12 22 Q2 ‘15 18 24 Second Quarter 2015 Table of Contents Recognition 3........................ Anniversaries 5........................ Driver Scorecard Bonuses 6........................ Star Award 7........................ Mileage Bonuses 9........................ Hero Spotlight Safety 11...................... Aggressive Driving 13...................... Lane Change Awareness 15...................... Red Lights & Stop Lights Wellness 17...................... Stress On The Road Human Resources Our company magazine is the voice of our organization - the best place to learn what is going on within the company. It is created to educate, inform and, at times, entertain. It will be an ever evolving piece of communication as we evaluate what content makes for the best read. Who wants to be bored while reading good news? No thank you! We want you to anxiously await our quarterly issues - you are the customer, our Quest Global family. This Magazine is for you! 19...................... Animal Instinct Driver Services 21...................... Women In Trucking 23...................... Did You Know? 25...................... Load Planners Puzzle Masters 27...................... Getting To Know Truck 493 Vice President/ Editor in Chief EDITOR Chris Champion | CREATIVE Erin Williams & Brooks Moore PHOTOGRAPHY Chris Champion | CONTRIBUTORS Gene Jenkins, Julie Weinbloom, Jo Denton, Bettina Cameron, Renee Lamb, Dennis Stock, Rebecca Overton, Brandy Hannah 2
12  22  Q2    15  18  24  Second Quarter 2015  Table of Contents Recognition 3........................ Anniversaries 5.......
12 22 Q2 ‘15 18 24 Second Quarter 2015 Table of Contents Recognition 3........................ Anniversaries 5........................ Driver Scorecard Bonuses 6........................ Star Award 7........................ Mileage Bonuses 9........................ Hero Spotlight Safety 11...................... Aggressive Driving 13...................... Lane Change Awareness 15...................... Red Lights & Stop Lights Wellness 17...................... Stress On The Road Human Resources Our company magazine is the voice of our organization - the best place to learn what is going on within the company. It is created to educate, inform and, at times, entertain. It will be an ever evolving piece of communication as we evaluate what content makes for the best read. Who wants to be bored while reading good news? No thank you! We want you to anxiously await our quarterly issues - you are the customer, our Quest Global family. This Magazine is for you! 19...................... Animal Instinct Driver Services 21...................... Women In Trucking 23...................... Did You Know? 25...................... Load Planners Puzzle Masters 27...................... Getting To Know Truck 493 Vice President/ Editor in Chief EDITOR Chris Champion | CREATIVE Erin Williams & Brooks Moore PHOTOGRAPHY Chris Champion | CONTRIBUTORS Gene Jenkins, Julie Weinbloom, Jo Denton, Bettina Cameron, Renee Lamb, Dennis Stock, Rebecca Overton, Brandy Hannah 2
12  22  Q2    15  18  24  Second Quarter 2015  Table of Contents Recognition 3........................ Anniversaries 5.......
Anniversaries 2nd Quarter 2015 I would like to thank each of you for your hard work and dedication to Quest Global during your time as part of our family. The accomplishments we have achieved together – all the improvements we have made – could not have been attained without your support and effort. The difference you make is nothing short of legendary. Congratulations on your successes and for setting solid foundations for the years to come. Again, thank you for your continued support. - Jason 12 YEARS Recognition Justin Johnson 7 YEARS Shaquita Dorsey 10 YEARS Lisa Holmes Wayne Holmes 6 YEARS David Henderson Teresa Hubbard Thomas Hubbard 8 YEARS Barbara Benefield Larry Benefield Mary Peterson Debbie Goodrich Patrick Bushue