No 1 October 2015 MONTHLY The online edition Sub committee Joshua Wong Meet our selected 2015 16 team Discussion Panel on Democracratisation in HK Naomi Chan on the Hong Konger s attitudes The Freelance Guy on the poverty in HK
No. 1 - October 2015  MONTHLY  The online edition.  Sub-committee  Joshua Wong                                            ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 contents 03 04 06 08 10 16 18 20 21 24 25 26 28 29 32 36 Page 2 Editor s Note 2015 16 Timeline Last and Next Event Introducing Sub Committee Panel Discussion Ft Joshua Wong Gone In The Blink Of An Eye In Memory of Timothy Chu Power of the Protest What s Happening in London EDITORIAL Hi Readers It is my pleasure to bring to you our first edition of PASS On Monthly Thanks for taking the time to read it This is our first year launching PASS On and we hope it will be informative thought provoking and entertaining We are also letting our members contribute by submitting their own articles Let your voice be heard If you have any opinions or requests please don t hesitate to let us know This month has been an eventful start to our year From our Panel Discussion Ft Joshua Wong to announcement of this year s Charity Partner sub committee recruitment and numerus PASS On articles this edition is a good kick start and we hope you will enjoy reading it Also HKPASS is a social community so in order to make your stay in London as enjoyable as possible we ve brought to you the latest events and deal Don t forget to check out what is happening in London this upcoming month which includes a list of all the ice rinks open this Christmas Zoe Liu Publications Officer 2015 16 Page 3
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  contents 03 04 06 08 10 16 18 20 21 24 25 26 28 29 32 36 Page 2  E...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 contents 03 04 06 08 10 16 18 20 21 24 25 26 28 29 32 36 Page 2 Editor s Note 2015 16 Timeline Last and Next Event Introducing Sub Committee Panel Discussion Ft Joshua Wong Gone In The Blink Of An Eye In Memory of Timothy Chu Power of the Protest What s Happening in London EDITORIAL Hi Readers It is my pleasure to bring to you our first edition of PASS On Monthly Thanks for taking the time to read it This is our first year launching PASS On and we hope it will be informative thought provoking and entertaining We are also letting our members contribute by submitting their own articles Let your voice be heard If you have any opinions or requests please don t hesitate to let us know This month has been an eventful start to our year From our Panel Discussion Ft Joshua Wong to announcement of this year s Charity Partner sub committee recruitment and numerus PASS On articles this edition is a good kick start and we hope you will enjoy reading it Also HKPASS is a social community so in order to make your stay in London as enjoyable as possible we ve brought to you the latest events and deal Don t forget to check out what is happening in London this upcoming month which includes a list of all the ice rinks open this Christmas Zoe Liu Publications Officer 2015 16 Page 3
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  contents 03 04 06 08 10 16 18 20 21 24 25 26 28 29 32 36 Page 2  E...
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PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 SUB COMMITTEE 2015 16 Page 6 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PUBLIC AFFAIRS DIVISION Christine Chan Matthew Cheung Crystal Lai Janice Leung Eric Li Michael Shi Adrian So Raymond So Cody Wang Claudia Wong Jason Yan SOCIAL SERVICE DIVISION Gwen Chan Kathy Cheung John Cheung Vanessa Cheung Tsz Kiu Ho Amy Huang Rowena Lee Steph Lee Helen Li Kevin Lim Nicole Tse Lilian Wong Tiffany Yau John Yu PUBLICATIONS DIVISION Designers Kathy Cheung Rowena Lee Writers Janice Leung Helen Li Adrian So Lilian Wong Page 7
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  SUB-COMMITTEE 2015-16  Page 6  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PUBLIC AFFAIRS DIVISION Christine C...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 SUB COMMITTEE 2015 16 Page 6 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PUBLIC AFFAIRS DIVISION Christine Chan Matthew Cheung Crystal Lai Janice Leung Eric Li Michael Shi Adrian So Raymond So Cody Wang Claudia Wong Jason Yan SOCIAL SERVICE DIVISION Gwen Chan Kathy Cheung John Cheung Vanessa Cheung Tsz Kiu Ho Amy Huang Rowena Lee Steph Lee Helen Li Kevin Lim Nicole Tse Lilian Wong Tiffany Yau John Yu PUBLICATIONS DIVISION Designers Kathy Cheung Rowena Lee Writers Janice Leung Helen Li Adrian So Lilian Wong Page 7
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  SUB-COMMITTEE 2015-16  Page 6  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PUBLIC AFFAIRS DIVISION Christine C...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 pass ed EVENT PANEL DISCUSSION FT JOSHUA WONG SS CHARITY SALES Wednesday 21st October 2015 Monday 16th Tuesday 17th November 6 30pm 8 30pm Page 8 on to the next Outside Saw Swee Hock Page 9
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PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 pass ed EVENT PANEL DISCUSSION FT JOSHUA WONG SS CHARITY SALES Wednesday 21st October 2015 Monday 16th Tuesday 17th November 6 30pm 8 30pm Page 8 on to the next Outside Saw Swee Hock Page 9
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  .....    pass   ed EVENT  PANEL DISCUSSION FT. JOSHUA WONG  SS CHA...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 Democratisation in Hong Kong and THE Role of the People s Republic of China Our Thoughts October 25th 2015 Zoe Liu PO With so many talks being given by Joshua Wong recently much of what he says may be quite repetitive Especially as we have read and seen so much on the matter So it was only fitting to invite along professors to stimulate greater discussion and provide a wider range of views to provoke further thoughts and opinions Hopefully that s exactly what we have achieved and here are the views of our PAO and 3 of the PO sub committee members who were present at the event Page 10 NAOMI CHAN Public Affairs Officer Is Joshua Wong even eligible to hold a conference in one of the most prestigious universities in the UK He is only a child who is so radical and his acts are always not mature enough in order to survive under the wrist of the Chinese or even the Hong Kong government Indeed Joshua is only a 19 year old guy and he is the founder of Scholarism a student activist group in Hong Kong As Joshua mentioned during the conference he started to be involved in political protest as early as the age of 14 protesting against the High Speed Rail in 2010 The Anti Civi Education Demonstration in 2012 marked the beginning of Joshua s involvement in political protests Being vocal in civil disobedience and student movements gained him fame within the political community Being a key player and also the first few who crossed the police border whilst invading the Citizens Square during the Umbrella Movement last September brought global media attention to this teen The Times Magazine during that period of time placed Joshua onto their cover for their Asia Edition making him well known across the globe Trying to be political neutral at all times the radical ideas about democratisation of Hong Kong by Joshua is not the main factor that appeals to me nor the fame that a youngster can gain through involving in student movements in Hong Kong What strikes me is his ambition and his courage in taking up such a challenging role during such a difficult time in Hong Kong In the eyes of the older generation full democracy and universal suffrage seem to be a goal that merely exist in their dreams It can never be achieved in Hong Kong Bear in mind although it is a so called special administrative region of China afterall in the eyes of the Beijing government it may be of no difference with other major and emerging cities in China such as Shenzhen Shanghai In times when worries and concerns about the future of Hong Kong in the next 30 years before the end of the 50 year promise of the One Country Two Systems agreed between the Chinese and British government in 1984 circulates within the Hong Kong community we are indeed grateful to have people from the younger generation such as Joshua who is willing to stand for Hong Kong I end with a note of advice that Joshua specifically spoke in Cantonese to the audience who are mostly from students from Hong Kong The future of Hong Kong do rely on you all the elites who being so fortunate to be educated in such prestigious institutions in the UK Please do come back after you have all graduated Hong Kong needs you LILIAN WONG PO SS Sub Committee As I saw this young boy of our age making his way to the discussion panel with an ordinary school bag which looked like the one we all once had accompanied by a undisguised look of exhaustion on his face there wasn t an immense sense of marvel and awe that I usually felt at a talk given by renowned academics or professionals Joshua Wong was not present that night as a lecturer but as a student who wished to share his insight and experience to his equals I believe the PowerPoint presentation given by Joshua wasn t relatively impressive to most of us as the information was rather factual and most of the students who went to the discussion that night Page 11
