Washington Metropolitan Chapter Community Associations Institute OCTOBER 2016 A Magazine for Community Association Volunteer Leaders, Professional Managers and Business Partners e r a p e r P u o Y e Ar ? r e t n i W r o f d ALSO IN THIS ISSUE Winter is COMING! Facility Maintenance and Repair Project Warranties ... and more!
Washington Metropolitan Chapter Community Associations Institute  OCTOBER 2016  A Magazine for Community Association Volun...
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OCTOBER 2016 CONTENTS 12 Snow Removal 101 By Michael Holland Managers and boards struggle to budget for snow removal. The unpredictability of seasonal accumulation of snow, and the number of weather events that the mid-Atlantic receives each year can vary, potentially causing much higher or lower spending than budgeted. 14 Winter is COMING! By Jason Kilmore 16 Understanding and Maintaining Facility Maintenance and Repair Project Warranties By Steven C. Turner, P.E. 18 Budgeting for Snow By Josh Harber, DEPARTMENTS AND MORE CMCA, AMS, PCAM 20 High-rise Success Story By Lee Ann Weir, 5 Message from the Executive Director 6 Chapter Benefactor: Minkoff Company Inc. 6 Quorum Magazine Editorial Calendar 7 Welcome New Members 8 Upcoming Events 10 People & Places 11 Volunteer Spotlight 21 Event Flyer: Annual Awards Dinner: Great Gatsby Gala 29 Event Flyer: Rookie Manager Essentials: Disaster Planning 32 Classifieds 33 Index to Advertisers 34 Cul de Sac: Snow…the Other Four Letter Word!%&# CMCA, AMS 22 Benumbed by Frozen Pipes By Ron Unger, CIC 24 Putting Your Winter Puzzle Together By Vicki E. Eaton, CMCA, AMS, PCAM 26 Planning for the Winter: Waterproofing Buildings By Hiruy Dafla, PE 28 Controlling Your Building’s Heating Expenses By Andrew Zimdahl 30 No Need to Scurry at the First Sight of Flurries By Cassie Park, P.E. WMCCAI MISSION STATEMENT To optimize the operations of Community Associations and foster value for our business partners. Reader comments and suggestions are welcome. Address your comments to: Quorum 7600 Leesburg Pike, Suite 100 West Falls Church, VA 22043 We also welcome article submissions from our members. For author guidelines, call (703) 750-3644 or e-mail publications@caidc.org. Articles may be edited for length and clarity. OCTOBER 2016 |3
OCTOBER 2016  CONTENTS 12 Snow Removal 101 By Michael Holland  Managers and boards struggle to budget for snow removal. Th...
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OFFICERS President Jeremy M. Tucker, ESQ President-elect Bruce H. Easmunt, ESQ. Vice President Sarah Elise Gerstein, CMCA, AMS, PCAM Secretary Crishana L. Loritsch, CMCA, AMS, PCAM Treasurer Rafael A. Martinez, CTP Immediate Past President Donna G. Newman, CMCA, AMS, PCAM Executive Director Matt Rankin, CAE (ex officio) COUNCIL CHAIRS Communications Council Ruth Katz, ESQ. Education Council Donald Plank, CMCA, AMS, PCAM Member Services Council Orlando Ramirez COMMITTEE CHAIRS Conference & Expo William Cornelius and Jennifer Bennett, CMCA, AMS, PCAM D.C. Legislative/LAC Jane Rogers, ESQ. Education Debra K. Johnson, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, and Kevin A. Kernan, ESQ. Golf Jim Pates and Elizabeth Rudolph, AMS, PCAM Maryland Legislative Ron Bolt, ESQ., and Mitch Farrah, CMCA Outreach David Jensen and Lenard Goldbaum, AMS, PCAM Membership Joe Inzerillo and Jarold Martin Quorum Editorial Susan L. Truskey, ESQ. and Nicole Williams, ESQ. Chapter Events Toni Partin, CMCA, AMS and June Chulkov Virginia Legislative Ronda DeSplinter, LSM, PCAM and William A. Marr Jr., ESQ. QUORUM Editor Rickey E. Dana, rdana@caidc.org Design Support Services QUORUM EDITORIAL COMMITTEE Co-chairs Susan L. Truskey, ESQ. and Nicole Williams, ESQ. Members Mira Brown, CMCA, AMS, Chris Carlson, PE, Deborah Carter, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, Bruce Easmunt, ESQ., Michael Gartner, ESQ., Laura Goguet, CMCA, AMS, Scott Greges, CMCA, AMS, Shannon Junior, Ruth Katz, ESQ., Crishana Loritsch, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, Thomas Mugavero, ESQ., Ed O’Connell, ESQ., Kara Permisohn, Brandi Ruff, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, Lauri Ryder, CIC, CRM, CMCA, Kim Veirs, Aimee Winegar, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, Michael Zupan, ESQ. Washington Metropolitan Chapter Community Associations Institute, a 501(c)(6) organization, serves the educational, business and networking needs of the community association industry in 80 cities/counties in Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia. Members include community association homeowner volunteer leaders, professional managers, association management companies, and other businesses and professionals who provide products and services to planned communities, cooperatives and condominiums. WMCCAI has more than 3,000 members including 300+ businesses, 1,100 professional managers from 85 management companies, and approximately 1,500 community association homeowners. WMCCAI is the largest of Community Associations Institute’s 60 chapters worldwide. Quorum is the award-winning premiere publication of WMCCAI, dedicated to providing WMCCAI’s membership with information on community association issues. Authors are responsible for developing the logic of their expressed opinions and for the authenticity of all presented facts in articles. WMCCAI does not necessarily endorse or approve statements of fact or opinion made in these pages and assumes no responsibility for those statements. This publication is issued with the understanding that the publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services and nothing published in Quorum is intended to constitute legal or other professional advice and should not be relied on as such. If legal advice or other expert assistance is required, the services of a competent professional should be sought directly by the person requiring such advice or services. Articles appearing in Quorum may not be reprinted without first obtaining written approval from the editor of Quorum. In the event that such permission is granted, the following legend must be added to the reprint: Reprinted with permission from Quorum™ magazine. Copyright 2016 Washington Metropolitan Chapter Community Associations Institute. Quorum is a trademark of WMCCAI. Receipt of Quorum is a privilege of WMCCAI membership for which $65 in nonrefundable annual dues is allocated. The subscription price for nonmembers is $75 per year; contact publications@caidc.org or call (703) 750-3644. To advertise in Quorum, contact Rickey E. Dana, editor, (703) 750-3644 or e-mail publications@caidc.org. For more information about Quorum or WMCCAI, visit www.caidc.org. E ducating community association board members on their roles and responsibilities has long been critically important to both Community Associations Institute and the Washington Metropolitan Chapter. After all, the stakes are high. Volunteers (often our neighbors) are expected to run the association, protect the community’s assets, and enforce the governing documents. Until recently, the education we provided for volunteers has been, well, voluntary. Board members attended our education programs and read Quorum regularly because they recognized the importance of being wellinformed and trained on their duties. However, local and state governments (including one in the Chapter’s backyard) have started discussing - and at times mandating - training for volunteer board members. This is a big deal and it’s easy to see why CAI had to act by approving a policy on board member education. CAI’s policy does several things that should prove helpful in keeping this issue manageable. First, the policy emphasizes that “Any state mandated education requirement should focus on incentives and tools to encourage boards to utilize existing industry tools to achieve educational goals rather than create new processes or burdens.” This is a vital position for multiple reasons. CAI, its chapters and its members have already created a wealth of resources that can fulfill even the most stringent education requirements. Plus, many of the resources are low-cost or free. Furthermore, we can reduce the burden on government by saving them from reinventing the wheel every time a new jurisdiction wants to mandate board member education. Associations like CAI have been successfully doing this for decades. It’s one of the reasons nonprofit organizations exist! Another productive take away from the policy is a model for board member training. I’m paraphrasing here due to space restrictions, but this model puts it all together in plain language that any common interest community can use immediately. from the executive director DIRECTORS Gordon Boezer, Dorothy Firsching, PMP, Michael Gartner, ESQ., Airielle Hansford, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, Jose Ignacio, CPA, Judith McNelis, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, Ted Ross, Todd A. Sinkins, ESQ., Elizabeth Schultz, CMCA, AMS, and Stephen Wright, CMCA, AMS, LSM, PCAM New CAI Policy Focuses on Board Member Education 1.After being elected to the board of a community association, certify in writing to the secretary that you have read and will uphold the association's documents and policies, and uphold your fiduciary responsibility to the association's members. 2.Engage in training to increase your level of knowledge, professionalism, competence, and effectiveness as leaders of community associations. 3.Board and committee members' should attest, and renew annually, to comply with CAI's Model Code for Ethics for Community Association Board Members. 4.Adopt and comply with CAI's Community Association Governance Guidelines and CAI's Rights and Responsibilities for Better Communities, and fund training programs on community association governance. I encourage you to read the full policy at www.caionline.org and stay informed on this important issue. Matt Rankin, MPA, CAE Matt Rankin, as the chapter’s executive director, is responsible for implementing the organization’s mission and goals and managing its staff. He is a graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in mass communications, and George Mason University, where he earned a Master of Public Administration degree, concentrating on nonprofit management. Rankin has 20 years of nonprofit/association management experience and is a Certified Association Executive. OCTOBER 2016 |5
OFFICERS President Jeremy M. Tucker, ESQ President-elect Bruce H. Easmunt, ESQ. Vice President Sarah Elise Gerstein, CMCA,...