Tammy Miller Gail Romine 5 YEARS Marcus Blue Hillarie Deavers Mark Doss 4 Velix Charles Tammy Fry Cindy Grigsby Lonnie Grigsby Latanya Jenkins Larry Kendrick Penny Kendrick Toddmon Mitchell 2 YEARS Dwight Perkins Susan Perkins Freddie Picanco Janet Young Brian Young Amy Picanco Ty Bell Gene Jenkins James Arkell Betty Blackston Jackie Blackston Bobbi Fridley Delford Kelly Geraldine Masters Chris Champion Kay Wilson Tammy Hoy Charlie McQueen Victor McQueen Teresa Noel Charles Noel Charles Runyon Tammy Runyon Enoch Shippy Rosemarie Shippy Dennis Stock Justin Stock James Storey Ricky Boone Tiffany Prince Valerie Hamilton-Bonne Lennon Hawes Jr LaRon High Brandon James Deborah Jenkins Vivian Jones Brandon Keith Cinceri Killebrew Elvin Killebrew Sharola Lambert Mason Lane Mike McElhaney Peggy McElhaney Michael Michetti Sandra Michetti Pamela Milliken Byron Payne Timothy Pennington Wayne Perry Jason Steelman Melissa Steelman Lawrence Walker William Wiley Amber Williams Colin Young Matt Patterson Justin Britton YEARS Iwona Aleksandrowicz Leszek Aleksandrowicz Debra Brown Michael Brown Daryl Durant Leslie Foster Robert Foster Jason Hoy 1 3 YEARS YEAR Angosom Adhanom Lloyd Austin Michelle Austin Georgina Barnette Nathan Barnette Terry Bell Adrienne Bonne Beth Brown Ronald Brown Bettina Cameron Brian Cameron Darrell Carswell Jason Chambers Lisa Crosby Adam Daigneault Christopher Gussenhoven THE DIFFERENCE YOU MAKE IS NOTHING SHORT OF LEGENDARY Q2 ‘15 4
Anniversaries 2nd Quarter 2015  I  would like to thank each of you for your hard work and dedication to Quest Global durin...
Anniversaries 2nd Quarter 2015 I would like to thank each of you for your hard work and dedication to Quest Global during your time as part of our family. The accomplishments we have achieved together – all the improvements we have made – could not have been attained without your support and effort. The difference you make is nothing short of legendary. Congratulations on your successes and for setting solid foundations for the years to come. Again, thank you for your continued support. - Jason 12 YEARS Recognition Justin Johnson 7 YEARS Shaquita Dorsey 10 YEARS Lisa Holmes Wayne Holmes 6 YEARS David Henderson Teresa Hubbard Thomas Hubbard 8 YEARS Barbara Benefield Larry Benefield Mary Peterson Debbie Goodrich Patrick Bushue Tammy Miller Gail Romine 5 YEARS Marcus Blue Hillarie Deavers Mark Doss 4 Velix Charles Tammy Fry Cindy Grigsby Lonnie Grigsby Latanya Jenkins Larry Kendrick Penny Kendrick Toddmon Mitchell 2 YEARS Dwight Perkins Susan Perkins Freddie Picanco Janet Young Brian Young Amy Picanco Ty Bell Gene Jenkins James Arkell Betty Blackston Jackie Blackston Bobbi Fridley Delford Kelly Geraldine Masters Chris Champion Kay Wilson Tammy Hoy Charlie McQueen Victor McQueen Teresa Noel Charles Noel Charles Runyon Tammy Runyon Enoch Shippy Rosemarie Shippy Dennis Stock Justin Stock James Storey Ricky Boone Tiffany Prince Valerie Hamilton-Bonne Lennon Hawes Jr LaRon High Brandon James Deborah Jenkins Vivian Jones Brandon Keith Cinceri Killebrew Elvin Killebrew Sharola Lambert Mason Lane Mike McElhaney Peggy McElhaney Michael Michetti Sandra Michetti Pamela Milliken Byron Payne Timothy Pennington Wayne Perry Jason Steelman Melissa Steelman Lawrence Walker William Wiley Amber Williams Colin Young Matt Patterson Justin Britton YEARS Iwona Aleksandrowicz Leszek Aleksandrowicz Debra Brown Michael Brown Daryl Durant Leslie Foster Robert Foster Jason Hoy 1 3 YEARS YEAR Angosom Adhanom Lloyd Austin Michelle Austin Georgina Barnette Nathan Barnette Terry Bell Adrienne Bonne Beth Brown Ronald Brown Bettina Cameron Brian Cameron Darrell Carswell Jason Chambers Lisa Crosby Adam Daigneault Christopher Gussenhoven THE DIFFERENCE YOU MAKE IS NOTHING SHORT OF LEGENDARY Q2 ‘15 4
Anniversaries 2nd Quarter 2015  I  would like to thank each of you for your hard work and dedication to Quest Global durin...