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  Democratisation in Hong Kong and THE Role of the People   s Republ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 Democratisation in Hong Kong and THE Role of the People s Republic of China Our Thoughts October 25th 2015 Zoe Liu PO With so many talks being given by Joshua Wong recently much of what he says may be quite repetitive Especially as we have read and seen so much on the matter So it was only fitting to invite along professors to stimulate greater discussion and provide a wider range of views to provoke further thoughts and opinions Hopefully that s exactly what we have achieved and here are the views of our PAO and 3 of the PO sub committee members who were present at the event Page 10 NAOMI CHAN Public Affairs Officer Is Joshua Wong even eligible to hold a conference in one of the most prestigious universities in the UK He is only a child who is so radical and his acts are always not mature enough in order to survive under the wrist of the Chinese or even the Hong Kong government Indeed Joshua is only a 19 year old guy and he is the founder of Scholarism a student activist group in Hong Kong As Joshua mentioned during the conference he started to be involved in political protest as early as the age of 14 protesting against the High Speed Rail in 2010 The Anti Civi Education Demonstration in 2012 marked the beginning of Joshua s involvement in political protests Being vocal in civil disobedience and student movements gained him fame within the political community Being a key player and also the first few who crossed the police border whilst invading the Citizens Square during the Umbrella Movement last September brought global media attention to this teen The Times Magazine during that period of time placed Joshua onto their cover for their Asia Edition making him well known across the globe Trying to be political neutral at all times the radical ideas about democratisation of Hong Kong by Joshua is not the main factor that appeals to me nor the fame that a youngster can gain through involving in student movements in Hong Kong What strikes me is his ambition and his courage in taking up such a challenging role during such a difficult time in Hong Kong In the eyes of the older generation full democracy and universal suffrage seem to be a goal that merely exist in their dreams It can never be achieved in Hong Kong Bear in mind although it is a so called special administrative region of China afterall in the eyes of the Beijing government it may be of no difference with other major and emerging cities in China such as Shenzhen Shanghai In times when worries and concerns about the future of Hong Kong in the next 30 years before the end of the 50 year promise of the One Country Two Systems agreed between the Chinese and British government in 1984 circulates within the Hong Kong community we are indeed grateful to have people from the younger generation such as Joshua who is willing to stand for Hong Kong I end with a note of advice that Joshua specifically spoke in Cantonese to the audience who are mostly from students from Hong Kong The future of Hong Kong do rely on you all the elites who being so fortunate to be educated in such prestigious institutions in the UK Please do come back after you have all graduated Hong Kong needs you LILIAN WONG PO SS Sub Committee As I saw this young boy of our age making his way to the discussion panel with an ordinary school bag which looked like the one we all once had accompanied by a undisguised look of exhaustion on his face there wasn t an immense sense of marvel and awe that I usually felt at a talk given by renowned academics or professionals Joshua Wong was not present that night as a lecturer but as a student who wished to share his insight and experience to his equals I believe the PowerPoint presentation given by Joshua wasn t relatively impressive to most of us as the information was rather factual and most of the students who went to the discussion that night Page 11
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  Democratisation in Hong Kong and THE Role of the People   s Republ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 would have familiarised themselves with the pro democracy movements in recent years As a result the spotlight of the night rested upon the Q A session where direct interactions took place The most poignant and forthright question that everyone was secretly hoping for came in the middle of the discussion when the question of whether the Umbrella Movement was counter productive was raised candidly in light of its subsequent intensification of social division and economic consequences This challenge was overturned by Joshua with a simple yet gripping response It was not Scholarism who has divided the citizens of Hong Kong but the government and the CCP s persistent refusal to dialogue and PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 direct negotiations Rerum Cognoscere Causas To Know the Causes of Things is the motto of LSE and to my surprise Joshua with his heavy Cantonese accent seemed to have better spelled out the essence of the motto than a LSE student Would divergence in political views and raising voices for socio economic demands have been non existent if they had not been manifested in this movement Not everyone prefers blunt confrontations and the tension it inevitably brought upon every aspect of our daily life Many have found it difficult to start an unpleasant argument with our beloved ones on this sensitive issue when you are supposed to have a peaceful conversation during dinner time All these fears are more than justifiable and I see no reason why you should insist on deepening the division with a two edged sword However the point of divergence here is not about whether you prefer smooth peanut butter over crunchy but on which path should your home embark in the near future The Umbrella Movement is not the cause of the dissatisfaction and frustration plaguing the city but a wakeup call for those who wished to bring about changes to the deep seated root cause of things the lack of people s representation in the political sphere This shortcoming combined with the government s failure to recognise and respond to existing social demands has culminated to an extreme sense of powerlessness and the resistance movement was a consequence born out of it As an ending note some suggested that the shift towards democracy was a long journey for a China which was not even long liberated from feudalism In their view what we need is to wait for a generational transfer of power to the younger generations of China the future leaders of the country I doubt whether such an erratic wait is worthwhile for us to bet all our chips on Time may or may not change the minds of the Zhongnanhai Page 12 successors but it could definitely blur our memories as well as our children s on why we resisted in the September of 2014 As Joshua had made clear in his final remarks we cannot rely solely on the support from the international community and we surely cannot rely on the gradual change in the CCP s way of ruling envisaged by some political analysts All we could do is to stop burying our heads in the pile of sand assembled deliberately under the name of prosperity or social harmony but instead be more informed on the political developments in Hong Kong and come to your own judgment Rerum Cognoscere Causas We can t tell the Chinese what to do they will punish us if we do JANICE LEUNG PO PA Sub Committee Joshua Wong was obviously the star of the show but the one sentence that stuck with me was this We can t tell the Chinese what to do they will punish us if we do Professor Christopher Hughes could not have put it any better The we in this statement could refer to any group of people few could stand up to China s current economic and political weight without eventually making at least some concessions in China s favour China s meteoric rise to superpower status over the past decade has left most of the former European imperial powers in the dust Its censorship keeps the domestic population under tight control those who fight it must keep dodging the Great Firewall s ever growing blacklist of phrases with increasingly creative ways Dissenters are spirited away like they never existed even though everyone knows where they have gone Of course these are grossly theatrical overgeneralizations but nonetheless the point stands The one party state may be ruthless and corrupt but you have to admit it is very good at doing its job But that s not the focus of this article What really caught my attention was the second half of the statement they will punish us if we do This raises a question why does China retaliate Although it has the capacity to do so it could choose not to there are many other ways to reject a proposal or halt a movement It could use dialogue compromise set agreements the list goes on So why does it choose to be aggressive The answer is very complex but I believe a Page 13