C H A P T E R B E N E F A C T O R Minkoff Company Inc. 11716 Baltimore Ave. Beltsville, MD 20705 Phone: ((301) 652-8711 www.minkoff.com chapter news For more than 60 years, Minkoff Company has been assisting the property management industry with turnkey restoration services at properties damaged by fire, water and numerous other causes. Minkoff Company works closely with every major insurance carrier in this region and is prequalified to respond to emergencies in a service territory that ranges from Southern Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, the District of Columbia and West Virginia. The tradition of building strong client relationships is another corporate principle that dates back to the late 1940s. Today, Minkoff Company is among the largest single location restoration firms in the nation operating from its headquarters in Beltsville and from several satellite offices in Virginia. than 50 service vehicles throughout the region. The staff is experienced and has been involved with thousands of restoration projects. From small water damage incidents to large-scale, catastrophic fires, Minkoff Company offers a level of service that most others find impossible to match. For decades, Minkoff Company has been serving the restoration and emergency response needs of the property management industry. Minkoff also capitalizes on its construction expertise to undertake large-scale renovations and capital improvement projects. The company’s tradition of relationship building continues to today, evidenced by Minkoff’’s involvement in several chapters of the Community Associations Institute, many other property management and insurance industry trade groups. The company prides itself on the fact that it has grown from an organization of four or five staff members to an employee base exceeding 100 professionals operating from more QUORUM MAGAZINE EDITORIAL CALENDAR Month November December January February March April Theme Making a Transition People of the Community Securing Your 2017 Our 40th Anniversary Community Associations of the Year Dirty Jobs *Themes subject to change. 6 | Quorum Article/Submisions Due Sept.1 Oct. 1 Nov. 1 Dec. 1 Jan. 1 Feb. 1 Ads Due Sept. 17 Oct. 17 Nov. 17 Dec. 17 Jan. 17 Feb. 17
C H A P T E R  B E N E F A C T O R  Minkoff Company Inc. 11716 Baltimore Ave. Beltsville, MD 20705 Phone    301  652-8711 ...
Welcome New Members WMCCAI proudly welcomes the following members who joined the chapter in August 2016. Community Association Volunteer Leaders from the Following Associations Belmont Community Association Cambridge Station Association Westberry Homeowners Association Individual Managers Karen Arguello, Cardinal Management Group, Inc., AAMC Lucinda Ashton, Associa-Community Management Corporation, AAMC Channa Rachel Chea Richard Jett, Legum & Norman, Inc., AAMC Lisa Leftwich, Legum & Norman, Inc., AAMC Cynthia Lyman, Associa-Community Management Corporation, AAMC Lisa Dawn McBride, Sequoia Management Company, Inc., AAMC Geisha Mills, CMCA, Woodlake Towers Condominium Jisela Molina, Woodlake Towers Condominium Jay Morrell, CMCA, AMS, PCAM, TWC Association Management, AAMC Giovana Salazar, Select Community Services Business Partners A.I.R. Klappenberger and Son Montgomery Co. Playground Specialists, Inc. Management Company Pearson Realty, LLC OCTOBER 2016 |7
Welcome New Members WMCCAI proudly welcomes the following members who joined the chapter in August 2016. Community Associa...
For more information on WMCCAI meetings or upcoming events, contact the chapter office at (703) 750-3644, e-mail info@caidc.org or visit www.caidc.org. OCTOBER 4 FREE CLASS upcoming events Animals Under the FHA 6 - 9 p.m. Lionsgate Condominiums 7710 Woodmont Avenue Bethesda, MD 20814 Do you need companion assistance or a service animal? Have you wondered what your rights are under the Fair Housing Act? Attend WMCCAI’s free community seminar: “Animals Under the FHA,” to learn the ins and outs of this hot topic! Register online at www.caidc.org. OCTOBER 25 Rookie Managers Disaster Planning Are you prepared for a disaster on your property? If not, you should be! This session has been developed for the new manager to learn the basics of managing a community and network with experienced managers. Register online at www.caidc.org. 12:30 - 3 p.m. WMCCAI Office 7600 Leesburg Pike, Suite 100W Falls Church, VA 22043 Registration Fees Member Nonmember $20 $25 OCTOBER 25 FREE CLASS Virginia Legislative Forum 7 - 9 p.m. Fairfax County Government Building 12000 Government Center Parkway Fairfax, VA 22035 More and more legislation is being developed that challenges the limits of the laws governing community associations and the constitutionality of those proposals. Join us in Fairfax as a panel discussion will explore the various initiatives that currently, or may soon, impact their communities. Register online at www.caidc.org. OCTOBER 27-28 M-205: Risk Management 8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Northern Virginia Registration Fees Member Nonmember $445 $545 Learn how to protect your community and respond to emergencies. This course shows you how to prepare for your community’s future by identifying insurance risks and addressing critical issues. Register through CAI, www.caionline.org/pmdp. For more information, e-mail caieducation@caionline.org. NOVEMBER 5 Annual Awards Dinner 6:30 - 11 p.m. Registration opens at 6:30 p.m. Ritz Carlton Tysons Corner 1700 Tysons Blvd. McLean, VA 22102 Registration Fees Member Nonmember 8 | Quorum $190 $240 We’re Puttin’ on the Ritz! Step back in time to the roaring 20s for a night of glitz and glamour in honor of WMCCAI’s volunteers. Come as a flapper or come as you are – a gangster or a silent screen star! It’ll be swell no matter the dress. RSVP online at www.caidc.org.
For more information on WMCCAI meetings or upcoming events, contact the chapter office at  703  750-3644, e-mail info caid...
OCTOBER 2016 |9
OCTOBER 2016   9
people & places Marc McCoy Joins Associa – CMC Reserve Advisor Adds New Account Manager Marc joins Associa – Community Management Corporation as the Senior Vice President of Develop Service. He brings 26 years of combined experience in the community association and golf management industries. Marc holds the designations of CMCA and AMS, and is also licensed as a Certified Supervisory Employee be the State of Virginia. 2 0 1 6 M E M B E R S H I P Luke Runion has joined the Arlington office of Reserve Advisors, Inc., as the Northeast Account Manager. Runion has worked in the property maintenance and facility service industries, and brings more than eight years of consultative sales experience to the his new office! R E C R U I T M E N T C O N T E S T Win A Trip to the Homestead 4TH ANNUAL RECRUITMENT CONTEST For every new member that signs up for a one year membership with WMCCAI—you get one entry in a drawing for a trip to the Omni Homestead Resort or other prizes! Step 1. – Go to caionline.org and click ‘Join Now’ Step 2. – Select your member level and fill out the form; Don’t forget to add your referral name! Sponsors 10 | Quorum WE CAN REACH 4,000 MEMBERS! 1st prize is Two Nights – Three Days at the Omni Homestead Resort for two adults! Daily Breakfast for two is included. PLUS... Other great 2nd and 3rd place prizes!
people   places  Marc McCoy Joins Associa     CMC  Reserve Advisor Adds New Account Manager  Marc joins Associa     Commun...
Christopher W. Carlson, P.E., SECB Education: BS Civil Engineering – University Maryland, College Park; MS Structural Engineering – University of Maryland, College Park Family: Wife (Pam) and three kids (Christopher, Jr., Molly, and Thomas) Employer/Occupation: Engineering and Technical Consultants, Inc. / Chief Structural Engineer Were you surprised you won an award? What went through your mind? Yes, I was not aware that there was a Rising Star Award. I felt undeserving and asked Matt Rankin for a recount, since I was sure others were more deserving. Why do you feel it is important to be so active in WMCCAI? Our core business is helping condominium associations solve volunteer spotlight Town of Residence: Columbia, Maryland their building and site related problems. CAI involvement gives us the best opportunity to meet condominium owners and managers who need our services. What was the most recent spontaneous thing you have done? How’d it turn out? The morning of my daughter’s wedding, I bought my wife some jewelry to wear at the festivities, since the mother of the bride does not have a featured role in the ceremony. She was surprised and looked great in her new bling. What advice would you give to new WMCCAI members? Get involved. There is a vast wealth of knowledge available among the members, many of whom have “been there” and are willing to help. Avail yourself of the local and national CAI publications; they are great resources. OCTOBER 2016 | 11
Christopher W. Carlson, P.E., SECB Education  BS Civil Engineering     University Maryland, College Park  MS Structural En...
1 0 1 l a v o m e R w o Sn There 12 | Quorum ow/i n s o n is ce chem g n i t l e m ical not s e o d t tha have effe l a u d i s re cts kway l a w n o s.
