Index
Applied Business
Applied Science
Art
Biology
Chemistry
Computing
Drama
Economics
English Language
English Literature
English Language & Literature
French
Geography
German
Health & Social Care
History
ICT
Maths
Further Maths
Media
Music
Physical Education
Philosophy and Ethics
Physics
Psychology
Systems & Control
Textiles
APPLIED BUSINESS
AQA A-LEVEL
About The Course
Skills You Will Develop
Entry Requirements
Assessment
This is a new course - first teaching from Sept 2016
The AQA Level 3 Certicate gives you the
opportunity to learn and understand a broad
range of business and entrepreneurial
knowledge and skills associated with working
within a business enterprise. This vocational
course is designed not just to test knowledge
but be a b but be a broad, practical and realistic experience
which prepares you to progress to study a
qualication at a HE business school or allow
you to move into employment.
Studying this qualication will enable you to
develop the fundamental knowledge and skills
recognised as most important by higher
education and employers. The qualication also
oers you an opportunity to develop
transferrable skills, such as teamwork, research
and and communication as part of your applied
learning. If you want your leaning to be
practical and active where you can apply
your leaning immediately and most
relevantly, then this would be a great
course for you to study.
You must have a C in Maths & a C in English
Lanuage to study this couse. You must also
be good at managing your time and meeting
deadlines. This qualication is aimed at those
who wish to progress to higher education and/or
pursue a career in business.
Assessment is through examination, external
assignments and centre set assignments. This
variety not only measures your knowledge
and understanding but can shape the practical
skills in beginning to think and realise your
own plans about business. The qualication
has been d has been developed in collaberation with a
select group of HE institutes and organisations.
The units are graded Pass, Merit or Distinction.
Please visit UCAS to get the latest information
regarding the points this qualication carries.
The latest information is being gathered which means
the exact course details may be subject to change.
Level 3 Certificate in Applied Science
AQA codes: TVQ01028/TVQ01029| contact: Louise Bradley
Is this the right subject for me?
The course is very good preparation for a career in medical science (for example nursing, occupational
therapy), sports science or as a technician in any field, such as forensics or microbiology. It teaches the
fundamental scientific knowledge and skills valued by universities and employers.
Level 3 Certificate
(Equivalent to an AS Qualification)
Key Concepts in Science
This unit covers Biology, Chemistry and Physics.
You will study the smallest unit of life, the
structure of organs and the functioning of the
human body. You will have the opportunity to
carry out practical work to investigate the
concentration of acids and alkalis and energy
released from chemical reactions. You will also
learn about forces and electricity generation.
Applied Experimental Techniques
This module explores the work of an analytical
scientist. You will carry out a series of practical
investigations in Biology, Chemistry and Physics to
solve problems and present your findings in a
portfolio.
Science in the modern world
This unit investigates current scientific issues,
considering the ethical and social implications of
scientific advancements. You will interpret
information from scientific texts and you will
explore how scientists work and the varied roles
they carry out.
Level 3 Extended Certificate
(Equivalent to an A2 Qualification)
The Human Body
This is a Biology unit which considers the health
and fitness measurements used to monitor the
activity of the body, the workings of the digestive
system and the structure and function of the
brain and nervous system. These concepts will be
studied in vocational contexts, such as the work
of sports scientists, nurses and dieticians.
Investigating Science
In this module you will draw on the knowledge
and skills you have learned in the other units to
research and carry out your own investigation
and then report your findings to a suitable
audience.
Microbiology
This unit investigates the role of microbiologists
in industry. You will use microbiological
techniques to culture microorganisms through
practical tasks. You will also find out about new
scientific advancements and the use of
microorganisms in biotechnology.
Assessment
Entry Requirements
A minimum of two C grades in two Science subjects and a C in Maths.
Level 3 Certificate
Key concepts in Science and Science in the
Modern World are externally examined
modules. Both modules have one, 1 hour 30
minute exam, worth 67% of the Level 3
Certificate (33% of the Extended Certificate).
Applied Experiment Techniques is a
coursework module and is worth 33% of the
Level 3 certificate (17% of the extended
Level 3 Certificate).
Extended Level 3 Certificate
The Human Body is an externally assessed
module through a 1 hour 30 minute exam.
This is worth 17% of the Extended Certificate.
Investigating Science and Microbiology are
both coursework modules worth 33% of the
Extended Certificate.
In total 50% is assessed through coursework
and 50% is externally examined.
Course Content:
AS: Fine Art
Component 1 (Portfolio unit 60% of AS)
The course is based around the development of understanding and
skills. This allows students to use a range of media throughout the
year. Students work to an open ended question where they will
explore a theme of their choice, finding their own artists and sourcing
observational stimulus independently. They will produce high skill
observed work as well as creating Abstract and experimental
outcomes, following their chosen theme and which come together to
create one large unit of work. Students are also required to submit a
written diary to support the practical work.
Component 2 (response to an externally set assignment. 40% of AS)
Preparatory period, from 1
st
February.
EXAM unit. This is set by the exam board which offers a choice of 5
questions. Students have around 12 weeks to produce a project
during which students will have 10 hours supervised time during
which they are required to produce a finished outcome informed by
their preparatory work. Students are also required to submit a
written diary to support the practical work.
A2 Level: Fine Art
Component 1 (Personal Investigation 60% of A2)
Students are required to conduct a practical investigation into an
idea or theme of their choice, exploring artists and sourcing
observational stimulus independently. This work must be supported
by written material. Students will explore both observational work
as well as Abstract concepts and must show clear evidence of an
ability to thoroughly research and develop a theme leading to
meaningful outcomes.
Component 2 (response to an externally set assignment. 40% of
A2)
Preparatory period from 1
st
February.
EXAM unit. This is set by the exam board which offers a choice of 8
questions to be used as a starting point. Students have around 12
weeks to produce a project during which students will have 15
hours supervised time during which they are required to produce a
finished outcome, informed by their preparatory work. Students are
also required to submit a written diary to support the practical
work.
Art and Design: Fine Art
Assessment:
Work is assessed through 4 assessment areas:
* Development of ideas through sustained
investigations informed by contextual
sources, demonstrating analytical and
critical understanding.
* Exploration of appropriate media,
materials and techniques, refining ideas as
their work develops.
* Recording of ideas and observations
relevant to intentions, reflecting critically
on work and progress.
