Vol 53 No 1 January 2017
Institute of Animal Technology
Bulletin
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Development
EDITOR*
Sarah Lane
bulletineditor@iat.org.uk
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Carole Wilson
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Bulletin
Vol 53 No 1 January 2017
Final copy date for
March Bulletin
1st February
The opinions expressed in the
Bulletin do not necessarily reflect
those of the Editor or the
Institute.
CONTENTS
Ken Writes 5-7
Congress 8,10,14
Workshops 17,26
Congress Publicity 9
UAR Openness Awards 11
Tech Month 18-19
Suppliers Register i-xliv
Branch News 23-31
Situations Vacant 33-34
Diary Dates 35
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January 2017
5
Ken Writes…
F
urther to my article in July concerning the very low number of active Fellows
in the Institute, I am absolutely delighted to report the election of
three new Fellows, Vanessa Andrews, Danielle Cox and Sylvia
Mehigan. All three achieved their election after gaining IAT HE Levels 4 and 5
following which they achieved the BSc (Level 6) Professional Practice in
Laboratory Animal Science via Middlesex University.
I also understand that there may well be other members who are on course to
complete the IAT Level 6 Award this academic year, which again will be a
welcome boost to the numbers of Fellows. A Graduation Ceremony for
successful HE students is being planned for this Autumn.
There was and is an ongoing discussion for succession planning for the
senior posts on the IAT Council. All current post holders have already been
charged with identifying a suitable (and willing) deputy, who can shadow the
present incumbent to ensure knowledge and understanding of the roles is not
lost. In addition, a number of the senior officers will be coming to the end of
their maximum five years tenure over the next few years and so it is essential
that suitable competent individuals are in a position to be elected in due
course.
Speaking of elections, there will be a Council Election this year, which I
am delighted about. I have always felt that individuals should be willing to
stand for annual re-election as it gives Fellows and Members a chance to vote,
generates interest in Council and is a sign of a democratic and vibrant
organisation.
Council have decided to use the services of Understanding Animal
Research (UAR) regarding our communications strategy for an initial
six month period, concentrating especially on widening the Institute’s use of
electronic social media. I am delighted to report that there has been a
dramatic increase in the use of social media, especially on Twitter. More people
are using Twitter and Facebook to keep up to date with the IAT and this will
be further encouraged in the future.
Organisation of Congress 2017 is progressing extremely well and a Provisional
Scientific Programme is available in this issue and on the website.
I very much hope as many members as possible will be able to take part,
especially as following last year’s success, there will again be a large range of
interactive workshops.
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January 2017
The Animal Welfare Group (a sub-group of Council) has a new Chair in Matt
Bilton and Secretary, Simon Cumming. The Group have also agreed to co-opt
Gemini Bevan. The AWG is an avenue for members to help Council, without
having to give up the same level of time commitment.
Following many months of negotiation between the IAT and the Science
Council, it is understood the Science Council at their November meeting
will ratify the IAT as being able to award Registered Science Technician
(RSciTech). The IAT will then be awarded a licence to award RSciTech for one
year, which will mean that RAnTechs will be able to apply to be RSciTech using
the same application process.
The IAT syllabuses have been updated and placed on the Ofqual
database, known as RITS, have been approved and are now live
qualifications. The Syllabus Review Group has now reviewed all the IAT
Educational Policy documents and they have been uploaded to the website.
A meeting of the Youth Reps was held last September and among the topics
was a discussion on IAT merchandising. The Youth Group agreed that a hoodie
would be very popular, suggesting using the strap line “A Caring Career” and
following a competition a “mouse” badge was chosen and will be developed
into a design suitable for screen printing. The Youth Reps suggested that
AS-ET be the beneficiary of the Branch Raffle at Congress 2017 and this
was agreed by the Branch Reps.
Ken’s view
I have often listened to Animal Technologists bemoaning the fact that their
contribution in the workplace and the wider scientific community is neither
recognised nor valued.
Let’s deal first with the employment opportunities for qualified professional
Animal Technologists, although few take up the profession because of the
potential financial rewards. There are a number of surveys in the industry
which give an indication of the salaries available for Animal
Technologists which compare extremely favourably with other
scientific technicians, plus in the majority of cases wages are far
higher than other animal related occupations.
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January 2017
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Being recognised by one’s peers is a little harder to quantify but two recent
events I believe, say a lot about how Animal Technologists are now valued.
