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PEOPLE
FOR
PEOPLE
We know the work LSSND does across North Dakota is important because we see the impacts every day in the lives of the people we get to know.
As 2016 comes to a close, we wanted to give you a chance to see just a little bit of the hope that comes from our work together. So, on behalf of
every person whose life has been touched by our work together this past year, thank you! We could never do what we do without you.
Jessica Thomasson, President/CEO
• More than 1,000 seniors either received companionship or an aordable place to live.
• More than 125 young families received regular visits from a Healthy Families home visitor, oering parenting advice, and a supporting
voice just when they needed it most.
• More than 100 homeless people found aordable places to live in LSSND-managed properties.
• More than 500 kids experienced the healing power of a caring mental health professional. They worked together to overcome the trauma that has
marred their young lives in ways that can have lifelong consequences if not addressed.
• More than 5,000 child care providers learned how to do the absolute best job they can for the kids in their care by taking online Child Care Aware
classes to advance their knowledge and skills.
• Student leaders in Youth Court held almost 200 of their peers accountable, gave them a chance to make amends and provided them a chance to
take a dierent path.
• More than 500 refugees, ages birth to 85, found safety and hope in North Dakota.
• People who struggle with gambling addiction and domestic violence both found new promise through group therapy that connected them with
skilled counselors and peers who were in the same situation.
Adoptive and birth families came together for the good of newborn babies.
Dozens of schools recognized the power of caring adults in the midst of the most trying times in kids' lives and took steps to bring restorative
practices to their everyday work with students.
• And thousands of North Dakotans spoke to us and with us about what it is to be a community, including hopes, dreams, fears, and opportunities
to do better together.
Each year LSSND serves more than 10,000 people across the state of North Dakota. With your help, we’ve done
a lot of things “worth doing” in 2016.
2016 was another year lled with change as LSSND continued its century-long drive to meet North Dakota needs. One big
change for our organization was the completion of the Great Plains Food Bank’s transition to independent status. After 34
years, we celebrated what we've achieved together and accepted this new opportunity to continue carrying out our shared
mission of helping those in need as two separate organizations.
We considered this new beginning an opportunity for internal restructuring. Lutheran Social Services of North Dakota is
now reorganized into six service areas that represent the work we do around some of the most critical issues in ND today.
Early Beginnings Adoption | Pregnancy counseling | Home visiting | Young family supports
Connecting families to child care | Training and guidance for child care providers
Youth Interventions School-based interventions and support | Restorative Justice | Juvenile court diversion
After school skill building | Youth supervision for law enforcement
Therapy Services Individual & family counseling |Group treatment for gambling addiction
Domestic violence treatment for batterers| Residential psychiatric treatment for kids
Aordable Housing New construction | Preservation and rehabilitation | Property management
Senior Independence Companionship | Care management | Service hubs | Volunteer Connections
Humanitarian Assistance Refugee resettlement | Foster care for unaccompanied refugee minors |Disaster response
Interpreter services | Immigration services
Find out more about the work we did in North Dakota during the 2016 scal year in the pages ahead.
William Sharpe, Chair - West Fargo
Bishop Mark Narum, VP - Bismarck
Rev. Bruce Vold, Secretary - Hatton
Melanie Stillwell, Treasurer - Williston
Rev. Patrick O'Brien - Oakes
John Plaggemeyer - New England
David Walth - Halliday
LSS Housing
Board of Directors
Board members from both organizations join to mark the transition to
independent operation for the Great Plains Food Bank
LSSND and GPFB planted trees at each of their facilities to
symbolize a new relationship that will grow and bear fruit
Mark Strand, Chair - West Fargo
David Walth, Vice Chair - Halliday
Rev. Sharon Baker, Secretary - Rugby
Melanie Stillwell, Treasurer - Williston
Thomas Eide - Fargo
Rev. Lynn Ronsberg - Grand Forks
Jim Melland - Grand Forks
Bishop Mark Narum - Bismarck
Rev. Clark Jahnke - West Fargo
Bishop Terry Brandt - Fargo
Tom Wade - Devils Lake
Murray Sagsveen - Bismarck
Susan Wefald - Bismarck
Faith Swenson - Hillsboro
* Scott Davis, Mandan, incoming director FY17
LSSND Board of Directors
Jessica Thomasson
President/CEO, LSSND and LSS Housing
Janell Regimbal
Vice President of Children's Services
Shirley Dykshoorn
Vice President of Senior & Humanitarian
Services
Steve Olson
Vice President of Operations, Housing
Executive Team
Guided by God’s love and grace, Lutheran Social Services of North Dakota brings healing, help and hope.
