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STRANGE CASE OF   DR. JEKYLL AND   MR. HYDE      BY ROBERT LOUIS   STEVENSON      STRANGE CASE OF DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE ...
STORY OF THE DOOR  MR. UTTERSON the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile  cold, sca...
mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity  and that was the lawyer   s w...
Two doors from one corner, on the left hand going east, the line was broken by the entry of a court  and just at that poin...
a church   till at last I got into that state of mind when a man listens and listens and begins to long for the sight of a...
any credit, we undertook that he should lose them. And all the time, as we were pitching it in red hot, we were keeping th...
   Tut-tut,    said Mr. Utterson.    I see you feel as I do,    said Mr. Enfield.    Yes, it   s a bad story. For my man w...
head in his own back-garden and the family have to change their name. No, sir, I make it a rule of mine  the more it looks...
   H   m,    said Mr. Utterson.    What sort of a man is he to see        He is not easy to describe. There is something w...

 

“Story of the Door”

 

1.  Explain the 2nd paragraph of the first chapter on page 1.

 

2.  Why does Mr. Enfield call that building Black-Mail House?

 

3.  What ironic or coincidental thing happens on page 9? 

 

 

 

 

 

SEARCH FOR MR. HYDE  THAT evening Mr. Utterson came home to his bachelor house in sombre spirits and sat down to dinner wi...
insubstantial mists that had so long baffled his eye, there leaped up the sudden, definite presentment of a fiend.    I th...
After a little rambling talk, the lawyer led up to the subject which so disagreeably preoccupied his mind.    I suppose, L...
   Hyde     repeated Lanyon.    No. Never heard of him. Since my time.    That was the amount of information that the lawy...
dreams, it had no face, or one that baffled him and melted before his eyes  and thus it was that there sprang up and grew ...
been some minutes at his post, when he was aware of an odd, light footstep drawing near. In the course of his nightly patr...
   I see you are going in,    returned the lawyer.    I am an old friend of Dr. Jekyll   s   Mr. Utterson of Gaunt Street ...
   And now,    said the other,    how did you know me        By description,    was the reply.    Whose description       ...
brow like a man in mental perplexity. The problem he was thus debating as he walked, was one of a class that is rarely sol...
   I will see, Mr. Utterson,    said Poole, admitting the visitor, as he spoke, into a large, low-roofed, comfortable hall...
   Yes, sir, he do indeed,    said Poole.    We have all orders to obey him.       I do not think I ever met Mr. Hyde     ...
be like sunshine. Things cannot continue as they are. It turns me cold to think of this creature stealing like a thief to ...

 

 

“Search for Mr. Hyde”

 

1.  Explain Jekyll’s will.

 

2.  Who are Damon and Pythias and why does Lanyon mention them?

 

3.  Notice how polite the characters are with each other.   This was written in 1886, during what is called the Victorian period.  The Victorian period is a time when most economic classes had pretty strict rules of etiquette.  How has Mr. Hyde in this chapter gone against some rules of society?  (You’ll have to read between the lines a little.) 

 

4.  Dr. Fell refers to a nursery rhyme that goes as follows:

"I do not like thee, Doctor Fell,

The reason why - I cannot tell;

But this I know, and know full well,

I do not like thee, Doctor Fell."

 

5.  How is the picture to the left not very accurate?

 

DR. JEKYLL WAS QUITE AT EASE  A FORTNIGHT later, by excellent good fortune, the doctor gave one of his pleasant dinners to...
   You know I never approved of it,    pursued Utterson, ruthlessly disregarding the fresh topic.    My will  Yes, certain...
   My good Utterson,    said the doctor,    this is very good of you, this is downright good of you, and I cannot find wor...
   I don   t ask that,    pleaded Jekyll, laying his hand upon the other   s arm     I only ask for justice  I only ask yo...

“Dr. Jekyll Was Quite at Ease”

 

1.  What is a “hide-bound pedant”?  Make an educated guess, based on the reading, about the reason Lanyon and Jekyll do not respect each other very much.  See page 13, as well.     

 

2.  What does Jekyll say about his relationship with Mr. Hyde that sort of puts Utterson’s mind at ease, at least a little.  