In November the British Pharmacological Society published a report on,
“The future of in vivo education and training” see
www.bps.ac.uk/futureinvivo
This report has ten main recommendations regarding those involved in
research using animals including:
7. Support integrated pathways for technicians and animal
technologists. There should be strong institutional support for
career progression, skills training and job security for
technicians and animal technologists, which takes account of
their key roles in laboratory animal research. Laboratory animal
technologists should be more integrated into the planning and
conduct of academic research and preclinical research and
development, both in industry and academic research.
At the November 2017 Understanding Animal Research (UAR) Openness
Awards:
The Internal or Sector Engagement Award was presented to the
Institute of Animal Technology for the development of their
Careers Pathway. The pathway provides a clear career structure
and development for animal technologists from school leavers
to managers. It is open about the need to improve training, and
seeks to raise standards, empowering animal care staff see
http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/communications-
media/openness-awards-2016-and-the-80th-stephen-paget-memorial-
lecture/
I hope these two events give our members the confidence to develop their
own careers and to be effective advocates for the animals in our care.
Ken Applebee
Chair IAT Council November 2016
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January 2017
IT’S TIME TO SERIOUSLY PLAN!
But first have you registered to attend?
www.iat.org.uk/congress and find us on
21st 24th March 2017
PROVISIONAL
SCIENTIFIC
PROGRAMME
PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME IN FULL
O The booklet circulated with this
issue of the Bulletin gives a
comprehensive guide to the
Scientific papers and workshops
ANDREW BLAKE TRIBUTE AWARD
O We are delighted to announce the
2017 recipient is John Waters at
the University of Liverpool and
you can read his abstract in the
booklet
WORKSHOPS AT CONGRESS
O Details on TEN workshops are
published in this Bulletin and
further information appears in the
booklet
O A pre-booking online system
applies this year for ALL delegates
and a link to the booking form will
be sent to everyone who has
REGISTERED although we are
repeating as many workshops as
possible, places will still be
limited, so don’t delay to avoid
disappointment
If you do not have a hard copy of the
‘Provisional Scientific Programme’
download it at
http://www.iat.org.uk/congress
Check for updates www.iat.org.uk
Closing date to register is
Friday 3rd March but don’t
leave it to the last minute
if you want to attend the
workshops
To discuss any aspect of Congress
with the Congress Committee or if
you have any questions, email
congress@iat.org.uk
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January 2017
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UAR Openness Awards 2016 and the 80th
Stephen Paget memorial lecture
O
n Monday evening 5th
December, the IAT
attended the UAR 80th
Stephen Paget memorial
lecture and the third annual
Openness award at the Royal
College of Physicians in
London. Professor Sir Mark
Walport, Government Chief
Scientific Adviser (GCSA) and
Head of the Government
Office for Science, presented
the Paget Lecture. After a
historic review of the
emergence of legislation
governing the use of animals
in research Sir Mark
challenged the scientific
community to provide a
more thoroughly researched
evidence base to support
animal use. While
congratulating the excellent
examples of Openness that
had been awarded, he
cautioned against
dragooning unwilling scientists into communicating about their research.
The Internal or Sector Engagement Award was presented to the Institute
of Animal Technology for the development of their Careers Pathway. The
pathway provides a clear career structure and development for Animal
Technologists from school leavers to managers. It is open about the need to
improve training and seeks to raise standards, empowering animal care staff.
The IAT were very proud and pleased to have won the category!
Steven Cubitt, a Fellow of the IAT and Managing Director of CCTech, collected
the award on the IAT’s behalf as shown in the picture, Steve (left) with UAR’s
Social Media Officer, Ronnie Guthrie.
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January 2017
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January 2017
Tech Month Get Involved!
T
he Institute of Animal Technology (IAT) is
running an Animal Technologist Month in
March 2017.
This will be a celebration of the contribution that
Animal Technologists make to animal care and
welfare and to biomedical research. It will consist
of a series of events running throughout March and
will also take place at Congress. During March the IAT
will be detailing opportunities for Technologists to
participate in fun competitions, online quizzes, training and Continual Professional Development
discounts, prizes, money off new merchandise and free giveaways.