3
*Note: This report includes activities of 2016 scal
year (July 2015- June 2016).
Service Availability by County
Taking Healing, Help and Hope across the state of North Dakota!
Theodore Roosevelt National Park
Submitted By: Mike Flugstad
(Housing)
Sunrise on snow drift near Minot
Submitted By: Jodi Webb
(Child Care Aware)
Sunset on ND prairie near Steele
Submitted By: Kory Schmitt-Schann
(Abound Counseling)
Bridge over Red River near Grand Forks
Submitted By: Sydney Keigley
(Communications)
A warm welcome in Lisbon
Submitted By: Paulette Paulson
(Housing)
Blue skies over Lake Sakakawea
Submitted By: Sonja Mickelson
(Senior Companions)
Out and About - Church partners, Service clubs, Public presentations & Community events
Growing North Dakota’s Workforce - Internships, Job fairs & Student talks
Public Support and Revenue
Contributions, Memorials/Bequests .......$1,019,640
United Way ..................................................326,335
Churches ......................................................300,873
Government Fees and Grants ..................12,307,181
Client and Program Income ..................... 1,673,844
Rent Income ..............................................3,322,905
Development and Mgmt Income ..............1,336,004
Misc. Income ................................................244,062
Total Public Support & Revenue .......$20,530,844
Expenses
Program Services ...................................$11,921,480
Housing Services ...................................... 5,819,622
Management & General ...........................2,237,412
Fundraising Expenses ...................................692,459
Total Expenses ........................ $20,670,973
Assets
Public Support in Excess of Expenses ..... -$140,129
Contr. for Long-Lived Assets/Equity ........1,050,122
Change in Net Assets
Continuing Operations ............................909,993
Discontinued Operations .................... -3,392,093
Net Assets, Beginning of Year .................32,192,561
Net Assets, End of Year ............ $29,710,461
This summary represents a consolidated summary that includes
both Lutheran Social Services of North Dakota and its subsidiary,
Lutheran Social Services Housing, Inc. The summary does not
include the activities of the Great Plains Food Bank as they were
considered a "discontinued operation" for LSSND in FY16.
Service Availability by County
*We continue to serve all counties based on referrals
Indicates location of
physical oce or facility
Taking Healing, Help and Hope across the state of North Dakota!
Sunset on ND prairie near Steele
Submitted By: Kory Schmitt-Schann
(Abound Counseling)
Blue skies over Lake Sakakawea
Submitted By: Sonja Mickelson
(Senior Companions)
Out and About - Church partners, Service clubs, Public presentations & Community events
Growing North Dakota’s Workforce - Internships, Job fairs & Student talks
Adoption - Adoption Option, a partnership between The Village Family Service Center
and LSSND, oers pregnancy and parenting support services, adoption services and
post-adoption search and disclosure services. 23 babies placed in loving adoptive
homes
Pregnancy Counseling - Pregnancy Counseling is a service for expectant mothers
and/or their families that helps them look at their options and make life plans.
102 individuals counseled
Healthy Families - Healthy Families provides free, voluntary home visitation services to
support expectant parents and parents of newborns in creating a safe and healthy home.
130 young families received in-home visits and assessments
Child Care Aware - A training and information hub for parents and child care
providers, this program helps build the capacity of the child care system in North Dakota
to ensure children have opportunities to play and learn in safe and healthy environments.
Helped 4,136 families search for child care
Bright & Early - With so much growth happening in their rst ve years of life,
children need quality child care and early education programs to thrive. Through this
website (brightandearlynd.org), parents can identify child care and early education
programs that go above and beyond to prepare children for school and life. 180 new
child care providers obtained a quality rating
Growing Futures - This statewide system is designed to support rewarding and
successful careers in the eld of early care and education by validating individual
professional achievements, heightening professionalism and expanding career
opportunities. Growing Futures provided 2,158 hours of training to the early
childhood workforce
Early experiences matter – creating healthy families and developing quality child care leads to
positive outcomes for kids, families and communities. What happens in early childhood sets the
stage for future learning, behavior and health.