 

 

 

THE CAREW MURDER CASE  NEARLY a year later, in the month of October, 18   -, London was startled by a crime of singular fe...
answered never a word, and seemed to listen with an ill-contained impatience. And then all of a sudden he broke out in a g...
and drove to the police station, whither the body had been carried. As soon as he came into the cell, he nodded.    Yes,  ...
It was by this time about nine in the morning, and the first fog of the season. A great chocolate-coloured pall lowered ov...
An ivory-faced and silvery-haired old woman opened the door. She had an evil face, smoothed by hypocrisy  but her manners ...
moment, however, the rooms bore every mark of having been recently and hurriedly ransacked  clothes lay about the floor, w...

"The Carew Murder Case" 

 

 

  1. What is all of the evidence that Hyde is guilty of killing Carew?
  2. Hyde apparently burned his checkbook, but he still has a bank account with several thousand pounds in it.  Why is this good news for Utterson and the police?
  3. The narrator tells us this: “when he [Utterson] glanced at the companion of his drive [the police officer], he was conscious of some touch of that terror of the law and the law's officers, which may at times assail the most honest.”  Have you ever felt this “terror”?  What is the point of the author bringing this up?

 

INCIDENT OF THE LETTER  IT was late in the afternoon, when Mr. Utterson found his way to Dr. Jekyll   s door, where he was...
   And now,    said Mr. Utterson, as soon as Poole had left them,    you have heard the news     The doctor shuddered.    ...
   No,    said the other.    I cannot say that I care what becomes of Hyde  I am quite done with him. I was thinking of my...
   Well, I shall consider,    returned the lawyer.    And now one word more  it was Hyde who dictated the terms in your wi...
scandal. It was, at least, a ticklish decision that he had to make  and self-reliant as he was by habit, he began to cheri...
   Yes, sir, indeed. It has elicited a great deal of public feeling,    returned Guest.    The man, of course, was mad.   ...
There was a pause, during which Mr. Utterson struggled with himself.    Why did you compare them, Guest     he inquired su...

“Incident of the Letter”

  1. Explain how is it possible for Utterson to be surprised and relieved by Dr. Jekyll’s selfishness?
  2. What does Utterson think Jekyll has done for Hyde because of the two documents/notes/letters?  
REMARKABLE INCIDENT OF DR. LANYON  TIME ran on  thousands of pounds were offered in reward, for the death of Sir Danvers w...
the 15th, he tried again, and was again refused  and having now been used for the last two months to see his friend almost...
But Lanyon   s face changed, and he held up a trembling hand.    I wish to see or hear no more of Dr. Jekyll,    he said i...
brought on myself a punishment and a danger that I cannot name. If I am the chief of sinners, I am the chief of sufferers ...
with a purpose all too plain and horrible. Written by the hand of Lanyon, what should it mean  A great curiosity came on t...

"The Incident of Dr. Lanyon"

 

  1. What is a fortnight? 
  2. What is in the letter from Lanyon that resembles Jekyll’s will?

 

 

INCIDENT AT THE WINDOW  IT chanced on Sunday, when Mr. Utterson was on his usual walk with Mr. Enfield, that their way lay...
half-way open  and sitting close beside it, taking the air with an infinite sadness of mien, like some disconsolate prison...
gentlemen below. They saw it but for a glimpse, for the window was instantly thrust down  but that glimpse had been suffic...

Incident at the Window”

THE LAST NIGHT  MR. UTTERSON was sitting by his fireside one evening after dinner, when he was surprised to receive a visi...
The man   s appearance amply bore out his words  his manner was altered for the worse  and except for the moment when he h...
The wind made talking difficult, and flecked the blood into the face. It seemed to have swept the streets unusually bare o...
housemaid broke into hysterical whimpering  and the cook, crying out,    Bless God  it   s Mr. Utterson,    ran forward as...
Mr. Utterson   s nerves, at this unlooked-for termination, gave a jerk that nearly threw him from his balance  but he re-c...
   Changed  Well, yes, I think so,    said the butler.    Have I been twenty years in this man   s house, to be deceived a...
Poole felt in his pocket and handed out a crumpled note, which the lawyer, bending nearer to the candle, carefully examine...
   That   s it     said Poole.    It was this way. I came suddenly into the theatre from the garden. It seems he had slipp...
life  No, Sir, that thing in the mask was never Dr. Jekyll   God knows what it was, but it was never Dr. Jekyll  and it is...
   You may say so, sir, indeed,    returned the butler.    It is well, then, that we should be frank,    said the other.  ...
I know it   s not evidence, Mr. Utterson. I   m book-learned enough for that  but a man has his feelings, and I give you m...
hummed solemnly all around  but nearer at hand, the stillness was only broken by the sounds of a footfall moving to and fr...
drew near with bated breath to where that patient foot was still going up and down, up and down, in the quiet of the night...
out for tea  the quietest room, you would have said, and, but for the glazed presses full of chemicals, the most commonpla...
fall of a perfect mat of cobweb which had for years sealed up the entrance. Nowhere was there any trace of Henry Jekyll, d...
there were traces of chemical work, various measured heaps of some white salt being laid on glass saucers, as though for a...
   And surely none stranger than itself,    echoed the lawyer in the same tones.    For what did Jekyll      he caught him...
and how  and in that case, can we venture to declare this suicide  Oh, we must be careful. I foresee that we may yet invol...
The lawyer put it in his pocket.    I would say nothing of this paper. If your master has fled or is dead, we may at least...