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  would have familiarised themselves with the pro-democracy movements in recent years. As a resu...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 would have familiarised themselves with the pro democracy movements in recent years As a result the spotlight of the night rested upon the Q A session where direct interactions took place The most poignant and forthright question that everyone was secretly hoping for came in the middle of the discussion when the question of whether the Umbrella Movement was counter productive was raised candidly in light of its subsequent intensification of social division and economic consequences This challenge was overturned by Joshua with a simple yet gripping response It was not Scholarism who has divided the citizens of Hong Kong but the government and the CCP s persistent refusal to dialogue and PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 direct negotiations Rerum Cognoscere Causas To Know the Causes of Things is the motto of LSE and to my surprise Joshua with his heavy Cantonese accent seemed to have better spelled out the essence of the motto than a LSE student Would divergence in political views and raising voices for socio economic demands have been non existent if they had not been manifested in this movement Not everyone prefers blunt confrontations and the tension it inevitably brought upon every aspect of our daily life Many have found it difficult to start an unpleasant argument with our beloved ones on this sensitive issue when you are supposed to have a peaceful conversation during dinner time All these fears are more than justifiable and I see no reason why you should insist on deepening the division with a two edged sword However the point of divergence here is not about whether you prefer smooth peanut butter over crunchy but on which path should your home embark in the near future The Umbrella Movement is not the cause of the dissatisfaction and frustration plaguing the city but a wakeup call for those who wished to bring about changes to the deep seated root cause of things the lack of people s representation in the political sphere This shortcoming combined with the government s failure to recognise and respond to existing social demands has culminated to an extreme sense of powerlessness and the resistance movement was a consequence born out of it As an ending note some suggested that the shift towards democracy was a long journey for a China which was not even long liberated from feudalism In their view what we need is to wait for a generational transfer of power to the younger generations of China the future leaders of the country I doubt whether such an erratic wait is worthwhile for us to bet all our chips on Time may or may not change the minds of the Zhongnanhai Page 12 successors but it could definitely blur our memories as well as our children s on why we resisted in the September of 2014 As Joshua had made clear in his final remarks we cannot rely solely on the support from the international community and we surely cannot rely on the gradual change in the CCP s way of ruling envisaged by some political analysts All we could do is to stop burying our heads in the pile of sand assembled deliberately under the name of prosperity or social harmony but instead be more informed on the political developments in Hong Kong and come to your own judgment Rerum Cognoscere Causas We can t tell the Chinese what to do they will punish us if we do JANICE LEUNG PO PA Sub Committee Joshua Wong was obviously the star of the show but the one sentence that stuck with me was this We can t tell the Chinese what to do they will punish us if we do Professor Christopher Hughes could not have put it any better The we in this statement could refer to any group of people few could stand up to China s current economic and political weight without eventually making at least some concessions in China s favour China s meteoric rise to superpower status over the past decade has left most of the former European imperial powers in the dust Its censorship keeps the domestic population under tight control those who fight it must keep dodging the Great Firewall s ever growing blacklist of phrases with increasingly creative ways Dissenters are spirited away like they never existed even though everyone knows where they have gone Of course these are grossly theatrical overgeneralizations but nonetheless the point stands The one party state may be ruthless and corrupt but you have to admit it is very good at doing its job But that s not the focus of this article What really caught my attention was the second half of the statement they will punish us if we do This raises a question why does China retaliate Although it has the capacity to do so it could choose not to there are many other ways to reject a proposal or halt a movement It could use dialogue compromise set agreements the list goes on So why does it choose to be aggressive The answer is very complex but I believe a Page 13
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  would have familiarised themselves with the pro-democracy movements in recent years. As a resu...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 Winning the support of the wider public requires experience part of it lies in the history both personal and modal of China s leadership The current Chinese leadership experienced firsthand the tumultuous 1970s and 80s a period of unprecedented social upheaval As with any experience it shapes individuals outlook and behavior To the outsider the heavy handed methods employed by the government seem incongruous and anachronistic to the supposedly modern world China has become a citizen of to them these methods are all they have ever known The last time there were any serious calls for reform on the mainland it ended with tanks storming Tiananmen Square bloody as the event was it proved that punishment was a viable method for silencing dissent Fast forward a decade or so Hong Kong s Occupy Page 14 movement Taiwan s Sunflower Movement and Xinjiang and Tibet s growing restlessness for autonomy all seem to be replays of the pro reform movements of the 1980s Drawing on past experience the logical response to these challenges to the central government is punishment not of the same kind as June 4th but punishment nonetheless Looking beyond the people who make up the central government one could even argue that the nature of China s leadership has never changed to this day it is dynastic with the President as the Emperor and the people as his subjects The people have no say in who governs and who does not the middling ranks of the CCP cater to the whims of their superiors in hopes of rising to a higher level the highest leadership defers to the wishes of the President how does this look any different from China from circa two thousand years ago Of course this is a very speculative argument but one that is worth thinking about If China s aggression is caused by the traumatic experiences of China s leadership then it follows that a generational change in leadership may bring reform The new generation will have grown up in a time of peace and prosperity as well as with access to a wealth of information through the growth of the internet and social media The next group of leaders will have been shaped by very different experiences to their predecessors and so will very possibly have different approaches to governance Perhaps all democracy needs in China is time the democracy movements just have to be patient and keep resisting until then HELEN LI PO SS Sub Committee I have heard many things about Joshua Wong and this talk was for me the first time seeing him in the flesh I came to the talk with a genuine interest in what he himself had to say about his actions the Umbrella Movement and the political climate in Hong Kong I left feeling somewhat overwhelmed by how I felt after his rather emotive closing words Despite this after the emotions subsided I began to really pick apart what were some of the still unanswered concerns I had about what he said Although Joshua remains optimistic about rallying more of the civil society to join in on his pursuit for universal suffrage and eventually self determination for Hong Kong whatever bargaining chip we could construct from this seems weak and small Even if Hong Kong elites were to abandon the city by 2047 the Beijing government may merely see this as an opportunity to open the floodgates and effectively replace the city already entrenched by gentrification with Mainland Chinese essentially a new Hong Kong The Guangzhou Shenzen Hong Kong Rail Express Link due to be finished in 2018 after all will make it much easier for this migration to occur There is also the question of the aftermath of self determination in Hong Kong and whether it will result in real liberation of the people or societal crisis and collapse Self determination does not always lead to desirable outcomes and it would be na ve to assume that success previous colonies experienced with self determination is indicative of how it would transpire for Hong Kong With regards to his aim to gain wider public support I do think that for a large part of the older generation who remain stubbornly skeptical of his efforts this is an opposition rooted in their disapproval of his hot blooded behaviour rather than towards universal suffrage as a basic human right Winning the support of the wider public requires experience an acute understanding of what different sectors in a society want and a clear idea of how to balance these different needs Despite these apparent concerns I applaud Joshua s bravery and admire his relentless perseverance towards what he believes to be right for Hong Kong Page 15