* Present a personal and meaningful
response that realises intentions and were
appropriate makes links with other visual
elements.
Skills you will learn:
* During the course students will
develop their understanding of art
genres, techniques and materials,
realising their potential and applying
these to their own outcomes.
* Students will learn how to take
responsibility for their own work,
directing the course of their study and
creation of their work independently.
Entry to the course:
* Students are required to have at least a C
grade in Art and design at GCSE level. As there
is a written component to all units students
must also have a grade C in English
* Students must have a mature attitude and a
keen interest in Art and Design.
Contact: If you have any queries about the course or
would like further information please contact Alice
Robertson, in the Art Department on 0191 200 8800
A-level Biology
AQA Codes 7401 and 7402 Contact: Alan Keegan
A-level Biology is a consistently popular choice for students. It is a challenging but enjoyable op-
on that produces well rounded sciensts. Many of our students go on to take degrees in biologi-
cal sciences or study medicine and other related subjects.
Biology Field Trip (12 to 13 Transion):
Students are expected to aend a residenal eldwork course in the nal half term of year 12.
For the last 6 years we have used Ambleside in the Lake District as our base. We use this oppor-
tunity to teach students the praccal skills required to successfully tackle A2 Biology. Students
consistently rate this experience as one of the highlights of sixth form and we are one of the few
centres in the North of England to oer a week long eld trip. There is a charge for this.
Year 12 (AS)
Starts at the level of biological molecules like
proteins and quickly builds up to the study of
the cell and its interaction with an organisms
internal environment. Familiar topics like mito-
sis will be revisited but new and exciting con-
cepts will be regularly introduced. By the end
of the year students will have a real flavour of
the diversity of living organisms.
Year 13 (A-level)
Year 13 has much more of a focus on the
whole organism and its interaction with the
external environment. Building on from the
residential field trip (see below) students study
ecology as well as genetic technology. There
is also more of an emphasis on “systems” biol-
ogy” and students will study the nervous and
endocrine systems in detail.
Praccal skills
Biology is a praccal subject. Accordingly 15% of A-level marks are allocated to “praccal skills”
which include the implementaon, analysis and evaluaon of praccal invesgaons (including
stascal analysis).
Assessment:
The course runs on a linear structure with terminal exams. Students will take 2x90 minutes exams at
the end of year 12. These can be “cashed in” for a stand alone AS qualicaon if students decide not
to connue on to year 13. If students connue to A-level they have to sit exams on ALL content (AS
grade will not count). Final A-level examinaons will be 3x2hr papers.
Skills:
Students will develop an analycal approach to problem solving. They will learn to eecvely ques-
on and back up opinions with clear and concise arguments and learn how sciensts carry out inves-
gaons that substanate their claims. We hope that they will have fun too!
Entry requirements:
A minimum grade B in both GCSE science courses and mathemacs is required. Students studying
separate sciences must aain a minimum of a grade B in Biology and in one other science and a
grade B in Mathemacs (10% of all marks will be allocated to mathemacal skills).
The most important requirement is to be interested in and movated to learn more about the living
world.
A-level paper 3
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Year 12
AS paper 1 and 2
A-level paper 1
Year 13
A-level paper 2
BUSINESS
AQA A-LEVEL
About The Course
Skills You Will Develop
Entry Requirements
Assessment
Want to know more? Visit our blog!
A-level Business introduces you to what you
need to know about working in business. The
main focus of the course is on helping you to
become a good decision maker and be aware
of how decisions can impact key business
areas such as marketing, operations, nance
and human and human resources. Lots of real world
examples are used to help you connect with
the theory.
The skills that you will develop in business
are always very transferable and valued in a
wide range of careers. Whether you decide
to set up your own business, study business at
university or go down a dierent route you will
nd things you learn in this course will help.
Skills such as pSkills such as problem solving, numeracy,
decision making and evaluation are all
integral parts of the course. You will also
develop an interest for current business
news which will help you understand
how the theory works in the real world.
You do not need to have studied GCSE
Business however it would be helpful.
You must have a minimum of a C in Maths
and a C in English Language to get on to the
course. Obviously a passion and interest in
the subject are just as important!
A-Level assessment consists of three two hour
written exams at the end of the two year course.
Each exam will be worth a third of the A-level
and all the papers will draw on material from
the whole course. The papers will feature
a range of question styles including multiple
choi choice, short answer, essay , data response and
case study. Students are issued with a course
companion to support their study throughout
the two year course.
businessatthebay.blogspot.co.uk
AS/A2 Chemistry
AQA Code 7404 / 7405
Contact:andy.gray@
whitleybayhighschool.org
Entry Requirements
This is a challenging A level and you will
need to be self movated and
determined to succeed. A minimum
grade B in both science courses and
mathemacs is required. Students
studying Chemistry , Biology and Physics
as GCSE separate sciences, must achieve
a minimum of a grade B in Chemistry and
one other science. Students must also
achieve a minimum of a grade B in GCSE
mathemacs.
We have a proven track record with the AQA exam board for the last 15 years
and have an experienced team of teachers who always provide addional
support to students in need. We know this course provides an excellent
foundaon for science study at university and by AQAs measures we achieve
outstanding results. Students follow the AS specicaon in year 12 and sit the
AS exam at the end of year 12.
Year 12 AS – year 1
Assessed in 2, 2 hour theory papers of 105 marks and a synopc and praccal
theory assessment of 90 marks. They will cover the 3 branches of chemistry,
Organic, Inorganic and Physical. The physical aspects are split over 2 exams.
Students praccal skills will be developed over the 2 years and examined in a
third wrien exam of 90 marks which is also synopc.
The subject content is broadly similar to the current course with a few mely
revisions where technology and research has moved on.
They will need to pass to connue to take A Level.
Year 13 A Level - year 2
The advanced topics will be taught. The assessment regime is the same but
none of the AS marks will carry forward to the full A level.
