIBUTIONS FOR THE PERIOD 2012-2015 Donor Name Amount 18 340 000 Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs (DANIDA)         Finland - Ministry of Foreign Affairs   Total Contribution   3 369 557         7 852 000      Unpaid                1 059 920        15 453 885 800 000     3 172 408              5 000 000 800 000     equivalent)       Unpaid 22 000 000 5 000 000 United Kingdom (DFID)     22 000 000   Paid (US$ 18 340 000   Norway - Ministry of Foreign Affairs   Paid   Table 2: FINANCIAL SUMMARY (AS OF NOVEMBER 30, 2015)   Table 2 shows the breakdown of MENA MDTF financial information1 as of November 30, 2015. The table shows the contributions paid in, disbursements, undisbursed fund balance, and the balance available for allocation. It also shows he 2 % admin fee, which is taken off the top of all contributions to defray costs of the central units of the World Bank (e.g. the legal unit, LEG). Managing unit costs are recovered on the basis of actual costs incurred, amount not exceeding 5 % to cover the costs of program management and trust fund administration, which is also reflected in the table.   US$ (+)Contribution Paid-In 15 453 885 (+)Other Receipts 28 187 (+)Investment Income 83 183 (-) Admin Fee - 2% 309 078 (-) Admin Fee - 5% 772 669 Total Funding Available 14 483 508 (-)Disbursements 6 975 040 Undisbursed Fund balance 7 508 468     (-) Grants Awarded Undisbursed 5 339 237 Balance available for allocation 2 169 230       1- Tables 2 to 6, with the exception of table 3, do not include the grants to be awarded through the 8th call for proposals. -
Overview of MENA MDTF Funding and Financial Status The MENA MDTF is financed by contributions from the Governments of Denm...
An 8th call for proposals was concluded early December 2015 and the remaining MDTF funds are currently being allocated among a set of new activities. Table 3 shows the list of grants awarded as of November 30, 2015. The “Grants Awarded” column reflects the actual spending of the closed activities, as in some cases smaller amounts undisbursed were returned to the MDTF. To date, US$ 12.3 million has been awarded to 29 activities, of which US$ 7 million has been disbursed and an additional US$ 1.5 million committed. The disbursement rate was an impressive 57 %. Of the 29 grants, 15 are officially closed, with outputs achieved and contributing to broader outcomes, and with all funds disbursed. In the case of the Life in Transition Survey, although the activity is closed on the financial books it was never initiated due to challenges with receiving government clearances to conduct the survey. The World Bank is currently in the process of recovering the funds from the EBRD, which was designated as the principal executing agency to conduct the surveys.
An 8th call for proposals was concluded early December 2015 and the remaining MDTF funds are currently being allocated amo...
Table 3: LIST OF GRANTS AWARDED (AS OF NOVEMBER 30, 2015) Activity Name 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Execution Execution Supporting Economic Governance Transition in Morocco and Tunisia Knowledge & Learning for Social Safety Nets and Active Labor Market Yemen Decentralization and Local Governance Initiative MENA Early Stage Innovation Technical Assistance Gender Learning and Operational Initiative - YEM and MA MNA Connecting Voices of MENA MNA Life in Transition Survey Sharing Know-How/How To in Subsidy Reform Implementation Yem Enhancing Governance thru Public Procurement Reform SPN YEM Enhancing Governance thru Public Procurement Reform Enhancing Microfinance amongst Women and Youth in MENA SPN Enhancing Microfinance amongst Women and Youth in MENA Communication for Policy Reforms in Tunisia SPN Communication for Policy Reforms in Tunisia Promoting Social Entrepreneurship in MENA Service Delivery and Governance Reforms in Egypt Morocco GAC in Health Management Information System Jordan Service Delivery in Health and Education Parliamentary Strengthening in Tunisia and Morocco Transition Support in Yemen SIRI Damage and Needs Assessment Tunisia PforR Service Delivery Support Jordan Strengthening Accountability for Improved Education Services SPN JOR Strengthening Accountability for Improved Education Services Djibouti Improving Youth Well-Being and Opportunities Tunisia Transforming the Road Sector Egypt Enhancing Broad-Based Participation in Community Dialogue Lebanon Promoting Capacity Building and Knowledge Sharing to Improve Egypt Mainstreaming Beneficiary Feedback in Select Sectors Iraq Expanding the Engagement on Youth Inclusion and Peace Building Egypt Supporting Land Acquisition Policy Study and Institutional Reform Lebanon Strengthening Financial Oversight Capacity of Lebanon Morocco Capacity and Design for Inclusive Groundwater Mgmt SPN Morocco Capacity and Design for Inclusive Groundwater Mgmt Bank Bank Bank Bank Bank Bank Bank Bank Recipient Bank Recipient Bank Recipient Bank Bank Bank Bank Bank Bank Bank Bank Bank Recipient Bank Bank Recipient Bank Bank Bank Bank Bank Bank Recipient Bank Total Grants Approved Ag 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20
Table 3  LIST OF GRANTS AWARDED  AS OF NOVEMBER 30, 2015   Activity Name 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 2...