Bill Gates
is the age at which the
achievement gap between low
income kids and their more
auent peers begins to appear
of deaths due
to abuse and neglect
involve children under
3 years old
Children who receive high-quality
early education are 44% more likely to
graduate from high school.
of brain development
happens before the age of
5 years old.
Home visitors saw a 16%
increase in stress factors, such
as drug and alcohol abuse
and mental health issues, for
at-risk families over two-year
period.
of kids in the home visiting
program (out of more than
1,000 families served since
2000) were separated from
their families because of abuse
or neglect.
of children in care in North
Dakota are in a
quality-rated program.
Sources: 44% - Child Care Aware (via Pinterest) Sesame St. Workshop | 71% - Casey Family Foundation "Investing in Hope" p.18 | 18 mo. - Center on the Developing
Child (5 Numbers to Remember about Early Childhood Dev.) | 90% - U.S. Dept. of Education | $8,431 - Child Care Aware of America, costs by state
7
Bill Gates
is the annual average cost of
care for an infant in a North
Dakota child care center
licensed child care
programs in
North Dakota with the
capacity to serve
36,529 children.
Restorative Justice - Restorative Justice creates safer communities by bringing victims
and oenders together with trained facilitators in a structured process that repairs harm
by helping people process conict. LSSND trains hundreds of educators in restorative
practices each year to support their eorts to help kids process conict and behaviors that
have caused harm in positive ways. 551 teens held accountable and hundreds of
victims provided reconciliation
Day Report - Day Report promotes the well-being of at-risk youth, ages 12-17, through
after-school structure, supervision and education. 22 kids had a safe, productive
place to be, learn and grow after school
Youth Court - Youth Court provides teen volunteers meaningful service learning as
they serve as judge and jury for their peers who have been charged with oenses or have
been referred by school administrators. The kids are held accountable for their actions,
but in positive, educational ways. 188 kids diverted from court served by 84 teen
volunteers
Safer Tomorrows - Safer Tomorrows creates lasting change by reducing childhood
exposure to violence. The program is a partnership with schools across Grand Forks
County (see pages 26 - 27 for more information). 22 schools and 23,000+ kids
touched over life of project
Attendant Care - Attendant Care helps keep kids out of jail by providing short-
term care and supervision in a safe, non-institutional setting. 118 kids kept safe in
supervised settings
We know it is absolutely possible to hold kids accountable while also allowing them
to make amends and build skills for healthier futures. Keeping kids out of the juvenile
justice system when appropriate makes economic sense and produces better outcomes
for kids, families and communities.
- Bill Millike
students mended the harm their
actions created by participating
in accountability conferencing,
empathy seminars and
peacemaking circles.
Early interventions that prevent high-risk
youth from engaging in repeat criminal
oenses can save the public nearly $5.7 million
in costs over that child’s lifetime.
of kids drink before age
13. Those who do are four
times more likely to
become addicted.
Sources: 5.7 million - Vanderbilt University Law School Law and Economics via the Campaign for Youth Justice | 12% - ND Behavioral Health Assessment pg. 14 |
90% - American Institute for Research: Trauma Informed Care Infographic| 2/3 - www.healmyptsd.com; 3/22/13 | More than 47% - www.acestoohigh.com
cases of shoplifting and theft
addressed in Youth Court or by
Restorative Justice instead of
by juvenile court.
police citations not issued
in one school
in one academic quarter
because restorative justice
practices were in place.
9
of adults being treated
for drug dependence have
a history of childhood
trauma.
of North Dakota children
(ages 0-17) have endured one
or more adverse childhood
experience.
of kids in the juvenile justice
system have experienced
trauma (often multiple or
repeated instances) from an
early age.