We appreciate that not all Animal Technologists can attend conferences such as the IAT Congress and
also understand that some may not have access to the IAT website and cannot receive e-alerts or
updates on opportunities to participate. To try and ensure that we are inclusive, the IAT is already
engaging with local IAT branches all around the UK and Ireland to supply them with freebies to hand
out to members attending their Annual General Meetings. Information about Tech Month will also be circulated to each branch to inform their members what it
is all about. The IAT will also provide new polo shirt and hoodie samples plus the opportunity to have some additional merchandise as prizes if the AGM includes
a quiz or competition. Announcements will appear in the Bulletin, via e-newsletters and on the IAT App. In addition to the IAT activities, it is hoped that
employers might want to get involved and support Tech Month.
Here are some ideas:
Provide a tech breakfast or lunch.
Organise a researchers lunch with highlights of projects.
Organise games or competitions.
Award gift cards or other small recognition gestures.
Hold a bowling or laser quest evening.
Instigate a tech awards for excellent work.
Offer an extra half day off via a free raffle.
We hope that you will want to get involved and help the IAT to
provide recognition for the excellent work that Animal
Technologists do 365 days a year. If you would like more
information or wish to share what your research facility has
planned please contact us on communication@iat.org.uk
Bulletin
January 2017
19
Tech Month Get Involved!
T
he Institute of Animal Technology (IAT) is
running an Animal Technologist Month in
March 2017.
This will be a celebration of the contribution that
Animal Technologists make to animal care and
welfare and to biomedical research. It will consist
of a series of events running throughout March and
will also take place at Congress. During March the IAT
will be detailing opportunities for Technologists to
participate in fun competitions, online quizzes, training and Continual Professional Development
discounts, prizes, money off new merchandise and free giveaways.
We appreciate that not all Animal Technologists can attend conferences such as the IAT Congress and
also understand that some may not have access to the IAT website and cannot receive e-alerts or
updates on opportunities to participate. To try and ensure that we are inclusive, the IAT is already
engaging with local IAT branches all around the UK and Ireland to supply them with freebies to hand
out to members attending their Annual General Meetings. Information about Tech Month will also be circulated to each branch to inform their members what it
is all about. The IAT will also provide new polo shirt and hoodie samples plus the opportunity to have some additional merchandise as prizes if the AGM includes
a quiz or competition. Announcements will appear in the Bulletin, via e-newsletters and on the IAT App. In addition to the IAT activities, it is hoped that
employers might want to get involved and support Tech Month.
Here are some ideas:
Provide a tech breakfast or lunch.
Organise a researchers lunch with highlights of projects.
Organise games or competitions.
Award gift cards or other small recognition gestures.
Hold a bowling or laser quest evening.
Instigate a tech awards for excellent work.
Offer an extra half day off via a free raffle.
We hope that you will want to get involved and help the IAT to
provide recognition for the excellent work that Animal
Technologists do 365 days a year. If you would like more
information or wish to share what your research facility has
planned please contact us on communication@iat.org.uk
Bulletin
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January 2017
The AS-ET Trustees would like to wish all our readers best wishes for 2017.
G We are very pleased to announce that Jas Barley has joined the AS-ET Board of
Trustees. Jas has a history of service to the IAT, a current member of Council
she has held a number of important posts including Membership Secretary and
Chair of the ATW Journal Editorial Board, a position she still holds. Jas has
made a major contribution to animal technology education serving as an
examiner and specialist lecturer.
We welcome Jas and look forward to working with her.
G We are very grateful to Jonathon Wood of Datesand who presented a cheque
to AS-ET for £1,700. Jonathon raised this
money by entering a boxing match to raise
money for another charity, he persuaded his
colleagues at Datesand to match the amount
he raised by sponsorship to give to AS-ET.
This is all the more impressive when you
consider Jonathon has never boxed before.
Jas Barley at the AS-ET stand
Jonathan Wood, CEO at Datesand presenting a
cheque to Professor Lord Naren Patel, Patron of
AS-ET
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January 2017
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AS-ET is a charity set up to advance education and promote excellence in
the care and welfare of animals used in science.
To see how you can apply for a bursary visit our website (www.as-et.org.uk)
The companies listed below sponsor AS-ET. If you would like to join them
find out how to support us by looking at our website.
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May 2014
15
AS-ET is a charity set up to advance education and promote excellence in
the care and welfare of animals used in science.
To see how you can apply for a bursary visit our website (www.as-et.org.uk)
The companies listed below sponsor AS-ET. If you would like to join them
find out how to support us by looking at our website.