1. Programming imperative procedural-oriented, OOP, recursive techniques
2. Data structures arrays, lists, dictionaries, hash tables, queue, graph, tree,
stack, vector, fields, records, files (text & binary)
3. Algorithms traversal, search, sort, optimisation
4. Theory of computation abstraction, automation, FSM with and without
output, language hierarchy, complexity, Turing machines
5. Data representation number systems/bases, information coding systems,
encryption
6. Computer systems logic gates, Boolean algebra, program translator types,
classification of programming languages, system software
7. Computer organisation and architecture machine code/assembly language,
CPU, internal components of computer, external hardware devices (limited
range)
8. Consequences of uses of computing software and their algorithms embed
moral & cultural values, issue of scale brings potential for great good but also
ability to cause great harm, challenges facing legislators
9. Communication and networking communication methods/basics, network
topology, wireless, the Internet, TCP/IP, CRUD applications and REST, JSON,
JavaScript
10. Databases data modelling, relational database, SQL, client server databases
11. Big Data volume/velocity/variety, fact-based model, distributed processing
and functional programming
12. Fundamentals of functional programming function type, first-class object,
function application, partial function application, composition of functions, map,
filter, reduce, lists
13. Systematic approach to problem solving skills needed for Paper 1 and NEA
14. NEA - The computing practical project
With today's contemporary computer age and fast-
paced technology advancements, it is essential that
there are people out there who have a great
computing knowledge, which is where the A-level
computing qualification comes into relevance.
The A-level computing course details the inner
workings and applications of computers, with
emphasis put onto solving realistic problems. A-level
computing is a fun, challenging subject that appeals
to students with most learning styles and interests.
Being amongst the technologically educated
population will put you in a brilliant position for job
searching, as there are so many careers where A-
level computing skills are essential.
To study A level Computing @ WBHS you will need:
Grade A Maths GCSE
Two grade Bs in a Science GCSE
To find out more please feel free to come and have a chat
or contact me with any questions you may have:
andrew.johnson@whitleybayhighschool.org
Drama and Theatre
AS /A level (Edexcel)
Inspiring creativity and confidence
A practical focus is at the heart of AS and A level Drama and Theatre
Engaging Set Texts
Clear and straightforward exam papers
Supports progression and develops transferable skills
Incorporates 21
st
century theatre practice
Drama and Theatre students will be required to:
Perform for a text based performance
Perform for a devised performance
Explore the work of two practitioners
Produce a portfolio to detail the creation and development of ideas for a
performance and analyse and evaluate their process
Answer questions on a set text in an exam
Analyse and evaluate a piece of live theatre they have been to see in an exam
Assessment
AS and A level in Drama and Theatre will be assessed through a combination of a
40% written examination and 60% Non-Examined Assessment (NEA).
AS - a separate, linear qualification; the content of the AS is a subset of the A level.
The course requires students to demonstrate a practical understanding of:
AS a minimum of one complete and substantial performance text and a minimum
of two key extracts from two different texts, placed in the context of the whole text.
A level a minimum of two complete and substantial performance texts and at least
three key extracts from three different texts placed in the context of the whole text.
Students must study the work and methodologies of one influential theatre
practitioner (individual or companies) at AS and two theatre practitioners at A level.
Drama and Theatre require students to participate in:
AS - a minimum of one performance from a text studied during the course.
A level - a minimum of two performances, one devised and one from a performance
text studied during the course.
For further information go to : www.edexcel.com/aleveldrama2016
ECONOMICS
AQA A-LEVEL
About The Course
Skills You Will Develop
Entry Requirements
Assessment
Want to know more? Visit our blog!
A-level Economics gives you an understanding
of how economies allocate their scarce resources
to meet the needs and wants of their citizens.
You will analyse the economic problems which
face indviduals and rms (microeconomics)
and also look at the big picture of how our
national e national economy ts into the global context
macroeconomics). Economics is seen as a
social science and by the end of the course
we believe you will look at the way the
world works in a very dierent way.
As an economist you will develop an excellent
way of thinking that means you will always
consider all of the options in every decision
that you make. These analytical and evaluation
skills will be useful in whatever path you
choose in the future. Your understanding of
the ethe economic forces that impact our day to day
actvitives may lead you to pursue a career
in a directly related eld such as banking
or nance. You may also look to continue
to study economics at university but no
matter what degree course you choose the
skills you aquire will benet you.
You must have a minimum of a B in Maths
and a B in English Language to get on to the
course. This is due to the increased focus on
quantitative skills that are featured in the exam.
Other than your grades an interest and curiosity
in the world around you is also very desireable.
A-Level assessment consists of three two hour
written exams at the end of the two year course.
Each exam will be worth a third of the A-level.
Two of the papers will draw on specic parts of
the course whilst the third will cover material
from the whole course. The exams will feature
a a range of question styles including multiple
choice, short answer, essay , data response and
case study. Students are issued with a course
companion to support their study throughout
the two year course.
businessatthebay.blogspot.co.uk
AS/A Level
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
Contact: Jon Brettell
Language students enjoy reading a diverse range
of texts in order to explore how the world is
constructed around them. They are analytical
thinkers but also make superb creative writers!
AS Course
You will study a variety of exciting texts and
consider how these represent the world around
us by analysing language in use. You will also
explore language diversity and think about how
gender, occupation, regional identity and other
social groups use and control language.
There are two examinations that assess your
understanding of representation, the language
frameworks and your ability to write creativity for
a specific audience and purpose. Each
examination will last 1 hour 30 minutes.
A Level Course
The A Level course is synoptic and brings together
everything you have covered at AS (language and
representation and language and the individual)
and introduces three new major strands:
Child Language Acquisition: you will consider how
and when children acquire language and become
an expert in your field!
Language Change: you will explore what has
influenced the English language over time and
how it continues to change and diversify
World Language Varieties: You will explore how
English is used and adapted in countries across
the globe
There are three components to the A Level
course: two examinations (which last 2 hours 30
minutes each) and the final component is Non
Exam Assessment. This element is a Language
Investigation where you will explore language in
everyday use on a topic of your interest. You will
also write a creative piece of writing for a specific
audience and purpose.
Skills you will develop
This course will change the way you view the
world around you and is absolutely fascinating.
You will find that you access every text you read,
film you watch, advert you see or article you read
in a different way since you will be able to
consider how language is used to represent
society and ultimately, condition us all into certain
ways of thinking. You will engage with a diverse
range of texts and also have the opportunity to
showcase your own creative writing skills.
Whether exploring gender, how social groups
control language, how children acquire it or how
English is changing you really will appreciate the
spoken and written word in a new light!
What can I do with A level English Language? As
well as studying Language and Linguistics at
University, past students have gone on to study:
Journalism, Law, MFL, Education, Journalism,
Drama, Economics, Business Studies
Entry Requirements
At least a grade B in GCSE Language and Literature.