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015     Winning the support of the wider public requires experience    ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 Winning the support of the wider public requires experience part of it lies in the history both personal and modal of China s leadership The current Chinese leadership experienced firsthand the tumultuous 1970s and 80s a period of unprecedented social upheaval As with any experience it shapes individuals outlook and behavior To the outsider the heavy handed methods employed by the government seem incongruous and anachronistic to the supposedly modern world China has become a citizen of to them these methods are all they have ever known The last time there were any serious calls for reform on the mainland it ended with tanks storming Tiananmen Square bloody as the event was it proved that punishment was a viable method for silencing dissent Fast forward a decade or so Hong Kong s Occupy Page 14 movement Taiwan s Sunflower Movement and Xinjiang and Tibet s growing restlessness for autonomy all seem to be replays of the pro reform movements of the 1980s Drawing on past experience the logical response to these challenges to the central government is punishment not of the same kind as June 4th but punishment nonetheless Looking beyond the people who make up the central government one could even argue that the nature of China s leadership has never changed to this day it is dynastic with the President as the Emperor and the people as his subjects The people have no say in who governs and who does not the middling ranks of the CCP cater to the whims of their superiors in hopes of rising to a higher level the highest leadership defers to the wishes of the President how does this look any different from China from circa two thousand years ago Of course this is a very speculative argument but one that is worth thinking about If China s aggression is caused by the traumatic experiences of China s leadership then it follows that a generational change in leadership may bring reform The new generation will have grown up in a time of peace and prosperity as well as with access to a wealth of information through the growth of the internet and social media The next group of leaders will have been shaped by very different experiences to their predecessors and so will very possibly have different approaches to governance Perhaps all democracy needs in China is time the democracy movements just have to be patient and keep resisting until then HELEN LI PO SS Sub Committee I have heard many things about Joshua Wong and this talk was for me the first time seeing him in the flesh I came to the talk with a genuine interest in what he himself had to say about his actions the Umbrella Movement and the political climate in Hong Kong I left feeling somewhat overwhelmed by how I felt after his rather emotive closing words Despite this after the emotions subsided I began to really pick apart what were some of the still unanswered concerns I had about what he said Although Joshua remains optimistic about rallying more of the civil society to join in on his pursuit for universal suffrage and eventually self determination for Hong Kong whatever bargaining chip we could construct from this seems weak and small Even if Hong Kong elites were to abandon the city by 2047 the Beijing government may merely see this as an opportunity to open the floodgates and effectively replace the city already entrenched by gentrification with Mainland Chinese essentially a new Hong Kong The Guangzhou Shenzen Hong Kong Rail Express Link due to be finished in 2018 after all will make it much easier for this migration to occur There is also the question of the aftermath of self determination in Hong Kong and whether it will result in real liberation of the people or societal crisis and collapse Self determination does not always lead to desirable outcomes and it would be na ve to assume that success previous colonies experienced with self determination is indicative of how it would transpire for Hong Kong With regards to his aim to gain wider public support I do think that for a large part of the older generation who remain stubbornly skeptical of his efforts this is an opposition rooted in their disapproval of his hot blooded behaviour rather than towards universal suffrage as a basic human right Winning the support of the wider public requires experience an acute understanding of what different sectors in a society want and a clear idea of how to balance these different needs Despite these apparent concerns I applaud Joshua s bravery and admire his relentless perseverance towards what he believes to be right for Hong Kong Page 15
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015     Winning the support of the wider public requires experience    ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 March 18th 2015 The Freelance Guy CY N Studio Art Econ transfer 1998 Logo Page 16 D CY Donald Art Logo Studio Art Logo Logo Logo Logo 2009 Page 17
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015                                                                    ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 March 18th 2015 The Freelance Guy CY N Studio Art Econ transfer 1998 Logo Page 16 D CY Donald Art Logo Studio Art Logo Logo Logo Logo 2009 Page 17
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015                                                                    ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 August 25th 2015 Naomi Chan PAO 2014 8 Page 18 99 9 Page 19
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015       PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  August 25th, 2015 Naomi Chan  PAO                            ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 August 25th 2015 Naomi Chan PAO 2014 8 Page 18 99 9 Page 19
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015       PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  August 25th, 2015 Naomi Chan  PAO                            ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 In Memory of Timothy Chu Public Affairs Officer HKPASS 2006 2007 September 2nd 2015 Zoe Liu PO After having returned back to London for a month before coming back to Hong Kong to attend the Freshers events in my capacity as Publications Officer I was so shocked to find what a big difference a month makes Let me explain I live in Sheung Shui which is a Mainlander hotspot Since the Government introduced a policy limiting the Mainlanders coming into Hong Kong so often the roads really have become wider and even the train station where they usually get off and hang around for an hour or so before boarding again for a discount journeying back to Mainland seems a little more spacious Page 20 But don t get me wrong this post isn t just about Mainlanders it s about the rate of change that occurs in Hong Kong In only one month my favourite desert place Hui Lau Shan has already been replaced by a new shop Coral Cafe on the high street has also been totally refurbished and even a pharmacy which only just celebrated an extravagant opening in July when I was last here has already closed down Compare this to where I used to live in a small town called Aldershot in Hampshire in UK where part of the shopping centre took 5 years FIVE YEARS to refurbish Every year when I come back to Hong Kong there s always been something that has changed but this really is immense progress It s no wonder Hong Kong is a world commercial centre The phrase time equals money really does ring true here It is with deep sorrow that we tell you that Timothy Chu LSESU HKPASS 2006 07 Public Affairs Officer has unfortunately passed away He went missing at a scuba diving trip and his body was subsequently found at Race Rocks in Victoria British Colombia Timothy was a fine member of our society who made significant and enduring contributions Our hearts go out to his friends and family Below is an article prepared by the 2006 07 Timothy Chu was the Public Affairs Officer PAO of HKPASS in 2006 2007 Tim passed away from a diving incident in July 2015 Nine years ago we worked with Tim in the HKPASS Committee Back then HKPASS was a small student society We did not have a big membership base or a lot of sponsors What we had was a dedicated Committee and a core group of members who believed in what HKPASS stood for promoting public affairs awareness and social services As the PAO Tim played an important role in our work that year Tim organised a good number of activities for HKPASS There was the annual Cambridge Quiz for which Tim put together the LSE team Tim also interviewed Emily Lau Long Hair and James Tien with other members for the society s newsletter Looking back at those interview reports from nine years ago you see pictures of a young smiling bright eyed Tim standing next to the politicians having just quizzed them on the hot political topics of the day such as Goods and Services Sales Tax Chief Executive election and universal suffrage The main event which Tim organised that year was the Public Affairs Tea As Tim reported in the society newsletter it was the first of its kind and from what we could gather probably also the last in the history of HKPASS The genesis of this Tea was that we did not manage to invite any speaker of some calibre to host the usual Global Forum this Page 21
