V alleyLife ISSUE NO. 2 JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2007 VALLEY KID JORDAN FARMAR IS HAVING A BALL Real Estate CORNERING THE MARKET Interior Design LIVE IN YOUR WHOLE HOUSE Body & Soul YOGA AND THE HIGHER SELF WEST VALLEY MAGAZINE Valentine’s Day TIPS FROM THE HEART L.A. Scene SEEING STARS Weekend Getaway MAMMOTH SKI RESORT THE OAKS AT OJAI Sports BORN TO RUN
V alleyLife ISSUE NO. 2 JANUARY   FEBRUARY 2007  VALLEY KID JORDAN FARMAR IS HAVING A BALL Real Estate  CORNERING THE MARK...
Performance, Comfort, Safety and Reliability. ACURA 101 WEST 24650 Calabasas Road, Calabasas, CA I 877-711-8899 I www.acura101west.com
Performance, Comfort, Safety and Reliability. ACURA 101 WEST 24650 Calabasas Road, Calabasas, CA I 877-711-8899 I www.acura101west.com
Performance, Comfort, Safety and Reliability.  ACURA 101 WEST 24650 Calabasas Road, Calabasas, CA  I  877-711-8899  I  www...
contents JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I ISSUE NO. 2 COVER STORY From local legend at Taft High School and UCLA to NBA Rookie with the L.A. Lakers, JORDAN FARMAR is having a ball 28 WEEKEND GETAWAY 7 ZACH’S VIEW MAMMOTH MOUNTAIN THE OAKS AT OJAI NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS 8 REAL ESTATE 34 PARENTING CHOOSING AN AGENT RAISING A HEALTHY EATER 10 HOME LIVE IN YOUR WHOLE HOUSE THE DIVINE IS IN THE DETAILS AN INTERIOR DESIGNER’S STORY 16 BUSINESS PROFILE 35 CASE STUDY GETTING YOUR DAILY JOLT 36 LOS ANGELES MARATHON BORN TO RUN GOLDCOAST COINS 38 BODY & SOUL 18 IN-TOWN YOGA AND THE HIGHER SELF SEEING STARS 20 SPORTS 20 JORDAN FARMAR 24 ROMANCE VALENTINE’S DAY BRINGING SEXY BACK 10 36 24 26 28 4 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 18 38
contents  JANUARY FEBRUARY 2007 I ISSUE NO. 2  COVER STORY From local legend at Taft High School and UCLA to NBA Rookie wi...
JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 
JANUARY FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE
page 6 editor’snote >> PicKING WinnerS Congratulations to Oak Christian High’s Lions for another perfect season, finishing 15-0! Coach Bill Redell was named the Sportexe National Football Coach of the Year and the team was ranked No. 1 in the state by Cal-Hi Sports! S ince the debut issue of ValleyLife Magazine this past November, we have been overwhelmed with an outpouring of support from the community. From the onset of this endeavor it has been our core focus to connect with the people of the West San Fernando Valley and Conejo Valley in a real and tangible way. Never has there been a magazine with a title truer to its purpose. ValleyLife is about where you live, how you like to spend your time and the places that you love to go and visit. We have been sincerely moved by the news, which has arrived via countless phone calls, letters and emails full of overwhelmingly positive feedback. Thank you, it means a lot. One thing that has been particularly compelling, and manifests itself in the content of our January/February issue, is how many of you are interested in contributing to the magazine, especially in the field of fitness and health. It’s true that few places in the country are more suited to an active, healthy lifestyle than Southern California with our year-round glorious weather, access to fresh produce and abundance of open spaces within a short driving distance. Whatever reason so many people are engaged in issues pertaining to wellness, it’s encouraging. Among popular trends, I would have to say that one centered on living a healthier and more fulfilling life is welcome indeed. Inside this issue you will find content ranging from interior design to profiles of local businesses and interesting personalities, all of which have a direct and vital connection to the place that we live and the people that we live amongst. And yes, I would have to say there is a rather healthy vibe that runs throughout. Maybe it’s just the time of year—the winter months following the holiday season—that often leaves many of us a few pounds North of our target weight and one or two minor complications away from a nervous breakdown, or maybe it’s more than that. One thing is for sure: the content of this magazine speaks to who we are right now, at this time and place, and something that falls under the title, ValleyLife. Brian Spero Editor >> Watch The Road! Please Jay [Leno], make sure you come to a complete stop before reading our feature on the Rock Store in our debut issue. Demand of ValleyLife Issue No. 1 was in high demand over on Mulholland Hwy. I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 Wondering where to find these beautiful examples from last issue’s “Getting A Grip: Replacement Knobs And Pulls” article (pg. 14-15)? Lucky for us these one of a kind little works of art just happen to come from Santa Monica. Visit Zietta Clara on the web at www.ziettaclara. com or call 310.459.2909 for product information. Zietta Clara “Luscious little pieces of art for the home” Zietta Clara, 212 26th Street #173 Santa Monica, California 90402 >> The Big Chill Its good to be here...in Southern California that is. Enjoy our winter weather because that’s (see photo) what other folks experience in the rest of the country. >> Welcome 2-007 – “Vodka Martini - Shaken Not Stirred.” 45 years after the first 007, Dr. No, Bond is back just in time for the New Year. With solid reviews and a strong box office showing, we are looking forward to bonding with Casino Royale star Daniel Craig more in 2007. >> Candy Cane LANE >>Music To OUr Ears This past Christmas’s light display was more spactacular than ever. The residents of Candy Cane Lane did it again! Our chat with piano instructor Edna Babayoff really struck a chord with our readers. Her phone has been ringing off the hook with inquires from parents of perspective students. V alleyLife WEST VALLEY MAGAZINE Boaz Gabbai CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Publisher/creative director Kelly Bonanno Brian Spero Kay Cole editor LorI Denman Mona Loring ZACH McLARTY Dawn Ritchie Kathryn L. Robyn Rochelle Scott KIM SMITH letters to the EDITOR: brian@valleylifemagazine.com for advertising please contact 818.340.3362 or email us at: ads@valleylifemagazine.com  VALLEYLIFE >> Lost in translation ValleyLife Magazine is published bimonthly. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited. All articles, photographs and artwork printed in ValleyLife Magazine are the sole property of ValleyLife and may not be duplicated or reprinted without written permission. All ads designed by ValleyLife Magazine are the property of ValleyLife Magazine and cannot be duplicated or reprinted without written permission. ValleyLife assumes no responsibility for care or return of unsolicited manuscripts and photographs. All correspondence must include an address and a daytime telephone number. The views presented in the editorials are those of the writers. They do not necessarily reflect the views held by ValleyLife or its staff. ValleyLife magazine 6411 Antigua Place, West Hills, CA 91307, T: 818.340.3362; F: 818.340.9099; Email: ads@valleylifemagazine.com. Printed in U.S.A.
page 6 editor   snote     PicKING WinnerS Congratulations to Oak Christian High   s Lions for another perfect season, fini...
zach’sview BY ZACH MCLARTY New Year’s Resolutions Require Too Much Resolution N ew Year’s resolutions are great. They represent a chance to wipe the slate clean, while affording an opportunity to atone for personal shortcomings. We work too much. We work too little. We don’t workout enough. “I’m going to spend more time with the family this year and get back into shape.” We all make them. Even people who say they don’t usually know what theirs would be if they did. Yet by April most people won’t be able to tell you what it was they had decided to resolve. Heck, by then many people can’t remember if they even HAD a New Year’s resolution. So why do we do this every year; and what comes between us and our New Year’s resolutions? To simply say that New Year’s resolutions don’t work is too vague. Sure, it’s possible that John from Accounting really had no chance of going without doughnuts for an entire year. But placing blame squarely on the shoulders of the individual, while in some cases true, can’t explain the lackluster efforts by people everywhere of completing their resolutions. There must be a more universal reason for so many broken promises on an annual basis. With much dismay, I have decided that society and modern culture are the culprits. That’s right: It’s the world’s fault. So this year when you aren’t able to carry out that pesky New Year’s resolution, don’t take it so hard. Blame it on the world we live in. Really, with stimuli at an all time high, who has an entire year to complete a task? We live in a resultoriented world. Work is expected to be done yesterday. Emails should be responded to in five minutes or less. I don’t care if you are traveling! My friends, we are knee deep in a stiflingly (technologically) advancing era. The age of the videoconference is upon us, where no one thinks it a task to talk face-to-face with someone in Japan in a matter of seconds. When a coffee craving comes, a Starbucks can’t be but a five-minute walk from your home or office (sorry, I forgot that this is LA. Change “five minute walk” to “two minute drive”). Even my fantasy football statistics are updated every two minutes. It’s mind-boggling! Surely all this craziness must be affecting the behavioral patterns of human beings everywhere. But how exactly? Is there an adjustment people are making to ingest this unprecedented amount of stimulus? I believe there is. I call it the Instant Gratification Syndrome. The Instant Gratification Syndrome, or IGS, seems to have a grapple hold on America. Who wants to wait for anything anymore? I don’t. I’ll admit it. In the early 80s I wouldn’t think twice about waiting six to eight weeks for something I mailed away for to arrive. You really didn’t have the option of, say, ordering it on the Internet with next day delivery. In 1987, if someone told me I’d have the ability to order anything I wanted on a computer and get it the next day, I’d have called them crazy and then would have had an aneurysm trying to process that thought. But here we are in 2007 and that’s our reality. We can complete tasks at a pace that was unimaginable even 15 years ago. So why act like times haven’t changed? Embrace, I say. Embrace your IGS as if it were a favorite personality trait. You are merely assimilating to societal standards. Which leads back to the concept of the New Year’s resolution, and the term that it implies, lasting a year, or, dare I say forever (yikes!). How can we be expected to hold out when so many variables are against us making it past February? We can’t do it. Period. Not in this day and age. Thus, I propose that next year we ask less of our New Year’s resolutions. A week is long enough. If resolutions only lasted a week, think of the possibilities. Everyone would have a resolution, and almost everyone could realistically complete it! This idea would change everything. People would actually TRY to do something beneficial for a week. Some peo- ple would have a great week helping feed the homeless. Others would have a terrible week of not drinking. It really doesn’t matter. People would actually be doing something they otherwise wouldn’t. The experiences would make people more interesting, and quite possibly make life more enjoyable. Imagine the conversations you could have. “How was the resolution?” “Pretty amazing. Camping with the family changed my life.” Or “Worst week ever. I had no idea that you got the shakes from going cold turkey on CSI reruns.” Plus, weeklong resolutions would do wonders for self esteem. Individuals wouldn’t feel as if they had failed (yet again), which is exactly what’s happening with our current system. When someone keeps a New Year’s resolution into March they shouldn’t feel disappointed that they did not carry it out the entire year, but instead they should be commended for having a strong will. Life should be rewarding and so should resolutions. Just coming up with something to resolve alone deserves a pat on the back. So next year, do yourself a favor and make a New Year’s resolution that will last a week. You’ll be able to see it through, have the satisfaction that you finished what you started, and still have the time to keep up with this fast and frenetic world we live in. u JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 7
zach   sview  BY ZACH MCLARTY  New Year   s Resolutions Require Too Much Resolution  N  ew Year   s resolutions are great....