Q2 ‘15 Driver Scorecard Bonus Recipients 2nd Quarter 2015 Our Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus is a recent addition to our pay package having started during the first quarter of this year. The Scorecard rewards outstanding achievements in the areas of safety, efficiency and productivity. Individuals who earn the Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus receive an additional $500.00 per quarter. Winners This additional bonus often means individuals earn an additional $1,000-$2,000 per year on top of regular wages and other bonuses. Congratulations to everyone listed! We appreciate your hard work and thank you for your continued commitment to excellence. Recognition "Individuals who earn the Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus receive an additional $500.00 per quarter." Dianna Arkell James Arkell Jeffrey Armstrong Lloyd Austin Norma Avery Michelle Austin Debra Ballard Gary Baugh Veronica Beginez Nia Bergman Edward Black Jackie Blackston Cindy Boyce Timothy Boyce Catherine Breiling Joseph Breiling Debra Brown Gregory Brownfield Michael Brown Bettina Cameron Brian Cameron Darrell Carswell Kathryn Chavers Edmund Chilcote Jerry Clark Brian Contin Jacqueline Cosby Cynthia Crossman Steven Crossman Carol Jones Davis Glenn Deimler Deborah Dunton Michael Dunton Milinda Durden Randall Durden Robert Dygert Terry Dygert Robert Foster Stephen Fulcher Jeannette Fulmer Froylan Gallegos Justin Gladden Lawrence Greene Kristoffer Gregorich Rebecca Gregorich Christopher Gussenhoven Darlene Haley Loretta Chilcote James Haskett Jr Lennon Hawes Jr Carol Udas Timothy Holleran Lisa Holmes Christopher Horton Eric Howard Thomas Huckeba Judy Husfeld Marvin Husfeld Christine Hysler Jeffrey Ives Teresa Wilson-Ives Deborah Jenkins Cinceri Killebrew Elvin Killebrew Kenneth Kimbrough Sharola Lambert Susan Lewis Alfredo Lopez Day Lyric Janie Mason Celeste McCaslin Mark McCaslin Joe McGill Jr Emilee McMaster William McMaster Milton Mejia Jason Meyer Michael Michetti Sandra Michetti Pamela Milliken Sheila Mitchell Thomas Mitchell Alina Moore Frederick Moore Tara Myricks Wayne Perry Adam Reutter Joshua Riser Deja Vu Roe Tammy Runyon Rebecca Scott Robert Scott Doris Shenefield Penny Skerritt Stella Spedden Jason Spies David Springer Felicia Springer Robin Stevenson Dennis Stock Kenneth Sullivan Chirea Thornton Eric Thornton Lee Vandiver Lawrence Walker Ryan Walton Sharon Walton Tony West Trent West George Wetzell James Whiddon Paula Whiddon William Wiley Amber Williams Jack Winkelman Nathanial Young Mark Zywiczka Nancy Zywiczka John and Susan have been a part of our family since 2007. Recently, we received a call of gratitude for some help they offered to a fellow driver in need. He chose to remain anonymous, but wanted to express his sincere appreciation for their help. He stated that if John and Susan hadn’t stopped to help him put a fire out due to a bad wheel seal, his trailer would have completely burned. According to this anonymous driver, several other trucks had passed by without stopping to help, so John and Susan went against the crowd and he is forever thankful for their actions. 6
Q2    15  Driver Scorecard Bonus Recipients 2nd Quarter 2015 Our Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus is a recent addition to ...
