This displays information on all of the following biomes: tundra, taiga, grassland, deciduous forest, chaparral, desert, savanna, rainforest and alpine.

 

 The Encyclopedia

 

 

of Biomes

By: Julian Hame

Life (biotic factors)

There are few plant species and even fewer animal types. The tundra is limited to grass, small trees and shrubs. As for animals, only a select few are able to survive here, such as wolves, bears and small rodents.

 

 

Humans

For obvious reasons, humans mostly don't live out in this brutal wasteland, but come up for the purpose of oil extraction, which results in extreme pollution. Unfortunatley for the few species that live here, there are no protection laws placed to keep the land safe.

Location: All along

 the North pole

Tundra

Abiotic factors

There is hardly any precipitation, mostly due to the unforgiving cold climate temperature which ranges from as low as -94 to 16 degrees celsius. The low amount of vegetation is becuase of the frozen, rocky soil.  

Alpine

Life (biotic factors)

Here, there are so little plant types due to the unlevel and cold characteristics. These few include flowers, mosses, shrubs and grasses. Not many animals live here as well, many of them being goats, llamas and leopards.

 

Location: Mountain Ranges all around the world

Abiotic factors

Much like the tundra biome, precipitation is low and the temperature is very cold, ranging from -12 to 10 degrees celsius. More so, the soil is extremely rocky and mostly frozen over.

Humans

People live here, in settlements mostly located in valleys. This leads to pollution via factories and construction. However, there are some protection laws in place.

Life (biotic factors)

Like the other two cold biomes, the taiga doesn't house too many plant species. Most of the ones here are coniferous trees. Here, there is a larger variety of animal life, ranging from rodents like squirrels to large species like mooses.

Humans

Some humans live in the taiga, but most of the damage comes from logging, which pollutes the air and destroys the habitat. To prevent this, there are many organizations seeking to prevent this.

 

 

Taiga

Abiotic factors

 There is little precipitation here, but more than the tundra and alpine. Since it mostly faces away from the sun, the temperature is obviously low, ranging from -54 to 21 degrees celsius. Here, the soil is cold and frozen, yet just warm and fertile enough for trees to grow.

Location: Around the globe, below the tundra 

Humans

Hundreds of millions of humans live in deciduous forests, in nearly half of the United States, most of Europe, and part of Asia, due to the fair climate and fertile land. We harm the forests to make room for these homes, especially since the soil makes for good farming land. Meanwhile, the trees are cut down in mass for materials. Due to this, there are a plethora of laws and policies for loggers to follow.

Life (biotic factors)

The Deciduous Forest is the first biome here to have a considerably large count of species, both animal and vegetation.  There are all sorts of trees, saplings, shrubs, mosses, grasses, flowers and more. Additionally,  it is home to many different mammals, like bears, deer, foxes and rodents.

Deciduous Forest

Abiotic factors

Aside from contaitemperature can go from ning a large variety of species, the deciduous forest is also the first of biomes here to have plenty of precicitation. There is lots of rain and snowfall per year, for the temperature ranges from around -30 to 30 celsuis per year. Given all the different plants, the soil here is very fertile.

Location: Eastern America, Europe and Asia

Life (Biotic factors)

The grasslands are much too dry for trees, but instead house many kinds of grasses, flowers and herbs. This dryness makes  it the preferrable living place for quite a few mammals such as wild dogs and cats like coyotes and bobcats. 

Humans

Many people have moved from the deciduous forests into grasslands, where they have settled. Many came to scour the ground for natural mined resources like coal and even gold. Many try to impose laws regarding grasslands, for they are very imperiled.

Grassland

Abiotic factors

Grasslands are very arid, which leads to a large lack of precipitation. This leaves the soil too thin dry for trees to survive, along with the 0 to 20 degree (celsius) temperature yearly. 

Location: Middle latitudes and continent interiors

Life (Biotic factors)

Although very hot, like grasslands, chaparrals are fertile enough for trees to grow, along with flowers and grasses. Also similar to the grasslands, chaparalls contain various wild cats and dogs, from foxes, to pumas.

Abiotic factors

 Just like grasslands, chaparrals are too dry for heavy precipitation. This and the 10 to 40 degree celsuis temperatures per year are the reasons why the soil is so dry.

Chaparral

Humans

As there are not many chaparral area on the Earth's surface, only a smaller amount of people live in them. However, due to the ones that do, there are factories and settlements which can cause mass pollution and even fires due to the hot climate. While there aren't laws preventing people from settling are polluting chaparrals, there are agencies and other groups dedicated to protecting them from further harm.

Location: Smaller areas of most biomes

Life (Biotic factors)

Due to the extreme heat (or cold) of a desert, there aren't any trees. Here, cacti thrives, not requiring much water while some shrubs grow nearby. Due to this lack of trees and other taller plants, the animals that live here are very small, mostly rodents and reptiles from rats and mice to snakes and lizards.

Humans

Most humans don't live in the sesert, but we do come here for the purpose of large scale projects, specifically, military activities. Not only are there numerous bases out here, but we use this barren land for military related experiments, which cause damage on a large scale. Aside from that, we exploit the land in search of oil and water. There are some laws in place to protect very specific desert areas, but not much more.

Desert

Abiotic factors

As one can guess, precipitation in the desert is a very uncommon occurence, for the temperature in hot deserts is usually from 20 to 25 degrees celcius, while cold deserts range from -2 to 4 degrees celsius. This obviously means either extremely dry and sandy soil or frozen and hard soil. 

Location: Around the equator or near the Arctic

Life (biotic factors)

While the savanna shares certain characteristics of hot deserts, they still have a huge abundance of grass, as well as some trees scattered and isolated, as the land is too dry for entire forests. Due to trees, large animals can survive here like elephants and giraffes. But at the same time, there are also many smaller and medium sized species like monkeys and zebras.

Abiotic factors

Much like the desert, grassland and chaparral biomes, savannas don't get much precipitation due to heat, which ranges from 20 to 30 degrees celsuis. As displayed numerous times previously, the soil is very dry and allows plant growth with much difficulty.

Savanna

Humans

 Like deserts, humans don't live very much out in savannas, but still affect it negatively. Rather than damaging the land, the harm comes from poachers, who kill the wildlife for the materials their bodies provide, like ivory. Of course, there are laws that try to prevent the killing os many animals out here, but a lot of hunters don't care.

Location: Near equator, mostly in Africa

Abiotic factors

 Even though the average temperatures here mostly range between 20 and 34 degrees celsius, being even more warm than hot deserts, there is extreme precipitation, more than anywhere else. The resulting factor is very fertile soil, fit for growing millions upon millions of trees and other plants.

Life (biotic factors)

 Despite being the warmest biome, tropical rainforests are undoubtedly the most lush, with thousands of plant species including various bamboos, trees and more. Appropriatley, there are plenty of animals to compensate like monkeys, tigers and hundreds of bird species. 

Rainforest

Humans

While we don't settle ourselves in rainforests, we certainly cause damage. Out of all the biomes, this one probably suffers the most, from deforestation on a gargantuan scale. So large that environmentalists are worried about the oxygen they soon won't be able to produce. As a result, there are many laws and groups that try to prevent this the best they can.

Location: All Around the Southern side of the planet