BUSINESS realestate REAL ESTATEMARKET CORNERING THE CHOOSING A REAL ESTATE AGENT CAN BE A SLIPPERY SLOPE, ESPECIALLY IN A CHANGING MARKET W elcome back to Cornering the Market, ValleyLife’s exclusive Q&A with Kay Cole, one of the most highly regarded real estate agents in the West Valley. In this “changing market” that we are experiencing, it is more important than ever to make sure you have an agent in your corner who knows the lay of the land. That’s why this month we sat down with Kay, an agent and partner at Ewing & Associates Sotheby’s International Realty, to pick her brain on how to choose the agent that is right for you, and make sure you get what you are paying for. 8 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 ValleyLife: In a market like the one we are seeing today, what is the first thing you should consider when you choose a real estate agent? Kay Cole: Clearly, you need to select an agent that is knowledgeable about what the TRUE current market conditions are and who also knows where there are niche markets that may affect your situation. You need to be able to discern where the truth stops and the fantasy begins. There’s a real market there and an agent who understands the idiosyncrasies of that market can help you price a property appropriately, market it the right way and negotiate the best price. VL: You want to be leery of an agent that paints too rosy a picture, but at the same point, you want someone who will bring a positive energy to the situation no matter what. Kay: That is a really important thing to consider. You don’t want an agent who is unrealistic about what the challenges of a changing market are. You do want an agent that is confident they can do the job, is upbeat and seems to be enjoying what they are doing. When there is a seller’s market and things are selling with multiple offers, the ranks of agents tends to swell. If the market has any kind of changeable direction whatsoever, and believe me, it’s changing on a weekly basis right now, you really need someone who has a finger on the pulse–a “seasoned agent”! VL: What qualifies an agent as seasoned? Kay: I think there are lots of ways to “season” an agent. It helps to have witnessed the cycles, if, however they’ve learned from them. Even if an agent has not lived through the transitions, it is still possible to be smart and intuitive enough to read the signs accurately. Seasoning doesn’t necessarily mean longevity in the business. The agent you are looking for should have an awareness of where the market is today and what that means historically. VL: What about credentials? What’s important? Kay: Your agent should be a certified Realtor and belong to the appropriate local Real Estate Boards. Being a member of organizations like the MLS (Multiple Listing Service) is critical, and by the way, there are several MLS possibilities. If you have just listed your home, you cer- tainly would want it in the local MLS, but you may also want an agent who is a member of additional boards, so they can reach beyond the local board to expose your property. VL: When you identify a real estate agent you might work with, what does that first meeting consist of? Kay: If you are unfamiliar with an agent and are having your first meeting, you want to see how they present themselves. This is important, as it is going to demonstrate how they will represent you and your property. As a seller, it’s incumbent for an agent to bring some current market analysis that will support how they analyze the property and determine pricing. As an agent meeting a perspective client, I want to focus on what I bring to the relationship that demonstrates that I may be more qualified than the other agents they are interviewing. VL: How do most people find their real estate agent? Kay: A substantial number of agents depend very heavily on personal referrals. If they’ve done a great job for somebody you know, then chances are they will also do a great job for you.
BUSINESS  realestate  REAL ESTATEMARKET  CORNERING THE  CHOOSING A REAL ESTATE AGENT CAN BE A SLIPPERY SLOPE, ESPECIALLY I...
VL: How many agents do you want to interview? Kay: If you don’t already have an agent that you know and trust than you probably want to interview two or three. VL: What other factors should you consider? Kay: A traditional listing period is generally six months, but whether it’s 30 days or 300 days you need to be very comfortable with the person you have hired. Your agent should be someone that you will look forward to hearing from—good news or bad—and, by all means, you need an agent that’s truthful. If an agent’s only motivation is to add your property to their listing inventory, hoping for a fast or lucky sale, they may opt to tell you what you WANT to hear, not what you NEED to know. With all the anxiety that you are likely to be experiencing in marketing and showing your home, it is monumentally important to like and trust the person you have chosen as your listing agent. And, as a buyer, it is additionally critical that your agent is diligently working to find you a home that suits your requirements and staying in continuous touch with you. VL: So you have an agent you like, what other things should you go over before making a decision? Kay: Before signing a Listing Contract, ask the agent to provide a comprehensive marketing plan that outlines all the things they will commit to do for you during the listing period. Some agents will show you materials such as brochures and magazines, and the seller naturally assumes that they are going to have these materials, but that may not always be the case. You also want to receive a documented marketing plan that includes a strategy that develops over the listing period. There’s a real estate “adage” that states: 80% of your marketing is done when you set the price of the house. As this is probably very true, it’s imperative to have that critical discussion when you select your agent. VL: What other services can you typically expect from your agent? Kay: The agent is expected to repre- sent you in all facets of the transaction, so first you will want to agree on how the property is going to be shown. Follow-up after a showing is also very important, as it provides important feedback as to how your home is being experienced by the buyers and their agents. Another issue that needs to be understood is what kind of contact you can expect from your agent. How often are they going to call you? There’s no right or wrong but it’s critical for an agent to understand your expectations and set up a regular type of review. Finally, it’s important to have not only the support of your agent, but they should be from a company that provides advertising and support for their agents. VL: How long is a normal length of listing? Kay: The traditional length of listing is six months. A good listing agent is going to spend time, energy and not a small amount of money on promoting the property. You need to allow the agent the time to exercise the marketing plan that was provided to you at the time of the listing. EXPERIENCE. QUALITY. SUPERIOR SERVICE With over 35 years of experience, THE TRIDENT INSURANCE AGENCY offers a complete line of insurance products, including Auto, Home, Earthquake, Umbrella, RV, Life and Health for both Individuals and Group. Representing Mercury Insurance Group, Blue Cross and many others, we can find you the best quality products at highly competitive industry premiums. We consider our clients to be our most valuable assets, and we continually strive to earn and retain your business, trust and confidence. 21241 Ventura Boulevard Suite 283 / Box 6125 Woodland Hills, CA 91365 P. 818.887.5952 F. 818.887.0706 www.tridentagency.net lic. #0779079 VL: What if an agent is not fulfilling their promises? Kay: Assuming the agent is part of a larger company, a seller always has the right to go to the Broker that the agent works for. Of course, having a good relationship with your agent should resolve most differences, but if you really have an issue or concern about your agent, whether it be related to attitude, work ethic or lack of performance, then certainly it is appropriate to go to their superior and see how you can work it out. VL: What makes a great agent? Kay: The qualities of a great agent are very intangible. I believe that integrity would top the list, for if that quality is present, all the above-mentioned items will have been presented honestly. You need somebody who is willing to commit financially to the marketing of your property, but also has the experience, the background and the negotiating skills, so that when they do find a buyer, they will know how to successfully complete the transaction and facilitate your sale with professionalism and skill. u Designs By Valerie VALERIE PUGLIESE INTERIOR DESIGNER SPECIALIZE IN SELECTING OF MATERIALS FOR REMODELS AND NEW CONSTRUCTION 342 HOUSTON DRIVE, THOUSAND OAKS, CALIFORNIA 91360 TEL. 805.379.0080 • EMAIL: LSTMOJICAN@CS.COM W W W. D E S I G N S B Y VA L E R I E . N E T JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 9
VL  How many agents do you want to interview  Kay  If you don   t already have an agent that you know and trust than you p...
HOME interiordesign BY KATHRYN L. ROBYN HOUSE RULE #1 LIVE IN YOUR WHOLE HOUSE L et’s agree on one thing: The desire to live in The Valley reflects a desire to live a great life. One where urban and suburban opportunities; contemporary and traditional cultures; and a lifestyle that includes ready access to the beach, the mountains and great restaurants all come together. Living a great life is not so much about having a great big house as it is about having a home that supports your lifestyle. An “Emotional House,” as realtors call a home that has been loved so much that it gives back to the one who has cared for it, is not about the “wow” factor; it’s about the “ahh” factor. Every home should support the quest for a great life, but if you are having trouble putting it all together, here is one hint: Live in your whole house. 10 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007
HOME  interiordesign  BY KATHRYN L. ROBYN  HOUSE RULE  1  LIVE IN YOUR WHOLE HOUSE  L  et   s agree on one thing  The desi...
The kitchen is today’s hearth, providing nourishment or physical sustenance in its practical function and the feeling of being taken care of emotionally. It produces the flavor of love, whether you’re aware of it or not. How you set it up, keep it and use it determines whether that flavor tastes bitter, sour, or sweet and healthy. EVERY ROOM SERVES A PRACTICAL AND AN EMOTIONAL FUNCTION H omes are designed with all of your general needs in mind, with each room serving a practical and an emotional function; but we have to figure out how to furnish and use these rooms to support the specific things our lives require. There are the basic needs like food, water, shelter and security, which evolve as they are met into emotional needs for freedom or privacy, connection to others, contribution to the whole, a need for our minds and spirits to grow and so on. When either the practical or the emotional function of a room doesn’t work, the room fails to serve your needs. The more money you have, the more bells and whistles you can employ to upgrade the practical functions of your home while putting more space into service. But you don’t need wealth to see to it that the emotional functions are served. You need what are called “emotional depots.” In a big house you can have a separate room for every emotional need—a studio space, adult-only gathering room, kids-only game room and so on. In a tiny studio apartment or small guesthouse you simply divide the space into smaller depots. It’s easy to do and helps you bring the order of fulfillment to the chaos of needs. I keep hearing from people who live in only one room. There’s the mother of three who never leaves the kitchen except to sleep; the single man whose bedroom has become a catchall, so he sleeps on the couch; and the Hollywood manager who conducts all her business from her bed. These people are eating, hanging out, reading, working, talking on the phone and sleeping all in the same room. Then there are those who decorate for display purposes rather than use and spend no time at all in large portions of their beautiful homes. The house is for show, but real life is hidden beneath the cushions or behind closed doors. None of these folks are living in their whole house and they are cutting themselves off from parts of their own special souls. Why would anyone want to do that? In this world where we have so little time for ourselves, why take away space as well? The answer is often an underlying emotional wound that has caused a disconnection from the need itself. It can be a major traumatic event or just an ongoing build-up of disappointments that suppresses an emotional need, a painful childhood, for example, causing a disengagement from the need to connect with others. The end result is a lack of wholeness, and if you let it take over, large parts of your life will suffer, guaranteed. However, by addressing each room in your house with your basic and emotional needs in mind, you can overcome such disconnects, initiate new practices, create fresh routines and benefit from the proper utilization of your space. The result is often a more balanced and satisfying life. SO WHAT ARE THESE EMOTIONAL DEPOTS? L Let’s look at three. The foyer is a gate or a bridge; emotionally and practically helping you transition between your house and the outside world. A mirror, a bench, bins or secretary’s table, for example, with a place for keys, gloves, sports equipment and such is essential here. Bringing in elements of the outdoors, such as a floral or water element also helps. If you have trouble getting out the door or dread coming home, consider redoing your entryway to better serve you in making that important transition. The kitchen is today’s hearth, providing nourishment and physical sustenance in its practical function and transferring the feeling of being taken care of emotionally. A filthy kitchen might indicate that being cared for often comes with a lot of garbage attached; a sterile kitchen might denote a starving heart. A functioning kitchen is all about good workflow. It should also be safely accessible to everyone, with knives stowed high out of the reach of children and bowls and spoons procurable to their little hands. Cozy seating is important, even if it’s a café table in the next room or a couple of stools at the counter. It gives you a spot for a light meal as well as an inviting place to sit and keep the cook company. Next are three types of food always on hand: something you can throw together quickly, something nutritious and something deliciously comforting. Out of your kitchen comes the flavor of love, and how you set it up, keep it and use it determines whether that flavor tastes bitter, sour or sweet. The living room is your “tribal council,” where you go for fellowship and entertainment and enjoy the benefit of camaraderie. You want comfortable seating that encourages conversation, tables to set a beverage in reach of every seat and three kinds of lighting [ambient/overall lighting, accent lamps and task or reading lamps]. This room is most likely to fall into the show room category. If you have a den, a family room and a formal parlor and are using the kitchen or the dining room for a variety of needs other than cooking and dining, consider repurposing these other rooms. A home office for example, a music room, a homework or project room and so on. Besides these, the bedrooms, the bathrooms, office and studio areas, storage areas and even the laundry room serve emotional functions beyond the practical needs of sleeping, bathing, working, storing things and washing clothes. Many times rooms are multi-functioned with several depots separated by the way you arrange the furniture. But if you have “hotspots” in your house (i.e., clutter. disrepair, etc.), or you are not using any part of your home (while crowding your family into other areas), chances are you are avoiding something of an emotional nature, or somebody’s need is not getting met—or both. If your life is not measuring up to the great life you deserve, start by changing it one room at a time. “Live In Your Whole House” is the No. 1 rule in my book. I promise you it will expand your life. u Kathryn Robyn is co-author of The Emotional House: How Redesigning Your Home Can Change Your Life (New Harbinger Publications, 2005). JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 11
The kitchen is today   s hearth, providing nourishment or physical sustenance in its practical function and the feeling of...