Clear written communication skills.
You must enjoy reading, be analytical in your
approach and be interested in the world around you
Here is an advert from the 1960s and one from
2015: do you think society has changed at all?
What social stereotypes still exist in 2015? Which
accents hold most power?
AS/A Level
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
Contact: Claire Appleby
Language and Literature students enjoy
reading a diverse range of fiction and non-
fiction texts. They are analytical thinkers but
also make superb creative writers!
AS Course
You will explore the imagined world of ‘The
Handmaid’s Tale’ and analyse the language
choices made by Margaret Atwood. You will
also study a collection of poems by Carol Ann
Duffy concentrating on the nature and
function of poetic voice in the telling of
events and the presentation of people. An
Anthology of texts thematically linked with
‘Paris ’will also be studied – developing your
understanding of form and creative writing.
There are two examinations that assess your
understanding of different genres of writing.
Both exams are closed book examinations.
Each examination will last 1 hour 30
minutes.
A Level Course
In addition to the above content, you will
study the theme of ‘Conflict’ in A Streetcar
Named Desire by Tennessee Williams and F.
Scott Fitzgerald’s ‘The Great Gatsby. You will
also develop the skills to adapt and shape
original material to respond to different re-
creative tasks.
There are three components to the A Level
course: two examinations (which last 2
hours 30 minutes and 3 hours) and the final
component is Non Exam Assessment.
An A Level English Language and Literature
study will enable you to become a thoughtful
reader who studies writers’ craft whilst also
perfecting your own writing style.
What can I do with A level English Language
and Literature?
As well as studying English Language and
Literature at University, past students have
gone on to study: Education, Journalism,
Drama, Business Studies, Economics and
History.
Entry Requirements
At least a grade B in GCSE
Language and Literature.
Clear written communication
skills.
You must have enthusiasm for
reading a wide range of texts.
Skills you will
develop
You will develop
skills of
interpretation and
analysis, broaden
your knowledge of
a range of
Literature and
advance your
creative writing.
Why study a language at A level?
A level Languages provide a broad
understanding of the culture, countries and
communities where modern languages
are spoken and encourage enjoyment of
language learning.
What GCSE grade is needed to study a
language at A level?
You will need at least a grade B in your
GCSE and will need to have been a Higher
candidate in Listening and Reading.
How is this A level assessed?
This qualification is linear. Linear means
that students will sit all their exams at the
end of the course. There are exam 3 Papers:
Paper 1Listening, Reading and writing (40%)
Paper 2Writing (30%)
Paper 3Speaking (30 %)
How long is each paper and what will be
required?
Paper 1 = 1h45 Listeni ng and res ponding to
spoken passages. Stu dents are in charge of
the recordings and answer in French.
Reading and responding to passa ges.
Translation into English.
Paper 2 = 1h15 Writing about a text or film and
translation into French.
Paper 3 = 15 minutes preparation followed by
14 minutes exam time.
What will be studied?
Core content
1. Social issues and trends
2. Political and artistic culture
3. Grammar
Options
4. Works: Literary texts and films
What are the main topics?
* Changing nature of the Family
* Cyber society
* Place of voluntary work
* Heritage
* Music
* Cinema
Film
E.g.
Au Revoir les Enfants
La Haîne
L’Auberge Espagnole
Literary Texts
E.g.
Un Sac de Billes
Un Sécret
No et Moi
Quote from past students:
“It’s an impressive achievement to speak a
foreign language and you'll have better
options for your future! “
GEOGRAPHY
Contact: Stuart Dean Exam board: AQA
Geography is the study of natural landscapes (physical geography) and of people and their
environment (human geography).
In this course you will learn about the physical and human processes that affect places and
environments that shape the world in which we live. At a personal level, you should be
interested in the world around you and in learning about people, places and the environment.
This course will encourage you to be interested in local and global issues.
During the course you will be involved in a range of teaching and learning styles, both within
and outside the classroom. These include fieldwork activities, decision making exercises,
presentations of research material and thinking skills where you actively involved in lessons. In
order to complete tasks effectively you will have to develop a range of practical, descriptive and
analytical skills.
This qualification is linear with all the exams taken at the end of the course
AS and A2 are de-coupled. If AS is sat Year 12 and students continue with the course in Year 13
then they will have to sit the modules again i.e. AS does not count towards the overall A level
grade
A Level Geography
The course has 3 components
1. Physical geography
Section A: Water and carbon cycles
Section B: either Hot desert environments and their margins or Coastal systems and
landscapes
Section C: either Hazards or Ecosystems under stress or Cold environments
2. Human Geography
Section A: Global systems and global governance
Section B: Changing places
Section C: either Contemporary urban environments or Population and the environment or
Resource security
Assessment
Both of these exams are assessed in a written exam of 2 hours 30 minutes which is worth 96
marks (40% of the A-level)
The questions will be a mixture of multiple-choice, short answer levels of response and
extended prose
3.Geographical investigation
Students complete an individual investigation which must include data collected in the field. The
individual investigation must be based on a question or issue defined and developed by the student
relating to any part of the specification content.
Assessment
A report of 3,0004,000 words worth 35 mark (20% of the A-level) This is marked by teachers
but moderated by AQA.
AS Level Geography
This course has 2 components, all of the modules are also A level modules.
Component 1: Physical geography and people and the environment
Section A: either Water and carbon cycles or Hot desert environments and their margins or
Coastal systems and landscapes
Section B: either Hazards or Contemporary urban environments
Component 2: Human geography and geography fieldwork investigation
Section A: either Global systems and global governance or Changing places
Section B: Geography fieldwork investigation and geographical skills
Assessment
Both of these are assessed in a written exam of 1 hour 30 minutes worth 80 marks (50%
of AS total each)
The questions will be a mixture of multiple-choice, short answer and levels of response
Attributes required for entry into the course
The syllabus assumes that candidates have achieved grade B or better in GCSE (higher paper)
geography.
Students who have completed the course in the past have gone on to a wide variety of courses,
including law, accounting and health studies. Last year a number of students went on to study
geography at university and others have used the skills learned in the subject useful for other
courses such as environmental sciences.
Geography contains all the skills that employers consider important and therefore studying
geography makes you attractive to future employers.
Why study a language at A level?