Abound Counseling - Abound Counseling brings quality, aordable counseling to
people in communities across North Dakota. The therapy network matches experienced
therapists with individuals and families who are seeking care. 252 people received
mental health services
Luther Hall - Luther Hall helps kids ages 10-18 in a home-like mental health setting
with on-site school and therapy services. At Luther Hall, kids are in a safe and caring
environment where they can learn about themselves, how to address the challenges they
are facing, and nd ways to build stronger relationships with their families. 43 children
provided with 24/7 care
Family Counseling - LSSND often helps families stay together by providing intensive
therapy to families who have a child who is at high risk of being placed outside the home
and is involved with the juvenile justice system. 607 individuals from 132 families
received in-home counseling
DIVERT - Through DIVERT, we connect with families that have children exhibiting
risky behaviors to help them identify diculties and strengths, set goals for improvement
and use community resources to get the help they need. 82 kids diverted from going
deeper into the juvenile justice system
Gamblers Choice - We help resolve the emotional, nancial and relationship
problems that result from problem gamblers' addiction. We support them and their
families in their journey to break free from gambling addiction and chart a path toward
recovery. 114 gamblers found help
Violence Free - Engage with men and women who have committed acts of domestic
violence in group therapy, to help them to form safe and respectful relationships with
their loved ones. 62 men and women learned about respectful relationships
where power and control are not used
Behavioral health is an important part of our overall well-being. Addressing mental health issues
early results in health-care cost savings, safer schools and better outcomes.
- Albert Camus
of those who will ever be diagnosed with a
mental disorder show signs of the disease
by age 14, and 75% by the age of 24.
North Dakota
high school students
struggle with depression.
North Dakota adults
had serious thoughts
of suicide within the
past year.
mental health and substance
abuse disorders will surpass
all physical diseases as a
major cause of disability
worldwide.
11
gambling addicts will
attempt to kill themselves–
that's twice the rate of
other addictions.
Sources: 50% - National Alliance on Mental Illness | 1 in 5 - National Council on Problem Gambling | ND Behavioral Health Assessment pg. 10 (By 2020), pg.
11 (1 in 4), pg. 17 (15,000) from SAMHSA Behavioral Health Barometer ND
of people served
by Abound
Counseling are
kids under age 12.
drug test kits provided to
parents in Grand Forks
area who wanted help to
know if their kids were
using drugs.
of kids who received
counseling through DIVERT
did not get involved in the
juvenile justice system.
Luther Hall kids saw
signicant improvement
in their mental health and
were able to be discharged
to family after completing
their treatment.
Senior Companions - Senior adults volunteer their time to provide life-arming
companionship to help older adults maintain their independence and continue
living in their own homes, as well as respite care to family caregivers to help avoid
caregiver burnout. 83,420 hours of companionship to 713 seniors in 35
counties
Volunteer Companions - LSSND opens the doors to volunteer companions of
all ages, who want to serve as a companion to a North Dakota senior. This simple
act of companionship banishes isolation and builds meaningful relationships,
which ultimately helps seniors live independently longer. Connecting volunteers
and clients in 9 communities
Aging Life Care Management - Care managers help families coordinate care
for older adults and those with chronic illnesses. They serve as advocates and care
coordinators, with the ultimate goal of delaying or preventing re-hospitalization or
premature placement in a long-term care facility. 47 families connected
with care managers to navigate health-care options in a exible,
person-centered manner
Support and Services at Home (SASH) Hub - SASH connects participants
with community-based services and promotes health-care coordination by
wrapping services around people wherever they live. The program improves the
health and functional status of older adults, decreases health-care expenditures,
and reduces people's need for more expensive types of care. Opened 1st SASH
hub in Jamestown in partnership with Guardian Angels, a local home
care agency
People should have opportunities to live independently as they age. It is possible for seniors to
get the care they need in their home communities if we work together.
- Unknown
Senior Companions - Senior adults volunteer their time to provide life-arming
companionship to help older adults maintain their independence and continue
living in their own homes, as well as respite care to family caregivers to help avoid
caregiver burnout. 83,420 hours of companionship to 713 seniors in 35
counties
Volunteer Companions - LSSND opens the doors to volunteer companions of
all ages, who want to serve as a companion to a North Dakota senior. This simple
act of companionship banishes isolation and builds meaningful relationships,
which ultimately helps seniors live independently longer. Connecting volunteers
and clients in 9 communities
Aging Life Care Management - Care managers help families coordinate care
for older adults and those with chronic illnesses. They serve as advocates and care
coordinators, with the ultimate goal of delaying or preventing re-hospitalization or
premature placement in a long-term care facility. 47 families connected
with care managers to navigate health-care options in a exible,
person-centered manner
Support and Services at Home (SASH) Hub - SASH connects participants
with community-based services and promotes health-care coordination by
wrapping services around people wherever they live. The program improves the
health and functional status of older adults, decreases health-care expenditures,
and reduces people's need for more expensive types of care. Opened 1st SASH
hub in Jamestown in partnership with Guardian Angels, a local home
care agency
People should have opportunities to live independently as they age. It is possible for seniors to
get the care they need in their home communities if we work together.