HOME & LANDSCAPING interiordesign BY DAWN RITCHIE HOUSE RULE #10: THE DIVINE IS IN THE DETAILS he divine lives in the details, and nowhere in your home are there more opportunities to instill stunning architectural details than through fine tile work. Ceramic, porcelain, glass, granite, marble, limestone, slate, metal, mosaic… the world is your oyster when employing this versatile design element. The limitationsof where and what can be tiled are restricted only by your imagination. 12 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 ne visit to the Historic Adamson House on the Pacific Coast Highway with its vibrant Malibu tiles will open your eyes to the possibilities. Ceiling murals serve up celestial vistas. Friezes dress exterior walls, and splashes of color on tiled stair risers make every ascent a lively adventure. Ambling through the grounds you’ll encounter ceramic tiles in burnt orange, aqua and white that transform garden benches into art pieces, windowsills into stunning borders that frame the California coastline, and garden fountains into living characters that almost seem to breathe. Inside the villa, tiled fireplace surrounds echo the profiles of the arched entryways; and base moldings of tile and stone steer your path through the expansive corridors like a welcoming companion. The result is that every inch of this warm and inviting home is a richly transcendent experience. Color somehow just works in California. Maybe it’s our sun-soaked beaches that explode in a rosy halo at sunset, or the way light and shadow zigzags through our canyons, but trendsetting Californians have always embraced tile. Hence the ubiquitous tile showrooms and stone quarry yards that dot nearly every major thoroughfare of the San Fernando Valley. In part it is due to our agreeable climate. We dine al fresco year round and tile arabesques have found their way onto our patios’ barbeque islands, outdoor firepits, brick pizza ovens, patio decking, poolside bars, and even on our gardens’ stepping-stones. Tile is, after all, one of the oldest design elements found in history. Everything seems a little brighter, a little more inviting and a little more “finished” when tiled. But what tile style is right for you?
HOME   LANDSCAPING  interiordesign  BY DAWN RITCHIE  HOUSE RULE  10   THE DIVINE IS IN THE DETAILS he divine lives in the ...
When you think of your home as the canvas of your life it is much easier to decide on which materials, textures and colors you want to introduce into your daily experience. (Photos: Cristi Walden, Adamson House) Lisa Lesniak of Walker Zanger says that homeowners generally tend to be sensitive to the stylistic concerns and influences of the local architecture. Many California ranches are still cottage-cozy with peach and periwinkle tiled bathrooms and kitchens. Our Spanish architecture invites palettes in the Tuscan, Moroccan and Moorish tones. Organic hues that blend easily one into another; creamy ivories, smoky greens, hints of warm golden sunlight and, of course, the ever-present terra cotta. Architects Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene put their stamp on a bold motif with their heritage Craftsman bungalows that adopted daring burgundies, oranges and greens. Modern contemporary homes in the canyons tend towards Zen fusion with flat straight-cut edges, creams, black or sand-colored flooring and white, mocha or chocolate walls. But Californians are breaking out of the old standbys. We are still the trendsetters who push envelopes, embrace the new, and reach for the extraordinary—more style, more color… more life. Which may explain why the hottest new trend taking the industry by storm are colorful metallic finishes and wondrous glass tiles. Glossy mesh-mounted glass in palettes of pastels, light blues and greens, or warm cinnabars and oranges reminiscent of an east coast autumn are brightening homes everywhere. Glass tile is also showing up in pools. The tired ultramarine of the past is fading in popularity, replaced by gorgeous weaves of glass like Walker Zanger’s “Glass Montage in Moroccan Blend” that dance with the sunlight across the surface of the water. Virtually every area of the home that currently utilizes ceramic, stone and porcelain tiles are now using glass—from showers and kitchen backsplashes to fireplaces and, yes, even floors. But consideration must be given to the environmental issues of our region when using this material. Earthquakes come into the mix, according to Lisa Lesniak. “Larger glass tiles are not suitable for flooring because the surface tension doesn’t correspond well with a moving earth condition,” she cautions. Smaller glass tiles are more appropriate in this case. Natural stone has also become widespread in kitchens and bathrooms as California homeowners exercise their yearnings for the conservative elegance of hotel-styled spa bathrooms and clean, uncluttered kitchens. Yadira Hernandez of The Tile Collection in the San Fernando Valley states that the bulk of their sales remain in muted palettes. But while the natural world offers us sedately sophisticated patterns of veined marble and speckled granite invoking the passage of time, natural stone will put a demand on your time as well. It’s a high maintenance design element that requires constant attention. Natural stone is porous and must be sealed correctly before first use and again annually to preserve its integrity, according to Yadira Hernandez. Dirt, soap scum and mold are enemies ready to storm the gates of any who don’t pay heed. This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t consider natural materials in the design of your home. There are plenty of first-rate sealants out there ready to do the trick. Miracle Sealants, to name just one, offers an excellent line of stone, grout and masonry sealants, cleaners and polishes and a Granite Care Kit to keep your investment up to par. But if all that work puts a kink in your busy schedule, consider the new breakthroughs in porcelain tiles, which have a lower water absorption factor and can mimic that highly desired stone appearance. Porcelains work well in high humidity areas like bathrooms, kitchens and laundry rooms. When you think of your home as the canvas of your life, it is much easier to decide on which materials, textures and colors you want to introduce into your daily experience. What better way to feel at home than with a tiled kitchen mosaic that reflects your culinary flare, or a beaded highrelief tile liner in your bathing spa that elicits a sense of tranquility and purity to your bathing rituals? As the owner of a pool bordered by gorgeous handcrafted Portuguese tiles, I can assure you not a day goes by that their intricate detailing and colorfully affable palette do not uplift me. If you haven’t already, it’s time to dive into the divine world of tile design. The divine, does, after all, live in the details. u Dawn Ritchie is co-author of The Emotional House: How Redesigning Your Home Can Change Your Life (New Harbinger Publications, 2005). JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 13
When you think of your home as the canvas of your life it is much easier to decide on which materials, textures and colors...
INTERIOR DESIGN designerprofile BY MONA LORING VALERIE PUGLIESE AN INTERIOR DESIGNER’S STORY It is very hard to start a business, especially if you are a mom with limited time and resources…just ask Valerie Pugliese. Valerie, who grew up in Northridge, California, was raised in the 70s by a single mother, and like many young woman at that time, she lost her way for a while and ended up dropping out of high school. From there the story is usually the same… a bumpy road, a few kids and a couple jobs (the ones that women without a high school diploma can get), but as you are about to learn, this is not your typical story. t the age of 25, determined to make something of herself, Valerie passed the GED (General Education Development) test, and at 35—after her second son was born— she went back to school to study interior design. After six long years of balancing her studies with taking 14 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 care of her kids, she finally earned a Certificate in Interior Design from The Learning Tree University in Chatsworth, CA. While Valerie was in school, she landed an internship as an assistant designer with Lake Sherwood, located in a posh area in Thousand Oaks, the city where she currently works and resides. She ended up staying on at Lake Sherwood for two years following her internship and gained most of her interior design background from the practice—which dealt with hard material design. Throughout her time at Lake Sherwood, she helped select and design over 40 beautiful new multimillion dollar homes. Valerie’s work with Lake Sherwood led her to become involved in the Wellness Community Charity Project—an organization that helps individuals with cancer improve their health and wellbeing. The specific work she was engaged in involved 20 local designers renovating a house in Lake Sherwood. Although each designer was assigned to only one area of the house, Valerie took on two— a girl’s bedroom, the Enchanted Sherwood Forrest Room (photo below), and a bathroom. Her work on this home was featured in Romantic Homes magazine and a coffee table book entitled, Spectacular Homes of California (available on BarnesAndNoble.com). Having attained her education and getting a taste of the professional life that she longed longed for, it was about time for Valerie Pugliese to take the biggest and perhaps most uncertain step of her life. In her early 40s, at the urging of her husband (whom Valerie refers to as her biggest fan), she decided to open her own design firm. Al-
INTERIOR DESIGN  designerpro   le  BY MONA LORING  VALERIE PUGLIESE AN INTERIOR DESIGNER   S STORY It is very hard to star...
though her husband had just been laid off, he was behind her all the way. They put all their hopes and dreams into the firm and in less than one year she has already experienced enormous success. In addition to running her own design firm, Valerie was recently elected the president of the I.D.S. (Interior Design Society) of their tri-valley chapter. I.D.S. is an organization that does community work such as Kids To Kids (for wayward girls) and the Kids Cancer Connection. Valerie Pugliese is a kind-hearted career mom who has risked it all and rededicated her life to helping people in her community with their interior designing needs. Besides her strong will and desire to grow her fledgling business, Valerie felt it was most important to tell her story so that other women can learn what can happen if you hold onto our dreams. After struggles with school, dyslexia and being a mother of two, Pugliese has overcome all obstacles and persevered to turn her dreams into reality. As an experienced designer, Valerie Pugliese has the education, professionalism and expertise to help anyone with their interior design needs. A good reputation is earned through creativity and quality service, and Designs By Valerie is quickly building a solid reputation throughout the West Valley. Visit Valerie’s website at www.designsbyvalerie.net for more information about this talented designer and positive role model for women everywhere. u JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 15
though her husband had just been laid off, he was behind her all the way. They put all their hopes and dreams into the fir...