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  In Memory of Timothy Chu Public Affairs Officer HKPASS 2006     20...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 In Memory of Timothy Chu Public Affairs Officer HKPASS 2006 2007 September 2nd 2015 Zoe Liu PO After having returned back to London for a month before coming back to Hong Kong to attend the Freshers events in my capacity as Publications Officer I was so shocked to find what a big difference a month makes Let me explain I live in Sheung Shui which is a Mainlander hotspot Since the Government introduced a policy limiting the Mainlanders coming into Hong Kong so often the roads really have become wider and even the train station where they usually get off and hang around for an hour or so before boarding again for a discount journeying back to Mainland seems a little more spacious Page 20 But don t get me wrong this post isn t just about Mainlanders it s about the rate of change that occurs in Hong Kong In only one month my favourite desert place Hui Lau Shan has already been replaced by a new shop Coral Cafe on the high street has also been totally refurbished and even a pharmacy which only just celebrated an extravagant opening in July when I was last here has already closed down Compare this to where I used to live in a small town called Aldershot in Hampshire in UK where part of the shopping centre took 5 years FIVE YEARS to refurbish Every year when I come back to Hong Kong there s always been something that has changed but this really is immense progress It s no wonder Hong Kong is a world commercial centre The phrase time equals money really does ring true here It is with deep sorrow that we tell you that Timothy Chu LSESU HKPASS 2006 07 Public Affairs Officer has unfortunately passed away He went missing at a scuba diving trip and his body was subsequently found at Race Rocks in Victoria British Colombia Timothy was a fine member of our society who made significant and enduring contributions Our hearts go out to his friends and family Below is an article prepared by the 2006 07 Timothy Chu was the Public Affairs Officer PAO of HKPASS in 2006 2007 Tim passed away from a diving incident in July 2015 Nine years ago we worked with Tim in the HKPASS Committee Back then HKPASS was a small student society We did not have a big membership base or a lot of sponsors What we had was a dedicated Committee and a core group of members who believed in what HKPASS stood for promoting public affairs awareness and social services As the PAO Tim played an important role in our work that year Tim organised a good number of activities for HKPASS There was the annual Cambridge Quiz for which Tim put together the LSE team Tim also interviewed Emily Lau Long Hair and James Tien with other members for the society s newsletter Looking back at those interview reports from nine years ago you see pictures of a young smiling bright eyed Tim standing next to the politicians having just quizzed them on the hot political topics of the day such as Goods and Services Sales Tax Chief Executive election and universal suffrage The main event which Tim organised that year was the Public Affairs Tea As Tim reported in the society newsletter it was the first of its kind and from what we could gather probably also the last in the history of HKPASS The genesis of this Tea was that we did not manage to invite any speaker of some calibre to host the usual Global Forum this Page 21
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  In Memory of Timothy Chu Public Affairs Officer HKPASS 2006     20...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 caused some commotion within the Committee and so as a fall back Tim organised what some of us liked to do best sitting around and discussing public affairs over tea and crisps As far as talking politics go the Tea was pretty informative and intellectually heavy going The Tea was organised around the Chief Executive election which was to take place later that year Tim had the sub committee prepared a document pack to facilitate discussions Two members presented on the platforms of the then Chief Executive candidates Donald Tsang and Alan Leong The finale was a mock election in which 30 or so members voted for the candidate of their choice in a classroom in the East Building In the event Donald won in this HKPASS election as he did in real life Right after our election result was announced without missing a beat Tim played the Miss Hong Kong Pageant theme That was Tim s style of humour More generally Tim saw the fun in public affairs and other intellectual endeavours and wanted to share that view with us and to instil that playfulness in what he did for the society Many of us in the society found Tim endearing A kind fun loving and somewhat intellectually serious young man like Tim would always have you know his fair share of the market interest The Committee Page 22 crisis In juxtaposition over the years Tim seemed to have become happier more contented and actually looked better compared to his younger self back in LSE In the last two months since the incident Tim s friends from different walks of life got together to show support in their respective ways We learnt from each other more about Tim and how Tim had touched our lives We also got to learn more about Tim s family who has dealt with this very difficult situation with tremendous grace and composure Tim left us way way too early There was clearly a lot ahead of him certainly noted with interest that Tim was affectionately referred to as Tim by a group of female members That year Tim and us tried to promote public affairs and social services in our humble ways with our humble resources We are not sure to what extent we succeeded or failed After all it was somewhat of a hard sell telling people that what HKPASS was doing was sexier than say strutting your stuff at the Ministry of Sound with the Chinese Society However what we are sure about is that Tim was most probably the best man we could get when it came to selling that almost impossible message It was because Tim believed in it and lived it and he did so not just as PAO in 2006 2007 but also throughout his life Tim stood out amongst this Committee as the one who truly lived and breathed the ethos of HKPASS of being politically and socially aware and giving back to the society through volunteering work After LSE Tim worked at the House of Commons as a Parliamentary reporter He also served in the British Army Reserve and was awarded Solider of the Year in 2011 Further Tim volunteered as a Metropolitan Police Special Constable On top of that Tim engaged in other charity and church commitments Tim also completed his law degree whilst working and was about to begin his traineeship with the HMRC Legal Department Tim somehow also managed to squeeze in time for his language studies he was fluent in French and proficient in Japanese Spanish and Latin travels and interests We lost track of Tim s long list of interests and only knew after the incident that Tim was also an avid diver We last saw Tim during Chinese New Year earlier this year when he came back to Hong Kong for holiday True to HKPASS form we talked extensively about Occupy Central Tim also updated us about his life in London It was clear that Tim was loving life and looking forward to the next stage in his career in the legal field It was actually refreshing to see Tim because having lived life to the fullest the way he had you could feel that Tim rose above the fray of us average Hong Kong graduates who walk around Central with our expanding waistlines and that tired expression that suggests an early onset of a mid life We would like to end with an excerpt of a poem by Rupert Brooke These two lines by Brooke are set on the walls inside the 12 sided WWII memorial shrine in the Memorial Garden in Central As Tim was a soldier we thought these lines to be a fitting tribute to him These had seen movement and heard music known Slumber and waking loved gone proudly friended HKPASS 2006 2007 Page 23