A level Languages provide a broad
understanding of the culture, countries and
communities where modern languages
are spoken and encourage enjoyment of
language learning.
What GCSE grade is needed to study a
language at A level?
You will need at least a grade B in your
GCSE and will need to have been a Higher
candidate in Listening and Reading.
How is this A level assessed?
This qualification is line ar. Linear means
that students will sit all their exams at the
end of the course. There are exam 3 Papers:
Paper 1Listening, Reading and writing (40%)
Paper 2Writing (30%)
Paper 3Speaking (30%)
How long is each paper and what will is
required?
Paper 1 = 1h45 Listening and responding to
spoken passages. Students are in charge of the
recordings and answer in French.
Reading and responding to passages.
Translation into English.
Paper 2 = 1h15 Writing about a text or film and
translation into French.
Paper 3 = 15 minutes preparation followed by
14 minutes exam time.
What will be studied?
Core content
1. Social issues and trends
2. Political and artistic culture
3. Grammar
Options
4. Works: Literary texts and films
What are the main topics?
* Social issues and trends
* Family
* Digital World
* Artistic Culture
* Music / Fashion
Film
E.g.
Good-bye Lenin
Das Leben der Anderen
Lola Rennt
Literary Texts
E.g.
Die Verlorene Ehre der Katarina Blum
Quotes from past students:
“Learning a foreign language can help you
understand your own language and make it
easier to learn others. “
“Speaking more than one language increas-
es your brain capacity and you have better
memory too.”
Course content
A Level
European History Breadth Study
Russia under the Tsars and Communists
1855-1964
This module covers the dramatic events leading
up to and including the two 1917 revolutions and
the Communist regime of the USSR. We go
from Tsars to Commissars and try to understand
how a monarchy could fall, not so much with a
bang as with a whimper. Why did Alexander II
feel he was being “hunted like an animal” by
revolutionaries before his assassination in
1881? Would there have been a Communist
revolution in October 1917 if Lenin had not
returned from exile? Many, many more
questions to be asked and answered in this
action packed course.
British History Depth Study
The Wars of the Roses 1450-1509
This module covers one of the most turbulent
periods in British History, with the Wars of the
Roses as a central issue. The causes and the
course of the Wars of the Roses, as well as the
beginnings of the Tudor dynasty, are explored
along with fascinating characters such as
Richard, Duke of York and the Earl of Warwick,
known as the Kingmaker. There are battles and
plots and women too, key figures such as
Margaret of Anjou, truly the power behind the
throne, and Elizabeth Woodville, wife of Edward
IV was she really a witch? What was the
Parliament of Devils? What did the Duke of
Suffolk do that could warrant his execution on
the deck of a ship with a rusty sword? Who
really killed the princes in the Tower? Was
Henry VII truly a “new monarch”?
Coursework - Civil Rights in the USA.
This course looks at interpretations of 100 years
of the Civil Rights movement, covering leaders
such as Malcolm X and Martin Luther King and
events such as the Montgomery bus boycott as
well as earlier less well known events.
Assessment
Y12
European Breadth study: hr written paper
involving the completion of one interpretations
question and one essay covering the topic up to
1917
British History Depth Study: 1½ hr written paper
based on one source question and one essay
question covering the topic up to 1470.
Y13
Historical Interpretations: 1 extended essay of
3,000 words.
European Breadth Study: 2hr 30min written
paper involving the completion of two essays and
an interpretations question covering the period
1855-1964
British Depth Study: 2hr 30 min written paper
involving the completion of two essays and one
sources question, covering the period 1450-1509
Skills You Will Develop
History is the study of ourselves, an investigation
of human behaviour, an enquiry into our motives
and their consequences, not just the study of the
past and the long-dead!
History teaches you to select relevant information
from a broad range of materials; evaluate and
draw conclusions from evidence and data; and
prepare reasoned and structured cases arguing in
favour of or against something.
History gives you the skills which are essential to
a whole range of careers, particularly law, media
and journalism.
Entry To The Course
Students must achieve at least a B grade in
GCSE History. If students have not studied
History they must achieve at least grade B in
English Language and English Literature.
A Level HISTORY
AQA History Units 1H and 2B
Contact: Hilary Henderson
8371
Maths
AS
at
WBHS
Maths at AS Level will encourage
students to:
develop their understanding of
mathematics and mathematical
processes in a way that promotes
confidence and fosters enjoyment
develop abilities to reason logically
and recognise incorrect reasoning,
to generalise and to construct
mathematical proofs
extend their range of
mathematical skills and techniques
and use them in more difficult,
unstructured problems
develop an understanding of
coherence and progression in
mathematics and of how different
areas of mathematics can be
connected
recognise how a situation may be
represented mathematically and
understand the relationship
betweenreal-world’ problems and
mathematical models and how
these can be refined and improved
use mathematics as an effective
means of communication
Students take 3 exams at the end of Year 12 for the AS
qualification and an additional 3 exams at the end of Year 13 for
the A2 level
AS LEVEL: A2 LEVEL:
Core 1 Core 3
Core 2 Core 4
Statistics 1 OR Mechanics 1 Decision 1
(chosen based on students other options)
There is no controlled assessment element to the course
Taking maths
really helped me
with my Science
AS levels
It’s tricky but you get
lots of help from
your teachers
Its really well
respected by
universities
and
employers
AS maths is much
trickier than GCSE
but it’s a great
feeling when you
“get it”!
Entry Requirement
Grade B+ in GCSE Maths
8372
Further
Maths
AS at
WBHS
Further Maths at AS Level is
taken alongside the Maths AS
Level and is designed for very
able mathematicians with a
genuine interest in
mathematics.
The course is taught during
General Studies and
enrichment lessons as well as an
additional lesson taught at
lunchtime. A greater emphasis
is placed on independent study
due to the reduced teaching
time.
Students take 3 exams at the end of Year 12 for the AS
qualification and an additional 3 exams at the end of Year 13
for the A2 level
AS LEVEL: A2 LEVEL:
Further Pure 1 Further Pure 2
Statistics 1 Two of: Further Pure 3
Mechanics 2 Decision 2, Statistics 2 or
Mechanics 3
There is no controlled assessment element to the course
I really enjoy the
challenge!