Q2 ‘15 Driver Scorecard Bonus Recipients 2nd Quarter 2015 Our Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus is a recent addition to our pay package having started during the first quarter of this year. The Scorecard rewards outstanding achievements in the areas of safety, efficiency and productivity. Individuals who earn the Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus receive an additional $500.00 per quarter. Winners This additional bonus often means individuals earn an additional $1,000-$2,000 per year on top of regular wages and other bonuses. Congratulations to everyone listed! We appreciate your hard work and thank you for your continued commitment to excellence. Recognition "Individuals who earn the Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus receive an additional $500.00 per quarter." Dianna Arkell James Arkell Jeffrey Armstrong Lloyd Austin Norma Avery Michelle Austin Debra Ballard Gary Baugh Veronica Beginez Nia Bergman Edward Black Jackie Blackston Cindy Boyce Timothy Boyce Catherine Breiling Joseph Breiling Debra Brown Gregory Brownfield Michael Brown Bettina Cameron Brian Cameron Darrell Carswell Kathryn Chavers Edmund Chilcote Jerry Clark Brian Contin Jacqueline Cosby Cynthia Crossman Steven Crossman Carol Jones Davis Glenn Deimler Deborah Dunton Michael Dunton Milinda Durden Randall Durden Robert Dygert Terry Dygert Robert Foster Stephen Fulcher Jeannette Fulmer Froylan Gallegos Justin Gladden Lawrence Greene Kristoffer Gregorich Rebecca Gregorich Christopher Gussenhoven Darlene Haley Loretta Chilcote James Haskett Jr Lennon Hawes Jr Carol Udas Timothy Holleran Lisa Holmes Christopher Horton Eric Howard Thomas Huckeba Judy Husfeld Marvin Husfeld Christine Hysler Jeffrey Ives Teresa Wilson-Ives Deborah Jenkins Cinceri Killebrew Elvin Killebrew Kenneth Kimbrough Sharola Lambert Susan Lewis Alfredo Lopez Day Lyric Janie Mason Celeste McCaslin Mark McCaslin Joe McGill Jr Emilee McMaster William McMaster Milton Mejia Jason Meyer Michael Michetti Sandra Michetti Pamela Milliken Sheila Mitchell Thomas Mitchell Alina Moore Frederick Moore Tara Myricks Wayne Perry Adam Reutter Joshua Riser Deja Vu Roe Tammy Runyon Rebecca Scott Robert Scott Doris Shenefield Penny Skerritt Stella Spedden Jason Spies David Springer Felicia Springer Robin Stevenson Dennis Stock Kenneth Sullivan Chirea Thornton Eric Thornton Lee Vandiver Lawrence Walker Ryan Walton Sharon Walton Tony West Trent West George Wetzell James Whiddon Paula Whiddon William Wiley Amber Williams Jack Winkelman Nathanial Young Mark Zywiczka Nancy Zywiczka John and Susan have been a part of our family since 2007. Recently, we received a call of gratitude for some help they offered to a fellow driver in need. He chose to remain anonymous, but wanted to express his sincere appreciation for their help. He stated that if John and Susan hadn’t stopped to help him put a fire out due to a bad wheel seal, his trailer would have completely burned. According to this anonymous driver, several other trucks had passed by without stopping to help, so John and Susan went against the crowd and he is forever thankful for their actions. 6
Q2    15  Driver Scorecard Bonus Recipients 2nd Quarter 2015 Our Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus is a recent addition to ...
May Mileage Bonus Recipients Q2 ‘15 Mileage Bonus Recipients 2nd Quarter 2015 Our Monthly Mileage Bonus is a tradition and rewards excellence in the area of productivity. Teams who earn the Monthly Mileage Bonus receive an additional $0.04 per mile split between the team members on all the miles they ran during the month. This additional bonus often means teams earn an additional $6,000-$9,000 per year on top of regular wages and other bonuses. Congratulations to all the teams listed! We appreciate your hard work and thank you for your continued dedication. "This additional bonus often means