BUSINESS businessprofile BY BRIAN SPERO Goldcoast Coin Exchange A UNIQUE SHOP SERVING THE WEST VALLEY TURNS OUT TO BE A RARE FIND T ucked away in the Woodland Hills Village shopping center on Ventura Blvd. you will find a special little store that is as useful as it is interesting. Goldcoast Coin Exchange just happens to be about the only place in the Valley that exchanges foreign money, and it’s certainly the most convenient. No matter where you are traveling in the world, or what far and exotic place you just got back from, Goldcoast has the currency you are looking for. That alone makes this a local business that everybody should know about; but it’s just one thing that makes it such a fun place to visit. Goldcoast also happens to be the destination of choice for area coin collectors, young and old alike. According to Lisa Lenk, who owns and operates Goldcoast with her husband Tom, “We are the collector’s store because we have one of the largest selections of collector’s coins in Southern Califor- 16 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 nia.” From wonderfully rare coins worth thousands of dollars to U.S. Mint collector sets, Goldcoast has it covered. They specialize in having those “key” coins—the hardest ones to find—that are like shiny little Holy Grails that hobbyists search for to fill out their collections. It’s clear that Lisa and Tom know their business, and that’s because they’ve been involved in it all of their lives. Lisa’s father owned his first store in the Valley back in 1964, so as she tells it, “I was just born into the business.” And Tom Lisa Lenk with her husband Tom. has been collecting since he was a little boy. “It’s the only thing that we’ve ever done,” says Lisa. Browsing the display cases that line the shop like a jewelry store is akin to visiting a museum of American money. You will find complete Eisenhower dollar collections; half dollars, silver dollars and rare proof coins dating back 100 years or more. Plus, there are all manners of collectable quarters, buffalo nickels, dimes and rare and expensive pennies. One penny your eyes may settle on is from 1909, a little rough looking because it had once been in circulation, with an “S” on it denoting that it was minted in San Francisco, and marked with the engraver’s initials, “VDB”, which in this case makes all the difference. That coin sells for somewhere near $650. However, don’t get your hopes up because you have a 1909 penny in your piggy bank from when you were a kid. The value of coins doesn’t just go by age, but varies by year, some being more popular than others; by what shape they are in; and by where they were minted. A plain old 1909 penny without the right mintmark might only be worth a couple of dollars. “It has to have all [the right] components,” Lisa explains. Want to see what money looked like way back when? Goldcoast has a beautiful collection of gold coins that people used to carry around instead of paper monmon ey. There’s also wonderful old paper money, the likes of which many have never seen. “One-Thousand dollar bills and $500 dollar bills are fun for a lot of people to collect,” Lisa says, adding that older, large-size paper money has become hot among collectors, doubling its value in the past 10 or 15 years. “Money was big, it had color and it was beautiful, she says.” And of course, Goldcoast has more common items for new and young collectors, like the U.S. Mint 50 State Quarters, Sacagawea dollars and coins with errors in how they were printed or pressed that make them valuable and rare. Besides all that pretty money, Goldcoast Coin Exchange has everything you need to start a collection, including albums to keep your coins in, books to help you know what you are looking for and gifts
BUSINESS  businesspro   le  BY BRIAN SPERO  Goldcoast Coin Exchange A UNIQUE SHOP SERVING THE WEST VALLEY TURNS OUT TO BE ...
and sets to get new and first-time collectors hooked for life. For the collectors that hang around the shop (think comic book shops or places where they sell rare record albums), there are rotators full of coins to sort through for filling out collections. Another service that Goldcoast offers is buying gold, silver, jewelry and flatware. So those that have jewelry they do not wear, or gold and silver items just sitting around in storage, can trade them in and take advantage of the high-market price of gold right now. It’s all part of the business, and Goldcoast Coin Exchange is family run, dependable and fair. Goldcoast Coin Exchange is special mostly because of the people who work there, who know the business and are passionate about what they do. “I personally love to watch the young collectors,” says Lisa, whose favorite customer is a little boy around nine years old who has a collection that rivals most adult collections. However, Lisa enjoys the foreign exchange side of the business just as much. “I like to help people who are traveling. You get a lot of good travel tips. You also see people all stressed out before they leave, and you can always tell when they just got back because they have a completely different aura around them.” If you are about to take a trip out of the country and need to exchange money, or if you are a coin collector or know one, it might be time for you to take the most worthwhile short journey you’ve taken in a while. Go to the rare find hidden right in Woodland Hills: the Goldcoast Coin Exchange. For more information call 818.347.0000 or visit their website www.goldcoastcoinexchange.com. You can also visit their store located at 20929 Ventura Boulevard, in Woodland Hills. u We have one of the largest selections of collector’s coins in Southern California, from wonderfully rare coins worth thousands of dollars to United States Mint collector sets JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 17
and sets to get new and first-time collectors hooked for life. For the collectors that hang around the shop  think comic b...
AROUND & ABOUT aroundtown L os Angeles may be the premier place on the planet for seeing Hollywood stars, but it’s also a great place to see the stars in the sky. Located in L.A.’s Griffith Park, the newly renovated Griffith Observatory is designed to stimulate imagination and curiosity by awakening the senses to the mysterious wonders of astronomy. Griffith J. Griffith, a 19th century mining speculator and great benefactor to the city of Los Angeles, was first exposed to the wonders of astronomy in 1904. Griffith was so inspired by the experience of gazing 18 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 BY BRIAN SPERO through a telescope at an object so far away suddenly made close that he wished to share it with his fellow man. In 1912, Griffith, having already donated the land and resources to found Griffith Park, bestowed the city of Los Angeles, $100,000 to construct an observatory on top of Mount Hollywood featuring an astronomical telescope, the use of which would be free to the public; a Hall of Science to house exhibits and a theater to show educational films (which would later evolve into a planetarium as technology progressed). Sadly, Mr. Griffith would not live to see his vision come to fruition, however, he left a de- tailed will with implicit instructions as to how the observatory should be constructed and the kind of equipment it should house. The Observatory opened on May 14, 1935 and has since sat high atop the Los Feliz section of Los Angeles as a beautiful ornament to art and architecture, as well as a beacon of education and inspiration. In 2002 the observatory was closed for the first time for major renovations and re-opened this past November, much to the delight of stargazers everywhere. The 12-inch Zeiss refracting telescope that has been the centerpiece of the observatory for more than 70 years has allowed over seven million visitors to look into the far reaches of outer space, making it the most used telescope in the world. Now those numbers are on the rise as the observatory moves into a new era following the many impressive renovations which have restored the aesthetics of the structure to its original grandeur. New additions and upgrades, along with innovative and captivating exhibits, only begin to describe a total makeover the likes of which would make Griffith J. Griffith proud of his legacy. Among the most popular features of the Griffith Observatory include
AROUND   ABOUT  aroundtown  L  os Angeles may be the premier place on the planet for seeing Hollywood stars, but it   s al...
“Man’s sense of values ought to be revised. If all mankind could look through that telescope, it would change the world!” -Griffith J. Griffith the state-of-the-art Samuel Oschin Planetarium, the new 200-seat multi-media Leonard Nimoy Event Horizon Theater and amazing exhibits like the Hall of the Eye, which examines how people throughout time have observed the sky and the implications of their observations. Still, the main attraction are the telescopes, where people can view the stars in the night sky or take advantage of the coelostat and solar telescopes which allow daytime visitors to look at the sun spots and solar flares of our local star, the sun. On most nights there are a number of freestanding telescopes on the lawn or terrace to maximize the number of opportunities to view the stars from the observatory. One of the main goals of the renovation project was to “expand public space to improve the visitor experience,” allowing more people to enjoy the serene setting and engaging program that the Griffith Observatory offers. There has never been a better time to see the stars in Los Angeles, and here you not only will come away with a deep and profound perspective of the universe that we live in, you also do not have to worry about being mistaken for a member of the paparazzi. u Visiting Griffith Observatory Right now visits to the Griffith Observatory are by appointment only. You need to have a timed-entry reservation and a Shuttle ticket. Tickets for The Samuel Oschin Planetarium are not included and must be purchased separately, however they are not guaranteed. The Planetarium can only accommodate about half of the visitors per day and sell tickets to the planetarium on site on a first-come, first-served basis. Families with young children should note that kids younger than five are only allowed to attend the first show of the day. For all the ins and outs of getting the most out of your visit to Griffith Observatory call 1-888-695-0888 or go to their website at http://www.lacity.org/rap/observatory/vshuttle.html. JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 19
   Man   s sense of values ought to be revised. If all mankind could look through that telescope, it would change the worl...
SPORTS showtime BY BRIAN SPERO THE KID FROM TAFT HIGH SCHOOL FROM LOCAL LEGEND TO NBA ROOKIE JORDAN FARMAR IS HAVING A BALL J ordan Farmar is a veteran of the Los Angeles basketball scene, even if he is only a rookie with the Lakers. As the star player for Taft High School in Woodland Hills, Jordan led the Toreadors to the City Championship. Last year, as a sophomore at UCLA, Jordan electrified Southern California basketball fans as the Bruins made an incredible run to the NCAA Tournament Championship Game. In his first year in the NBA, Farmar is earning minutes and turning heads. What makes this talented player with strong ties to the Valley tick? Find out that and more in this exclusive interview as ValleyLife goes one-on-one with Jordan Farmar. 20 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 ValleyLife: What was it like growing up in L.A. and playing basketball in the Valley? Jordan: I was born and raised in West L.A. and my mother moved out to the Valley later on. I have some good memories out there. My friends and I would go to the Valley YMCA and that’s kind of where it really started. It just took off from there. VL: I understand you come from an athletic family. Your dad, Damon Farmar, was a professional athlete and your godfather is former baseball great, Eric Davis. How did that influence you? Jordan: It definitely helps a lot. Being around professional athletes my whole life kind of grooms you for this lifestyle and what it takes to make it to this level. All the dedication and hard work they put into it everyday and all the outside aspects that come with it…just seeing it everyday kind of gets you ready to deal with it when it was my turn to be here. VL: Who were some of the other people who helped get you to where you are today? Jordan: My family first and foremost. They always supported me in whatever it was that I wanted to do. In terms of basketball I would have to say people who coached me. I’ve had great coaches my whole life. The biggest reason I’ve been so successful is that I learned how to play the game the right way and learned all the fundamentals. At every level I took something from each coach I had. VL: What was it like playing for Taft High School? What makes them so good every year? Jordan: They just have a good coach, and then we get kids from the inner city at Taft. It’s just a crazy-good dynamic because you have good athletes out there in the Valley and you combine them with some good kids coming in from the inner city and it’s just a good combination. We just play hard. And the whole atmosphere around there— it’s a powerhouse, and the expectations are really high. When you have high expectations and people who want to live up to them, good things happen. I think I just came in
SPORTS  showtime  BY BRIAN SPERO  THE KID FROM TAFT HIGH SCHOOL FROM LOCAL LEGEND TO NBA ROOKIE JORDAN FARMAR IS HAVING A ...