90% of surveyed Americans have
not talked about critical long-term
care issues with their families.
Our volunteers
oered respite care
to caregivers in
32 families.
volunteers served as
companions to 713
seniors in 35 North
Dakota counties.
13
baby boomers turn
65 every day. The trend
began in 2011 and is
expected to hold true for
20 years.
Falls are the number one
cause for hospitalization
and the most common
cause of traumatic brain
injury.
Sources: 90% - 2010 Genworth Study | 10,000 - Pew Research Center | #1 Reason - Fall Prevention for Seniors and Assisting Hands | 76% - Medicare PMT Advisory Commission
Report to Congress as reported by NDCHRI | 76% - CMS.gov - Draft Measure Specications | 55% - AARP Public Policy Institute; 7-16-15
of caregivers feel
overwhelmed by the
amount of care a family
member needs.
of readmissions to
hospitals within 30 days
are preventable.
percent of seniors felt
they could remain in their
home longer because they
had a companion.
Housing Development - LSSND works with local leaders to identify critical
community needs and then identify approaches for meeting them that have the
best chance for success. To address shortages, we build and renovate to provide
new, aordable housing. 39 new apartment units opened in Hettinger and
Watford City
Preservation - Works with communities and local partners to acquire,
rehabilitate and, ultimately, preserve existing aordable housing units in rural
North Dakota communities. Working to preserve 63 rent-subsidized
apartments in 2 communities
Property Management - We watch over all the housing properties owned
by LSSND, as well as units owned by others around the state. The property
management team is committed to being both compassionate and competent,
oering day-to-day on-site management while also addressing individual
tenant needs. 1,063 people lived in homes managed by Lutheran Social
Services
Isaiah Investments - Gives people and businesses a chance to invest in
aordable housing and child care in North Dakota through social impact loans.
The fund provides investors with a modest return while facilitating powerful
community change.
Having an aordable place to live is a basic necessity for every family. Preserving
aordable housing keeps communities strong.
A renter earning the federal
minimum wage of $7.25/hr would
need to work 86 hours per week to
aord an average priced
one-bedroom rental home.
Of the 800+ households
served approximately –
were homeless.
were veterans.
were kids under 18.
were seniors.
Since 2009, LSSND has built 387
new apartments in 9 North Dakota
communities and renovated 52
apartments in 4 communities.
15
North Dakota's population
grew by 13% from 2010 to
2015.
of North Dakotans reported
having a disability in 2014.
The gure for people over
75 was 47%.
From 2014-2029, the
group of North Dakota
residents ages 65+ will
grow by 52%.
Increase in North Dakota
households with poverty-
level incomes. That is
projected to increase by
24% by 2019.
Sources: 86 hours - National Low Income Housing Coalition - Out of Reach 2016 | ND Statewide Housing Needs Assessment 2016 - p. 12, 14, 17 (component
2), 27
Disaster Response - Disaster Response leverages resources to help individuals and
communities in North Dakota prepare for and recover from disasters. The program
provides preparedness training, recovery response and recruitment, coordination and
supervision volunteers. Responded to disasters in 5 North Dakota communities
Refugee Resettlement - As the only federally recognized and approved refugee
resettlement organization working in the state, LSSND helps refugees integrate into their
new home communities and begin building their new lives. We equip them with the tools
they need to become self-sucient, help them nd jobs to support their families and
communities, connect them with English language learning opportunities and provide
them with case management services. 611 refugees newly arrived
Immigration Services - New American Services helps refugees, immigrants and
U.S. citizens reunify with their families or achieve the highest legal immigration status,
including citizenship. We oer aordable immigration counseling and processing services
to refugees, asylees and others in need. 707 people received help with immigration-
related services
Interpreter Services - LSSND bridges the language divide between individuals with
limited or no English speaking ability and those who are serving them. Our trained
interpreters oer them oral interpretation as well as written translation services. 31
languages interpreted
Foster Care for Unaccompanied Refugee Minors - This program encourages
growth toward independence by placing unaccompanied refugee children with safe,
nurturing foster or kinship families. We focus on building independent living skills and
helping them nd employment and education as they approach adulthood. 75 kids
cared for and connected with foster care during this scal year
Services to Older Refugees - Refugee elders are unlikely to nd employment due
to their language, physical and cultural barriers. LSSND helps them develop a sense of
belonging through social and community activities, allowing for a smoother integration
into their new communities. Approximately 400 refugee elders resettled in Fargo-
Moorhead since 2008
From rebuilding ooded homes to rebuilding lives in a new country, standing with people in times of
crisis is central to our humanity.