tion ent ent ent ent ent ent Grant Agreement Date Closing Date 2012-07-11 2012-08-31 2012-09-01 2012-09-13 2012-09-17 2012-12-11 2012-12-10 2013-01-25 2013-01-02 2013-01-02 2012-12-27 2013-12-17 2013-01-22 2013-01-22 2013-09-18 2013-10-23 2013-10-14 2014-01-29 2014-05-12 2014-05-21 2014-07-08 2014-10-10 2015-10-24 2015-10-24 2015-04-02 2014-10-09 2015-05-11 2015-04-02 2015-05-26 2015-01-12 2015-04-08 2015-04-01 2014-10-10 2014-10-10 2014-05-15 2014-09-15 2014-05-15 2014-05-12 2014-06-30 2014-03-31 2013-11-30 2015-02-28 2015-06-11 2015-06-11 2015-06-30 2015-06-30 2015-08-31 2015-08-31 2015-12-01 2015-04-30 2015-09-30 2015-12-31 2016-03-31 2016-07-31 2015-09-30 2016-06-30 2016-12-31 2016-12-31 2016-09-01 2017-03-01 2016-12-30 2016-09-30 2016-10-31 2016-02-08 2016-10-16 2016-06-20 2016-12-30 2016-12-30 Grants Awarded a 420 507 441 959 416 820 167 467 336 500 278 908 211 773 341 692 302 400 27 763 600 000 105 350 600 000 133 000 350 000 311 703 316 638 448 000 360 000 450 000 500 000 490 000 587 800 247 000 363 000 909 000 185 000 350 000 325 000 220 000 397 800 319 200 750 000 50 000 12 314 278 Disbursed Committed b c 420 507 441 959 416 820 167 467 336 500 278 908 211 773 341 692 294 533 7 867 27 763 1 211 598 789 105 350 600 000 121 666 4 400 228 372 121 758 311 703 316 638 364 416 10 111 177 630 87 368 95 957 8 554 499 914 189 198 166 951 437 800 150 000 113 409 52 415 180 098 80 585 8 159 31 821 44 617 21 145 6 975 040 72 850 170 099 38 583 47 070 10 607 1 439 989 Available % Balance Disbursed a-b-c 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 97% 100% 100% 100% 100% 6 934 91% (130) 65% 100% 100% 73 473 81% 49% 95 002 345 489 21% 86 100% 133 852 34% 26% 46% 81 177 102 318 22% 909 000 0% 103 991 4% 148 080 9% 325 000 0% 136 800 20% 350 730 0% 7% 287 448 0% 750 000 50 000 0% 3 899 248 57%
tion  ent  ent  ent  ent  ent  ent  Grant Agreement Date Closing Date 2012-07-11 2012-08-31 2012-09-01 2012-09-13 2012-09-...
Table 4 shows how MENA MDTF funds have been committed across the MENA region. The largest share of commitments, 31 %, has gone to multi-country or regional activities. Some of these activities are truly regional, while other may have regional elements but also some components largely focused on one or two countries. Tunisia is the largest single recipient, while Iraq has received the least as a single recipient. Although Morocco only has received 12 % as a single recipient of TA, when including all regional activities that support reforms in Morocco, the amount would increase substantially. Table 4: ALLOCATION BY COUNTRY The distribution between Bank Executed and Recipient Executed grants is shown in table 5. Table 5: EXECUTION Execution Bank Executed Recipient Executed Grand Total Sum of Grant Amount USD 8 565 078 3 749 200 12 314 278 % 70% 30% 100%
Table 4 shows how MENA MDTF funds have been committed across the MENA region. The largest share of commitments, 31  , has ...