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By Michael Holland Michael is the Mid-Atlantic Region Snow Manager for Brightview Landscape Services. He is also a member of Accredited Scow Contractors Association (ASCA), a Snow Professional, and member of Snow and Ice Management Association (SIMA), as well as a Maryland State Certified Professional Horticulturist. M anagers and boards struggle to budget for snow removal. The unpredictability of seasonal accumulation of snow, and the number of weather events that the mid-Atlantic receives each year can vary, potentially causing much higher or lower spending than budgeted. The only absolute is what the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 30-year average for snowfall is in the mid-Atlantic. This is based on a rolling average of total snow accumulation and the number of winter events as reported by the weather stations at the airports within the region. The average yearly snowfall total in the mid-Atlantic, according to NOAA, is approximately between 15 and 22 inches, depending on where the property is located. However there are micro-climates throughout the region that can receive much more or less snow than what is reported at the closest airport reporting station. Contract Types Historically, the mid-Atlantic region has overwhelmingly utilized Time & Material (T&M) rates for snow removal services. Over the past several years, a growing number of clients have chosen to explore different contract types in order to better predict their costs. T&M This contract type provides hourly rates for hand labor and each type of equipment and ice melting chemicals. One potential problem when selecting a contractor based on hourly rates is determining how much time and material will be used to accomplish the same job. Less qualified contractors may spend more time clearing snow and applying more ice melting chemical, potentially leading to a larger invoice than expected based on their submitted hourly rates and material prices. A T&M contract for snow removal requires payment only for services received. In a year with above normal snowfall, a snow removal budget can easily be exceeded; alternatively, a year with below normal snowfall can lead to an unexpected budget surplus. An unappealing aspect of a this contract is that the client can spend hours verifying the hours a snow removal contractor spent clearing snow on the site and the amount of snow/ice melting chemical that was applied. Per Inch or Per Event A per inch or per event price contract is an option for those who wish to avoid the task of verifying labor/equipment hours and materials used on their property. The contract will be written with snowfall increments and a fixed fee attached to those increments. For example: Snowfall Total 0 - 1.99” Total Price $2,992.50 2 - 3.99” $3,403.75 4 - 5.99” $4,596.25 6 - 7.99” $5,626.25 8 - 9.99” $6,746.25 10 - 11.99” $7,677.50 Prior to entering into a contract, the customer and contractor need to determine which services should be incorporated into each incremental price. Each price above assumes one full chemical application and one full clearing of all walkways and roadways/parking areas with its associated increment range. Additional services such as pretreatment with chemicals or liquid brine can be added to the scope of work for an additional cost. When the client receives the invoice for each event, a certified weather total from the zip code of the property issued by a third party will be attached. The invoice amount will reflect the accumulation increment price in the contract confirmed by the certified weather total. Per Occurrence A per occurrence contract is an option best suited for a client who wants to be able to control when services are performed and manage their costs. The client makes the decision when to request services based on current and forecast conditions. The contract price per occurrence would include one full clearing of all walkways and roadways/parking areas with a snow accumulation up to 4 inches and a full chemical application. An additional “occurrence” would apply with every additional 0.99-4 inches of snow after the original 4 inch threshold during the event.x Lump Sum Since recent years have been above normal in regard to total seasonal accumulation, several of our clients have opted to enter into a lump sum contract. This contract type has been gaining popularity in the mid-Atlantic. Unlike T&M and per inch/occurrence, lump sum is the only type of contract where the client will know exactly what the cost will be to remove snow from the property for the entire season, regardless of the total snowfall. Lump sum is typically contracted for five years. During that term, it is assumed that based on snowfall averages, there would be a blend of below, above, and normal seasonal snowfalls. The lump sum seasonal contract price is based on a normal snowfall year as determined by NOAA. During a higher-than-normal snowfall year, the client would benefit from reduced costs OCTOBER 2016 | 13
By Michael Holland Michael is the Mid-Atlantic Region Snow Manager for Brightview Landscape Services. He is also a member ...
By Jason Kilmore Jason has been with Ruppert for 11 years. He is a Certified Landscape Technician (CLT) and holds a bachelor’s degree in landscape contracting management from Penn State. Winter is COMING! So how do you prepare for another challenging season of snow and freezing temperatures? Get a Game Plan. Sit down with your contractor to make sure they understand priorities of the property. Some of the questions that I would ask are: 8 What areas of the property should be treated first? (High priorities include schools, first responders, and medical needs areas. 8 Where should excess snow be stored in the event of large storm or should they be required to haul snow over certain inch? 8 Are there areas from which you do not want snow removed? 8 Is there a certain time line in which all snow should be removed? 8 Is there a documentation on the game plan? Important Contacts. Both the contractor and the customer should have good contact information for each other to discuss progress and challenges through the storm. Snow Stakes. Customers should invest in this service! The stakes allow the contractor to mark the curb lines, fire hydrants, and storm drains so that they are protecting the property when performing snow removal operations Gypsum applications. In the mid-Atlantic climate, we tend to put down salt to control ice accumulations. This salt can have a harmful effect on plant material. Gypsum is great product that can offset this chemical burn to plant material. Equipment Inspection. It is a good idea to take a look at the contractor’s equipment before the season starts. Make sure it’s in good working order. Ask if they have enough to perform the task and ask for a list of equipment to be used on your site. Labor Plans. Review labor plans for their sites. Find out if the contractor has enough labor to handle the area’s needs. Materials. Review what materials the contractor plan to use to control ice on site. They should be using different products for different types of surfaces (asphalt vs. concrete). Storage of Material and Equipment. Review the contractor’s planto store equipment and material for your site. There may be an area on site they can store these item which would allow them to be more efficient in servicing the community instead of transporting trucks and salt to the site every storm. Monthly Equipment Rentals. If you know that a specific piece of equipment is needed for your site, see if you can work out an agreement to store it on your site for the season to ensure that it is there for your needs. Weather Reporting. Refer to a weather service to verify forecasts and snow totals. 14 | Quorum opposed to those resulting from T&M rates. In a below normal snowfall season, the contractor would benefit from a guaranteed payment without services performed to cover costs incurred during season start-up. The scope of service is approved by the client, and the cost is billed in equal monthly payments over the course of several months. These payments do not change regardless of the amount of snow received. Most appealing to our clients utilizing a lump sum contract is the ability to confidently budget for snow removal for the year. Regardless of the contract type a client selects, it is recommended that the contract be executed no later than October 1. This allows the contractor to set a snow removal plan in place prior to any winter precipitation. Snowfall Triggers Snowfall triggers determine when snow removal services will begin. Typically, a 2 inch trigger will be used on most properties that operate under normal business hours or in residential communities, and result in personnel and equipment being on-site within 2-3 hours of reaching the 2 inch of accumulation threshold. Several exceptions to the 2 inch trigger are hospitals, 24-hour businesses, and retail stores. A “zero tolerance” trigger may be incorporated into a contract, requiring mobilization prior to the start of precipitation with approval by the client. Triggers of an inch or more indicate that mobilization will begin when snowfall reaches that threshold and it may take several hours before snow clearing equipment and personnel arrive on the site. “Start of Precipitation” should be selected if the client would like snow removal to begin prior to 2 inches of accumulation. Ice Melting Chemicals The variety of ice melting chemicals available to contractors has grown enormously over the last 10 years, leading to confusion about their effectiveness, safety and cost. Sodium Chloride (Rock Salt) Sodium chloride is the most common ice melting chemical used on roadways and parking areas. The exception is on parking garage decks, where magnesium chloride or calcium chloride is recommended. Sodium chloride is preferred in the mid-Atlantic due to its less expensive cost compared with other ice melting chemicals and its effectiveness based on temperatures typical in the region. Sodium chloride can melt ice to a temperature as low as -6 degrees Fahrenheit although the Federal Highway Administration lists its effectiveness to approximately 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Sodium chloride is effective as both a de-icer and an anti-icer applied prior to precipitation in
By Jason Kilmore Jason has been with Ruppert for 11 years. He is a Certified Landscape Technician  CLT  and holds a bachel...
order to melt initial snow/ice and to prevent bonding of ice to the asphalt. Calcium Chloride (Peladow or equivalent), Magnesium Chloride (Mag Pellet or equivalent), Blended Mix Walkway snow/ice melting chemicals come in different forms and based on site conditions, temperature and availability, the most cost effective material will be applied to a property for each winter event. When applied to walkways, concrete snow/ice melting chemical combines with moisture from the air or precipitation to generate heat that begins the melting process. Calcium chloride is the de-icing agent that is most often applied when air temperature is below where magnesium chloride and blended ice melt is effective. Calcium chloride is effective to -25 degrees Fahrenheit, which is the lowest effective temperature of any snow/ice melting chemical. There is no snow/ice melting chemical that does not have residual effects on walkways. Blended ice melts containing sodium chloride tend to leave a white powdery residue on walkways that leads to potential tracking of the material into buildings. Calcium and magnesium chloride are more effective melting ice and snow at low temperatures and have less of a visual residual. However, since either completely dries, an oily residual can be tracked onto carpet and hard flooring. Sodium Chloride Brine Applying liquid salt brine prior to a winter event is not a new concept but has gained a great deal of popularity since some state highway administrations began pretreating roadways with it. Drivers often see the tell-tale “lines” on the roadway preceding a storm’s arrival. Liquid salt brine is beneficial in two ways. It melts the initial precipitation allowing the snow removal contractor sufficient time to mobilize to the site before hazardous conditions are present. Perhaps more important, applying liquid brine prior to a winter event will decrease the amount of plowing/shoveling hours needed and the amount of ice melting chemical required to clear a property resulting in a reduced cost to the client. In rare cases when extremely low temperatures are present prior to a winter event, magnesium or calcium chloride can be mixed with the sodium chloride to be effective to -25 degrees Fahrenheit. It is not recommended that ice melting chemical be used on walkways that have been poured within the last year, or that was not properly mixed, finished, or cured. Utilizing sand for traction is a suggested option. Flaking or spalling may occur on any concrete surface that is poorly constructed, contains porous concrete or mortar joints or is brick/flagstone. In addition, spalling may occur when excessively applied beyond manufacturer’s specifications and/or applied repeatedly over a short period of time. Resources 8 Salt Institute www.saltinstitute.org 8 Federal Highway Administration www.fhwa.dot.gov 8 Deicing Depot www.deicingdepot.com OCTOBER 2016 | 15
order to melt initial snow ice and to prevent bonding of ice to the asphalt.  Calcium Chloride  Peladow or equivalent , Ma...