“Winning the City Championship with Taft…a Valley team didn’t win the City Championship for 40 years or something, so to be the only one to do it was really special. ” (Photos: NBA Photos) -Jordan Farmar JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 21
   Winning the City Championship with Taft   a Valley team didn   t win the City Championship for 40 years or something, s...
sports at the right time and was the leader they needed to push them over the top. And now they’ve been doing well ever since. VL: What was the highlight of the time spent there? Jordan: Winning the City Championship. A Valley team didn’t win the City Championship for 40 years or something, so to be the only one to do it was really special. VL: Did you always want to play for UCLA, being from the area? Jordan: No (laughs). I wasn’t a big Bruin fan growing up, but I’m a Bruin for life now. The older and more mature I got, I realized what UCLA really meant and how special it was. Growing up I was a big Arizona fan. Gilbert Arenas is from the Valley, so his dad was my AAU coach and I was a big-time Arizona fan. When it was time for me to make my decision, UCLA was just too good. They had too much tradition and too good a situation for me to pass up. What makes UCLA such a special place to play? Jordan: You really feel like part of the family. There’s nothing like it. There’s no basketball program in this country that comes anywhere close to what UCLA has accomplished. And being one game away from putting another banner up in Pauley Pavilion was really special. It was tough to walk away not accomplishing that, but at the same time that was a stepping-stone, a platform for me to get here. VL: You guys were on such a hot streak going into the tournament and through your run all the way to the Final Four. What’s it like being a part of a team like that? Jordan: It’s extremely special. You just know that no matter what’s going on you’re going to win. That’s how it feels. Walking on the court it’s like, ‘I don’t care what’s going to happen in this game, we’re going to end up winning.’ We had guys who were determined; we played for each other and we were just going to get it done when it counts. Even against Gonzaga, we were down by 11 with two minutes to go or something, and it’s like: It’s not over. We’re still in this and there’s a lot of time left. And we 22 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 Jordan Farmar and teammate Vladi Radmanovic instruct a future star during a surprise visit to Carr Elementary School in Torrance. (Photo: NBA Photos) just got it done. It felt like that in the National Championship game, but Florida, was just better on that night. But we still had that feeling and we came to play for each other and we loved each other and we just grew together. That’s the biggest thing about being a basketball player and part of a team in general. As long as you continue to grow and improve as an individual and as a team, it just creates a feeling of supreme confidence where you feel like you can’t be stopped. VL: Did that experience let you know that you were ready to step up to the next level? You came so close to the Championship. Did that help you move on or make it harder? Jordan: A little bit of both. What we came to do is put UCLA back on the map, and make it to the pros. We all want to be pro basketball players. You have to go in this business when the time is right. You can twist an ankle and that can mess you up for a whole year. There are so many setbacks that can happen—when your time is right, your time is right. On the other hand, wanting to win the National Championship and being so close and feeling that we had the team that could definitely do it made it tough to go. Knowing that I was the point guard and leader of the team it was really tough to step away from my guys. I try to go over there as much as I can, since I got lucky enough to be in L.A. I go and hang out, go in the dorms with them, watch practice, go to the games, and sit courtside to just let them know that I am definitely still a part of the family. VL: Did you grow up a Lakers fan? Jordan: Oh yeah. In L.A. you’re definitely a Lakers fan. Showtime and the more recent times with Kobe and Shaq winning championships— I was a big Lakers fan. VL: When did you get the idea that you might be in line to be drafted by the Lakers? Jordan: I worked out for them a few times before the draft. That’s rare to have a team bring you in more than once. They said they liked me and the day before the draft they brought me in again to get a last glimpse. I didn’t expect, nor did they, that I’d still be around at the 26th pick in the first round, but I wouldn’t take it any other way. VL: What was draft day like? Jordan: It was crazy. Crazy things happen on draft day. They tell you that, but until you are actually sitting there waiting for your name to be called you don’t understand how things can change. You know, trades and people getting picked who are “not supposed to get picked” and stuff like that. That’s how it works and it just worked out perfectly for me. VL: What does it feel like when your name gets called? It’s something you’ve dreamed of all of your whole life . . . Jordan: Yeah, my agent kind of ruined it for me. Kept calling me tell- ing me that the Lakers were going to take me, so I kind of knew before that I was going to get picked by them. I had my whole family at the house with me and it was just a great feeling. I worked my whole life to make it to this level and now I get to play for the home team that I’ve loved my whole life. VL: What has your experience been like so far? Jordan: The rap on [Lakers’ coach] Phil Jackson is that he doesn’t like to play rookies, but I’ve just been trying to be a good teammate and do what I know I can do. I’ve been fortunate enough to play somewhere around 17 minutes a game, which is a lot, especially under Phil. The main thing I said when I made the jump [to the pros] is that I know how hard I am willing to work. Whether I get sent to the Developmental League, whether I get hurt or get drafted and play a lot—I’m still going to be the hardest working person out here. VL: Who has taken you under their wing, whether it is a player or a coach or member of the organization who has helped make the transition easier? Jordan: Everybody has been helpful. [Lakers assistant coach] Kurt Rambis coached me in the summer league, so we have a little bond. I just take a little bit from everybody and it really helps me be successful. VL: What has been the biggest eye opener? Jordan: Really, being a rookie is
sports at the right time and was the leader they needed to push them over the top. And now they   ve been doing well ever ...
“I’m a winner. I love to win and I’ve won everywhere I’ve been, so I want to bring that back to Los Angeles with this great organization.” tough. You get fouls called on you; you don’t get fouls called for you. You’re going to make mistakes; you are going to have to do all the rookie chores around the facility. So being a rookie is just a different experience. Most guys up until this level have been “that guy.” That’s how it has been for me. I’ve always been the one who everybody came to see, a leader and the captain and now I am starting at the bottom of the Totem Pole. That’s probably the biggest transition. VL: How about your goals in life? Jordan: I feel I have so much more to offer the world than just basketball. Me staying in L.A. will really help me with that. I’m a smart kid; I’m definitely going to go back to school and get my degree and, depending on how my career goes (and how I’m feeling), I may go to Law School. I’m interested in real estate, things where you can amass wealth, so I can help my family be stable for future generations. And you know, we’re in Los Angeles, so lots of crazy things can happen out here. u POWER AND GRACE: JORDAN FARMAR SOARS OVER THE COMPETITION. (Photos: NBA Photos) VL: What are your goals in the NBA? Jordan: I just want to reach my maximum potential, no matter what that is. I just want to really improve each year, year in and year out, game to game. Get better, get more comfortable, become a leader and have a long and successful career. I’m a winner. I love to win and I’ve won everywhere I’ve been, so I want to bring that back to Los Angeles with this great organization. JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 23
   I   m a winner. I love to win and I   ve won everywhere I   ve been, so I want to bring that back to Los Angeles with t...
ROMANCE valentine’sday BY KELLY BONANNO Valentine’sTips (FROM THE HEART) It’s that time of year when everyone searches for clever little ways to express their love. It’s a holiday filled with anticipation and expectations. Whether you dread Valentine’s Day or think it’s the most romantic day of the year, chances are you fret over what to give and where to go. Well, stop wracking your brains, because we’ve come up with a few ideas that are sure to please. GREAT GIFT IDEAS J ewelry is always a good idea. Stop by perLei at The Lakes in Thousand Oaks and check out their vintage heart-shaped lockets by Natalie B. These aren’t knock offs; they are true antiques circa the late 1800s through the early 1900s. You might even find the photograph worn by the original owner inside! Also at The Lakes is Sophea Parros where you’ll find gifts that are tailor made for the sophisticated lady in your life, such as L’Artisan, a designer French perfume with a deliciously musky scent. Think she would prefer a more floral scent? Try Bond No. 9. Or surprise her with one of their high-end purses by Kooba, Rafe or Tylie Malibu. Why not get the man in your life tickets to see his favorite sports team? Is your guy into gadgets? You’ll find plenty of ideas at Best Buy and Fry’s Electronics. Nothing says I love you like a High Definition TV. Pop over to Barnes and Noble and pick up a pair of Italian handcrafted alabaster floating-heart bookends in gorgeous red for the book lover in your life. If your valentine has a sweet tooth, order a box of delectable chocolate covered strawberries from Berrygourmet.com. They arrive beautifully wrapped in a red foil box. Mrs. Fields will personalize a heart-shaped cookie cake for you. And you can’t go wrong with a time honored Valentine tradition like a box of chocolates from See’s candy! A simple bouquet of flowers just isn’t enough? Then give them all year long. Calyxand corolla.com offer three, six and twelve-month plans. You’ll find an array of bath and body items at L’Occitane. They’ve come out with a limited edition line especially for Valentine’s Day in a yummy scent of rose, infused with blackberry. The line will include a candle, a fragrance, a spray-on body lotion and massage oil. Locations include The Oaks mall in Thousand Oaks, The Commons in Calabasas and the newly renovated Westfield Topanga mall in Canoga Park. Belle Gray in Calabasas and Sherman Oaks has all sorts of goodies that will make your Valentine smile. What girl wouldn’t love getting cozy in their signature cashmere wrap? Or choose something from the new apothecary line from Juicy. Looking for something a little more intimate? A lacey thong or boy shorts by Mary Green are fun and sexy. Oriental Trading Company (orientaltrading.com) has everything from stickers to glitter if you want to personalize the holiday with a homemade valentine. Want more gift ideas? You’ll find hundreds at personalshopper.com. ROMANTIC THINGS TO DO M ake the spirit of Valentine’s Day last by enrolling in a class together. Choose something you’re both interested in learning, such as cooking, yoga or ballroom dancing, and make a date of it every week. Voted the most romantic thing to do on Valentine’s Day in Los Angeles for many years now is the sunset dinner ride at Sunset Ranch Hollywood. On horse back, they lead you on a romantic ride up through the Hollywood Hills to dinner at Viva Fresh Mexican Restaurant. Horseback riding not your style? An Enchanted Carriage in Moorpark will pick you up in a horse drawn carriage, serve you champagne and take you to the destination of your choice. For a relaxing experience try a soothing couples massage at In Touch Massage and Day Spa in Thousand Oaks. An overnight or weekend getaway at your favorite hotel or bed & breakfast tops the list of romantic things to do. 24 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007
ROMANCE  valentine   sday  BY KELLY BONANNO  Valentine   sTips   FROM THE HEART   It   s that time of year when everyone s...
PLACES TO DINE A great meal is the most popular way to celebrate the occasion. With its zebrawood and soothing waterfalls, P6 Dinner Lounge in Westlake Village offers a tranquil atmosphere with a high class and exciting vibe. They’ll feature a special four-course menu for two. If you love the nightlife Chapter 8 Steakhouse and Dance Lounge in Agoura Hills is a hot spot with a lively bar scene and live band, so you and your honey can dance the night away. Both Fins locations—Calabasas and Westlake Village—will have a special sweetheart menu, live entertainment and the dining room will be decked out with festive Valentine décor. Many couples have been making it a date at Seashell Restaurant in Woodland Hills for over 30 years. If you want a romantic setting with an ocean view, take a drive over to Malibu. Both Geoffrey’s and Moonshadows have a great menu and offer seaside dining. Located at the landing in Westlake Village is Zin Bistro. Dine out on the fire lit patio that overlooks the lake and enjoy the elegant yet casual atmosphere. Another new hot spot is Bamboom Restaurant and Lounge in Agoura Hills. They feature everything from steak to sushi. After dining hours, their DJ kicks things up a notch to set a more energetic mood. Keep in mind that Valentine’s Day is the busiest day of the year for most restaurants so make your reservations early. The most important thing about this holiday is being together. So you might want to avoid the crowds by ordering in. Dim the lights, burn some candles, turn on some soft music and enjoy each other. Happy Valentine’s Day! u Happy Valentine’s Day! JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 25
PLACES TO DINE  A  great meal is the most popular way to celebrate the occasion. With its zebrawood and soothing waterfall...