Bulletin
May 2014
15
AS-ET is a charity set up to advance education and promote excellence in
the care and welfare of animals used in science.
To see how you can apply for a bursary visit our website (www.as-et.org.uk)
The companies listed below sponsor AS-ET. If you would like to join them
find out how to support us by looking at our website.
Bulletin
May 2014
15
AS-ET is a charity set up to advance education and promote excellence in
the care and welfare of animals used in science.
To see how you can apply for a bursary visit our website (www.as-et.org.uk)
The companies listed below sponsor AS-ET. If you would like to join them
find out how to support us by looking at our website.
Bulletin
May 2014
15
AS-ET is a charity to advance education and promote excellence in the care and
welfare of animals used in science.
Sponsors of AS-ET are listed below and to find out more please visit the website
www.as-et.org.uk
AS-ET is a charity set up to advance education and promote excellence in
the care and welfare of animals used in science.
To see how you can apply for a bursary visit our website (www.as-et.org.uk)
The companies listed below sponsor AS-ET. If you would like to join them
find out how to support us by looking at our website.
Bulletin
May 2014
15
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January 2017
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Oxford Branch Annual Scientific Symposium
O
n the afternoon of Thursday December 8th the Oxford branch held their
sixth annual Scientific Symposium at the Medical Research Council,
Harwell.
A small trade exhibition with the following companies were in attendance:
Tecniplast, Scanbur, Aston Pharma, IPS, Vet-Tech Solutions, MMM Medical
Equipment, Special Diets Services, Impex, LBS and Datesand.
The Symposium, as on previous occasions, was a great success with a
programme of interesting lectures. After the initial registration lunch was
served, allowing plenty of time for everyone to visit the various trade stands.
Afterwards the meeting was opened by the Oxford branch Chair Adrian
Woodhouse who then handed over to Michelle Stewart, Scientific Manager at
the Mary Lyon Centre to chair the sessions.
The programme began with the following lectures:
Huw Golledge – Universities Federation for Animal Welfare
Cage-side welfare assessments are our tests sensitive enough, or
specific enough?
Abstract
Assessing animal wellbeing is crucial to protecting the welfare of animals used
in research. Several techniques have been proposed as cage-side welfare
assessment tools which can be used to test whether an animal is suffering poor
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January 2017
welfare. For those concerned with welfare it is extremely tempting to rapidly
deploy and rely upon newly developed methods which promise improved
detection of poor welfare. However, deciding which techniques are useful
requires careful consideration of what one wants to achieve by scoring welfare
followed by an examination of the suitability of the test to achieve that aim.
This talk will consider how best to assess the suitability of a technique for use
in cage-side welfare assessment.
The ideal welfare assessment is a test that provides an immediate, non-invasive
indicator of the welfare state of the animal (so-called cage-side assessment)
whereby any signs of poor welfare are detected and can be acted upon
providing treatment to ameliorate suffering or euthanasia if the suffering
cannot be treated. Cage-side assessment is analogous to a diagnostic test used
in clinical medicine. An ideal cage-side welfare assessment needs to be both
sensitive (able to reliably identify poor welfare) and specific (able to reliably
identify animals not suffering poor welfare). There are clearly consequences if
suffering animals are not identified and go untreated (lack of sensitivity
leading to false negative results) but there may also be consequences to
misidentifying healthy animals as suffering such as needlessly treating healthy
animals (lack of specificity leading to false positives). The suitability of various
techniques as cage-side welfare indicators were discussed, arguing that some
methods currently in use cannot be relied upon as cage-side welfare indicators
due to their lack specificity and/or sensitivity.
Other methods may be sensitive and specific but impractical, for instance if
they rely on post-hoc data analysis and therefore do not allow for rapid
intervention to relieve poor welfare. Techniques which are not suitable to be
cage-side welfare indicators may have other uses, for instance in classifying the
retrospective severity of procedures; as ‘epidemiological’ indicators of poor
welfare; or as group-level indicators of the efficacy of an intervention, more
analogous to the measurements used in clinical trials. Tests can be considered
even though they lack the specificity or sensitivity to be a cage-side welfare
indicator, as they could still be applied to improve animal welfare.
This talk could hopefully provide a framework for deciding which tests are the
most appropriate welfare indicators for a given scenario.
Maria Martinez – RAnTech, Primate NACWO, University of Oxford
Monkey business – behavioural management of laboratory primates
Abstract
Macaques are socially and cognitively complex animals, characteristics that
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January 2017
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make them ideal subjects for behavioural neuroscience research programmes.