By Steven C. Turner, P.E. Steven is the Principal at Building Envelope Consultants and Scientists, LLC. He has been involved in the construction industry since 1993 in capacities such as structural engineer, senior project manager, consulting engineer, and quality assurance. Understanding and Maintaining Facility Maintenance and Repair Project Warranties W hen was the last time you reviewed your building warranties for owner required maintenance? Condominium associations are faced with numerous facility maintenance and repair projects (facade and garage repairs, roof repairs/replacements, balcony restoration, windows/doors replacements, etc.), each year. Such projects involve various trades, materials, and their associated warranties. Understanding the protection and value of the warranties and what that protection can provide a condominium association, if any, requires proper interpretation of warranty terms and an in depth understanding of the flow of work and external factors that can hinder, reduce, or even negate warranty agreements. A warranty is a written guarantee to a purchaser of services, equipment, materials, etc., that promises to repair, replace, and/or compensate the purchaser for all or part of the item if it turns out to be defective, does not perform as described, was improperly installed, or wears out within an agreed upon time frame and under certain conditions. Warranties also often delineate the rights and obligations of both parties in the event of a claim or dispute. Construction projects involve various warranties primarily from the contractor and the material manufacturer. The responsibility of contracted parties to set warranties into effect and maintain them begins during design development and continues throughout the life of the warranty. Some general guidelines to help understand, initiate, and understand warranties are discussed below. Warranties are negotiable. The terms, amount of coverage, and time frames established for warranties can be negotiated in many cases as part of a construction contract. Extended coverage may result in additional costs and owner responsibilities. When feasible, select the scope of work so complimentary work items (such as paint and sealants) are performed at the same time, by a single contractor, and using materials from the same manufacturer. This “single source” approach helps assure continuity and compatibility between components and materials as well as the installer. Should one or multiple systems fail, the “source” for the warranty action is then the same and reduces potential confusion and conflict over who the responsible party might be. 8 Performing complimentary work items simultaneously places those work items on a similar time table for future maintenance and repair needs and improve efficiency of the overall installation. Theoretically then, we expect those items will require similar maintenance and repair needs at or around the same time or 16 | Quorum cycle in the future. A chain is as strong as its weakest link. Complimentary work items rely upon one another to maintain their integrity. A new sealant joint adhered to a failed wall or deck coating may perform as intended, but the joint the sealant is intended to protect may still leak because of the failed wall or deck coating. The material and contractor warranty as related to the sealant materials and installation are not affected in this scenario. Repairing the leak, however, requires removal of the recently installed sealant and the original defective coating, proper surface preparation, and installation of new coating and sealant. 8 Using a single source manufacturer for materials helps assure compatibility between materials, utilizes tried and verified programs through testing and historical data on other projects, and can extend manufacturer warranties. In the scenario above, assume the owner replaces the sealant and coating system as recommended to seal the leaking joint in question. The selected replacement material manufacturers for each system differ and are incompatible. Both the coating and sealant can be installed per manufacturers’ guidelines and perform as intended, but the bond between the sealant and coating may faildue to material incompatibility allowing the joint to leak again. Neither the contractor or material warranties are affected. Repairing the leak requires removal of the newly installed sealant and coating and reinstallation with compatible materials. Install mock-ups to serve as the standard of quality control prior to the start of overall work. Involve the material manufacturer and/or qualified persons to document through monitoring, testing, and basic field reports material and surface preparation, installation procedures and conditions, proper detailing, textures, colors, and all feasible aspects of the installation. Place the mockup into service for an agreed upon period of time, if possible without delaying the project schedule, to help assure it performs as intended. Leave the mock-up in place and functional during the warranty period, when possible, under the same conditions the remainder of the project will perform. Should a defect emerge during the warranty period, the mock-up and associated documentation prepared during installation will be invaluable. Document material installation through quality assurance check lists, periodic monitoring, testing per manufacturer requirements and industry standards, photo, video, and as-built drawing documentation, field reports, progress meetings, and other acceptable forms of recording project information. Proper documentation can
By Steven C. Turner, P.E. Steven is the Principal at Building Envelope Consultants and Scientists, LLC. He has been involv...
help identify failure mechanisms should a problem arise and help determine who needs to be involved in the repair process. Periodic monitoring should be performed by qualified individuals including periodic visits by a manufacturer’s representative. Ask the material manufacturers’ representatives to explain to the owner responsibilities for maintaining warranties. Such items may include periodic cleaning, inspections by an agreed upon qualified person, testing, repairs, re-applications, etc. A maintenance log is often required to formally document this work. Not performing the required maintenance could void a 20-year warranty within the first year. Understand who is responsible to provide access to defective items and under which warranty(s). Material warranties often extend beyond the contractor’s warranty. When installation of a key material or system is a driving cost component and impacts a project on a large scale, the manufacturer of the defective material may limit their warranty to material costs only. In such cases, the owner should seek a joint and several or similar type warranty from the contractor and material supplier. Material costs are often a fraction of the contractor access needs and installation costs. In such a case, the owner may have to pay multiple times for the work even though material costs are covered under warranty. A joint and several warranty is an agreement between the contractor and material manufacturer to jointly replace the defective material and cover costs related to the replacement. As an example, consider the additional costs to the owner in the scenario below, which does not consider disruption to residents and tenants, and their daily activities and usage of the facility in question. 8 Removal of original system, 8 Install of new defective system, 8 Removal of defective system, and 8 Install of new system. Establish the date a warranty or warranties start. This may be the date of substantial completion for the entire project, for a single material at a specific location on the project, for a specific portion of the structure, or may commence at some agreed upon future date. In many cases, a single product or installed system may have several warranty periods depending upon when and where on a project the work was started and completed. All projects should include a “warranty” review phase. Upon completion of a project, the operating and maintenance manual (O&M manual) should include a section that identifies all project warranties, their start dates, 50 percent or other agreed upon percentage completion, and final dates of effectiveness. Protocol for making a warranty claim should also be identified. The project team should agree to meet again approximately 50 percent through the overall warranty period to review the current building operation and the condition of the newly installed systems in general. The meeting will include an interview of management staff to help identify problems or concerns they have with installed systems (if any). Suggestions for improvements and maintenance and repair needs at problematic locations should be discussed and recorded and areas that may come under warranty or under the original construction contract should be identified. By following these guidelines, condominium associations can develop and maintain an effective warranty program that will protect them, limit disruption and service to their property, and save costs associated with defective workmanship and materials on facility maintenance and repair projects. OCTOBER 2016 | 17
help identify failure mechanisms should a problem arise and help determine who needs to be involved in the repair process....
By Josh Harber, CMCA, AMS, PCAM Josh has been with Legum & Norman, Inc. since 2007. He is currently the general manager of the Cascades Community Association, a large scale HOA with over 6,000 single family, townhouse, and condominium units located in Potomac Falls, Virginia. Budgeting for Snow S ummer is gone, pools have closed, and the last thing anyone wants to think about is snow! However, it’s not too late to put a plan in place (if you don’t have one) or review your plan before the snow falls. With 97 private roads and 17 miles of trail that fall under my Association’s snow removal responsibility, preparing for snow can be overwhelming. After the recent winters in this region, the last thing you want is to be is unprepared. No matter the size or location of your community, the following are some ways for you and your boards to successfully prepare for the snow season. Budgeting Budgeting for snow is difficult because there are so many variables: chemicals and materials for snow and ice, equipment (from shovels to skid loaders), personnel (including site staff and/or contractors). It’s impossible to budget based on what you think the weather will be in the upcoming season. You also don’t want a large surplus by budgeting too much in a particular year to make up for a previous season. It’s recommended to stay consistent with your budgeting so you are able to explain to your members how you arrived at that amount when presenting the budget. A multi-year average is good place to start although you are likely to have a deficit in some years and a surplus in others. The Board The board approves the budget, and in so doing, also sets the financial expectations for the community. A community that knows what to expect with each snow season or snow storm is less likely to complain and is more likely to be prepared and understanding of the circumstances. The board should maintain an operating reserve 18 | Quorum Example multi-year average of unappropriated member’s equity in an amount of 10%-20% of total assessments which is an industry standard and recommended by association auditors. This will ensure that any operating deficits due to snow removal will not consume funds designated for other operating expenses, or more importantly, the replacement reserves. Contractors Every community needs to have a qualified snow removal contractor in place before the end of fall. Some contracts are multiyear, some are calendar year, and some are seasonal. There are different ways a community can approach and decide when to begin service with the contractor. This is a decision the board and manager can make together. Each community is different, but whatever is decided should be communicated to the community and included in the contract. The contactor should know what the community’s priorities are (roads vs sidewalks) and also have contingencies in place to handle multiple scenarios (like pushing three feet of snow!). Planning The board should meet with management and its contractor prior to the winter to discuss snow removal operations. Prior to each event, it’s also good for the manager and contractor to discuss how the event will be handled. What equipment is needed? Where is the contractor going to store its equipment? Can the contractor bring in additional equipment if necessary? Do you need to have a backup contractor in case your contractor is unable to perform? These are questions that need to be answered during the planning phase to make sure that your community is serviced as expected. Local ordinances and laws should also be reviewed to confirm areas of responsibility that may change from one year to the next: an example of this would be sidewalk snow removal along public roads that are adjacent to association owned property.
By Josh Harber, CMCA, AMS, PCAM Josh has been with Legum   Norman, Inc. since 2007. He is currently the general manager of...
Staffing To understand the amount of staffing required, you first need to understand what the contractor’s responsibilities are. Some communities subcontract all aspects of removal and some have staff members perform some of the smaller jobs related to snow removal. It’s also important for management to know how they are going to handle resident communications during and after a storm. This is an opportunity for the board and management to shine in front of the community. If these items are handled correctly, the community will notice. It’s best to have a system in place on how these events will be handled and to make sure that everyone involved with snow removal operations is on the same page. Communications If a community is informed, even with bad news, they are less likely to contact you to express displeasure. Snow removal expectations should be promulgated throughout the community prior to the snow event and provide everyone with a list of all streets within the community that includes who has the responsibility for removing the snow. This communication should also include contact information for whom to call if someone has a question or concern. The community should try to set a schedule for providing updates to the community (including the means) and stick to it as best as possible. Communication is key and can be the main factor to the success or failure of performance during a snow event. Looking back on my own community’s pitfalls from last year’s blizzard, I think a better communication plan could have alleviated some of the anxiety in the community. In today’s age of instantaneous electronic communication, people want information when they want it and you have to be able to accommodate that mind set. Even when you think you are prepared for the snow season, things can still go wrong. Managing winter events (snow, ice, or the cold) is not a perfect science. There are a lot of variables involved, but creating a comprehensive plan for the inevitable will set you and your community up for a successful winter season. OCTOBER 2016 | 19
Staffing To understand the amount of staffing required, you first need to understand what the contractor   s responsibilit...