Each minute, 24 people around the
world ee their homes because of
violence or persecution.
LSSND helped
294 people to
become United
States citizens.
LSSND supported
16 local organizations
that help refugees
integrate into their
new communities.
leveraged to support
disaster recovery
in 4 North Dakota
communities.
of North Dakota
immigrants came to the
state via the refugee
program.
17
of refugees who come
to North Dakota are
reuniting with family.
Refugees arrived from
11 dierent countries in
FY16.
Bhutanese refugees represent
27% of all refugees resettled
in North Dakota since 1997.
(2,179 of 7,961)
employers in 4
communities saw their
own workforces grow
because they hired
newly arrived refugees.
Sources: Each minute - unhcr.org Global Trends - Forced Displacement | <23% - American Fact Finder 2014-2015 est. of ND foreign-born population |
Kalisa Ndikumwimana - Global Refugee
Youth Council
Kalisa is a former refugee from the Democratic
Republic of the Congo who resettled in Fargo in
2011, through the Unaccompanied Refugee Minors
program. He was selected as one of 20 U.S. youth to
attend The Refugee Global Youth Consultation.
Reggie Tarr - White House Leaders
Summit on Global Refugee Crisis
Reggie was one of 10 honored leaders at a White
House ceremony for his eorts and leadership in
resettling and integrating refugees in Grand Forks.
Luther Hall - Barbara Allen-Hagen Award
Performance-based Standards selected Luther Hall
for the community residential category for its plan for
improving safety measures across the entire program.
Tyler Holland, Bob Guertin and Ryan Daniel accepted
the award on behalf of the Luther Hall team.
Howard Barlow - Senior of the Year
The annual Senior of the Year award, sponsored by
Bethany Homes, recognizes ve seniors who have
made or are making a huge contribution to the
community. Howard Barlow was the Senior of the
Year in the Business category.
Jessica Thomasson - Person of the Year
The Forum named Jessica Thomasson its 2015 Area
Person of the Year for her leadership, service and
impact on the region.
Aimee DeSherlia - 35 Under 35
Aimee DeSherlia was selected for the 35 Under
35 program of the United Way of Cass-Clay. The
program focuses on mobilizing the caring power of
women, energizing and inspiring women to make a
dierence and deepening leadership opportunities for
young women in Fargo-Moorhead.
Williston - Aordable Housing Champion
Legacy at Central Place in Williston received North
Dakota Housing Finance Agency’s housing Production
Award. The project is the adaptive reuse of a former
school building that was transformed into 44 aordable
housing units for lower income people aged 55+.
Philanthropy and Youth (PaY) Intern
LSSND hosted a PaY intern for the rst time this year.
Hannah Papenfuss, our PaY intern, helped the agency
discover new, more impactful approaches to service
learning for young people looking for opportunities to
volunteer.
Restorative Practices in Schools Workshop
Restorative Justice oered an educators training
opportunity that explored restorative principles and
practices as well as adverse childhood experiences
(ACE).
Building Bridges Conference, 2016
More than 300 educators, human service professionals
and business leaders came together in April to learn
about mental health, entrepreneurship and community
integration in the spirit of building successful and
diverse communities.
National Summit on Preventing Youth Violence
Janell Regimbal and Kelli Adams (Youth Interventions
Team) were invited to the National Forum on Violence
to present about proactive bullying prevention
measures.
This is What Home Tastes Like
The Prairie Rose WELCA cluster met in Binford and
hosted a cultural exchange. Two women from Bhutan
demonstrated batti (thread making) and the ladies from
Binford and Bhutan shared tastes from home.