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  caused some commotion within the Committee , and so as a fall-back...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 caused some commotion within the Committee and so as a fall back Tim organised what some of us liked to do best sitting around and discussing public affairs over tea and crisps As far as talking politics go the Tea was pretty informative and intellectually heavy going The Tea was organised around the Chief Executive election which was to take place later that year Tim had the sub committee prepared a document pack to facilitate discussions Two members presented on the platforms of the then Chief Executive candidates Donald Tsang and Alan Leong The finale was a mock election in which 30 or so members voted for the candidate of their choice in a classroom in the East Building In the event Donald won in this HKPASS election as he did in real life Right after our election result was announced without missing a beat Tim played the Miss Hong Kong Pageant theme That was Tim s style of humour More generally Tim saw the fun in public affairs and other intellectual endeavours and wanted to share that view with us and to instil that playfulness in what he did for the society Many of us in the society found Tim endearing A kind fun loving and somewhat intellectually serious young man like Tim would always have you know his fair share of the market interest The Committee Page 22 crisis In juxtaposition over the years Tim seemed to have become happier more contented and actually looked better compared to his younger self back in LSE In the last two months since the incident Tim s friends from different walks of life got together to show support in their respective ways We learnt from each other more about Tim and how Tim had touched our lives We also got to learn more about Tim s family who has dealt with this very difficult situation with tremendous grace and composure Tim left us way way too early There was clearly a lot ahead of him certainly noted with interest that Tim was affectionately referred to as Tim by a group of female members That year Tim and us tried to promote public affairs and social services in our humble ways with our humble resources We are not sure to what extent we succeeded or failed After all it was somewhat of a hard sell telling people that what HKPASS was doing was sexier than say strutting your stuff at the Ministry of Sound with the Chinese Society However what we are sure about is that Tim was most probably the best man we could get when it came to selling that almost impossible message It was because Tim believed in it and lived it and he did so not just as PAO in 2006 2007 but also throughout his life Tim stood out amongst this Committee as the one who truly lived and breathed the ethos of HKPASS of being politically and socially aware and giving back to the society through volunteering work After LSE Tim worked at the House of Commons as a Parliamentary reporter He also served in the British Army Reserve and was awarded Solider of the Year in 2011 Further Tim volunteered as a Metropolitan Police Special Constable On top of that Tim engaged in other charity and church commitments Tim also completed his law degree whilst working and was about to begin his traineeship with the HMRC Legal Department Tim somehow also managed to squeeze in time for his language studies he was fluent in French and proficient in Japanese Spanish and Latin travels and interests We lost track of Tim s long list of interests and only knew after the incident that Tim was also an avid diver We last saw Tim during Chinese New Year earlier this year when he came back to Hong Kong for holiday True to HKPASS form we talked extensively about Occupy Central Tim also updated us about his life in London It was clear that Tim was loving life and looking forward to the next stage in his career in the legal field It was actually refreshing to see Tim because having lived life to the fullest the way he had you could feel that Tim rose above the fray of us average Hong Kong graduates who walk around Central with our expanding waistlines and that tired expression that suggests an early onset of a mid life We would like to end with an excerpt of a poem by Rupert Brooke These two lines by Brooke are set on the walls inside the 12 sided WWII memorial shrine in the Memorial Garden in Central As Tim was a soldier we thought these lines to be a fitting tribute to him These had seen movement and heard music known Slumber and waking loved gone proudly friended HKPASS 2006 2007 Page 23
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  caused some commotion within the Committee , and so as a fall-back...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 September 30th 2015 Naomi Chan PAO Page 24 October 10th 2015 The Freelance Guy hea https www youtube co m watch v WN2ESUbCel U 2014 06 27 https www youtube co m watch v RD27XiBGrR U 42 Page 25
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015                   September 30th, 2015 Naomi Chan  PAO             ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 September 30th 2015 Naomi Chan PAO Page 24 October 10th 2015 The Freelance Guy hea https www youtube co m watch v WN2ESUbCel U 2014 06 27 https www youtube co m watch v RD27XiBGrR U 42 Page 25
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015                   September 30th, 2015 Naomi Chan  PAO             ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 October 12th 2015 The Freelance Guy 65 25 1235 4000 30 1 000 45 180 1 000 250 000 1000 45 180 5 51 14 3 3500 24 5 4 2000 1200 6 285 d d d https www youtube com watch v 1PqGgygOf1w Page 26 Page 27
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015                  October 12th, 2015 The Freelance Guy              ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 October 12th 2015 The Freelance Guy 65 25 1235 4000 30 1 000 45 180 1 000 250 000 1000 45 180 5 51 14 3 3500 24 5 4 2000 1200 6 285 d d d https www youtube com watch v 1PqGgygOf1w Page 26 Page 27
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015                  October 12th, 2015 The Freelance Guy              ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 October 15th 2015 Naomi Chan PAO Page 28 2015 4 11 https www youtube com watch v cdtEnMo8JIU 9 10 http christiantimes org h k Common Reader News ShowNews jsp Nid 6171 9 Pid 5 Version 0 Cid 220 October 15th 2015 Naomi Chan PAO Naomi Chan considers the history of protest in China leading to a discussion of the recent Umbrella Revolution in Hong Kong and what it has meant and will mean for China s political landscape The word protest is never new to Asia and certainly not to the Western world It is revolution generated from public protests that kick started the evolution of many Western democracies Protests are commonly used as tools for the general public to express their discontent over a certain issue in society and thus demand change The doctrine of non violent protest was first introduced in the 1920s by Gandhi the leader of the Indian nationalist movement against British rule The success of India s breaking away from being a British colony was greatly appreciated by Martin Luther King who then upheld similar principles during his fight for the civil rights of African Americans in the 1960s Up until recently the belief that protests should be held in a peaceful and non violent way has been widely spread across the world even in communist countries such as China Despite huge efforts to suppress the freedom of speech and media the Chinese government still felt challenged by the protest movements of recent years The outbreak of the Tiananmen Incident within a decade of the Qing dynasty being overthrown by the Xinhai revolution of 1911 is a typical example As students at elite universities in Beijing saw the new Republic of China government as weak especially in its response to the Treaty of Versailles at the end of World War One they co opted into a broader May Fourth Movement fused with a more intellectual cause to reject traditional Confucian culture that called for radical political changes in China Over 3000 of them marched to Tiananmen Square shouting slogans and burning the residence of an official they saw as culpable challenging the government in power The student leadership which began the Tiananmen protests in April 1989 never directly called for an overthrow of the Communist Party but rather for top leaders to step down and for those more receptive to political reform to take over Despite splits within the party those in power took a hard line against the occupation of Tiananmen Square ultimately resulting in the bloody crackdown that killed several hundred demonstrators many of them students The survivors of the protest could never forget that day one of the most disastrous moments that they had encountered in Page 29
