FunCation Academy’s 4th Grade Lesson Plan Sampler
Thank you for trying our Lesson Plan Sampler! Here are a few
quick tips before you begin.
1. This Lesson Plan Sampler contains six (6) 5th grade lessons, Reading, Writing, Spelling, Math, Science, and
Social Studies.
2. Please read through the complete lesson before you begin teaching. (Some lessons require a little prep work
before you can teach).
3. Each lesson includes additional resources, such as an instructional/introduction video, worksheets, and
activities and/or games to enhance the lesson.

 

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Disclaimer
FunCation Academy is not the original author of any lesson plans. We compiled and modified free online lesson
plans and free additional third-party resources to create homeschool friendly easy-to-use lesson plans. You do
not have to become a member to use our lesson plans, we share 3 lesson plans every month via our newsletter.
Subject
Reading
Title
Compare and Contrast
Lesson Objective
Students will gain a firm understanding on comparing and contrasting different elements of a story.
Background Information for Teacher
Teacher words are in bold.
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
The Recitals (Step 3)
Student Page 1 (Step 3)
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Remember, when we compare and contrast two or more things, we explain how those things are alike and different. This is
easy to do with things we know a lot about already, or with things we can see, such as a car or animal. When we compare
and contrast pieces of text, characters in a story, or information we read about, we will need to return to the text for
information to help us.
Distribute a copy of The Recitals and Student Page 1.
Read it as you would in a guided reading setting, offering support along the way. Suggested stopping point: the dotted line and after
paragraph 14. As the student read the story, listen and make anecdotal notes on accuracy and fluency. Suggested story introduction
and guiding questions to check for understanding are below:
This is a short story called The Recitals. Have you ever had a recital or watched a recital? Listen to the students’ reply. What
kind of recital have you had or watched? Listen to students’ reply.
This story is about a brother and sister who are twins. Their names are Milo and Mikayla. Read to the dotted line and then
stop. Be sure you think about how Milo and Mikayla are alike and how they are different. You may make notes about Milo
and Mikayla on your student page if you would like.
After the student has read to the first stopping point, ask them the following questions about Milo and Mikayla to check for
understanding and to generate discussion.
What does the story tell us about Milo and Mikayla?
What else have we now learned about Milo or Mikayla that we can put on our chart? We get to peek into Milo’s head a little
bit in this section. How is he feeling just before his recital? (nervous, had butterflies in his stomach)
What additional information can we put into the middle part of our chart? Remember, this is where we are recording ways
they are alike. Give the student time to answer and record their responses on their chart. (Student Page 1)
Read through the end of the story. Fill in any additional character information for Milo and Mikayla. Be sure you are only
recording information about the characters and not about their actual recitals. Give the student enough time to complete this
task. Additional info can include: watched each other’s recitals, happy to do well in their recitals, took a bow (Milo), got flowers and
curtseyed (Mikayla).
Look at your completed chart. This chart helped us record information from the story so we can quickly see ways Milo and
Mikayla are alike and different. Remember, this is comparing and contrasting, and it can be done between any two or more
things, characters, events, books, etc. The type of chart usually used for comparing and contrasting is a Venn diagram. The
H-chart we used today accomplishes the same thing, but instead of overlapping circles, we have the middle part of the H.
Have the student complete Student Page 2 for further comparisons.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
Worksheets for extra practice with answer key
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Art Compare and Contrast Essay ( online)- Students will select two ancient art pieces and will write an essay comparing and
contrasting the pieces while learning a little art history.