ROMANCE romanticgifts odiva’s After Dark is a one-of-a-kind store designed to redefine the idea of a boutique with adult products. Open since June, Rochelle Scott’s new boutique is a sophisticated adult shop, the likes of which most have never seen. Inside the store you will find a stunning array of sensual items, from rhinestone jewelry, masks and feathers to chocolate body frosting and chocolates that make for suggestive gifts, as well as essential supplies. Godiva’s is low on the sleaze factor and high on romance, stocking items like genie bottles made to hold secret messages between lovers, board games that stimulate the imagination and spark communication, and ingenious little items like a candle that melts into massage oil. Whether you are looking for the perfect favors for a bachelorette party or a gift for someone you love or an intimate gift for yourself, Godiva’s After Dark has a full line of specifically chosen products that help to enrich and stimulate a couples’ personal romantic journey. 26 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 Bringing Sexy Back Godiva’s After Dark “A Boutique For Romance!” Q & A W I T H W O O D L A N D H I L L S’ N E W Q U E E N O F R O M A N CE , R O CH E L L E S CO T T ValleyLife: What made you want to open a store like Godiva’s After Dark? Rochelle Scott: I also own Godiva’s Secret Wigs, which is about a block away. Our specialty is working with cancer patients over there, so after 10 years of working with cancer patients and survivors, we found that most of our clients had a desire to better express their sensuality, but wouldn’t dare walk into a typical adult store. ed steps, and then over time they just end up doing the two-step over and over again. This store is about doing the jitterbug and the mamba—everything, and keeping it unexpected and fun. VL: So how has the reaction been? VL: What’s the mission of the store? Rochelle: Although my original objective was to provide for cancer survivors, all kinds of women are coming in and saying, “Wow, this is sophisticated. I’m comfortable in here.” Rochelle: Well so many couples, when they first get on the proverbial dance floor together, do the twostep, the cha-cha, the tango and all types of mysterious and unexpect- VL: What elements did you incorporate into your business plan to ensure that this would be something different from any other adult shop? Rochelle: It has to do with everything from the furniture to the fixtures. Every product that is in here has been hand selected. All of our items have been tested and approved, so to speak, so we can talk with confidence as to how to use them and what they are for. VL: How do you handle a situation when a client is a little shy? Rochelle: Because of our background working with cancer patients, we are already accustomed to speaking to people gently about sensitive subjects. So, when people come in here apprehensive and shy we commend them and acknowledge that they took
ROMANCE  romanticgifts  odiva   s After Dark is a one-of-a-kind store designed to redefine the idea of a boutique with adu...
Rochelle’s Tips For Putting Romance Back In Your Relationship Set time aside for “romance” on your “to-do” list. It’s too easy to get lost in day-to-day chores. Sunset on the beach with snacks and blankets will do. Find ways to bring fresh, unexpected ideas to your partnership. Dress differently, buy a wig, create a mystery date or try a new toy. Stop pre-judging what you haven’t yet experienced. Be open to change—no whining allowed. Say, “Yes, I’d love to” and see where it takes you. Introduce your lover to a heightened awareness of all their senses, not just vision. Let them listen, sniff, touch, and taste with eyes covered. Experiment with feathers, chocolate kisses and juicy fruits. Your romantic partnership has a person- ality all its’ own. Is it happy, content, peaceful, or in turmoil—bored and disinterested? Chances are your mate feels the same way. Step out of your comfort zone for the possibility of creating an adventure that will provide new levels of joy and exhilaration for both of you! the action to come in, and then we just speak the facts and have a great communication. VL: Besides all the unique products that you have, what are some of the special services that you provide? Rochelle: Well, we like to refer to ourselves as a romance concierge, because we really can put ideas together. If somebody comes to us with an event, like a birthday or anniversary, we can really help create something unusual. We can even go to a hotel room ahead of time and set it up for an evening of great romance. We host Goddess Parties, which are women only. We do it for groups of 10 to 30 at no charge, so a woman can invite her friends here for a birthday or divorce party or just a girls-night out and we lock the doors, play music and I take them on a tour of everything the store has to offer. We also have coming up regular men-only nights with a panel of three woman [so they can ask honest questions they might not be able to ask their partners], as well as women-only nights with three men on the panel. VL: What has been the biggest challenge so far? Rochelle: That’s been helping people find their way to my boutique, because once they come in they love it and they tell their friends. VL: What kinds of interesting interactions have you had in the store? Rochelle: Everyday is unique. People shares with me very interesting and intimate stories. What I am finding out is that most people want to play, but they’ve forgotten how somehow. I’ve heard it all and I could write a very interesting book! VL: What do you enjoy the most? Rochelle: Helping people experience more joy in their lives. And from working with women with medical challenges, I have learned that life can change in an instant. So if something makes you giggle, if something turns you on, then that’s a great thing. 5 G GREAT GIFTS FOR EN ENERGIZING A RELATIONSHIP With the most romantic day of the year coming up, here are a few gift ideas for that special somebody. CHOCOLATE STENCIL KIT This kit comes with delicious chocolate body frosting, a paintbrush and stencils to write and draw on each other. Inspire the artist in you! $24.99 FUR AND SATIN MASKS Stimulate and awaken the other senses by covering your partner’s eyes. Include items that taste, smell, touch and sound romantic to light your lover’s fire. $12.95-$30.95 DELICIOUS SCENTED CANDLES Made of hemp and soy, these circular candles become massage oil as they burn. Use the attached spoon to scoop oil to apply for a sensual massage. $19.95 THE “LIPSTICK” MASSAGER Unique and unexpected, it fits perfectly into a purse or makeup bag. Available in pink or magenta, this sexy “lipstick” is a definite hit! $26.95 LOCK BOXES These beautifully lined boxes are the size of a shoebox. They become a wonderful hiding place for private pleasures, letters, etc. Available in masculine and feminine prints. $42.95 VL: So, is it safe to say you are making the West Valley a happier place? Rochelle: Um, yes [Laughs]. I’m doing this for my community! Visit Rochelle at 22565 Ventura Blvd. in Woodland Hills (Between Shoup and Fallbrook) or call 818.222.LUV1. Rochelle Scott demonstrates the difference a wig can make. JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 27
Rochelle   s Tips For Putting Romance Back In Your Relationship Set time aside for    romance    on your    to-do    list....
TRAVEL & LEASURE weekendgetaway BY BRIAN SPERO Mammoth skiresorts Nestled in the heart of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains at the inspiring height of 12,000 feet above sea level sits Southern California’s winter play land, Mammoth Mountain. It’s an area that features unique natural beauty, diverse landscapes and climate, as well as great conditions for skiing. Mammoth Mountain is just that, a big mountain, and it gets lots of snow. For those of us who ski, snowboard, make snowmen or just love to wake up with a hot cup of cocoa and look out the window and see snow, it doesn’t get much better than this. 28 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 M ammoth Mountain is the second most visited ski area in the country, and 80% of visitors venture there from the warm and sunny confines of Southern California. According to Communications Director, Dana Vander Houwen, there are more reasons to visit Mammoth than ever. Mammoth’s long season results from its extremely high elevation, which allows the mountain to stay open well into the spring. Unlike many other ski resorts, Mammoth makes it’s own rules when it comes to opening and closing, and will often start the season off early if there’s snow, and refuse to close its slopes if there’s still good powder on the trails. “We’re really more about the passion for skiing,” Vander Houwen said. “While it certainly isn’t as busy during the late season, we still like to be able to provide a place for people to ski.” With an average of 400 inches of snow a year (the last two years Mammoth has averaged 600 inches) and 300 sunny days, Mammoth is one of the most accommodating places to ski anywhere. Besides being a haven for skiers, snowboarders and winter sport enthusiasts, it’s also one wonderful place for families, and especially appealing to people who live in more urban environments. “It’s surrounded by untouched beautiful wilderness, so it’s a great place to get away from things,” Vander Houwen confirmed. Just one more reason why Mammoth Mountain, while
TRAVEL   LEASURE  weekendgetaway  BY BRIAN SPERO  Mammoth skiresorts Nestled in the heart of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mou...
far enough down the mountain that it’s usually not snowy. A scenic Gondola ride to the top of the mountain is not to be missed, and of course Mammoth offers lots of lessons with an improved beginner area, expanded group and private lessons, clinics and camps. NIGHTLIFE Photos courtesy of Mammoth Mountain Ski Area WHEN TO GO not technically part of Southern California, is proud to be Southern California’s mountain. LOCATION AND WEATHER Mammoth gets a lot of snow, but if it’s not snowing it’s usually sunny. A fresh snow makes the sunny days that follow all the more glorious, something the ski industry calls a “blue bird day,” when you wake up and there’s two feet of fresh powder and perfectly blue skies. Mammoth, besides offering a clearer climate than many of the mountains of the Pacific Northwest, also boasts a more temperate climate than the well-known resorts of Colorado, with typical winter mornings starting in the low 20s and topping out in the 30s. While Mammoth opens as soon as they have snow (late October/early November) and stays open well into May, January and February offer the best chance of snow. Weekdays are great to escape some of the crowds and find a deal; and special events are always fun. Mammoth hosts a number of ski and snowboard competitions, the best of which happen during Springfest (May 4–6), which is the biggest party weekend with the whole mountain and Village bustling with activity. WHERE TO STAY The Mammoth Mountain Inn is at the Main Lodge and is open if the slopes are. Best of all the newly remodeled Inn leaves you truly slopeside! Roll out of bed and you are on the mountain. If you are going to Mammoth to ski your brains out, then this is the place. The next spot down the mountain is The Village Lodging. Accommodations are condo style, with studios, one, two and three– bedroom units available with full kitchens. If you like to be in the center of the action, this is the scene. The Village is connected to the top of the mountain by a gondola that gets you on the slopes in about six minutes. Next is Juniper Springs resort. This is the lowest place on the mountain to find slope-side lodging. Juniper, like The Village, offers condo-style accommodations and is a favorite with families. It’s quiet, convenient to some great beginner terrain, and now has group ski and snowboarding lessons on site. Tamarack Lodge and Resort is tucked away on the backside of the mountain. At Tamarack you have your choice between lodge rooms and cabins. This is a place for the adventurer looking to connect with nature or with someone special. The setting is rustic and beautiful. The Tamarack is also home to the small and romantic Lakefront Restaurant. FOR THE FAMILY It seems Southern California families love to play in the snow. Sledding is great when you are not taking lessons or hitting the slopes, but you never run out of fun things to do on a visit to Mammoth. Among the family favorites are activities like dogsled rides, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing and exploring. For a few days around every full moon there are snowshoe tours that offer an unforgettable experience. Families often enjoy a side trip to Mammoth’s sister ski area, June Mountain (about 20 minutes drive), which features a slower pace, gentle intermediate runs and jaw-dropping views. FOR THE NON-SKIER Every family has one and Mammoth has plenty of shopping opportunities, movies and exciting activities like snowmobile adventures to keep them busy. Also a visit to Bishop (the closest town) make a fun destination and great location for rock climbing; and it’s Mammoth used to be a place where you came up to ski hard and crash quietly, but now with the new Village options abound. This is the central hub of nightlife at Mammoth, where you can go out to eat, hit a bar and dance the night away until 2am. There’s a really cool Hawaiian bar called Lakanuki, there’s a wine bar and lots of places to take off the ski boots and kick up your heels. WHERE TO EAT On the mountain you will find lots of cafeteria style dining, places to grab a bite to eat and cool sun decks to sit outside and refuel with some really tasty BBQ. Besides the aforementioned Lake Front Restaurant, which offers your best bet for really fine dining, there’s the Mountain Side Grill in the main lodge and everything from Japanese to Mexican food in town. For a special experience during the busiest times of the year, snowcat dinners are a must. Picture cruising up the mountain on a snow-cat with a glass of champagne in hand. Your destination: Parallax, the highest fine dining at Mammoth, where you will enjoy a five course meal, complete with wine pairings. FAVORITE SLOPES Cornice Bowl, the main run off the top of the mountain, is groomed so that good skiers can say they skied the top of Mammoth without risking life and limb. It’s not for beginners, but not as intimidating as some of the other slopes at the top. On the backside you will find beautiful views, a place to grab a bite and hangout and great skiing at Chairs 13 and 14. If you love to ski the trees, Chair 9 is the place to be. Mammoth is also well known for their three half pipes and terrain parks, which is extremely popular with the kids, especially early and late in the season when there’s less snow. u JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 29
far enough down the mountain that it   s usually not snowy. A scenic Gondola ride to the top of the mountain is not to be ...