By Lee Ann Weir, CMCA, AMS Lee Ann has been in the community association industry for the past 27 years. She is currently the General Manager of Lionsgate at Woodmont Corner Condominium in Bethesda, MD. Lee Ann is active in Rockville High’s After Prom Party and Booster Club, as well as president of the Twinbrook Swimming Pool. High-rise Success Story L ionsgate is a 13-story building in the heart of Bethesda. All resident parking is underground and most guests get valet parked. There is a driveway behind the building that is used to avoid a traffic light by those who don’t live here and provides access to the loading dock, trash rooms, and overhead garage door to residents’ parking. The driveway can also accommodate seven or eight contractor vehicles. There is a standard size sidewalk in the back. The sides and front of the building have large, expansive sidewalks and beds, the type with trees, bushes and flowers. There are seven commercial tenants on the first floor. Now that you have an idea of what Lionsgate looks like, it won’t surprise you too much that the Association does not hire a snow removal company. Instead, it is all done by Lionsgate staff. Unless you moved to the DC area after February 2016 AND didn’t have a television, you are all too aware of how much snow was dumped on us in mid-January, and how it crippled transportation in all ways. Were you prepared? Would the residents of your community say the ability of the association to handle the mammoth snowfall was excellent? The answer to these two questions had to be the same regardless of the community. Yes, no, or kind of… The answer from every Lionsgate resident was a resounding YES! If you ask the residents why it went so well, they will tell you it is because of the incredible employees who worked for five days cleaning the sidewalks 20 | Quorum and driveway, and keeping them clean. This is certainly a good answer, but there is more to it than that. I’ll tell you how it all happened… It started in August with a Finance Committee who didn’t trim back this budget line item just because it was a “crap shoot.” Instead, they recommended enough money be set aside so there are sufficient funds for shovels, gloves, boots, ice melt, spreaders, and snow blowers. The Board of Directors supported the committee and management by leaving the number alone. In October, our engineers checked the equipment to determine if tune ups and/or parts are needed. It’s so important to do this early before the rest of the “world” hogs parts and supplies. In November, the employees were surprised with shovels. Most of my employees live in apartments and didn’t have a need for a shovel, or so they thought! Try shoveling your car out from under 12-20 inches of snow without one. When snow was predicted, Lionsgate staff were asked about family obligations in order to determine who could stay overnight, or possibly multiple nights. Hotel rooms were reserved as soon as snow is rumored. We didn’t forget about cleaning or trash - even though our porters are contractors, with the company’s permission, we provided sleeping accommodations for a few of them as well. Keep in mind, that whether the trash can be removed or not, it must be managed! You need someone onsite to do this. And finally, wait for it, we communicated to the residents - letting them know what to expect and what not to expect. For example, we let them know that with the predicted snowfall, doormen were being let go before the roads became hazardous, and that two concierge would alternate 12 hour shifts; the engineer and his assistant would also rotate as needed; a porter would be in the building during the day to control trash and recycling, as well as vacuum when and where needed. We assured the residents that their needs would be taken care of, and what they could do if stores weren’t open, e.g., provide soup, sandwiches, or drinks for the staff. Residents love to help out! For the best possible outcome, continue to communicate how things are going and when appropriate, when staffing will return to normal. Thank the guys and gals who stayed on site as often as possible. Listen to their stories. If your community is pet friendly, work out an area near a door that will be cleared just for their needs. Tell the owners what you arranged and you may be included in their wills! Bottom line: plan in advance and communicate often.
By Lee Ann Weir, CMCA, AMS Lee Ann has been in the community association industry for the past 27 years. She is currently ...
We’re Puttin’ on the Ritz! Saturday, November 5, 2016 Ritz Carlton Tysons Corner Step back in time to the roaring 20s for a night of glitz and glamour in honor of WMCCAI’s volunteers. Prohibition style cocktails will be served in the Speakeasy Reception followed by a dinner party Jay Gatsby himself would enjoy. Come as a flapper or come as you are - a gangster or a silent screen star! It’ll be swell no matter the dress. 6:30 p.m. Registration & Speakeasy Reception opens 7:30 p.m. Gatsby Gala begins 11:00 p.m. Event ends RSVP online AT www.caidc.org SPONSORS as of September 16, 2016 The Falcon Group Nagle & Zaller, P.C. Daly, Hamad & Associates, PLC Wellness Solutions, Inc. Closetbox OCTOBER 2016 | 21
We   re Puttin    on the Ritz   Saturday, November 5, 2016 Ritz Carlton Tysons Corner Step back in time to the roaring 20s...
By Ron Unger, CIC Ron is the vice president of Commercial Lines at the Griffin Owens Insurance Group. While assisting various businesses in the D.C. Metro area, he continues to grow the firm’s presence with WMCCAI and educate their members. The winters of 2014 and 2015 have profoundly changed how insurance carriers underwrite and craft guidelines for communities regarding their history of frozen pipe claims. 22 | Quorum I t’s no surprise that we are all still trying to figure out the streak of fickle that Mother Nature has imposed upon us these last few years. I flash back to just this past year with jeans and a tshirt around Christmas time, only to be suffering from cabin fever during the blizzard in late January, and then having to wear ear warmers in May while mountain biking. However, most of us in CAI are still trying to shake the nightmares that were the winters of 2014 and 2015. These two winters have profoundly changed how insurance carriers underwrite and craft guidelines for communities regarding their history of frozen pipe claims, getting through a current claim, and what can be done to avoid claims in the future should we experience another brutally cold winter. The arctic blasts of the last few years have exposed kinks in the armor of buildings dating back to the ‘70s and ‘80s. Based on the frozen pipe claims that our agency experienced between 2014 and 2015, the hardest hit groups were the gardenstyle condominiums built in the 1990s and early 2000s. The DC Metropolitan area saw unprecedented growth and real estate development in this time, so to facilitate the new population a lot of these garden-style condos were built fast and cheap. During inspections on these condos, we saw lower amounts of insulation in attic spaces and even sprinkler system piping being routed through exterior walls. While it may not have been the direct responsibility of the builders, our building codes in that time did not take into account the possibility of our area experiencing subzero temperatures and for extended periods of time. The direct result of the claims paid due to frozen pipes have caused insurance carriers to adapt to the condominium market. Historically, insurance carriers have always wanted a pre-inspection of buildings; however, these have become quite a bit more detailed in the last year. Here are a few things that insurance carriers like to see for associations during current inspections: 8 If the association has experienced frozen pipe claims, were any additional steps taken while the repairs were being done to help further mitigate the same claim from happening? For example, was extra insulation used or plumbing re-routed? 8 Has the association implemented a mandatory minimum heat requirement throughout the building? National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) codes and standards use 40 degrees for an adequate building temperature. 8 If the association has not experienced large amounts of frozen pipe claims, have they done any proactive work to avoid these types of claims? For example: switching wet-pipe sprinklers with non-freeze type systems; installing remote thermometers in ceiling spaces that give notification in case temperatures drop within the building; or even cold weather inspections to make sure doors, walls, etc. are sealed tight, heaters are functional, and overall building temperature remains above the threshold. This has been a difficult time for associations and insurance carriers alike; however, the silver lining in this situation is that the associations that have been reactive or proactive in taking this issue of frozen pipes seriously have positioned themselves brilliantly for the future from an insurance standpoint. Insurance is inherently a reactive industry, therefore, as insurance carriers begin to understand claims scenarios more, they can help further educate the communities, their managers, and their residents.
By Ron Unger, CIC Ron is the vice president of Commercial Lines at the Griffin Owens Insurance Group. While assisting vari...
AWESOME Service WOW Technology GREAT Pricing Full Service Management for Community Associations Susan Blackburn or Heather Graham (703) 821-CAMP (2267) www.Gocampmgmt.com OCTOBER 2016 | 23
AWESOME Service WOW Technology GREAT Pricing  Full Service Management for Community Associations Susan Blackburn or Heathe...