Subject
Writing
Title
Conjunctions
Lesson Objective
Students will understand how to properly use conjunctions.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Pencil
Student Writing Sample ( Step 3)
Student Pages 2a & 2b (Step 3)
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
I would like to show you a sample student’s writing that I think could be much better than what it is. I would like you to help
me think of ways to connect some of the sentences together so the paragraph doesn’t sound so choppy.
Show the writing sample on the Student Writing Sample page. (Step 3)
Read the paragraph aloud so the student can hear the choppiness of it.
What do you notice about this paragraph and how it reads? ◊ Give the student time to answer, guiding them to the choppy sound
of it if necessary.
This paragraph needs some sentence revision. The ideas are all fine, and the student seems to stay on topic without going
off into other directions from the main idea, but the sentences do not have good flow.
Many of the sentences are short, and many of them share similar ideas. For example, look at these sentences: I got a
football. My sister got a soccer ball. What are both of these sentences about? (They are both about what the kids got as
presents from their uncle.)
Some of these conjunctions are used more frequently than others. For example, and, or, and but are used more often than
nor or for.
The word for as a conjunction means something different than its usual meaning. As a conjunction, for has a similar
meaning to because.
Write the following sentences on the board:
My mother told me not to ride my bike in the street. It is too dangerous.
Watch how I join these two sentences with the conjunction for.
Change the sentences so they become one sentence like this:
My mother told me not to ride my bike in the street, for it is too dangerous.
Using for as a conjunction is not as common today as it once was, but it is important to know its function and use as a
conjunction because you will see it used this way in things that you read.
The word yet is also used in a different way as a conjunction than its usual meaning. For example, as a conjunction, yet has
a similar meaning to but.
◊ Write this example sentence on the board: My dog makes me so mad sometimes, yet I still love her.
If I replaced yet in this sentence with but, the meaning would not change. My dog makes me so mad sometimes, but I still
love her.
◊ Change yet to but in the example sentence.
You can see from the example that yet used as a conjunction to join the two ideas together is a lot different than using yet
as in“Are we there yet?”
Now that we know a few conjunctions and what they do, we will work together to finish revising the sentences in the
sample writing we looked at earlier. (return to the Student Sample Writing page
)
Distribute the following materials: ◊ Independent Practice, Student Page 2a ◊ Independent Practice, Student Page 2b
Now that you have had some practice joining sentences and phrases with conjunctions, you will practice using
conjunctions on your own.
Each student writing sample has some sentences or phrases that need to be joined with a conjunction. Your job is to select
the best conjunction that makes sense and is the best revision for the sentences.
First make your corrections in the paragraph, and then read the questions.
Give the student time to complete both Student Pages.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Conjunction Eater (online game)

Subject
Spelling
Title
Sight words, suffix -ant, and academic vocabulary
Lesson Objective
Students will learn how to spell Sight words, suffix -ant
Background Information for Teacher
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Paper
Pencil
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
Play the video, turn off the volume, and pause it between each word and ask the student to read the word. For an added challenge
ask the student to define each word. If the student is unfamiliar with the words, you may turn on the volume and have the student
repeat the word.
Please note: not all words in the video will be on the spelling list.
Step 2: Teach Lesson
1. possibility
2. grasp
3. comic
4. quiet
5. feast
6. sheepish
7. betray
8. defendant
9. immigrant
10. irritant
11. assistant
12. brilliant
13. compliant
14. extravagant
15. ignorant
16. artifact
17. migration
18. nomad
19. adapt
20. agriculture
21. rounding
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheet for extra practice
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Play a game a hangman using 4-5 spelling words everyday for one week.