25
The U.S. Department of Justice Defending Childhood Initiative selected "Safer Tomorrows" as one of four pilot projects in the nation
to address children's exposure to all forms of violence. The project partners worked in every corner of Grand Forks County to test and
grow proactive approaches with kids of all ages. As the 6-year project comes to a close in 2016, here are some things we have learned:
students reached with
violence prevention
education.
fewer high schoolers
reported someone forced
them to do something
sexual they did not want to
do, compared to 2015.
teachers and coaches
trained on prevention
curricula and
programming.
fewer students in
4th-12th grade
were bullied.
"We value our children, and we are committed to making their lives and their future the best possible. Safer Tomorrows is a clear
example of those commitments and, simply, an example of who we are as a community."
- Grand Forks Mayor, Michael R. Brown
Instead of asking, "What's wrong with you?" We started asking, "What happened to you?"
Safer Tomorrows, funded by the U.S. Dept. of
Justice's Defending Childhood Initiatives, is a
collaboration of 40 local agencies including every
public school across Grand Forks county and three
parochial schools. Thank you to all.
Four Lead Entities:
All GF County schools participated
K-12 public schools: Emerado, Grand Forks,
Larimore, Manvel, Midway, Northwood, and
Thompson Catholic Schools: St. Michael's, Holy
Family-St. Mary's and Sacred Heart. Head Start
and Preschools: Ben Franklin, Century, Discovery,
Immanuel Children's Center, Lake Agassiz,
Midway, Phoenix, St. Mary's Project Kids,
Sacred Heart, Twining, West and University
Children's Center.
UP ⋅ stand ⋅ er
noun
An upstander is someone who recognizes when
something is wrong and acts to make it right.
When an upstander sees or hears about bullying, they
speak up.
Being an upstander is being a hero: we are standing
up for what is right and doing our best to help support
and protect someone who is being hurt.
"Me and my friends
stand up for kids who
are bullied."
Our Hopes for the Future
Oer diversion opportunities across North Dakota to help kids avoid getting
involved with the juvenile justice system.
Advocate for greater investment in preventing problems before they turn into crises
that require expensive intervention.
Help kids develop skills they need to eecitvely cope with trauma they experience.
Help schools infuse restorative practices into their everyday work
Equip educators and early childhood providers with tools to eectively manage
challenging behaviors in kids.
What does your Safer
Tomorrow look like?
"When an adult sees bullying,
they do something about it."
"Kids always invite
me to play with
them."
"We learn how to be good friends to
each other in school. We learn how to
work out our problems together."
"When I am
sad or angry
or scared,
there is a
trusted adult
who cares
about me and
helps me."
Be present for a child.
Learn about trauma,
Share your youth events
and celebrations
Support our schools
A caring adult can make a big
dierence in a child's life.
how to cope and heal from your
own trauma and to make a
trauma-sensitive environment.
with the Safer Tomorrows
website and social media
as they continue to work on
decreasing bullying and violence
to create and sustain safe,
positive classrooms.
www.safertomorrows.com
27
The benets of investing time in boy’s lives and talking with them about violence are
clear: they will know what is and is not okay in relationships with girls and women,
and they will know they can come to you with problems and questions. Coaches have
an important role to play in boys’ lives. They can give positive messages – ones about
respect, honor and responsibility.
Note: "Coaching Boys into Men" is part of the Safer Tomorrows programming
Fargo Program Center
3911 20th Ave. S.
Fargo, ND 58103
Phone: 701.235.7341
Bismarck Program Center
1616 Capitol Way
Bismarck, ND 58501
Phone: 701.223.1510
Devils Lake Program Center
423 6th Ave. NE
Devils Lake, ND 58301
Phone: 701.662.8017
Grand Forks Program Center
412 Demers Ave.
Grand Forks, ND 58201
Phone: 701.772.7577
Minot Program Center
1905 2nd St. SE Suite 1B
Minot, ND 58701
Phone: 701.838.7800
Williston Program Center
P.O. Box 163
603 Main Street
Williston, ND 58802
Phone: 701.774.0749
/LutheranSocialServicesND | @LSSND
/company/LSSND | LSSND
www.lssnd.org
Licensed Child
Placement Agency
Lutheran Social Services
of North Dakota
3911 20th Ave. S.
Fargo, ND 58103
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