“The Last Night”

 

  1. What has been going on that has worried Poole and the other servants?
  2. How has the will they find changed?
DR. LANYON   S NARRATIVE  ON the ninth of January, now four days ago, I received by the evening delivery a registered enve...
house. Poole, my butler, has his orders  you will find, him waiting your arrival with a locksmith. The door of my cabinet ...
place, labouring under a blackness of distress that no fancy can exaggerate, and yet well aware that, if you will but punc...
speaking  and we moved in a body to old Dr. Denman   s surgical theatre, from which  as you are doubtless aware  Jekyll   ...
the honour, the sanity, or the life of my flighty colleague  If his messenger could go to one place, why could he not go t...
constitution, and   last but not least    with the odd, subjective disturbance caused by his neighbourhood. This bore some...
   Have you got it     he cried.    Have you got it     And so lively was his impatience that he even laid his hand upon m...
He sprang to it, and then paused, and laid his hand upon his heart  I could hear his teeth grate with the convulsive actio...
   And now,    said he,    to settle what remains. Will you be wise  will you be guided  will you suffer me to take this g...
black and the features seemed to melt and alter   and the next moment, I had sprung to my feet and leaped back against the...
                  STRANGE CASE OF DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE   Stevenson  77

“Dr. Lanyon’s Narrative”

 

1.  Where exactly in this chapter did you realize that that guy who goes to Lanyon's house is Mr. Hyde?  What made you realize that? 

2.  What does Utterson learn in Lanyon’s narrative?

HENRY JEKYLL FULL STATEMENT OF THE CASE     S I WAS born in the year 18   - to a large fortune, endowed besides with excel...
the transcendental, re-acted and shed a strong light on this consciousness of the perennial war among my members. With eve...
I was so far in my reflections when, as I have said, a side-light began to shine upon the subject from the laboratory tabl...
smoke together in the glass, and when the ebullition had subsided, with a strong glow of courage, drank off the potion. Th...
my own house  and coming to my room, I saw for the first time the appearance of Edward Hyde. I must here speak by theory a...
must flee before daylight from a house that was no longer mine  and hurrying back to my cabinet, I once more prepared and ...
Hyde. I smiled at the notion  it seemed to me at the time to be humorous  and I made my preparations with the most studiou...
The pleasures which I made haste to seek in my disguise were, as I have said, undignified  I would scarce use a harder ter...
the name of Edward Hyde himself  and when, by sloping my own hand backward, I had supplied my double with a signature, I t...
another bound of terror   how was it to be remedied  It was well on in the morning  the servants were up  all my drugs wer...
infinite risk of death, to treble the amount  and these rare uncertainties had cast hitherto the sole shadow on my content...
Yes, I preferred the elderly and discontented doctor, surrounded by friends and cherishing honest hopes  and bade a resolu...
balancing instincts by which even the worst of us continues to walk with some degree of steadiness among temptations  and ...
whether I would or not, I was now confined to the better part of my existence  and oh, how I rejoiced to think it  with wh...
There comes an end to all things  the most capacious measure is filled at last  and this brief condescension to evil final...
myself to solve. The laboratory door I had closed. If I sought to enter by the house, my own servants would consign me to ...
Thenceforward, he sat all day over the fire in the private room, gnawing his nails  there he dined, sitting alone with his...
I was stepping leisurely across the court after breakfast, drinking the chill of the air with pleasure, when I was seized ...
shocking thing  that the slime of the pit seemed to utter cries and voices  that the amorphous dust gesticulated and sinne...
for a fresh supply, and mixed the draught  the ebullition followed, and the first change of colour, not the second  I dran...