However it is those characteristics that make it a great challenge to meet their
natural needs and ensure the best standards of welfare.
To ensure high standards of welfare and the application of the 3Rs it is
essential for scientific, veterinary and animal care staff to work closely
together.
This presentation gave an overview of Oxford’s approach to the behavioural
management of laboratory macaques involved in long term neuroscience
research.
Sonia Bains – MRC Harwell
Home-cage analysis system for multiply house mice
Abstract
Several central nervous system disorders such as Schizophrenia, Huntington’s
disease and Autism are investigated using mouse models. The current system of
investigation involves removing the animals from their home-cage
environment and placing them into novel environments to undergo a battery
of tests measuring a range of behavioural and physical phenotypes. These tests
are often only conducted for short periods of times in social isolation. However,
human manifestations of such disorders are often characterised by multiple
phenotypes and have a large social element. Therefore it becomes essential to
investigate the social behaviours such as social interactions, dominance and
anxiety over extended periods of time (months).
To address this, MRC Harwell is the sponsor for a ‘CRACK-IT’ initiative by the
NC3Rs: ‘Rodent Little Brother’. This initiative was put together to provide a
method of home-cage monitoring of the mice. The system, devised by Actual
Analytics comprises of standard IVC racks fitted with rigs that allows the
activity within a standard individually ventilated cage to be monitored. This
can be done by two methods – the first uses radio-frequency identification
(RFID) chips to track the mice around the cage, which are detected by the
antennae in the baseplate of the rig and the second method uses video
recording. The current set up enables the distinction between three mice
within a cage to be made. Using a combination of qualitative video data and
quantitative baseplate data, this system is capable of analysis of activities such
as circadian rhythms, locomotion and time spent in isolation for each mouse in
their home-cage. This unique combination of video and spatial data provides a
very rich set of features for analysis and a system is being developed which will
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January 2017
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automatically annotate behaviours such as grooming, feeding and social
interactions without experimenter intervention.
This project is aimed at refining existing models used to understand the cause
of disorders under investigation by keeping the welfare of animals in the
forefront and generating high quality reproducible data which can be used to
test possible treatments in the future.
Robyn Grant – Manchester Metropolitan University
Mouse whisker analysis
Abstract
Generating quantifiable metrics for the assessment of animal health and
welfare is often intrusive (such as taking physiological samples) and places the
animal under a great deal of stress. Measurable behavioural models have been
proposed as a way to mitigate a large part of the stress and also allow for the
animal to be studied while behaving freely. Several behavioural models have
been developed in the past, including beam balancing (to test balance),
rotorod (to test balance, coordination, stamina), novel object (to test cognition
and memory) and Morris water maze (to test memory and navigation). These
tests require extensive animal training and usually only measure the duration
and frequency of certain behaviours. Most laboratories will expose their
animals to a host of these behavioural tests in order to capture a range of
behaviours; however, these approaches lack sufficient sensitivity to wholly
characterise the progressions and recovery of animal health problems over
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January 2017
different periods. Measuring whisker movements might well address this
problem. Rodent whiskers are specialised for high-speed motor control during
exploration; indeed, the whiskers can move forward and backwards at rates of
up to 25 Hz. With the recent development of high-speed filming techniques, it
has become clear that whiskers can make very complex movements especially
during object exploration. Indeed, rodents have the capacity to alter the
timing, spacing and positioning of their whiskers to maximise sensory
information using a complex array of facial muscles. In addition, it has been
found that whisker movements are particularly affected in rodent models of
motor neuron disease, ageing, anxiety, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s
disease. Due to these successes the LocoWhisk arena has now been built which
can simultaneously quantify locomotion and whisker movements.
At the end of the programme the meeting was closed by the Chair, followed
by presentations to the speakers and a prize draw for everyone who attended.
Our thanks go to Michelle Stewart for chairing the meeting, the Medical
Research Council, Harwell for the use of their facilities, including the staff
involved in setting up the Symposium, the Oxford Branch Committee members
for the actual organising, the speakers and not forgetting everyone who
attended the event.
Finally our appreciation and thanks go to the exhibiting sponsors of this event.
John Bowler
Branch Reporter
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January 2017
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Stem Cell Biofacility
Away Day 2016
O
n the 23rd of September we made the journey across Cambridge to Bar
Hill to partake in the ‘Si5 SpyMissions’ for our away day.