You’ve got to be
really organised
to make sure you
get everything
done
Its really well
respected by
universities and
employers
Be prepared to
have to go to the
support sessions
when it gets
tough
Entry Requirement
Grade A* in GCSE Maths
Whitley Bay High School
MUSIC
Edexcel Codes: 8MU01/9MU01
Contact: Kieran Baldwin
What do I need to know or be able to do
before taking this course?
It is useful to have taken Music at GCSE level, but
this is not essential as long as you have a level of
understanding equivalent to at least a C at GCSE,
can already play a musical instrument to at least
grade 4 standard and are able to read music.
What will I learn on this course?
Music is an academic, practical and creative subject. The course demands
performing, composing, listening and analytical skills in almost equal measure.
You will improve your skills in performing and composing in a range of styles.
You will listen to a wide variety of music and develop a more informed
appreciation of how and why it was written and/or performed.
What kind of student is this course suitable for?
Anyone who has a keen interest in creating and listening to different styles of
music and who wishes to broaden their experience and deepen their
understanding of music.
What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?
AS
The AS qualification consists of the following three units:
Unit 1: Performing Music (30% AS 15% AL)
This unit gives students the opportunities to perform as soloists and/or as part of
an ensemble. Students can choose music in any style. Any instrument or voice is
acceptable as part of a five-six minute assessed performance. It is recommended
that students take lessons on their chosen instrument.
Unit 2: Composing (30% AS 15% AL)
This unit encourages students to develop their composition skills leading to the
creation of a three-minute piece in response to a chosen brief. Students also write
about aspects of their final composition and explain how other pieces of music
have influenced it.
Unit 3: Developing Musical Understanding (40% AS 20% AL)
This unit focuses on listening to music and understanding how it works. Set
works from an anthology provide the focus for the first two sections of the
examination, through listening and studying scores. Students familiarise
themselves with each work as a whole, before learning how to identify important
musical features and social and historical context. In the third section, students
use a score to identify harmonic and tonal features and then apply this knowledge
in the completion of a short and simple passage for SATB.
Whitley Bay High School
A2
Unit 4: Extended performance (15% AL)
This unit gives students opportunities to extend their performance skills as
soloists and/or as part of an ensemble. Students can choose music in any style.
Any instrument or voice is acceptable as part of a 12-15 minute assessed
performance of a balanced programme of music. It is recommended that students
take lessons on their chosen instrument.
Unit 5: Composition and Technical Study (15% AL)
This unit has two sections: composition and technical study. The composition
section further develops students’ composition skills, leading to the creation of a
final three-minute piece in response to a chosen brief. The technical study section
builds on the knowledge and awareness of harmony gained in the 3
rd
section of
Unit 3 through the medium of pastiche studies. Students normally complete one
composition and one technical study.
Unit 6: Further Musical
Understanding (20% AL)
This unit focuses on listening to music,
familiar and unfamiliar, and understanding
how it works.
Set works from the anthology provide the
focus for much of the unit. Students
familiarise themselves with each work as a
whole, before concentrating on important
musical features, context and/or elements
of continuity and change. Students will
learn how to compare and contrast
excerpts of music, place music in its
historical context and identify harmonic
and tonal features.
What could I go on to do at the end of
my course?
This AS/A Level in Music can lead to
further study in Music or Performing Arts
in Higher Education at degree or HND level.
A-level Music, along with a high standard
on at least one musical instrument (with practical and theory exam grades to
prove it), will be highly desirable for students wishing to study music at degree
level. In addition to your main instrument, Grade 5 piano is often considered
useful. Music can be used as a course to broaden your studies and may lead on to
a career in the music industry, business, education, event management, leisure
and tourism, broadcasting.
Muscle Fibre
Epimysium
Perimysium
Fibula
Cartilage
Muscle Fibre
Epimysium
Perimysium
Have you ever
wondered...
Why some people can run faster than others?
How your personality affects your
performance?
How you could become an elite sports
performer?
Why people take drugs?
How technology can help you?
Study A Level Physical Education
to nd out the answers.
A Level Physical Education
Studying A Level Physical Education will give you a fantastic insight
into the amazing world of sports performance. Not only will you
have the chance to perform or coach a sport through the non-exam
assessment component, you will also develop a wide ranging
knowledge into the how and why of Physical activity and sport.
The combination of physical performance and academic challenge
provides an exciting opportunity for students. You can perform,
and then through the academic study improve your performance
or coaching though application of the theory.
Physical Education is studied though a range of different contexts
and the impact it has on both ours and others everyday lives. You
will learn the reasons why we do things, why some people out
perform others, mentally and physically. You will also delve into
the ethical considerations behind the use of drugs and also the
influence that modern technology is having in and on physical
activity and sport.
Key features
Simple, straightforward assessment structure
All key areas of study covered
Opportunities to either coach or perform in an activity
Provides an excellent grounding for further study in this or many
other areas
Are you...
Thinking of becoming a Physiotherapist?
Aiming to manage a Gym?
Wanting to become a Personal Trainer?
Wanting to influence the diet and exercise
habits of the nation?
Fascinated by the human body?
Studying other sciences?
Or do you just want to understand the why
behind sports performance?
If so, A Level Physical Education is for you
*This is just
a draft as
the new Specification
is not due to be out
until February 2016*
Muscle Fibre
Epimysium
Perimysium
Fibula
Cartilage
Muscle Fibre
Epimysium
Perimysium
What’s included
30% Non-Exam assessment giving you the opportunity to apply the theory to your own sporting performance (as either a coach or a practitioner) and
also to analyse performance in your chosen sport.
How will you be assessed?
Non- Exam Assessment (NEA). One practical performance, as either
a coach or a performer in an activity.
NEA. One Performance Analysis task.
A total of four hours assessment split over three examination papers
(2x 1 hour and 1x 2 hour) taken at the end of the two year course.
A wide range of Question types including: single mark, short answer
and extended response questions.
The opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge of both theory and
performance skills in both your NEA and through the examinations.
What are the benefits?
This is an interesting and challenging learning experience, linking key
sporting ideas with practical performance and gaining insight into the
relationships they have with each other.
The development of transferable skills including: decision making,
psychological understanding of people, independent thinking,
problem solving and analytical skills as well as thinking and acting
under pressure.
The study of A Level Physical Education opens up a range of
possibilities for further study and careers associated with the subject.
Where can A Level Physical Education take me?
A Level Physical Education is an excellent base for a university degree in
sports science, sports management, healthcare, or exercise and health.