ANNEX Delivery on Agreed Results: Outputs To better showcase the progress on 2015 results, outputs from December 2014 to June 2015 (which were presented in the 2015 Interim Report) are highlighted in purple bullets, while outputs from July to November 30, 2015 are highlighted in bright blue bullets. Black bullets represent progress up to and including November 2014. Ongoing Activities Activity Funded Country Key Areas of Planned Support Progress on deliverables • Workshop on solar pumping completed; Recipient-executed activity to improve resilience of stakeholders to current and future water scarcity and bringing stakeholders in to the dialogue on groundwater management through inclusive approaches not previously used in the sector. • The short list for the firms to support the Hydraulic Basin Agency in the design of the groundwater contract has been approved and the request for proposals is being reviewed; • A mission to meet with the Ministry of Water, the meteorological service, and the hydraulic basin agency to discuss current information on modeling, climate change projection, and existing activities is ongoing. Help reduce Qat consumption among youth by raising awareness of the negative impacts, as well as improve the employability of vulnerable youth through appropriate skills-building training. • Information/Education and Communication sessions ongoing; • Identification of vocational training sectors and schools initiated; • Monitoring of activities ongoing. • Consultant to deliver training has been hired; • Vocational Training for 200 youth ongoing. • Preparation of ToRs for diagnostic assessments completed; • Lead consultant has been hired and ready to initiate work once clearance has been obtained from the Government; • First training workshop planned. MA Capacity and Design for Inclusive Groundwater Management in Morocco DJ Djibouti Qat Consumption EG Enhancing Participatory Monitoring and Community Engagement in Egypt Monitor and target poverty in relation to the Government’s anti-poverty and social protection programs. Support the development of participatory M&E systems to obtain direct citizen feedback and engage communities in the process of assessing different government policies, programs and activities.
ANNEX Delivery on Agreed Results  Outputs To better showcase the progress on 2015 results, outputs from December 2014 to J...
EG Land Acquisition in Egypt EG Mainstreaming Beneficiary Feedback in Egypt • Contracts for consultants issued; • Mission to Iraq completed; • Project proposal to the State and PeaceBuilding Fund (SPF) was submitted but was rejected due to lack of funds. A new proposal is under preparation and will be submitted to the Japanese Social Development Fund. Help the Egyptian Government to adopt a more transparent and accountable legal framework for land acquisition and strengthen the capacity of key public agencies involved in land acquisition. • Consultation meetings on diagnostic analysis held; • Diagnostic analysis ongoing. 6 out of 10 meetings with concerned entities held; • Planning of study tour to India ongoing; Dialogue with the Government on the sectors that will need to develop guidelines ongoing; • Expanding the Engagement of Youth Inclusion and Peace Building in Iraq Offer youth opportunities for positive engagement and sustainable livelihoods through community development approaches with the aim to engage youth in violence prevention and peacebuilding. • IQ Work on policy note ongoing. • Mission to kick off discussions with implementing agencies completed; • Roll out of activities agreed with the implementing agency; • Mission to conduct the diagnostic assessment for the rural sanitation sector ongoing; • Detailed 6 month timeline to implement the first part of the TA agreed; • International consultant to lead diagnostic work identified. Strengthen the capacity of national and local institutions to design and implement effective sectoral grievance redress systems in the health, energy, and rural sanitation sectors.
EG Land Acquisition in Egypt  EG  Mainstreaming Beneficiary Feedback in Egypt        Contracts for consultants issued     ...
• Technical assistance trainings in the MA Parliament completed; MA/TU Regional Parliamentary conference held. Case studies highlighting local success stories on governance and the link to quality of service delivery in health and education completed; • Analysis of case studies completed and dissemination ongoing; • Technical Advisory Committee established; Workshops held; Quantitative study completed; • Governance and Service Delivery Surveys completed; • Field work completed and analysis of data ongoing. • Improve the governance framework of the education system by ensuring that ongoing decentralization efforts are matched with a rigorous, well-designed, and well-implemented quality assurance system based on high professional standards. Training of trainers activities ongoing; • Strengthening Accountability for Improved Education Services in Jordan Training of trainers program in TU developed; • JO Training of trainers program in MA developed; • Assess the quality of health and education services and better understand how local governance in those sectors can be supported to help improve the quality of service delivery In MA, training modules on methods and tools for public consultations, petitions and budget analysis developed; • Service Delivery in Jordan’s Health and Education Sectors • • JO Participation training survey completed; • Provide support to parliament in the areas of budget oversight and public engagement in Tunisia and Morocco. • • Parliamentary Strengthening in Morocco and Tunisia Capacity evaluation completed; • MA, TU Operational guidelines completed; • Development of training modules completed; • Regulation on organizational mandate approved; • ToRs for communications campaign prepared; • Training of first batch of professionals concluded; • Communications brief drafted.