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015                                                                    ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 October 15th 2015 Naomi Chan PAO Page 28 2015 4 11 https www youtube com watch v cdtEnMo8JIU 9 10 http christiantimes org h k Common Reader News ShowNews jsp Nid 6171 9 Pid 5 Version 0 Cid 220 October 15th 2015 Naomi Chan PAO Naomi Chan considers the history of protest in China leading to a discussion of the recent Umbrella Revolution in Hong Kong and what it has meant and will mean for China s political landscape The word protest is never new to Asia and certainly not to the Western world It is revolution generated from public protests that kick started the evolution of many Western democracies Protests are commonly used as tools for the general public to express their discontent over a certain issue in society and thus demand change The doctrine of non violent protest was first introduced in the 1920s by Gandhi the leader of the Indian nationalist movement against British rule The success of India s breaking away from being a British colony was greatly appreciated by Martin Luther King who then upheld similar principles during his fight for the civil rights of African Americans in the 1960s Up until recently the belief that protests should be held in a peaceful and non violent way has been widely spread across the world even in communist countries such as China Despite huge efforts to suppress the freedom of speech and media the Chinese government still felt challenged by the protest movements of recent years The outbreak of the Tiananmen Incident within a decade of the Qing dynasty being overthrown by the Xinhai revolution of 1911 is a typical example As students at elite universities in Beijing saw the new Republic of China government as weak especially in its response to the Treaty of Versailles at the end of World War One they co opted into a broader May Fourth Movement fused with a more intellectual cause to reject traditional Confucian culture that called for radical political changes in China Over 3000 of them marched to Tiananmen Square shouting slogans and burning the residence of an official they saw as culpable challenging the government in power The student leadership which began the Tiananmen protests in April 1989 never directly called for an overthrow of the Communist Party but rather for top leaders to step down and for those more receptive to political reform to take over Despite splits within the party those in power took a hard line against the occupation of Tiananmen Square ultimately resulting in the bloody crackdown that killed several hundred demonstrators many of them students The survivors of the protest could never forget that day one of the most disastrous moments that they had encountered in Page 29
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015                                                                    ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 their lives The dictatorial rule of the Chinese government was once again highlighted due to its suppressing of the 1989 Tiananmen Protest Opposition against any value or element of the government is never allowed One does not even dare mentioning the word protest in China as he she will most probably face prohibition from communicating with the rest of the world prosecution or even house imprisonment This is China where the governing party rules over everything This is where the government constantly fears the eventuality that a protest movement may become so powerful as to overthrow their rule The Hong Kong July 1 Marches are an annual protest rally originally led by the Civil Human Rights Front since the 1997 handover on the HKSAR establishment day which clearly reflect the power of the common masses to demand changes in society The 2003 march has proven to be one of the most remarkable and largest protests of them all Half a million citizens took to the streets opposing the legislation of Basic Law i e the constitution of Hong Kong Article 23 and expressing their Page 30 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 happening of SARS earlier in the year It forced the government to back down on the proposal because it lacked the necessary votes to pass it As a result of the protest the introduction of the Article 23 legislation was temporarily shelved It was the first time since the 1997 handover that the Hong Kong government had suffered a defeat It definitely set a precedent although not in law to the minds of people in Hong Kong Since then they have maintained a belief that by protesting by striking for what they want the government could no longer ignore the opinions of the people From 2003 held every year rationally and peacefully by citizens of Hong Kong as a channel to demand democracy universal suffrage rights of minorities protection of the freedom of speech and a variety of other political concerns However fearing the slipping away of the freedoms promised to them under the one country two systems formula introduced after the handover in 1997 citizens of Hong Kong then decided to initiate a large scale protest hoping to prevent communist rule in Hong Kong in the near future 28th September 2014 marked the beginning of this historical event the Umbrella Movement the Day when Hong Kong Cried The failure of the Hong Kong police in using tearing gas to drive away large crowds of pro democracy protestors in Admiralty rallied more people to the cause The use of umbrellas by the protestors as a shield from the continuous use of tear gas by police was how the name of the movement came to be Tens of thousands of Hong Kong residents young and old rich and poor have peacefully occupied major thoroughfares across the city demanding true universal suffrage and the resignation of hugely unpopular Chief Executive CY Leung It was the largest demonstration on Chinese soil since the 1989 Tiananmen Square protest The scale of the current protests has thus invited comparisons Many regarded the movement to be the Mini Tiananmen a repeat of 4 June 1989 Violence between the police and protestors had been seen during the driving away of protestors in Causeway Bay and the beating of protestors by wielding batons and pepper spray in Mongkok Nonetheless it failed to gain a large degree of support from the international community especially from the US which proclaims itself to be The Leader of the Democratic World Although the movement started to lose its support after 70 odd days and the Chinese government claimed victory after police dismantled the main protest camp on 15th December it certainly rang the bell for student involvement in future protest movements The protest also brought the problems underlying the city of Hong Kong to the surface such as the widening income inequality rocketing property prices regions being over flooded by mainland tourists ever increasing cost of living and the lack of opportunities Commentators suggest that the protest presented to the government the socio economic problems that Hong Kong has been encountering in recent years Despite the failure to achieve the aims of the Umbrella Movement the protest has been able to demonstrate the unity of the Hong Kong community and once again forced the Chinese government to rethink its governing policy over this special administrative region Since the twentieth century protests have been seen as a way to demand change and to express discontent towards the leader of the region While I have focused only on the protest movements that have taken place in China and Hong Kong in recent years these can be treated as microcosms of the wider world where the outbreak of demonstrations can either end up in partial success or complete failure However whilst remaining under the rule of the Communist Party Hong Kong and even China will not be able to aspire for large scale political social and economic changes without the consent of the Beijing government Page 31