By Vicki E. Eaton, CMCA, AMS, PCAM Vicki is the General Manager of Worman’s Mill Community Conservancy, Inc. She has been engaged in the management of community associations as a senior portfolio manager since 2003, before transitioning to on site management in February 2015. Vicki is a member of the Chesapeake Chapter’s Expo Committee and serves as chair of the Education Committee. Putting Your Winter Puzzle Together M anaging snow removal for a large scale community is a challenging endeavor, but when you divide that community into several clusters, each with differing levels of service and a mandate for equitable billing, the effort can be mind boggling. Add to that scenario that your snow removal contractor submits one invoice for the entire community, then you have a potential for chaos. allocation model, such as: different hardscape components (asphalt courts, paver courts, asphalt driveways, paver driveways, concrete walks, paver walks); different types of equipment required to be utilized for the differing hardscape components (normal plow, rubber tipped plow, skid steer, skid steer with rubber blade, snow blower, hand shoveling); time allocation for using these differing types of equipment; Above: Table of paved surfaces within the community. Left: Variables to weight the distribution of snow removal. Below: Weighted distribution of snow removal costs. After the snow falls, as managers, our first priority is safety; making certain that all snow and ice has been removed in a timely manner. Our next priority is to determine the “equitable” distribution of the associated costs of said snow removal. Since the community consists of different levels of service, this can get very involved and requires the development of a snow allocation model. There are several elements that need to be considered when creating this snow 24 | Quorum and measurements of each component associated with each cluster (courts, driveways, lead walks, city sidewalks, etc.). Once the information has been gathered, the really hard work begins. Because different equipment is required to remove snow from differing hardscape, variables must be introduced to “weight” the factors. For example: it takes longer for the plow with the rubber tip to clean the paver court versus the time it takes the skid steer to clean the asphalt driveway. So, you now find yourself “weighting” the differing factors in order to achieve an equitable allocation. Since this affects the budgets of the various cluster areas, this can become a very hot topic. In an effort to do our due diligence, the community hired an engineering firm last year to measure all the components requiring snow removal: courts, sidewalks, driveways, lead walks, etc., so that we would have the exact square footage to use for each cluster. The square footage for each component was then assigned a “weighted” formula which accounts for the time and equipment needed to maintain each area, according to that cluster’s scope of work. To further validate the snow allocation model, we hired a different engineering company, as an independent third party, to review the current snow allocation model and provide a recommendation on the variables used. The real issue is that although “weighting” the factors is needed to achieve a realistic allocation, the way in which the “weighting” is achieved, is subjective. Everyone has their own “opinion” on how to “weight” the factors, and the true difficulty and frustration is that there is no definitive “right” or “wrong” answer. Since this allocation model directly affects the distribution of snow removal costs to individual cluster areas, it is an exceedingly contentious topic. In order to involve the community and ensure a level of transparency, we established a Snow Oversight Committee, consisting of representatives from each of the cluster areas, to help develop the allocation model and the “weight” factors. This is a tremendously time consuming and costly endeavor for any community, and one that is full of controversy. My advice is to be transparent, have an open line of communication, and involve your community in the development of your model.
By Vicki E. Eaton, CMCA, AMS, PCAM Vicki is the General Manager of Worman   s Mill Community Conservancy, Inc. She has bee...
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By Hiruy Dafla, PE Hiruy is an Associate with Structural Rehabilitation Group, LLC (SRG) a consulting engineering firm that specializes in the rehabilitation of existing buildings. He is a registered professional engineer in the District of Columbia, the State of Maryland, and the Commonwealth of Virginia. Planning for the Winter Waterproofing Buildings Short-term and long-term planning is required to manage your facility through the cold temperatures of winter, as well as the occasional snow and ice events. There are several potential water intrusion issues that need to be anticipated and preventative measures taken to avoid issues such as ice damming, domestic waterline and fire sprinkler pipe breaks, structural damage due to excessive snow loads, snow removal protocols, and long term freeze thaw cycles. Here’s a few practical recommendations as you proactively make winter preparation your priority this fall. Water Lines One of the major issues to avoid is water intrusion caused by the cold weather. Significant property damage is caused by freezing water and fire sprinkler pipes that burst. For water lines that are not required during the cold winter months, the solution is easy: shut off the line from the internal valve and drain the pipes/lines in the region that is exposed to the cold temperatures. Piping systems that fall into this category include outside hose bibs, pool supply pipes, irrigation systems, etc. Homeowners should also be reminded to keep their heating system operational during travel, as turning them off could result in frozen pipes that result in burst water lines. Sprinkler Piping Fire sprinkler lines that are located in exterior walls and attic spaces can be exposed to the cold temperatures and, therefore, prone to freezing. These systems should be designed and installed to account for the cold weather. In parking garages, breezeways, HVAC closets, loading docks, and 26 | Quorum other similar locations, a sprinkler system typically utilizes a dry line or a section of pipe filled with an antifreeze solution. Both dry systems and antifreeze filled sections require inspection. With dry systems, the system needs to be drained to remove any condensate accumulating inside the pipe. Fall is the best time of the year to perform such an inspection. Previous versions of the building code used to allow the use of antifreeze in the sprinkler lines as a whole, however this has been changed in recent years. If a building still utilizes such a system, yearly inspections are required to confirm the mixture concentration is appropriate. Low concentration mixtures do not provide adequate protection while high concentrations mixtures can actually be a fire hazard. Such outdated systems should also be planned for replacement or upgrade. If some of your piping is protected by electrical trace tape of other means such as mechanical heating, such systems should be inspected to ensure they are operational and ready for winter. Roof Areas Ice damming is another source of water intrusion in the winter months. This is caused when a higher portion of a steep slope roof (such as asphalt shingle roof ) is warm enough to melt accumulated snow while the lower section of roof (eave section) is cold enough to re-freeze the flowing water. The frozen section forms the dam allowing water to accumulate and thus impedes the drainage creating a leak into the adjacent interior space. The flow of water is caused by air leakage and/or poor insulation in the attic space resulting in heat loss. Long-term planning to protect a building from such an issue includes installation of ice and water shield (waterproofing membrane) along the edges of a steep slope roof, as well as proper air sealing and insulation of the attic. If a structure has a history of such leaks, consideration should be given to address the issue during future roof replacement work. Late fall is the ideal time to perform gutter, downspout and drain cleaning, and flushing work. Foliage from the season typically clogs drainage systems and, if not cleaned, could exacerbate water intrusion issues described above. Also, make certain downspouts discharge water at least 10 feet away and down slope of the buildings foundation walls. Hose test the buried drainage lines to make sure they are clear as well. Potential Snow Overloading Snow removal and de-icing is a potential major issue that should be well thought out and planned ahead of time. Any agreement with a company performing snow removal should include a discussion regarding the type and size of equipment to be used, as well as restrictions on where snow can be stockpiled and how much can be placed in any one location. The size of the equipment and restrictions on stockpiling is a critical consideration as certain elevated structures such as plaza decks, garages, and terraces have a limited load capacity. Snow Removal Damage Concerns Building assets such as expansion joints, traffic bearing membranes, and stop blocks can be damaged by snow plow blades. Requirements such as using rubber blades/brushes and/or hand removal should be considered in certain regions of
By Hiruy Dafla, PE Hiruy is an Associate with Structural Rehabilitation Group, LLC  SRG  a consulting engineering firm tha...
the property. A site visit should also be arranged with the contractor ahead of the winter season to survey the site and mark out structures that cannot be coved with snow banks (fire hydrants, curb lines, drains, etc.) to prioritize as well as protect them from damage during snow removal effort. The selection of appropriate de-icing agent is critical as some chemicals can cause damage to your property. Salt is typically used on sidewalks and asphalt pavement, however use of salt on structural decks such as plazas and garages should be avoided as the chlorides accelerate corrosion and concrete deterioration. A better option is using de-icing agents such as Urea or Calcium Magnesium Acetate (CMA) which have less of an impact on concrete structures. Plan to power washed all concrete by early spring to remove de-icing agents that may have been brought into the facility by vehicles. Inspect and flush drains each spring and fall, as well to prevent drainage issues. Freeze Thaw Cycles Freeze thaw cycles that occur during the winter season are also quite damaging to infrastructure. As water gets inside cracks in sidewalks, asphalt pavement, masonry, and concrete construction, the water freezes and the expansive forces induced by the formation of ice further increases the size of the cracks. Through the winter, this repeated cycle can be damaging to the structure. Efforts to seal cracks prior to winter can go a long way in helping extend the serviceable life of your building components. Depending of the structure, this may involve routing and sealing cracks with a sealant, or repointing deteriorated mortar joints, and removing and replacing masonry. OCTOBER 2016 | 27
the property. A site visit should also be arranged with the contractor ahead of the winter season to survey the site and m...
By Andrew Zimdahl Andrew is a co-founder at Honeydew Energy Advisors and has published a textbook titled, “A Clear Guide to Solar PV Design and Installation.” Prior to launching Honeydew, he was Executive Director of Infinite Solar, a trade school in Philadelphia, and a Senior Energy Advisor with Nextility in DC. Controlling Your Building’s Heating Expenses D ealing with snow removal, black ice, and the biting cold of winter is tough. Getting a whopping heating bill at the end of a winter month can feel like insult added to injury. This article outlines a few easy ways to control heating costs giving property managers some nice wins for cold weather board meetings. Calibrate Your Thermostats Most people set their thermostat to a temperature number they have always set it at, regardless of how the room actually feels. A thermostat that heats a space to 75 degrees when the user is expecting 73 can cost your community thousands of dollars over a winter. Refer to your heating systems manual to set it for calibration. Then, get a good quality thermometer and go to each terminal in your building. Adjust the thermostats baseline temperature to that of the thermometer. Then, put up signs offering to lend your thermometers to residents to let them do the same for their units. 8 Do not cover any vents as this poses a carbon monoxide hazard. 8 Thicker insulation will result in a longer payback period, but will save more money in the long run. Consider 6 inches of insulation the minimum, 18 inches the maximum. It’s also fine to gradually layer it over time to match budget priorities. 8 Consider also insulating exposed hot water pipes. For additional savings, you can install a solar hot water heater on your roof. Note that this differs from a more common solar electric or photovoltaic (PV) system, which convert light into electricity. Solar hot water systems system collect heat from the sun hitting your roof, then pump Insulate your Hot Water Tank While it is a heavy lift to re-insulate a building, insulating a building’s central hot water tank can be done in a day and have a 1 to 2 year return on investment from reduced utility expenses. This makes an especially big difference with older or electric hot water systems. Please take note of the following: 8 Use only non-flammable materials like fiberglass or rock-wool. 8 For gas heaters, only insulate the sides of the tank, leaving the top and bottom exposed for ventilation purposes. 28 | Quorum hot fluid down to a heat exchange tank, heating the potable water in your building. These systems vary depending on size, but typically run $40,000 to $200,000. Most states and many localities have generous subsidies to mitigate the cost by as much as 50 percent or more. Be conservative in sizing your system - bigger is not better with this technology as larger systems require a disproportionate amount of maintenance and expertise. Solar hot water companies may encourage you to size a system to cover more than 75 percent of your hot water load, but as little as 35 percent will still have a significant impact on your budget and keep maintenance costs low. Lock in Your Natural Gas Supply Rate While the utility will always be responsible for delivering natural gas, many states allow you to choose the company that supplies your natural gas. These competitive suppliers offer you fixed or variable rate plans, typically lasting for 1 to 3 years. In early 2016, natural gas prices hit a 17 year low on the national market (see below), so experts are advising managers to lock in for longer terms to avoid price hikes. Many property managers turn to energy brokers to help them find the best price across many different suppliers, complete the paperwork, and help explain the process to their boards. There are only three ways to reduce energy expenses: use less energy, create your own energy, or pay less for the energy you use. Local utility subsidy programs can significantly improve the return on investment on these types of projects when funding is available. Taking advantage of new programs and technologies provides a longterm reduction in your expenses, freeing up your budget for other priorities.
