Analyze This!
Analyzing How to Analyze Text
Carolyn Edwards-Wood
What is analysis?
A
n
a
l
y
z
e
Analyzing is looking closely at small
parts to see how they affect the
whole.
I-N-T-E-R-C-O-N-N-E-C-T-I-V-I-T-Y
Analyzing is not summarizing!
Summary
Explicit
Literal
Surface-Level meaning
Does not change
No original thought
Analysis
Implicit
Figurative
Underlying or
obscured meaning
Can change
Original Thought
SUMMARY vs. ANALYSIS
Think about this: You’ve been sick for several days and can’t seem to get a handle on what ails you.
You finally manage to muster up enough strength to drag yourself to the doctor- which would you
prefer?
Dr. NoGood
Merely skims over the list of symptoms
Doesn’t pay much attention to the patient
in front of him
Simply summarizes and rehashes what
you’ve already explained to him (“So I see
you’ve had a fever for 3 days…)
Offers a vague diagnosis with a basic
overused treatment plan (It’s a virus- let it
run it’s course. Drink lots of fluids. Next
patient.)
Dr. DoRight
Carefully reviews the patient’s chart
Asks clarifying questions
Examines the patient closely
Thinks aloud
Considers patient’s history
Orders more tests to prove or disprove
inferences
Designs a treatment plan that is specific
and authentic for that patient
IS THERE A DOCTOR IN THE HOUSE???
1. Consider the Patient
(gender, age, occupation, habits,
hobbies, medical and family
history, social situation, etc.)
2. Consider the Symptoms
(What are they, how strong, how long,
what makes them stronger/weaker, etc.)
3. Consider Environment
(season of the year, community
outbreaks, etc)
4. Generate Possible
Explanations
“DIAGNOSE” THE TEXT
1. Consider the Purpose
(to entertain, to inform, to argue,
to persuade, etc. Who is the
audience?)
2. Consider the Structure
and/or Genre
(novel, poem, song, article, website, etc.)
3. Consider Elements
(Fiction-plot, character, conflict,
etc. Nonfiction- graphic features,
etc.)
4. Consider Author’s Craft
(figurative language, rhyme,
symbolism, tone/mood, etc.)
5. Make Inferences, Draw
Conclusions, Make Connections,
Embrace Ah Ha Moments
“DIAGNOSE” THE TEXT (#1)
1. Consider the Purpose
(to entertain, to inform, to argue,
to persuade, etc.)
2. Consider the Structure
and/or Genre
(novel, poem, song, article, website, etc.)
3. Consider Elements
(Fiction-plot, character, conflict,
etc. Nonfiction- graphic features,
etc.)
4. Consider Author’s Craft
(figurative language, rhyme,
symbolism, tone/mood, etc.
5. Make Inferences, Draw
Conclusions, Make Connections,
Embrace Ah Ha Moments, etc.
(cite textual evidence as support)
RACE RESPONSE (#1)
What would be an appropriate 3-5 word caption for this photo? Cite textual
evidence to justify your choice.
“DIAGNOSE” THE TEXT (#2)
1. Consider the Purpose
(to entertain, to inform, to argue,
to persuade, etc.)
2. Consider the Structure
and/or Genre
(novel, poem, song, article, website, etc.)
3. Consider Elements
(Fiction-plot, character, conflict,
etc. Nonfiction- graphic features,
etc.)
4. Consider Author’s Craft
(figurative language, rhyme,
symbolism, tone/mood, etc.
5. Make Inferences, Draw
Conclusions, Make Connections,
Embrace Ah Ha Moments
RACE RESPONSE (#2)
What message is The American Heart Association sending with this ad? Is it
effective? Cite textual evidence to justify your answer.
“DIAGNOSE” THE TEXT (#3)
1. Consider the Purpose
(to entertain, to inform, to argue,
to persuade, etc.)
2. Consider the Structure
and/or Genre
(novel, poem, song, article, website, etc.)
3. Consider Elements
(Fiction-plot, character, conflict,
etc. Nonfiction- graphic features,
etc.)
4. Consider Author’s Craft
(figurative language, rhyme,
symbolism, tone/mood, etc.
5. Make Inferences, Draw
Conclusions, Make Connections,
Embrace Ah Ha Moments
RACE RESPONSE (#3)
How does the unknown writer use figurative language to deliver the quote’s
theme? Was this an effective strategy? Cite textual evidence to support your
answer.