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  their lives. The dictatorial rule of the Chinese government was once again highlighted due to ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 their lives The dictatorial rule of the Chinese government was once again highlighted due to its suppressing of the 1989 Tiananmen Protest Opposition against any value or element of the government is never allowed One does not even dare mentioning the word protest in China as he she will most probably face prohibition from communicating with the rest of the world prosecution or even house imprisonment This is China where the governing party rules over everything This is where the government constantly fears the eventuality that a protest movement may become so powerful as to overthrow their rule The Hong Kong July 1 Marches are an annual protest rally originally led by the Civil Human Rights Front since the 1997 handover on the HKSAR establishment day which clearly reflect the power of the common masses to demand changes in society The 2003 march has proven to be one of the most remarkable and largest protests of them all Half a million citizens took to the streets opposing the legislation of Basic Law i e the constitution of Hong Kong Article 23 and expressing their Page 30 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 happening of SARS earlier in the year It forced the government to back down on the proposal because it lacked the necessary votes to pass it As a result of the protest the introduction of the Article 23 legislation was temporarily shelved It was the first time since the 1997 handover that the Hong Kong government had suffered a defeat It definitely set a precedent although not in law to the minds of people in Hong Kong Since then they have maintained a belief that by protesting by striking for what they want the government could no longer ignore the opinions of the people From 2003 held every year rationally and peacefully by citizens of Hong Kong as a channel to demand democracy universal suffrage rights of minorities protection of the freedom of speech and a variety of other political concerns However fearing the slipping away of the freedoms promised to them under the one country two systems formula introduced after the handover in 1997 citizens of Hong Kong then decided to initiate a large scale protest hoping to prevent communist rule in Hong Kong in the near future 28th September 2014 marked the beginning of this historical event the Umbrella Movement the Day when Hong Kong Cried The failure of the Hong Kong police in using tearing gas to drive away large crowds of pro democracy protestors in Admiralty rallied more people to the cause The use of umbrellas by the protestors as a shield from the continuous use of tear gas by police was how the name of the movement came to be Tens of thousands of Hong Kong residents young and old rich and poor have peacefully occupied major thoroughfares across the city demanding true universal suffrage and the resignation of hugely unpopular Chief Executive CY Leung It was the largest demonstration on Chinese soil since the 1989 Tiananmen Square protest The scale of the current protests has thus invited comparisons Many regarded the movement to be the Mini Tiananmen a repeat of 4 June 1989 Violence between the police and protestors had been seen during the driving away of protestors in Causeway Bay and the beating of protestors by wielding batons and pepper spray in Mongkok Nonetheless it failed to gain a large degree of support from the international community especially from the US which proclaims itself to be The Leader of the Democratic World Although the movement started to lose its support after 70 odd days and the Chinese government claimed victory after police dismantled the main protest camp on 15th December it certainly rang the bell for student involvement in future protest movements The protest also brought the problems underlying the city of Hong Kong to the surface such as the widening income inequality rocketing property prices regions being over flooded by mainland tourists ever increasing cost of living and the lack of opportunities Commentators suggest that the protest presented to the government the socio economic problems that Hong Kong has been encountering in recent years Despite the failure to achieve the aims of the Umbrella Movement the protest has been able to demonstrate the unity of the Hong Kong community and once again forced the Chinese government to rethink its governing policy over this special administrative region Since the twentieth century protests have been seen as a way to demand change and to express discontent towards the leader of the region While I have focused only on the protest movements that have taken place in China and Hong Kong in recent years these can be treated as microcosms of the wider world where the outbreak of demonstrations can either end up in partial success or complete failure However whilst remaining under the rule of the Communist Party Hong Kong and even China will not be able to aspire for large scale political social and economic changes without the consent of the Beijing government Page 31
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  their lives. The dictatorial rule of the Chinese government was once again highlighted due to ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 October 28th 2015 The Freelance Guy d Page 32 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 11 12 17 17 1985 5 19 https www youtube com watch v cR5Yaxnamd4 2 1 2009 2010 3 6000 4 2000 5 10 100 153 129 5 3 500 1000 Page 33
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015                                                October 28th, 2015 The Freelance Guy            ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 October 28th 2015 The Freelance Guy d Page 32 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 11 12 17 17 1985 5 19 https www youtube com watch v cR5Yaxnamd4 2 1 2009 2010 3 6000 4 2000 5 10 100 153 129 5 3 500 1000 Page 33
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015                                                October 28th, 2015 The Freelance Guy            ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 http www thenewslens co m post 4166 d 6000 d https www youtube com watch v eq0oGb3WxsA d Page 34 http www goalgoalgoal ne t redirect php tid 289614 goto lastpost P s HKPASS 17 book youtube P http hk apple nextmedia co m sports art 20151019 19 338712 Page 35
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015                                                                    ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 http www thenewslens co m post 4166 d 6000 d https www youtube com watch v eq0oGb3WxsA d Page 34 http www goalgoalgoal ne t redirect php tid 289614 goto lastpost P s HKPASS 17 book youtube P http hk apple nextmedia co m sports art 20151019 19 338712 Page 35
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015                                                                    ...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 WINTERVILLE 2015 Victoria Park 26 Nov 23th Dec Features ice rink Santa s grotto and a circus plus a pantomime of Snow White and the Winter Night Garden an indoor cinema WHAT S HAPPENING IN LONDON Page 36 UNDERGROUND FILM CLUB IS BACK Waterloo Vaults 11 29 Nov Tickets 15 and sold out quickly Screenings Benedict Cumberbatch in Hamlet Amy the documentary about Amy Winehouse and Spice World Toy Story Up and Inside Out and more at undergroundfilmclub com Page 37
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  WINTERVILLE 2015 Victoria Park 26 Nov - 23th Dec Features  ice rin...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 WINTERVILLE 2015 Victoria Park 26 Nov 23th Dec Features ice rink Santa s grotto and a circus plus a pantomime of Snow White and the Winter Night Garden an indoor cinema WHAT S HAPPENING IN LONDON Page 36 UNDERGROUND FILM CLUB IS BACK Waterloo Vaults 11 29 Nov Tickets 15 and sold out quickly Screenings Benedict Cumberbatch in Hamlet Amy the documentary about Amy Winehouse and Spice World Toy Story Up and Inside Out and more at undergroundfilmclub com Page 37
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  WINTERVILLE 2015 Victoria Park 26 Nov - 23th Dec Features  ice rin...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM South Kensington 29 Oct 3 Jan Price Adult from 12 65 CANARY WHARF Canada Square Park 31 Oct 27 Feb WINTER WONDERLAND Hyde Park 20 Nov 3 Jan Price Adult 10 50 14 50 TOWER OF LONDON 20 Nov 4 Jan Price Adult 12 14 Price Adult 14 95 BROADGATE 16 Nov 25 Feb Price Adult 13 SOMERSET HOUSE Fortnum Mason Rink 18 Nov 10 Jan Page 38 Prices Regular skating from 8 85 16 10 Club Nights 17 Skate School 17 22 Free entry to Fortnum s Lodge and The Christmas Arcade HAMPTON COURT PALACE 20 Nov 4 Jan Price Adult 11 50 13 JW3 CENTRE Finchley Road 6 Dec 10 Jan Price Adult 12 50 Page 39
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM South Kensington 29 Oct - 3 Jan Price  Adul...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM South Kensington 29 Oct 3 Jan Price Adult from 12 65 CANARY WHARF Canada Square Park 31 Oct 27 Feb WINTER WONDERLAND Hyde Park 20 Nov 3 Jan Price Adult 10 50 14 50 TOWER OF LONDON 20 Nov 4 Jan Price Adult 12 14 Price Adult 14 95 BROADGATE 16 Nov 25 Feb Price Adult 13 SOMERSET HOUSE Fortnum Mason Rink 18 Nov 10 Jan Page 38 Prices Regular skating from 8 85 16 10 Club Nights 17 Skate School 17 22 Free entry to Fortnum s Lodge and The Christmas Arcade HAMPTON COURT PALACE 20 Nov 4 Jan Price Adult 11 50 13 JW3 CENTRE Finchley Road 6 Dec 10 Jan Price Adult 12 50 Page 39
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM South Kensington 29 Oct - 3 Jan Price  Adul...
PASS On Monthly Oct 2015 The rst step towards change is awareness Nathaniel Branden Page 40 LSESU HKPASS is a politically neutral society and any views expressed belong entirely to the author themselves
PASS-On Monthly   Oct 2015  The    rst step towards change is awareness. - Nathaniel Branden  Page 40  LSESU HKPASS is a p...