      Technical assistance trainings in the MA Parliament completed  MA TU Regional Parliamentary conference held. Case st...
• Capacity baseline review completed; • Options for learning visit explored; • ToRs of experts drafted and completed; Work on briefs ongoing; Work on preparatory material and brief minutes ongoing; • Development of committee business procedures ongoing; • Provide technical assistance to the Finance and Budget committee to strengthen the parliamentary oversight capacity in Lebanon. • • Strengthening Financial Oversight Capacity of the Lebanon Parliament Consultant hired to perform the baseline capacity review; • LB Learning visits and knowledge-sharing activities ongoing. TU Recipient-executed activity to improve efficiency and sustainability of the road sector by taking a transformational approach to its management, consider performance-based approaches (the first in MENA’s road sector) and encourage economic inclusion of lagging regions. • Board approval of project and grant signing completed. RY Due to the currently ongoing conflict in Yemen and the World Bank’s suspension of disbursement and activities on the ground, the funds have been re-assigned and the focus of the activities has been shifted. The new activity will be part of a remotely conducted Damage and Needs Assessment (DNA) to better inform rapid post-conflict reconstruction and recovery support. The aim of the activity is to conduct an in-depth analysis of the Ministry of Local Authorities (MoLA) database to understand the degree of access, capacity, resources, and functioning of District Councils across Yemen as a baseline survey. • Ongoing preparations for S-S exchange in December (India); • TOR for a diagnostic study on local councils completed; • Inter-ministerial team established to coordinate the roll out of the transition support plan • Preliminary analyses completed (description of the data); • In-depth analyses ongoing; • Technical input to Yemen Strategic Country Diagnostic seminars provided; • Formatted MoLA dataset as input to the Programmatic Damage Needs Assessment (PDNA) provided; • Drafting Technical short note to the Country Engagement Note ongoing. Transforming the Road Sector in Tunisia T ransition Support to Yemen Technical Assistance to Yemen for Post National Dialogue Transition
      Capacity baseline review completed         Options for learning visit explored         ToRs of experts drafted and c...
• Youth Employability in Lebanon LB Improve youth employability among National Volunteer Service Program (NVSP) participants and to promote knowledge sharing and capacity building in this area. Guide on local level grievance redress mechanisms prepared and adopted for use by municipalities; • Beta version of the Tunisia local government e-portal developed and made publicly accessible; • User experience testing to make platform more accessible completed; • Performance assessment system design completed and work on legislation establishing it is ongoing; Preparation of high profile training events ongoing; Study tour for technical staff planned for December 2015; • Tunisia PforR Service Delivery Support • • Contribute to enhancing the accountability of Local Governments to citizens, with a particular focus on disadvantaged municipalities. Provide critical support to the Tunisia Urban Development and Local Governance performance-for-results program financed by the World Bank and the GoT. Manual for Participatory Planning and Budgeting developed; • TU Development of a system for demanddriven capacity building support for all Tunisian local governments ongoing. • • • • • Baseline survey completed; Training curriculum adapted to the Lebanese context developed; Training of staff from Ministry of Social Affairs completed; Soft skills training ongoing; Mission to Beirut to discuss knowledge sharing activity ongoing.
      Youth Employability in Lebanon  LB  Improve youth employability among National Volunteer Service Program  NVSP  part...
CLOSED ACTIVITIES • Communication for Policy Reforms in Tunisia RY Enhancing Governance through Public Procurement Reform Recipient-executed activity to build capacity on procurement issues to central and decentralized agencies, as well as to service providers • TV-shows aired; • Partnership with British Council and Edupartage to organize university town halls established; • University town halls held; Dissemination of town halls on social media completed. • Recipient-executed activity to increase awareness and understanding on reforms through communications tools; Engage citizens in debate; Make economic topics accessible via different platforms Project website launched; • TN Workshops on procurement held, • Contract management and technical auditing held; • Training of contractor service providers to improve their responsiveness to bidding opportunities held; • Training of CSOs to improve their participation in monitoring procurement activities and quality of service delivery held.