As nine ‘spies’ we were split into two teams. One team went off on their
adventure while the other team waited for 10 minutes to elapse before they
started theirs.
Leadership skills were tested in a time pressured environment, as the teams
worked their way through a challenging mission, with the objective of
preventing World War Three and achieving the highest team score.
UNS Steadfast, a state-of-the-art Battle Cruiser, had been seized by enemy
forces, with the intention of sailing the vessel to a specific target and
launching a nuclear missile. Our mission was to stop them!
Inside Si5 SpyMissions they have built a UNS Steadfast ship that is divided into
16 rooms, each containing an objective which we needed to complete to stop
the missile from being launched. The objectives were a mix of physical tasks,
dexterity and mental challenges and all against the clock.
On each mission we were set 4 or 5 objectives. A guide is provided that gives
help and explains the challenges in each room.
It all started with Gemini testing her great driving skills to dock us onto the
UNS Steadfast.
This was then
followed by a
tunnel of lasers
that we needed
to cross to get to
the other side
without setting
them off,
climbing over
and under in
what seemed a
very tight space.
University Biomedical Services
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January 2017
The next mission
consisted of
finding different
objects to turn on
or off within the
room to stop the
timer before
moving on.
Christian was the
smallest in our
group so he
unfortunately ended up crawling through the smallest of gaps and nearly got
left behind.
We then had to run through a series of small tunnels which Katherine got
stuck in but with the help of team members she was soon eased out and on
her way down the cargo net and onto the next task.
We were given laser guns next and had to shoot three targets to stop an
explosive device going off. With this complete, we then had to get across three
platforms onto the other side.
Ladders and platforms of various heights is what awaited us next, higher and
higher we went, we could hear screams from Julie and Claire on the other
team and really did not know what was ahead.
Darren led the way and suddenly disappeared; as we called out for him we
realised he had descended down a massive drop slide which we would have to
follow to get out. This was what led to all the screams we had heard!
Finally all reunited both teams, though worn out, really worked hard together
to complete the mission. The world was saved for another day!
A great day was had by all with lots
of fun and laughter.
We would like to thank IPS and IMPEX Services International Limited for their
kind sponsorship.
Katherine Brame
University of Cambridge
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January 2017
The Surrey Hampshire &
The Surrey Hampshire &
Sussex Branch
Sussex Branch
On the evening of Wednesday the 8th of February
You’re invited to our AGM and a short workshop on:
Transmission Pathways Protecting Your
Environment
This workshop will be hosted by Sychem Ltd and will
examine the importance of effective cleaning, disinfection
and hygiene monitoring within a biomedical facility.
Topics include:
G Identifying the risk of bad hygiene standards
G Identify the key transmission pathways
G Looking at ways we can take control and manage the
risk
G Discuss the issues raised and identify how to implement
change
Refreshments and finger buffet will be provided
For more information, or to confirm attendance, please contact our
Branch Secretary:
francesca.whitmore@apha.gsi.gov.uk
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January 2017
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DIARY Dates
26 January
Named Persons Workshop
Central UK
Details from
www.iat.org.uk
See pages 26-27
27 January
Final date to submit a poster for
Congress 2017
See page 9
31 January – 2 February
PiL A-C training
London
Details from
info@learningcurvedevelopment.co.uk
1 February
Tecniplast Foundation Course in
Tecniplast IVC’s
Central UK
Details from
clare@tecniplastuk.com
2 February
Tecniplast IVC Knowledge & Skills
Refresher Course
Central UK
Details from
clare@tecniplastuk.com
8 February
Surrey, Hampshire & Sussex
Branch AGM & Short Workshop
South England
Details from
francesca.whitmore@apha.gsi.gov.uk
See page 32
14 February
West Middlesex 6th Annual
Technician Trade Day
Central London
Details from
julie.bee@crick.ac.uk
23 February
West Middlesex Branch AGM
London
Details from
w.steel@imperial.ac.uk
21-24 March
Congress 2017
Latest updates
Details from
www.iat.org.uk
22-24 March
8th European Charles River Short
Course
Berlin
Details from
www.eushortcourse.criver.com
See page 2
30 March
LASA & Fish Veterinary Society
Meeting
Edinburgh
Details from
www.lasa.co.uk/meetings
Cover photo: White Tail Deer Malcolm Gamble