Physical Education can also complement further study in biology, human
biology, physics, psychology, nutrition, sociology and many more.
A Level Physical Education can open up a range of career opportunities
including: sports development, sports coaching, physiotherapy, personal
training or becoming one of the next generation of PE teachers. The
transferable skills you learn through your study of Physical Education,
such as decision making and independent thinking are also useful in
any career path you choose to take.
Thought provoking questions
Is the monetary cost of holding the Olympics worth it?
How much influence does the mind really have over the body?
If drugs were legal for all what would the sporting world look like?
Why do we ‘hit the wall’ during exercise?
Why train SMART?
Joints movement and muscles
Muscle functions and types of contraction
Analysis of movement
Skeletal muscle contraction
Muscle contraction during exercise of differing
intensities and during recovery
Cardiovascular system at rest
Cardiovascular system during exercise of
differing intensities and during recovery
Respiratory system at rest
Respiratory system during exercise of differing
intensities and during recovery
Diet and nutrition
Ergogenic aids
Aerobic training
Strength training
Flexibility training
Periodisation of training
Impact of lifestyle, active/sedentary
Acute and chronic injuries
Injury prevention
Responding to injuries and medical conditions
in a sporting context
Rehabilitation of injury
Biomechanical principles
Levers
Linear motion
Angular motion
Fluid mechanics
Projectile motion
Classification of skills
Types and methods of practice
Transfer of skills
Principles and theories of learning movement skills
Stages of learning
Guidance
Feedback
Memory models
Information processing
Individual differences
Group and team dynamics in sport
Goal setting in sports performance
Attribution
Confidence and self efficacy in sports performance
Leadership in sport
Stress management to optimise performance
Emergence and evolution of modern sport
Sport in the 21st century
Ethics and deviance in sport
Commercialisation and the media
Routes to sporting excellence in the UK
Modern technology in sport - its impact on
participation, fair outcomes and entertainment
The emphasis throughout the course is
on the development of your knowledge,
competence and confidence in a wide
variety of skills that will enable you to
confidently move forward in life. You will
learn how Physical Education affects and
contributes to society and also how to
apply your knowledge from this course to
any number of different practical situations
or career choices.
AS/A2 Philosophy & Ethics
at Whitley Bay High School
Exam Board: OCR
Contact: Dorothy Moore
Course Content
This is an exciting and challenging course which is suitable for
anyone with an enquiring mind, understanding and appreciation of
other people’s points of view, and an ability to come to clear,
informed decisions.
AS Course
Philosophy of Religion Ethics
Plato & Aristotle Absolute & Relative Morality
Judaeo-Christian Concept of God Natural Law
Arguments for and against Kantian Ethics
the existence of God Utilitarianism
Problems of evil Christian Ethics
Religion and Science Applied Ethics: abortion, euthanasia,
genetic engineering, war & peace.
A2 Course
Philosophy of Religion Ethics
Miracle Meta-Ethics
Religious Language Free Will & Determinism
Religious Experience Conscience
Nature of God Virtue Ethics
Body & Soul Applied Ethics: sexual ethics,
environmental & business Ethics
Skills You Will Develop
These will include those essential for enquiry, interpretation, reasoning,
evaluating and communication. It will provide you with the opportunity to think
about moral, philosophical and ethical issues and to evaluate and make choices
related to them.
How is the subject assessed?
There is no coursework. Assessment is in the form of exams at the end of the A2
year. There are two assessment objectives: the first requires students to
demonstrate their knowledge and understanding through the use of evidence,
examples and correct language and terminology. The second assessment
objective requires you to critically evaluate and justify a point of view using
evidence and reasoned argument.
Entry Requirement
Students should have attained at least a grade B at GCSE in English Language.
The course leads on from some of the experiences and topics touched upon in
GCSE Religious Studies: Philosophy & Ethics, but at a much deeper level. It
should also be noted that the course title is Religious Studies (Philosophy &
Ethics) and is not a pure Philosophy course.
What can I do with my qualifications?
Philosophy & Ethics as an examination subject has positive career advantages,
especially in competition for jobs and courses which involved dealing and
managing people under demanding circumstances. Employers in the following
careers regard Philosophy and Ethics as a desirable exam subject:
Medicine Personnel work
Law Banking
Journalism The Armed Services
Health Work Social Work
Leisure The Police
Teaching
If you have any further enquiries please ask Mrs Moore or Mrs Brown.
If I have seen further than others, it is by standing on the
shoulders of giants.” Isaac Newton
“A person who never made a mistake never tried
something new.” Albert Einstein
“If Quantum Mechanics hasn’t profoundly shocked you,
you haven’t understood it yet.” Niels Bohr
“But of what use is this electricity, Mr Faraday?” William
Gladstone to Michael Faraday (inventor of the ac
generator)
“My goal is simple. It is a complete understanding of the
universe, why it is as it is and why it exists at all.” Stephen
Hawking
Further Info
hp://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/science/as-and-a-level/physics-
7407-7408
hp://www.iop.org/careers/i-am-at-school-college/index.html
hp://physicsnet.co.uk/a-level-physics-as-a2/
AS/A Level Physics
AQA Code 7407/7408
Contact Kathryn Evans
Is this the course for me?
Physics is the study of the Universewhat it is made of, the
forces that govern it and the energy within it. It can prepare you
well for further scientific study and is required for physics,
engineering, architecture, optometry or astrophysics at
university. It is also a great subject if you are considering earth
science, geology or natural sciences. If you want to pursue a
career in medicine, dentistry or veterinary science it is the
favoured third science.
Yr 13 Physicists at CERN,
Geneva
The physics department
takes a group of A2
students to Geneva each
year to support their
studies on particle
accelerators, fundamental
particles, electric and
magnetic fields.
AS Topics
Students will study 5 contrasting topics over the course of the year.
Particle physics looks at the fundamental forces that hold the
universe together and the standard model of particles that make up
everything around us. Electricity builds on previous study and
provides lots of hands on work. Mechanics is the study of the physics
behind forces and motion and students will learn to predict how
objects will move. Waves are a means of transferring energy and we
will concentrate on light. The final section is measurements and their
errors, this will be covered through practical work within the four
topics and students will learn how to plan and carry out experiments
that provide accurate results.
A Level Topics
Students will study 4 topics in year 13 adding to the 5 in year 12.