CLOSED ACTIVITIES       Communication for Policy Reforms in Tunisia  RY Enhancing Governance through Public Procurement Re...
• • Financial education diagnostic report completed; Video explaining microfinance and development benefits in Tunisia completed; Study on mobile money and innovation landscape completed. CoP established and website launched; • Training (audit, other) provided; • Supreme Audit Institution legislation papers (EG, RY) and surveys completed; • Boot camps, quarterly dialogue solutions labs, and exchange conference held Surveys and roundtable discussions with CSOs and media held • RY, MA Large-scale conference on financial education held; • Support gender inclusion through awareness raising along-side Yemen’s National Dialogue and Morocco’s Human Development Initiative Training of trainers on integrating tech-based learning tools into training methodologies held; • Gender Learning and Operational Initiative - Yemen and Morocco Focus groups to capture dynamic picture of demand-side constraints to financial services for women and youth completed (TU, MA, EG); • MENA • • Promote public sector governance and private sector development with improved FM through training, establishing a CoP Knowledge exchange workshop held; • Financial Management (FM): Connecting Voices in MENA • • MENA Training of trainers on financial literacy held; • Enhancing Microfinance among Women and Youth in MENA Financial literacy program developed; • Recipient-executed activity to improve financial literacy of women, youth through training; Help financial institutions serve women, youth Financial inclusion diagnostic completed; Faith-based leadership program completed; • Gender consultations held; • S-S exchanges (Indonesia) held; • Quick notes for awareness raising activities developed; • Training on women’s leadership skills held
           Financial education diagnostic report completed  Video explaining microfinance and development benefits in Tuni...
• JO, EG, MA, TN S-S and other exchanges held (Australia, Georgia, Colombia); • Training provided (smart cards, targeting, public-private partnerships or PPPs); • Policy notes and How-to Guide developed; • Operations Manuals for M&E (TU and MA) developed; Virtual Workshops held Gap analysis and stakeholder mapping conducted; • Partnership with Goldman Sachs in place; • Workshops held; • Draft TA facility design and governance framework developed; Toolkit on gender and economic empowerment developed • MNA Life in Transition Survey CoP established; • Fill critical data gaps for more evidenced-based policies, e.g. on reducing inequality of employment opportunities (EBRD-led) Workshops with HMIS technical committee held. • MENA Draft data dictionary and coding standards developed; • MENA Early Stage Innovation (ESIF) Technical Assistance Draft national chart of accounts and statistics developed; • Provide gap analysis, awareness, other, to ensure greater gender inclusion in ESIF and Bank’s FinancePrivate Sector portfolio High-level retreat on HMIS held; • MENA WB/WHO workshops held; • Establish a community of practice (CoP) for SSN & ALMP to increase awareness & share knowledge in/out of region and provide detailed training • • Knowledge & Learning for Social Safety Nets and Active Labor Market Programs Case studies completed (best practices in health service delivery); • MA Help improve equity and delivery of health services through improved MIS (policy, data, systems, consultations) • • Governance and Accountability in Moroccan Health Management Information Systems (HMIS) Country 10-year Health Management Information Systems (HMIS) staging plan developed; ESIF itself has not yet been funded. • Pilot conducted and questionnaire completed • Activity has been cancelled and funds are being transferred back to MENA MDTF
      JO, EG, MA, TN  S-S and other exchanges held  Australia, Georgia, Colombia          Training provided  smart cards, ...
• • • Partnership with British Council to promote social entrepreneurship established; Awareness raising events to promote social entrepreneurship held; Social enterprise boot camp held; Business plan competition held; Boot camp with candidates with different business ideas held; Tailored coaching to potential social entrepreneurs provided. • Support governance reforms which aim to improve public service delivery First Social Enterprise Forum held; • EG • • Service Delivery and Governance Reform in Egypt Learning visits (Jordan, UK) held; • Raise awareness on and create opportunities for social entrepreneurs via coaching and knowledge platforms • • MA, JO Concept note and operations manual developed; • Promoting Social Entrepreneurship in MENA Blog and media campaign launched; Policy notes produced on civil service reform, access to information, and undertaking, public consultations; • Rapid Results Initiatives (RRIs) in health care and administration services launched; • Dialogue and knowledge exchange events, and workshops and training held (tax and industrial RRI, skill building)
                 Partnership with British Council to promote social entrepreneurship established  Awareness raising events...