By Andrew Zimdahl Andrew is a co-founder at Honeydew Energy Advisors and has published a textbook titled,    A Clear Guide...
ROOKIE MANAGER ESSENTIALS 7600 Leesburg Pike, Suite 100 West Falls Church, VA 22043 T: (703) 750-3644 F: (703) 941-1740 E-mail: education@caidc.org Web: www.caidc.org DISASTER PLANNING ROOKIE MANAGERS Who Should Attend? M Managers Tuesday, October 25, 2016 12:30 - 3 p.m. Registration opens at noon Are you prepared for a disaster on your property? If not, you should be! This session has been developed for the new manager to learn the basics of managing a community and network with experienced managers. Learn how to: 1. Prepare a disaster plan 2. Effectively handle a disaster 3. Effectively manage residents at the time of crisis 4. Know the do’s and don’ts in the event of a disaster When & Where Join Sharon Toepfer Burns and Dani Bressler, both of Toepfer Construction Co., Inc., as they guide you through managing a disaster. Register today! Credit Hours Lunch will be served. Gold WMCCAI Office 7600 Leesburg Pike, Suite 100W Falls Church, VA 22043 Registration Fees Member $25 Nonmember $30 Visit www.caidc.org to register. This class is worth three (3) education units. Premier Sponsors Capitol Concierge, Inc. OCTOBER 2016 | 29
ROOKIE MANAGER ESSENTIALS 7600 Leesburg Pike, Suite 100 West Falls Church, VA 22043 T   703  750-3644 F   703  941-1740 E-...
By Cassie Park, P.E. Cassie is a Registered Engineer with Engineering and Technical Consultants, Inc. She is part of the structural staff who strives to evaluate and correct deficiencies in existing structures and their components. No Need to Scurry at the First Sight of Flurries W e’ve all heard the question on the evening news. As soon as a major snow storm is forecasted for the area (which is, thankfully, few and far between) and the first snowflake is spotted, there it is: Should I shovel the snow off of my roof? Unfortunately, the answer is never as simple as yes or no. Commercial building roofs in the Washington Metropolitan area are designed to support a rather considerable amount of snow, typically around 30 pounds per square foot. Similarly, residential roofs are designed to support approximately 20 pounds per square foot. To put that in perspective, that’s 5-7 feet of light, powdery snow, approximately 1 foot of dense, wet snow, or 4-6 inches of ice. However, snow that has melted and refroze, or heavy rain following a storm can significantly reduce these quantity guidelines. Damage sustained by roofs and building structures during snow storms is not always solely due to the weight of the snow itself. More often than not, the weight of the snow reveals an area of damage (i.e. broken roof truss member) or shortcoming in the roof structure that was existing prior to the storm. As snow accumulates, it is wise to keep an eye out for warning signs of potential structural distress. Telltale signs typically include leaks, new and/or worsening cracks in the walls or ceilings, bowed roofing members, and doors that will not open or close. Should any of these warning signs present themselves, it is best to consult with a structural engineer or building official. However, if the roof looks as if collapse is imminent, the building should be evacuated immediately. 30 | Quorum If opting to remove snow from a building roof, the following items should be considered: 8 Use upmost care when walking on roof surfaces. Wet membranes and ice deposits can be extremely slippery and the potential for falling is elevated. 8 Shovels with rubber tips should be used to remove the snow from low-sloped roofs. Snow rakes should be used on pitched roofs. Shovels or snow removal tools with sharp edges or exposed metal should never be used, as these items could damage the roof covering. 8 Remove snow in lifts, several inches at a time. Leave a few inches of snow on the roof covering to prevent scraping and possibly damaging the underlying roof covering. 8 Never use salt or other sidewalk/driveway ice melt products on roof surfaces. The chemicals in these products can severely damage membranes/coverings, drains, and drain conduits. Ice melt products specifically made for roofs are available; however, prior to use, it is best to consult with your roof covering manufacturer to avoid potentially voiding any existing warranties. 8 Snow removal efforts should be concentrated at drain locations and/or gutters first. Prior to the storm, ensure the roof drainage provisions are clear of debris and ice and are able to properly drain surface water. 8 Ensure snow is thrown off the roof surface, not piled along the edges or corners of the roof. Piled snow can overload the roof structure. Also, be sure the snow isn’t piled up against the building wall, which may contribute to leaks. 8 Consider hiring a qualified roofing contractor to remove the snow. Performing routine inspection and maintenance of roofing structures and components throughout the year can help put building owners’ and managers’ mind at ease that the roof is ready for the winter and any forecasted storms. In any case, it is best to be mindful of impending weather conditions, knowledgeable about your roof structure, and have proper personnel on hand (i.e. experienced maintenance staff, trusted roofing contractor), should snow removal become necessary.
By Cassie Park, P.E. Cassie is a Registered Engineer with Engineering and Technical Consultants, Inc. She is part of the s...
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Directory and Classifieds ASPHALT PAVING/MAINTENANCE/REPAIR Espina Paving Inc. 15441 Farm Creek Drive Woodbridge, VA 2191 Serving: MD, DC, VA (703) 491-9101 (703) 491-9100 info@espinapaving.com O’Leary Asphalt, Inc. 9629 Doctor Perry Road Ijamsville, MD 21754 F: T: OLearyAsphalt.com T: (301) 948-0010 F: (301) 874-8505 ATTORNEY Segan, Mason & Mason, P.C. www.seganmason.com Donna Mason dmason@seganmason.com Alliance Association Bank T: (703) 856-7463 Direct F: (702) 818-8076 Tracy Burkhammer tburkhammer@AllianceAssociationBank.com BB&T Association Services www.bbt.com Let us save you time and money with our lockbox processing, ACH, coupon book, statement printing and transmission services. Joseph Inzerillo Jr. T: 703-201-5774 jinzerillo@bbandt.com Community Association Banking/CondoCerts Mutual of Omaha Bank Noni Roan T: (301) 639-5503 Noni.Roan@mutualofomahabank.com www.ncb.coop T: (703) 302-1928 dplank@ncb.com T: (703) 966-5962 Xenith Bank Funding your next project is easy with Xenith Bank’s experienced bankers on your team every step of the way! Tom Durrer tdurrer@Xenithbank.com ENGINEERS ETC Engineering and Technical Consultants Inc. Water intrusion, roofing, exteriors, windows, balconies, property studies, structural & architectural services www.etc-web.com T: (703) 450-6220 Mindy Maronic mindy@etc-web.com Falcon Engineering, Architecture + Energy Consultants 7361 Calhoun Place, Suite 325 Rockville, MD 20855 www.falconengineering.com T: (240) 328-1095 Stew Willis info@falconengineering.com 32 | Quorum www.cascadeig.com T: (703) 551-2000 david@cascadeig.com USI Insurance Services LLC 3190 Fairview Park #400 Falls Church, VA 22042 Steve Dickerson, CIC Theresa Melson, PCAM, CIRMS www.usicondo.com T: (703) 698–0788 Steve.Dickerson@usi.biz Theresa.Melson@usi.biz CAMP (Community Association Management Professionals) 1921 Gallows Rd., Suite 320 T: (703) 821-CAMP (2267) Tysons Corner, VA 22182 Heathergraham@gocampmgmt.com Susanblackburn@gocampmgmt.com Comsource Management, Inc. AAMC www.comsource.com T: 301-924-7355 3414 Morningwood Drive Olney, Maryland 20832 F: 301-924-7340 Tony Martella, CMCA, AMS, PCAM tmartella@comsource.com JANITORIAL T: (703) 354-9170 BANKING AND FINANCIAL SERVICES National Cooperative Bank 2011 Crystal Drive, Suite 800 Arlington, VA 22202 Don Plank, PCAM MANAGEMENT SERVICES (CON’T) INSURANCE Cascade Insurance Group 1100 N Glebe Road, Suite 1010 Arlington, VA 22201 David Dodero Clean Advantage Corporation 4000 Penn Belt Place District Heights, MD 20747 www.cleanadv.com T: (800) 315-3264 F: (301) 595-3331 info@cleanadv.com LAKE & POND MANAGEMENT SOLitude Lake Management 12522 White Drive info@solitudelake.com Fairfax, VA 22030 T: (540) 371-4382 Kevin Tucker www.solitudelakemanagement.com MANAGEMENT SERVICES FirstService Residential DC Metro LLC, AAMC 11351 Random Hills Road, Suite 500 T: (703) 385-1133 Fairfax, VA 22020 T: (703) 591-5785 Daniel Bauman daniel.bauman@fsresidential.com KPA Management, AAMC 6402 Arlington Blvd., Suite 700 Falls Church, VA 22042 Offering personalized service Ed Alrutz, CPM, CMCA, PCAM www.kpamgmt.com T: (703) 532-5005 F: (703) 532-5098 ealrutz@kpamgmt.com Legum & Norman, Inc., AAMC 3130 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 200 T: (703) 600-6000 Falls Church, VA 22042 Direct: (703) 970-8811 John Rhodes jrhodes@legumnorman.com Associa-Community Management Corporation, AAMC 4840 Westfields Blvd., Suite 300 T: (703) 631-7200 Chantilly, VA 20151 F: (703) 631-9786 11300 Rockville Pike, Suite 907 T: (301) 692-1700 Rockville, MD 20852 F: (240) 221-0443 Nick Mazzarella, MBA, CMCA, PCAM, LSM NMazzarella@cmc-management.com Select Community Services 4840 Westfields Blvd., Suite 160 T: (703) 631-2003 Chantilly, VA 20153 F: (703) 631-5380 John Tsitos, CMCA, AMS jtsitos@scs-management.com Nick Mazzarella, MBA, CMCA, PCAM, LSM nmazzarella@cmc-management.com Barkan Management Company Inc. 8229 Boone Blvd., Suite 760 Tysons Corner, VA 22182 Michael Feltenberger, CMCA, AMS, PCAM Sentry Management 6395 Little River Turnpike Alexandria, VA 22312 Dave Ciccarelli, AMS, PCAM T: (703) 388-1005 F: (703) 388-1006 www.sentrymgt.com T: (703) 642-3246, ext. 203 F: (703) 891-2378 dciccarelli@sentrymgt.com Capitol Management Corporation 12011 Lee-Jackson Highway, Suite 350 T: (703) 934-5200 Fairfax, VA 22033 F: (703) 934-8808 L. Peyton Harris Jr., CMCA, CPM lph@capitolmanagementcorp.net Sequoia Management Company Inc., AAMC 13998 Parkeast Circle www.sequoiamanagement.com Chantilly, VA 20151-2283 T: (703) 803-9641 Craig Courtney, PCAM ccourtney@sequoiamgmt.com Cardinal Management Group Inc., AAMC 4330 Prince William Parkway, Suite 201 Woodbridge, VA 22192 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 300 Bethesda, MD 20817 www.cardinalmanagementgroup.com Thomas A. Mazzei, CMCA, AMS, PCAM cardinal@cardinalmanagementgroup.comt Vista Management Co. Inc., AMO 1131 University Blvd. West, Suite 101 Silver Spring, MD 20902 www.vistacares.com L. Scott Wertlieb, ESQ. T: (703) 569-5797 T: (301) 896-9700 CFM Management Services, AAMC T: (703) 941-0818 Suite 100, 5250 Cherokee Ave. Alexandria, VA 22314 F: (703) 941-0816 Christiaan Melson, AMS, PCAM cmelson@cfmmanagement.com Zalco Realty Inc., AAMC, AMO 8701 Georgia Ave., Ste. 300 Silver Spring, MD 20910 Arthur Dubin,CMCA, PCAM, CPM Z.J. Chelec, CPM T: (301) 649-2700 F: (301) 649-3560 vistacares@aol.com www.zalco.com T: (301) 495-6600 adubin@zalco.com zchelec@zalco.com