creative design solutions TRAVEL & LEASURE • PUBLICATIONS • LOGOS • CORPORATE IDENTITIES • CATALOGS • BROCHURES • ANNUAL REPORTS • FOLDERS • STATIONARY • ADVERTISING • INVITATIONS • POSTERS • TRIBUTE BOOKS • PACKAGING • WEB SITES LineByLineGraphics T. 818.340.3362 E-mail: info@lbldesign.com www.lbldesign.com weekendgetaway BY BRIAN SPERO THE OAKS AT OJAI SPRING-CLEANING FOR THE MIND, BODY AND SOUL Looking for a place to recharge, refresh and renew? Rediscover the very best of you at the Oaks at Ojai. L ocated in the mystical and beautiful Ojai Valley, The Oaks represents a health spa where one can come to refresh and recharge. According to Elizabeth Horton, director of activities at The Oaks, “Most people [that come here] are on the same mission; however, everybody has different goals. Some people come here to relax and unwind, to have somebody cook for them, to motivate them to exercise and to kick-start their routine.” Within minutes of being on the property you will encounter a soulful pres- ence and inviting nature that The Oaks is famous for. However, it’s only after a few days of soaking up the atmosphere, taking part in the incredibly diverse activity schedule and eating their delicious spa food that you will begin to enjoy the healing benefits of The Oaks’ program and philosophy. “A big percentage of our clients are return customers,” says Horton. “They come back because it’s so very comfortable and they feel at home.” The recently refurbished health spa, geared mostly for women who want to relax, unwind and get back into the groove of exercising and eating right, is a great place to get away from the rigors of everyday life and reconnect with the person that you are and always wanted to be. The positive and ultimately healthy vibe of The Oaks is invariably set by the owner and founder Sheila Cluff, a fitness pioneer in her own right, who has always taken a hands-on approach when it comes to her family-run spa. Sheila and her expert and caring staff have instilled an air of welcome that is as unassuming as their approach to getting their guests to move their bodies and relax their minds. THE OJAI VALLEY Some say the Ojai Valley gets its spiritual aura from its physical attributes, being one of the rare valleys in North America that runs from east to west. Whether it truly has spiritual and healing powers or not, open minded, artistic people have been drawn to Ojai through the decades, making it one of the most unique and diverse places to visit in Southern California. THE PROGRAM Brisk morning walks, low impact muscle-conditioning, yoga, aqua toning, stretching and more, The Oaks’ schedule is designed for all
creative design solutions  TRAVEL   LEASURE      PUBLICATIONS     LOGOS     CORPORATE IDENTITIES     CATALOGS     BROCHURE...
trip to spend a couple weeks and recharge is the comaraderie that they will experience in this supportive environment. Perhaps 95% of clients are women; however, men are welcome and feel relaxed despite being out -numbered by the fairer sex. THE STAFF From the person who greets you at the front desk to the instructors who will make you feel comfortable and safe in their classes, everyone working at The Oaks seems to be part of the family. The casual atmosphere here will be the freshest you’ve encountered at a spa in a long while. SERVICES AND ENTICEMENTS fitness levels and will have you moving all day long, yet feeling strong and refreshed at the end of the day. Odds are if you spend a few days at The Oaks you are going to try something you’ve never attempted before. Well-timed meals and breaks for things like potassium broth, smoothies and veggies keep you energized for more sessions than you could have ever imagined you would attend. GUESTS The atmosphere inside The Oaks is very familiar, friendly and family-like. However, no one will ever push you to be social beyond your comfort level, or intrude on your solitude if that’s what you seek. One of the reasons why The Oaks is a favorite place for not only Southern Californians looking to get away from the hustle and bustle of their lives, but for women traveling in the region or making a special Messages and body treatments, in addition to nutrition and fitness counseling, are on site and usually part of the game plan. The spa food, while delicious and ranked among the best in the industry, is as guilt-free as it comes. The local environment is prime with outside adventures like biking, hikes and rollerblading. Other local attractions include shopping, art galleries, horseback riding, kayaking and a visit to local wineries. ACCOMMODATIONS Godiva’sAfterDark A BOUTIQUE FOR ROMANCE 22565 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills, CA 91364 (Between Shoup & Fallbrook) 818.222.LUV1 (5881) I wwww.godivasafterdark.com “The Best Place To Be!” V alleyLife WEST SAN FERNANDO AND CONEJO VALLEY MAGAZINE Reach over 160,000* Readers Within the Spanish inspired architecture of The Oaks, you will find everything from standard twin, double rooms to the recently added double courtyard suites that include a private patio with a courtyard fountain, two large rooms with fireplaces and more. All the rooms are comfortable, and have a rustic, serene feel that helps bolster the peaceful and relaxing approach of the spa. TYPICAL STAY While some come for the day, the large majority stay for five nights or more. Packages are available for a variety of durations, and a minimum overnight stay of two days is required. u For advertising information, please call 818.340.3362 or email us at: ads@valleylifemagazine.com www.valleylifemagazine.com *Based on Circulation of 40,000 JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 31
trip to spend a couple weeks and recharge is the comaraderie that they will experience in this supportive environment. Per...
valleyscene SunRISE over the San Fernando Valley An early morning view from West Hills 32 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007
valleyscene SunRISE over the San Fernando Valley An early morning view from West Hills  32 VALLEYLIFE  I JANUARY FEBRUARY ...
Photo: Boaz Gabbai JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 33
Photo  Boaz Gabbai  JANUARY FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 33
parenting healthykids by kelly bonanno Raising a Healthy Eater biotics. They also carry a variety of organic deli meats. Because white bread has little nutritious value, make sandwiches with whole grain bread. If you need a quick meal that is sure to please, Annie’s makes a line of organic pasta and macaroni & cheese. Even if your child only has a PB & J is a good choice, but for taste of certain foods, you’re mak- a change of pace switch it up by reing progress. Studies show that it placing the peanut butter with aloften takes 10 to 15 mond or soy butter. These are also exposures to a food good substitutions if your child is before a child might allergic to peanuts. decide she likes it. So Rather than stocking your pandon’t give up. Con- try with the typical sugar laden cetinue serving those reals found on grocery store shelves, Brussels sprouts and opt for versions that have less sugar your child may sur- and more vitamins. Kashi’s Heart prise you one day. to Heart and Go Lean Read them Dr. Seuss’s Green Crunch are tasty Eggs and Ham and refer back alternatives. Envito it. It’s a great book about ro Kids has a line of trying things! cereals that kids love. There are healthier substiClifford’s Crunch by tutes for many of the foods Cascadian Farms and kids love. Because hot dogs Barbara’s Puffins are are a perennial favorite, it’s also good choices. Look hard to keep them off the for crackers that don’t menu permanently. Health food contain artery clogging trans fats stores like Whole Foods sell organic and hydrogenated oils. You’ll find uncured hot dogs that do not con- many of these healthy alternatives tain added nitrates, nitrites or anti- at Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods and, if you look hard enough, at the larger chain grocery stores. Quick & healthy snacks: Make an effort to offer a wide ar> Fruit ray of healthy meals and snacks so > Celery topped with peanut butter your children don’t miss out on the > Nuts (for kids over 4) nutrients a varied diet provides and > Low fat yogurt you’ll be ahead of the game. An> Raisons & dried blueberries > Applesauce other important thing you can do is > Milk practice what you preach, be a good > Edamame (soybeans) role model and help yourself out by eating healthy, too. u My 4-year-old son was disappointed when a classmate of his beat him at “wrestling.” I told him that little boy probably eats his vegetables because they make us strong. At dinner that night he ate every piece of broccoli on his plate! i t’s a challenge nearly every parent faces. How do we get our children interested in eating anything other then pizza, macaroni & cheese and sugary snacks? Moderation is key when it comes to these foods. The number of children who are overweight in this country has tripled in the last 25 years. The diabetes rate among children has also tripled. Empty carbs lack the nutrients to properly slow down digestion, so they are rapidly converted to glucose and go through the system too quickly. This can leave kids feeling hungry and cause overeating. Getting kids to eat vegetables is an age-old struggle. We all have memories of our own parents harping on us to eat our veggies. Frankly, most adults don’t eat enough. Coming up with clever ways to entice our kids to eat vegetables is not easy, but there are a few tricks. You can jazz up veggies with different dips and sauces. Many kids like to dip baby carrots, strips of bell pepper and broccoli florets in ranch dressing. Let your kids experiment with different sauces such as marinara, teriyaki or hummus. Make steamed veggies more palatable by melting low-fat cheese on top. Try sneaking shredded carrots and zucchini into you meatloaf. 34 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 Chop up veggies and add them to spaghetti sauce and chili. Try a “salad-bar” night. Put out assorted veggies in bite-size pieces and let your kids put together their own combination. Make sweet potatoe “fries” by lightly coating strips with vegetable oil and bake at 400 degrees until golden brown, about 10–12 minutes. It’s usually not too difficult to coax kids to eat some fruit, but picky eaters who don’t even like grapes may enjoy a homemade smoothie. Whip up some nonfat vanilla yogurt, strawberries, a banana, orange juice and ice in a blender. Experiment with different fruit to see what your kids like best. If you often go grocery shopping with your children, let them pick out the produce to help get them excited about their smoothies.
parenting  healthykids   by kelly bonanno  Raising a Healthy Eater biotics. They also carry a variety of organic deli meat...
case study currentbuzz Most people believe the phrase “part of this nutritional breakfast” refers to a bran muffin, a piece of fruit and a glass of pulpfree Tropicana. Throw in a hot cup of coffee and most of us are good to go. However, this is not quite the case anymore. Thousands of Americans are in fact trading in their morning O.J., and cup of Joe, for a tall, cold glass of…Cocaine. E nergy drinks like Cocaine, Jolt, RockStar, Red Bull, Monster and others are fueling not just Americans, but the American economy itself. According to market research, energy drinks are a $3.7 billion industry with revenues that have increased by more than 50% in the past year. Alluring ingredients like caffeine act as stimulants and are attracting those who crave a boost most: the 16 to 28year-old age group. Fruit juices, teas, and herbal supplements like ginseng and glucosamine are frequent additives. Amino acids like taurine, essential to growth in infants, are added and advertised even though scientists say they offer no real benefits to adults. So do energy drinks like Red Bull really “give you wings”? Jamey Kirby says yes. Kirby, inventor of the new beverage Cocaine, describes his drink as a “fruity, atomic fireball.” While Kirby’s concoction thankfully contains no actual cocaine, it does by Kim Smith Getting Your Daily Jolt Potent energy drinks like Red Bull, and the highly potent Cocaine, are quenching young America’s thirst to catch a buzz. Are these legal drinks drugs? contain approximately 280 milligrams of caffeine and promises a euphoric buzz about 15 minutes after consumption. The buzz, perhaps due to Cocaine being 350 percent stronger than Red Bull, according to Kirby, lasts five to six hours. People do not experience the “sugar crash” or jitters that he says some of the other energy drinks can produce, however Kirby also states there is a secret “throat-numbing” ingredient [a typical side-effect of cocaine-use is a numb throat] that he refuses to divulge. “There’s an American subculture out there that loves the idea of being wired,” says Dr. James D. Lane, professor of medical psychology at Duke University. “But caffeine produces real psychological and physiological dependence.” The question is does a drink like Cocaine have a place in our society, and how irresponsible is it to peddle a beverage named after a dangerous and addictive controlled substance to kids? While the Food and Drug Administration does not standardize the legal amount of caffeine in soft drinks, the suggested serving is 68 milligrams of caffeine or less per regular 12-ounce serving. However, the average cup of coffee consumed in the United States contains between 40 and 150 milligrams of caffeine. Studies on the long-term effects of high caffeine intake in young adults are ongoing, although surveys have shown that the majority of those who over-consume caffeine tend to be in their early 20s. Although death from overdose is rare, caffeine has numerous toxic effects, and in large doses can result in arrhythmia, coma, and on the rare occasion, death. At any rate, Jamey Kirby is planning on producing more than 200,000 additional cases of his Cocaine drink due to an increase in orders. “We’re getting a phenomenal response…It’s an energy drink, and it’s a fun name,” says Kirby. “As soon as people look at the can, they smile.” Maybe not everyone, as the popularity of these types of buzz drinks spreads, more people are voicing their concern as to the dangers they represent to society. Whether some sort of legislation is on the way limiting the potency of drinks like Cocaine is unclear, and the debate on the effects they are having on young people is just perking up. u Healthy Ways to Accelerate Your Days 1. Lighten Up Time and energy can become consumed by stress. Simply by chatting with friends, taking up stress-reducing activities like yoga or listening to music can provide relief. 2. Hit the Gym Exercising promotes better blood circulation throughout the body, in effect delivering more oxygen to your brain and muscles. It also tires your muscles out, helping achieve a more sound sleep, letting you feel more relaxed and well-rested. 3. Make Your Body Happy Drink more water. When your body is short of fluids, the first indicator is fatigue. Being well hydrated enhances performance in the workplace and at the gym. 4. Become energy-conscious Who said you have to stick to three meals a day? Eating in small amounts every few hours throughout the day can reduce your perception of fatigue. Foods with a low glycemic index are especially helpful here; their sugars are absorbed more slowly… allowing your body to think itself full for a longer period of time. JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 35
case study  currentbuzz  Most people believe the phrase    part of this nutritional breakfast    refers to a bran muffin, ...