Further mechanics and thermal physics includes studying oscillations
and heat transfer. Fields and their consequences is the study of
gravitational, electrical and magnetic fields and the effects these have
on mass and charge. Nuclear physics allows students to explain
radioactivity and nuclear power in terms of the forces that exist in the
nucleus. The final topic is our optionastrophysics. Students can
pursue their interest in cosmology and space, culminating in a
conclusion on the age of the universe.
Skills you will develop
You will develop your analytical thinking skills and problem solving
abilities. Throughout the course you will develop an ability to look at
the Universe and how it works in a critical way and be able to explain
how and why it behaves using clear and correct scientific language
and explanations. You will develop your ability to ask effective
questions and back up opinions with clear and concise arguments
based on evidence. You will learn how scientists carry out
investigations to test theories and make conclusions about physical
phenomena.
Assessment
AS
Students sit paper 1 and paper 2 in May/June, each is worth 50% of
the AS grade. Paper 1 covers all five topics and consists of short and
long answer questions split by topic. Paper 2 also covers all five
topics and consists of three sections. Section A covers practical skills
and data analysis, section B includes short and long answer questions
that cover the whole of the course and section C is made up of 30
multiple choice questions.
A Level
Students sit three 2 hour exams in May/June of year 13. Paper 1 is
worth 34% of the A level and covers topics 1-5 (studied in year 12) and
part of further mechanics. It includes multiple choice, short and long
answer questions. Paper 2 is worth 34% and covers the rest of further
mechanics and the other 3 A level topics. Again it includes multiple
choice, short and long answer questions. Paper 3 is worth 32% and
covers practical skills, data analysis and astrophysics. It is made up of
short and long answer questions.
Entry Requirements
You need to be a self motivated learner who has an interest in physics
and an enquiring mind. A minimum grade B in GCSE Core Science and
GCSE Additional Science is a requirement for this course. Students
studying Physics, Chemistry and Biology as separate sciences must
achieve a minimum of grade B in GCSE Physics and one other
science. You must also achieve a minimum of grade B in GSCE
Mathematics.
AS and A-Level Psychology
What is Psychology?
Briefly, Psychology is the study of the
behaviour and emotions of humans and non-
humans. It aims to investigate why we behave
as we do and to tries to find ways of changing
such behaviour.
Psychology tries to understand and explain
human phenomena, from mass events to the
individual: what makes you, you? How have
you been shaped? From your evolutionary
past, through your relationship with your
parents, the experiences you have had
growing up, to today.
Questions to consider:
Are you interested in people?
Can you express yourself clearly in writing?
Can you understand quite complex, technical
writing?
Are you prepared to discuss your own ideas
and opinions in class?
Are you happy to accept that there may be
more than one answer?
Why study Psychology?
You will learn a variety of skills including
analytical thinking, improved communication,
problem solving and many more that will
prepare you for an exciting future with the
possibility of a range of fantastic careers.
Possible degree options
According to bestcourse4me.com, the top
seven degree courses taken by students who
have an A-level in Psychology are:
Psychology
English Studies
Sociology
Business Studies
Teaching
Sport and Exercise Science
Law.
Possible career options
Studying Psychology at university can give you
a whole host of exciting career options,
including:
Marketing
Business Development
Accountancy
Human Resources
Forensic Psychology
Occupational Therapy
Clinical Psychology
Nursing
Teaching
Why are some eye
witness accounts so
unreliable?
What topics will you study?
AS and first year of A-level
Subject content
Social influence
Memory
Attachment
Approaches in Psychology
Biopsychology
Psychopathology
Research methods
Second year of A-level
Compulsory content
Issues and debates in Psychology
Optional content
Option one
Relationships
Gender
Cognition and development
Option two
Schizophrenia
Eating behaviour
Stress
Option three
Aggression
Forensic Psychology
Addiction
Assessment
There are two exams at AS each worth 50% of your AS
qualification. Each exam lasts 1 hour 30 minutes and is worth
72 marks. The exams consist of multiple choice, short answer and
extended writing questions.
At A-level there are three exams, each account for one third of your
A-level. The three exams last 2 hours and are worth 96 marks each.
The exams consist of multiple choice, short answer and extended
writing questions.
Entry requirements
As the subject is not available at GCSE, no prior knowledge is required.
However, as all of the exam papers include an essay component, research methods and some
maths, it is expected that students will have achieved at least grade B in GCSE English
Language/English Literature and Grade C in Double Award Science and Maths.
Contact: Sarah McKeown
Where might it lead...
We have taught students who have used this subject
to progress in a number of directions e.g.
· Technical degrees - particularly in the fields of
engineering and design
· Advanced apprenticeships in several areas such
as the Merchant Navy to motor sport
· As a secondary subject to support others
e.g. Several students have combined it with
music recently to work in recording
· As an AS level to add a technical dimension to
your subject portfolio
Entry requirements...
· Grade C or above at GCSE
Systems & Control or Electronic
Products or Grades C or above
in Double Award Science and
Maths
· Comfortable with scientific and
mathematical concepts and
calculations
· Perhaps the biggest factor will be
your ability to demonstrate your
enthusiasm, interest and tenacity
A2 Level (Y13)
Content:
Pneumatics, energy and storage,
programmable control systems,
microprocessors, further digital and
analogue electronics, product life cycle
and international standards
Assessment:
Written exam 25% of A level
A 2 hour paper sat in June with 3 questions
based on Design and Manufacture
Coursework 25% of A level
A significant design and manufacture project on
a topic suggested by the student
AS Level (Y12)
Assessment:
Written exam 50% of AS
A 2 hour paper sat in June with a range of
compulsory and optional questions
Coursework 50% of AS
Practical assignments focusing on developing
and making solutions to set problems
Content:
Materials, electronic sensors, timers &
counters, amplifiers, mechanical systems,
CAD/CAM, social issues in design, drawing
& modelling, commercial manufacturing
methods, health & safety
Other skills and benefits...
· You will develop the ability
to apply your knowledge in
practical situations to solve
real problems
· You can develop skills in
investigation and analysis
· You will learn the benefits
of an empirical approach to
research
· You will be far more aware
and prepared for
technological change
· Become more of an
autonomous and creative
problem solver
· Develop and refine
practical skills
Scan QR code
above or click here
You will learn to love the challenge and struggles and ultimately the huge personal satisfaction
that designing and making solutions to technical problems can generate.