Directory and Classifieds ASPHALT PAVING MAINTENANCE REPAIR  Espina Paving Inc. 15441 Farm Creek Drive Woodbridge, VA 2191...
INDEX TO ADVERTISERS A Alliance Association Bank ...........................................................................................................7 Associa-Community Management Corporation, AAMC.................................................................23 B Barkan Management Company, Inc...........................................................................................31 BB&T Association Services .......................................................................................................25 C Capital Painting Co. ..................................................................................................................27 Cardinal Management Group, Inc., AAMC ..................................................................................17 Clean Advantage Corporation ......................................................................................................7 PAINTING SERVICES AND RETAILERS Capital Painting Co. 5520 Oakwood Road Alexandria, VA 22310 George Tsentas www.capitalpainting.net T: (703) 313-0013 F: (703) 922-1826 george@capitalpainting.net NOVA Painting Company www.NOVAPAINTING.com 22831 Silverbrook Center Drive #150 mark@novapainting.com Sterling, VA 20166 T: (703) 401-2000 Painting/Drywall/Carpentry Serving DC/VA/MD (CAMP) Community Association Management Professionals ........................................................23 Cowie & Mott. P.A.....................................................................................................................15 D DoodyCalls ..............................................................................................................................15 F Falcon Engineering, Architecture & Energy Consulting ...................................................................2 Ploutis Painting & Contracting Co., Inc. T: (703) 360-0205 8365 Richmond Hwy F: (703) 360-5439 Alexandria, VA 22309 info@ploutispainting.com Stella Ploutis www.ploutispainting.com Reston Painting & Contracting 619 Carlisle Drive Herndon, VA 20170 David Hamilton FirstService Residential, AAMC..................................................................................................35 L Legum & Norman, Inc., AAMC....................................................................................................9 T: (703) 904-1702 F: (703) 904-0248 dave@restonpaint.com M Mutual of Omaha Bank.............................................................................................................19 PET WASTE REMOVAL DoodyCalls Pet waste management solutions and services 13923 A Willard Road Chantilly, VA 20151 T: (800) DoodyCalls(366-3922) www.DoodyCalls.com PM+ (Specializing in Reserve Studies Since 1990) A Veteran Owned Company T: (703) 803-8436 www.pmplusreserves.com Ben Ginnetti, PRA, RS, P.E. pmplusreserves@cox.net Reserve Advisors Reserve Studies & Insurance Appraisals T: (703) 812-0580 Michelle Baldry, P.E., RS mbaldry@reserveadvisors.com Long-term thinking. Everyday commitment. O'Leary Asphalt, Inc. ................................................................................................................25 P Ploutis Painting & Contracting Co., Inc........................................................................................35 R Reserve Advisors, Inc. ..............................................................................................................34 Reston Painting Company...........................................................................................................2 ROOFING Exterior Building Services T: (703) 971-6016 F: (703) 971-4161 info@twcserv.com S Segan, Mason & Mason, PC......................................................................................................23 Sentry Management, Inc...........................................................................................................19 SOLitude Lake Management .....................................................................................................11 WINDOWS & DOORS Windows Plus, LLC 14230 Sullyfield Circle, Suite F Chantilly, VA 20151-1660 Kimberly Wayland NOVA Painting Company ..........................................................................................................36 O RESERVE SERVICES TWC Services LLC 6700-M Springfield Center Drive Springfield, VA 22150 Linda Walker N National Cooperative Bank........................................................................................................27 T: (703)956-6172 F: (703)956-6744 kknight@windowspls.com T\ TWC Services, LLC ...................................................................................................................25 W Windows Plus, LLC.....................................................................................................................4 X Xenith Bank ..............................................................................................................................9 OCTOBER 2016 | 33
INDEX TO ADVERTISERS A Alliance Association Bank ............................................................................
By Crishana L. Loritsch, CMCA, AMS, PCAM cul de sac Crishana is the general manager for Arlington Oaks, A Condominium in Arlington, VA. She serves on WMCCAI’s Board of Directors as the secretary, is a member of both the chapter’s Quorum Editorial Committee and Outreach Committee, and has served as Outreach Committee chair and Communication Council chair. S.N.O.W. …the Other Four Letter Word!%&# A hhh! There is nothing like a snowstorm to make you want to curl up with loved ones, pop in an old movie, munch on some popcorn, and hunker down for a few lazy days. That is unless you’re a community manager and then that blanket of snow that covers the ground becomes your worst nightmare. How is that possible you might ask? Honestly no one knows for sure but one thing is for certain; it only takes a few inches of snow to move folks from being calm and collected to completely unhinged in a matter of moments. 34 | Quorum Maybe it’s because you’re not in the mood to be stuck in the house WITH your kids. Let’s face it. Sometimes our sweet little ones are a little salty and we need the buffer of the school day to keep us from losing it. Or you have a job that requires that you report to work no matter what, through storm and gale, dark of night but not even our postal carriers have to adhere to such a strict motto nowadays. I am reminded of a community in Alexandria not too long ago who went without mail for several weeks on end because someone didn’t feel the need to deliver it. Maybe it’s because all you have is basic cable and if you watch one more rerun of Everybody Loves Raymond, you’re going to explode. Whatever your maybe is, you are in no mood for “excuses” and by excuses I mean anything less than I will work 24/7, forgoing showers, eating, and any form of contact with my family until all evidence of snow is obliterated from the community. During snow events, community managers are held to the highest of high standards. In fact, I liken it to being a head of state for a small nation. No matter what, you are expected to move heaven and earth and 30 plus inches of snow to make sure that all of the sidewalks and streets are cleared to black pavement by 6:00 a.m., personally. You read that right; personally. Anything less is unacceptable. Never mind that the streets in your own community have not seen a plow and your neighbors are using cross country skis to navigate around town. Borrow those skis and make your way down to your community, stat! Some readers may find my take on snow a little harsh. After all, who doesn’t remember of the joy of flushing ice cubes down the toilet and wearing your PJ’s inside out in hopes of the all glorious snow day. Those were good times indeed and one thing has changed and it’s a big one. We’re not kids anymore. We are adults with responsibilities and “adulting” during snow storms is hard. Thankfully winter doesn’t last all year and we can look forward to sweltering hot days with humidity so thick you can slice it with a knife. Yes! Anything is better than snow. After all, snow is the other four letter word.
By Crishana L. Loritsch, CMCA, AMS, PCAM  cul de sac  Crishana is the general manager for Arlington Oaks, A Condominium in...
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CHAPTER BENEFACTORS WMCCAI 7600 Leesburg Pike Suite 100 West Falls Church, VA 22043 www.caidc.org (703) 750-3644 PRESORT STANDARD US POSTAGE PAID WASHINGTON, DC # 3070 To optimize the operations of Community Associations and foster value for our business partners. OUR MISSION
CHAPTER BENEFACTORS  WMCCAI 7600 Leesburg Pike Suite 100 West Falls Church, VA 22043 www.caidc.org  703  750-3644  PRESORT...