• • South-south forum in Brazil held; Study tour to Colombia completed. Dialogue with multiple international organizations on the development of information sharing mechanisms held; • MENA Course on design and implementation of SSN held; • SIRI - Regional Syrian Damage and Needs Assessment Round table held; • Establish a comprehensive damage and needs assessment that allows tracking the impact of the conflict throughout the sub-region and in Syria itself, and the aggregation of existing and new information in a usable platform for open analysis. ‘How-to’ & Policy Briefs on Subsidy Reform drafted; • Provide strategic advisory and promote knowledgesharing (workshops, virtual conferences) on subsidies • • EG, MENA Workshops and virtual conferences held (unified database, unified registries and cash compensation schemes, knowledge sharing and how-to in subsidy reform); • Sharing KnowHow and How To in Subsidy Reform Implementation Consultation sessions with MoF held; Consultations with private sector vendors to explore the avenues for using technology (satellite imagery, etc.) for a remote assessment held; • Damage and needs assessment for six Syrian cities (Aleppo, Dar’a, Homs, Hama, Idlib, and Latakia) completed; • Damage assessment results made available on a geo-referenced portal; • Cost effective and replicable model for the damage assessment developed and translated into a process guideline, which has since been used in Iraq and is currently used in Yemen; • Presentations on the methodology and technology used held; • Staff trained on the methodology; • Percentage based assessment model conceived; • Needs assessment for critical sectors in regions returning to normalcy completed; • Recommendations for select sectors linking the recovery needs and the development objectives completed.
           South-south forum in Brazil held  Study tour to Colombia completed. Dialogue with multiple international organi...
• • Training to ministries provided and training of trainers on new ATI held; High level consultations on ATI held National workshop, media/ awareness events held; • Design of SPF-funded project completed; • Analytical note on Institutional & Fiscal Arrangements prepared; • Newsletters produced; • RY Inform National Dialogue participants on policy and regulation related to decentralization; Increase awareness of key civil society organization (CSO) stakeholders Policy notes and guiding documents drafted on programmatic budget structure, performance approach, fiscal rules public consultation, eParticipation, petitions, and on legislative initiatives by citizens; • Yemen Decentralization and Local Governance Initiative • • Develop guidelines for performance-based budgeting, M&E systems; support for drafting access to information (ATI) law and on fiscal transfers/ equalization Budgeting and performance plans guidelines completed and TA on new budgeting approach provided; • TN, MA Detailed assessment on ATI completed; • Supporting Economic Governance Transition in Morocco and Tunisia Draft budget law prepared; S-S exchange (India) held Djibouti (DJ); Egypt (EG);Iraq (IQ); Jordan (JO); Morocco (MA); Tunisia (TN); Yemen (RY); Regional (MENA)
           Training to ministries provided and training of trainers on new ATI held  High level consultations on ATI held ...
Acknowledgements This Annual Report was prepared by Agnes Said, Farhad Peikar and Olivier Lavinal, of the Program Coordination Unit of the Middle East and North Africa Multi Donor Trust Fund (MENA MDTF), under the guidance of Franck Bousquet, Director of Regional Programs, Partnerships, and Integrated Solutions, and Hafez Ghanem, Vice President for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region at the World Bank. The Program Coordination Unit would like to thank the donors – Denmark, Finland, Norway, the United Kingdom – for their financial support and technical guidance provided throughout the year, and specifically during the annual Program Council Meetings. The Coordination Unit would also like to thank the MDTF-funded activity task team leaders (TTLs) for their input, in particular for providing updates on work completed and data for the results framework. The MENA MDTF team would like to express its special thanks to Yogita Mumssen, former Program Manager, and Thomas Djurhuus, Lead Partnership Officer, for their dedication and outstanding contribution. Finally, we thank the MENA MDTF Technical Review Committee for its time and efforts during activity selection and review.
Acknowledgements This Annual Report was prepared by Agnes Said, Farhad Peikar and Olivier Lavinal, of the Program Coordina...
The World Bank Group The Middle East and North Africa Multi Donor TRust Fund 1818 H Street NW Washington, DC, 20433 USA Email: menamdtf@worldbank.org
The World Bank Group The Middle East and North Africa Multi Donor TRust Fund 1818 H Street NW Washington, DC, 20433 USA Em...