Subject
Math
Title
Word Problems Strategies
Lesson Objective
Students will demonstrate their ability to solve problems in mathematics by selecting and correctly applying appropriate problem
solving strategies to a given problem and explaining why the strategies are appropriate.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
Students should have a basic level of proficiency with addition and subtraction with/without regrouping, multiplication and division.
Materials:
list of problem solving process and strategies (included in Step 2)
chart paper or whiteboard
markers
paper
pencil
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
1. Discuss problems students have had and the ways they solved them. Ask students these kinds of questions:
a. Have you ever forgotten your lunch? What did you do?
b. Have you ever been unable to do your homework because you didn't understand it? What did you do?
c. Have you ever been in a fight with somebody? How did you work it out?
2. Talk about the strategies scientists, engineers, and mathematicians use when solving problems. How are their strategies
similar to those of the students?
3. Below is a list of a few different types of problem solving strategies.
Use guess and check. When a problem calls for a numerical answer, a student may make a random guess and then
check the guess with the facts and information given within the problem. If the guess is incorrect, the student may
make and check a new guess. Each subsequent guess should provide more insight into the problem and lead to a
more appropriate guess. In some instances the guess and check strategy may also be used with problems for which
the answer is non-numerical.
Draw a picture or a diagram/use a graph or number line. A picture or graph may illustrate relationships between
given facts and information that are not as easily seen in word or numerical form.
Use manipulatives or a model/act it out. When a problem requires that elements be moved or rearranged, a
physical model can be used to illustrate the solution.
Make a list or table. A list or table may be helpful to organize the given information. It may be possible to make an
orderly list or table of all possible solutions and then to choose the solution that best fits the given facts and
information from this list. In some problems, the answer to the problem is a list or table of all possible solutions.
Eliminate possibilities. When there is more than one possible solution to a problem, each possibility must be
examined. Potential solutions that do not work are discarded from the list of possible solutions until an appropriate
answer is determined.
Look for a pattern. Patterns are useful in many problem-solving situations. This strategy will be especially useful in
solving many real-world problems. “Patterns are a way for young students to recognize order and to organize their
world” (NCTM, 2000, p. 91).
Choose the operation/write a formula or number sentence. Some problems are easily solved with the application
of a known formula or number sentence. The difficulty often lies in choosing the appropriate formula or operation.
Work the problem backward. If the problem involves a sequence of steps that can be reversed, it may be useful to
work the problem backward. Children at the early childhood level may already have some experience in working
backward. In solving many mazes and puzzles, it is sometimes easier to begin at the end than to begin at the
beginning.
4. Ask the student the following questions: When does diagramming or drawing pictures come in handy? When do students or
their parents make lists to help them solve problems? How does discussing a problem or situation help solve it? Why is it
important to think clearly and be organized when solving a problem?
5. Brainstorm some home-based problems with the student, (such as taking out the trash, noise, incorporating healthier foods in
meal planning, the need for more computer time or devices). Choosing one, discuss with the student how they might go about
solving it. What are some possible solutions to this problem? How would you test the solutions? Who would you talk with to
discuss possible solutions? Would a diagram or drawing help you solve this problem? Do you need math to solve this
problem? What would you say to make people understand your solution?
6. Demonstrate drawing a line down the center of a piece of paper. Draw an example of a problem on one side of the paper,
such as planning lunch or difficulty building a model airplane. On the other side of the divided paper, draw a solution to the
problem, perhaps asking for help, or a child drawing a diagram of the model airplane.
7. Distribute drawing paper and have the student divide their paper in half and write or draw a problem on one side and the
solution on the other side.
8. Once the student has completed their drawing, have them share and explain their drawing and how the arrived to their solution.
Now it is time for the student to solve a couple of word problems. Complete the two problem with the student using the steps in the
video in Step 1. Have the student decide which strategy they would like to use to solve each problem. Encourage different strategies.
Problem One
Mrs. Mason has just returned from a day trip to Washington D.C. She looked in her wallet and found that all she had left were two
one dollar bills, a twenty dollar bill, a five dollar bill, three quarters, a nickel, a dime and three pennies. She remembered that she only
spent money twice during the trip. She spent $15.07 on gasoline and some money on food. When she counted the amount of money
in her wallet, she realized that it was exactly half of the amount of money she left home with in the morning. How much money did
she spend on food during her trip? Which strategy or strategies did you choose? Explain why you think you chose the best strategy
for solving this problem?
First we need to count /add to find out exactly how much is left in the wallet. We know that the amount spent on food would be the
difference between double the money she has left now and money she has now plus money spent on gasoline… (The student might
proceed to solve it that way, or may discover that since they asked to find out how much was spent on food, they could simply say
change-gas money=food money.
Check the student’s plan and provide feedback as needed. Have the student solve the problem individually based on their plan.
Discuss the solution process once the student has solved the problem. If the student solved the problem incorrectly, give students an
opportunity to try again if needed.
Answer: She spent $12.86 on food.
Problem Two
Linda bought 3 notebooks at $1.20 each; a box of pencils at $1.50 and a box of pens at $1.70. How much did Linda spend?
Answer: She spent $6.80.
Finally, have the student complete the worksheet from Step 3. Encourage the student to select a strategy to solve each problem.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets for extra practice with answer key
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Multi-Step Word Problems (online practice) with answers