SPORTS los angelesmarathon BY BRIAN SPERO BornTORun 23 YEARS AFTER DOING THE IMPOSSIBLE AND WINNING THE 1983 NEW YORK MARATHON ROD DIXON IS STILL MAKING DREAMS COME TRUE W hen the Los Angeles Roadrunners, the organization which implements the official training program for the L.A. Marathon, brought former Olympian and cross-country racing star Rod Dixon on board as the Director of Coaching, it was an inspired decision. Dixon, one of the all-time great athletes from New Zealand, knows a thing or two about being a winner, and we don’t just mean being the first to cross the finish line. Sure, Dixon took home his share of victories over his long and impressive career, but it was his ability to adapt to any condition, rise to the biggest challenge and never stop believing in himself that made him a running legend. Today Rod Dixon is an ambassador to his sport, in addition to being engaged in training the average athlete to perform a great feat like running the Los Angeles Marathon. For more than 20-years, however, Dixon was one of the 36 VALLEYLIFE I JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 most versatile runners the world has ever known. At the 1974 Olympic Games in Munich, Dixon won the bronze at 1500m, and as a testament to his brilliance at any distance over many years ran 10th in the marathon at the 1984 Los Angeles Games. In his day, Dixon beat all the great runners of his time, and was called by John Walker, the 1976 Olympic gold medalist at 1500m, the greatest cross-country runner ever. However, it was at the 1983 New York Marathon that Dixon cemented his legacy, in addition to finding inner peace. Rod Dixon watched the 1982 N.Y. Marathon at close range, and the following day made a pledge to himself that he would run the contest the next year and win. For the runner that was thought to be too old and not experienced enough at the long distance to win a marathon, it was a year of total dedication and commitment, of which he admits required the most intensive training he had ever un- “As you get older, your body is your life. If your body stays in good shape, you can lead a much fuller and more energetic life.” –Rod Dixon dertaken. While traveling to New York the day before the race, Dixon recalls having a feeling of total peace and contentment knowing he had done everything possible to prepare. On October 20, 1983, Dixon won (photo above) the race by chasing down Geoff Smith in one of the most dramatic finishes in the event’s history. It was a moment of ultimate success for Dixon, and a transcending vision for those looking on in awe, inspired by the courageous performance of a man who was born to run. It’s easy to see what attracted the Roadrunners to a man like Rod Dixon, and conversely why Dixon would be interested in coaching. With a lifetime of competition behind him it is in his blood to pass the gift of running to the masses and share the experience of personal satisfaction that comes with completing one of the great tests of human endurance. u
SPORTS  los angelesmarathon  BY BRIAN SPERO  BornTORun 23 YEARS AFTER DOING THE IMPOSSIBLE AND WINNING THE 1983 NEW YORK M...
LOS ANGELES ROADRUNNERS The L.A. Roadrunners administer the official training program for the City of Los Angeles Marathon. The program, which Rod Dixon oversees, offers “professional marathon training for the everyday athlete.” The training, which has an amazing 99% finish rate and has helped almost 27,000 runners finish the race since 1990, is a 28-week program that includes many different pace groups, expert lectures, a training manual and calendar to track progress and all the support you need to be at your best on race day. The Roadrunners meet every Saturday during the training period at three locations from Ventura to the Inland Empire. For more information on the Los Angeles Roadrunners and their training program, visit www.laroadrunners.com. 6 TRAINING TIPS FOR RUNNING A MARATHON XXII LOS ANGELES MARATHON MARCH 4, 2007 The 22nd L.A. Marathon will run on an entirely new course, which will likely be the fastest in the race’s history. The 26.2mile race will take place on its first ever “point-to-point” course—beginning in the valley at Universal Studios Hollywood and ending at 5th and Flower Sts. opposite the Central Library in downtown Los Angeles. The Los Angeles Marathon is the largest marathon held in California, the fourth largest in the country and the seventh largest in the world. It is expected to draw more than 26,000 runners from 50 states and 100 countries in 2007. 1 Keep track of the amount that you run and the time it takes. You want to work up to being able to run 2 1/2 to 3 hours straight. 2 Know what you are getting into. For most runners of various levels, training for a marathon is a six-month commitment. flowers The Best “I Love You” Gift For Valentine’s Day... And Any Day! WEST HILLS FLOWER SHOPPE 6800 Platt Avenue, West Hills, CA 91307 • 818.340.1433 www.westhillsflowershoppe.com 3 Taper your training. By running various distances at different speeds your body will become stronger and more ready to absorb the punishment of a 26-mile course. 4 Eat a proper diet. We’re talking low-fat, high-carbohydrate, high-protein foods and lots of fluids. 5 Run shorter distances (3–5 miles) during the week and longer runs (8, 10, 15, 20 miles) on the weekends. 6 Get in the right frame of mind. You need to believe that you can do it, so don’t underestimate the importance of preparing yourself mentally for the race and bringing lots of supporters. They call it a marathon for a reason, so be ready to fight through the pain and stay focused on the finish line. JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2007 I VALLEYLIFE 37
LOS ANGELES ROADRUNNERS The L.A. Roadrunners administer the official training program for the City of Los Angeles Marathon...
BODY & SOUL yourbody BY LORI DENMAN TRANQUIL TRASFORMATION: YOGA AND THE HIGHER SELF I The word yoga has its origin in the Sanskrit word “Yog,” meaning “union.” It is the union of the organ systems in the body with the consciousness in the mind. The postures, called asanas, and breathing techniques, called pranayama, produce a union of body, mind and energy that introduces a state of calmness resulting in better physical health, mental control and, ultimately, self-realization. f someone offered you the key to enlightenment, would you graciously accept it or put it in your pocket? If you are tired of living in the box, take the key, open the doors to your first yoga class and unlock your dreams. This promise of spiritual fulfillment might sound distant and unattainable. However, I speak to you from the experience of an eight-year practice. I admit this truth. The journey began with an open mind. My days before yoga were not pretty. I felt small and insignificant within the crowds of Los Angeles and trapped by the confines of a repetitive dayto-day routine. Life was boring and mundane. Keeping in shape wasn’t easy. I literally felt like a rat in a cage running on the treadmill. Eventually, my metabolism slowed down and led to weight gain and a downward spiral of physical and spiritual neglect. A close friend was watching my love for life deteriorating. She stepped in and literally dragged me to my first yoga class in Calabasas. I had heard relentless rumors and feared the worst. Images of Gumby-like yogis with their feet behind their heads circulated within my mind. I couldn’t even touch my toes and lacked all forms of coordination! I entered the yoga studio and discovered all shapes and sizes of people. A man my grandfather’s age was to my right, a professional basketball player stood to my left and a teenager with tattoos stretched out in front of me. The variety of
BODY   SOUL  yourbody  BY LORI DENMAN  TRANQUIL TRASFORMATION  YOGA AND THE HIGHER SELF  I  The word yoga has its origin i...
students set my mind at ease. If they could do it, I could too! The instructor guided us through almost two hours of slow moving poses. We were never asked to put our feet behind our heads, and he encouraged each student to move within their range of motion. Meaning, if we couldn’t reach our toes, we could touch our knees. This concept was quite refreshing, compared to the “no pain, no gain” motto. I had experienced a newfound stillness at the close of the class. My mind was put at rest. Suddenly, repetitive worries did not exist. I learned that the movements had stretched out the muscles that stored tension from everyday stresses, tension and trauma that are imprinted in the body. The deep stretching in the “storage depots” of the body, especially the hips and shoulders, cleansed the toxins and released tension. I realized then that cleanliness did lead to godliness. There are many types of yoga. Beginners like to warm up with “gentle” or “easy flow” classes that teach them how to learn “A person is said to have achieved yoga, the union with the Self, when the perfectly disciplined mind gets freedom from all desires, and becomes absorbed in the Self alone.” – Bhagavad Gita correct alignment and breathing in basic yoga postures. The next level whisks a person into the world of Power Yoga, a type of practice designed by instructor Bryan Kest. Kest owns studios in Santa Monica and also opened Inner Power Yoga with Linda Pushkin and Anya Longwell, who are now the owners. Power Yoga is a term that Kest describes as “a type of yoga with an increased emphasis on meditation, gentleness and consciousness…a practice that touches all parts of the body.” “We have all discovered so much and made so many realizations in our life, thanks to yoga,” Kest explained of the practice. “It has helped us learn and grow. When you do yoga, you really quiet down your mind, which allows a lot of stuff to come through that otherwise would not have been able to because you are clogging up your channels of thought.” Through these mechanics of moving energy, yoga blesses the mind and replenishes the spirit. It becomes more than a workout. It is a system of exercise that fully integrates the mind and body. The word “yoga” explains it all. The origin is a Sanskrit word “Yog,” meaning “union.” It is the union of the organ systems in the body with the consciousness in the mind. The postures, called asanas, and breathing techniques, called pranayama, produce a union of body, mind and energy that introduces a state of calmness resulting in better physical health, mental control and, ultimately, self-realization. In time, yoga simply brings you to you. The layers of ego, materialism and superficiality are stripped, revealing your inner core. Your mind and heart open to the beauty of life and all that is possible. On a personal note, my practice has produced abundance and gratitude, leading to gifts of self-confidence and the discovery of my missions in life. These are the gifts that are available to anyone and everyone. Take the key, open the doors to fulfillment and say hello to your higher self! u (L-R) Wayne, an instructor at Inner Power Yoga Studio in Calabasas, in Ardha Chandrasana (Half Moon Pose) and stands proudly in Virabhadrasana II (Warrior II Pose) . Photos: Lori Denman
students set my mind at ease. If they could do it, I could too  The instructor guided us through almost two hours of slow ...
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