Subject
Science
Title
A Hair Raising Experience
Lesson Objective
Balloons are used to help students explore static electricity.
Background Information for Teacher
Static electricity exists when an object has lost or gained electrons. All matter is made of atoms. The nucleus of an atom contains
protons, having a positive charge, and neutrons having no charge. Electrons, which have a negative charge, spin around the
nucleus. Usually the protons and electrons are in balance; however, when an object loses some of its electrons, it is positively
charged, and an object with extra electrons is negatively charged. Both objects now have static electricity. The electricity is at rest; it
does not flow through the object as in current electricity.
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Three balloons ( might need more in case one pops)
Bits of tissue, sand, and paper
One plastic bag
2 pieces of thread or lightweight string about 2 feet long (exact length is not critical)
wool as in previous activity
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Begin by discussing the following questions:
Have you ever been shocked after walking on a carpet or putting on a sweater? Combing your hair? Getting out of a car with
cloth seats? Can you explain what caused the shock?
Describe your experiences playing with magnets. Have you noticed that sometimes two magnets will repel each other? What
causes them to repel?
Why do your clothes stick together when they come out of the dryer?
Why do you sometimes get a shock on a cold day when you touch metal?
What other experiences have you had with static electricity?
Now, have students perform two simple activities to reintroduce them to the concepts of static electricity that they may have already
learned.
Activity One
1. Give the student a balloon and a plastic bag. Have the student blow up and tie off their balloons. They should also blow air
into their bags and tie them off as best they can.
2. Instruct them to create static electricity by rubbing the balloon on their clothes or hair and testing it for static properties.
They should do the same with the plastic bag.
3. Allow the student time to explore with static electricity. The student can freely explore around the room, or they may need
some direction. Having an "exploration box" with bits of tissue, sand, paper, and other small items available can direct the
exploration.
4. If available, have the student explore static electricity with the fur and glass and metal rods. Rubbing fur on a glass rod
produces a greater charge than rubbing fur with a metal rod.
5. Discuss what they have discovered. The following questions may be used to guide the discussion:
What did you discover about your balloon?
What did you discover about your plastic bag?
Which produced the greater amount of static charge?
What objects will your balloon attract?
How is your balloon like a magnet?
Did your balloon attract objects more easily at some times than others?
6. Ask the student how these experiences could be called electricity. Help the student to determine ways the electricity with
the balloons is the same and different from electricity in other situations.
7. Direct the student in listing examples of electricity under two headings:
Electricity that moves along a pathway to light a light, moves a motor, etc. (current electricity)
Electricity that acts like a magnet, attracting and repelling objects (static electricity)
8. Guide the student in defining the two kinds of electricity. Use working definitions, definitions created by the student. These
definitions may not be exactly correct but can be changed through additional experiences with electricity.
9. List several occurrences of static electricity that happen in everyday life.
Activity Two
1. Blow up 2 balloons and tie each one closed so that the balloons stay inflated.
2. Tie a long thread or string onto the end of each balloon.
3. Give each balloon a static charge by rubbing it with fur, wool, or your hair.
4. Hold each balloon by the end of the thread and try to bring the balloons close to each other. Observe what happens.
5. What conclusions can you make about the activity? Again, think about what is happening to the atoms in the balloons.
When we rub the balloons with the wool, each of the balloons acquires a negative charge. Negatively charged particles called
electrons are transferred from the wool to the balloons, giving the balloons an overall negative charge. Because the two balloons
have the same kind of charge, they repel each other.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheet for deeper understanding
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Stuck-Up Balloon Activity
balloon
piece of fur or wool
a blank space on a nearby wall
1. Blow up a balloon and tie the end so that the balloon stays inflated. Without doing anything else, hold the balloon against the wall and see if
it will stick. Observe what happens.
2. Next, briskly rub the balloon across a piece of wool; you can use a sweater, sock, scarf, or rug.
3. Hold the balloon against the wall and see if it will stick. Does the balloon stay?
4. What conclusions can you make about the activity? Think about what might be happening to the atoms of the materials.

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Subject
Social Studies
Title
Bill of Rights
Lesson Objective
Students will investigate one of the amendments to the Constitution to find out how it was important for the time, how it protects
citizens and how it applies to our current needs.
Background Information for Teacher
The United States Constitution was ratified in 1787. It came under heavy criticism by Anti-Federalists who were upset that certain
guarantees of individual rights were not included. Others in the Constitutional Convention only approved of the Constitution on the
understanding that a guarantee of such rights would be added. The Bill of Rights, written by James Madison were the first additions,
or amendments made to the Constitution. They guarantee certain individual rights like freedom of speech, religion, the right to
petition the government for redress of grievances, the right to a jury, the right to bear arms, and other rights. The Bill of Rights was
ratified in 1791.
3 class periods that run 45 minutes each.(Possibly more days because of how the assignments are)
Student Prior Knowledge
Students should know why the Constitution was created, what it said, and what freedom the Bill of Rights gave to the people. The
students need to know that the Founding Fathers worried about the basic rights of the citizens. These rights were not included in the
Constitution. The Signers ( James Madison) created the Bill of Rights. These ten rights were added amendments to the Constitution.
Materials:
Decoding The Bill of Rights (Step 3)
Poster Paper & Markers
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Introduce students to the Bill of Rights by watching the video in Step 1 then ask the following questions to guide the discussion.
What is the Bill of Rights? What does it consist of? Which document is it part of?
What is an amendment?
What are examples of important rights and freedoms that Americans have because of the Bill of Rights?
What are examples of other rights and freedoms that Americans have?
What are examples of rights and freedoms that Americans do not have?
2. Distribute the handout Decoding The Bill of Rights (Step 3)
so that students understand exactly which rights are protected by
which amendments. This handout includes both the original language in the Bill of Rights (preamble and ten amendments) and
parenthetical translations in language that younger students will more easily understand. Ask the following questions to guide a
discussion about this handout:
Which of the ten amendments are familiar to you? How did you first learn about them? Why do you think they were familiar to you?
Which of the ten amendments are new to you? Why do you think you are less familiar with these amendments?
Are any of the ten amendments confusing to you? If so, what questions do you have about them? \
Why do you think it is important that Americans have these rights and freedoms?
3. Assign the student one of the ten amendments to the Constitution and research their amendment. They need to know why the
amendment was important for the time, how it protects citizens and how it applies to our current needs.
4.The student is given the the task of creating a poster for their amendment. Their poster needs to advertise (explain) the
amendment in their own vocabulary and relate the amendment to their life.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson plus Bingo for Step 4
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Bill of Rights Bingo ( offline)

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