teams earn an additional $6,000-$9,000 per year on top of regular wages and other bonuses." Recognition April Mileage Bonus Recipients Gregory Archer Jennifer Archer Gary Baugh Eric Bennett Nia Bergman Marcus Blue Dominic Cardoza Jason Chambers John Cooper Joy Cooper Victor Corral Lisa Crosby Adelle Daigneault Eddie Darnell Trisha Darnell Brandon Dooley Milinda Durden Randall Durden Marty Edmond Trenda Edmond Stevie Estep Stephanie Floyd Jeffery Foster II Leslie Foster Robert Foster Barbara Freeman Charles Freeman Justin Gladden Carol Gordon Mark Greer Cindy Grigsby Lonnie Grigsby Christopher Gussenhoven Anthony Hancock James Haskett Jr Susan Haskett Sherylyn Hill Carol Udas Donald Hollister Jason Hoy Tammy Hoy Judy Husfeld Marvin Husfeld Gary Jermalowicz Thomas Kilbride Brian Kochie Sharola Lambert Scott Lindsay Cheryl Long Thomas Long Anita Lowrey Dennis Lowrey Celeste McCaslin Mark McCaslin Mike McElhaney Peggy McElhaney Joe McGill Jr Marcus Metcalf Jason Meyer Michael Michetti Sandra Michetti Theresa Oliver Byron Payne Roy Payton Wayne Perry Deja Vu Roe Charles Runyon Tammy Runyon Doris Shenefield Kevin Shenefield Enoch Shippy Rosemarie Shippy Mark Skerritt Penny Skerritt Hazel Floyd Randall Snook Stella Spedden Robin Stevenson William Stevenson Scott Udas James Whiddon Paula Whiddon Cheryl Williams Jeremiah Workman Colin Young Mark Zywiczka Nancy Zywiczka Shaquita Dorsey Phillip Hunter Darjuan Jackson Angosom Adhanom Jeffrey Armstrong Acie Ates Lloyd Austin Michelle Austin Debra Elger Debra Ballard Ricky Ballard Kevin Benedict Betty Blackston Jackie Blackston Adrienne Bonne Valerie Hamilton-Bonne Daven Brown Gregory Brownfield Sheila Brown Michael Bruno Darrell Carswell Danny Chambers Kristi Chambers Velix Charles Edmund Chilcote Eddie Darnell Trisha Darnell Carol Jones Davis Glenn Deimler Deborah Dunton Michael Dunton Daryl Durant David Elger Mark Fox Barbara Freeman Charles Freeman Stephen Fulcher Pamela Garrett Justin Gladden Anthony Hancock Loretta Chilcote James Haskett Jr Susan Haskett Lennon Hawes Jr Sherylyn Hill Carol Udas Lisa Holmes Wayne Holmes Jovonn Horrice Christopher Horton Eric Howard Jason Hoy Tammy Hoy Thomas Huckeba Judy Husfeld Marvin Husfeld Christine Hysler Jeffrey Ives Teresa Wilson-Ives Tanicca Jackson Danny Jacobs Tanya Jacobs Latanya Jenkins Gary Jermalowicz Gale Kimble Brian Kochie Mason Lane Celesia Laymon Darnell Levy Geraldine Masters Victor McQueen Sheila Mitchell Alina Moore Frederick Moore Tara Myricks Jonathon Norrick Chris Patterson Roy Payton Douglas Randolph Adam Reutter Angela Rice James Rice Joshua Riser Janet Young Galen Sanborn Marquis Sapp Lois Schroeder Rebecca Scott Robert Scott Samuel Silver Mark Skerritt Penny Skerritt Junetta Cole-Stebbins Lloyd Stebbins Robert Stephens Kenneth Sullivan Chirea Thornton Eric Thornton Shawn Tucker Scott Udas Lawrence Walker Kandi Bruno George Wetzell William Wiley Jeremiah Workman Brian Young Teresa Wilson-Ives Paula James Deborah Jenkins Latanya Jenkins Terrell Johnson Babette Kramp Kevin Kronsagen Hope Laire Mason Lane Rose Lane Brenda Looney Curtis Looney Alfredo Lopez Anita Lowrey Dennis Lowrey Nathan Lutsic Michael May Eric Maynard Mike McElhaney Peggy McElhaney Victor McQueen Alina Moore Frederick Moore Toni Moya Tara Myricks Jonathon Norrick Dwight Perkins Susan Perkins Emily Teague-Quinlin Steven Quinlin Jr Tony Register Angela Rice James Rice Erika Royals Marquis Sapp Doris Shenefield Kevin Shenefield Enoch Shippy Rosemarie Shippy Earl Smith, Jr. Hazel Floyd Stella Spedden Jason Spies Robin Stevenson William Stevenson Sandor Toth Zsuzsanna Toth Shawn Tucker Kimberly Shire Scott Udas Christopher Vivelo Robert Waggoner Amy Wesley Franklin Wesley James Whiddon Paula Whiddon Jeremiah Workman Colin Young Nathanial Young Sonny Brazeale June Mileage Bonus Recipients Anthony Hancock Angosom Adhanom Dianna Arkell James Arkell Sherry Blackledge Marcus Blue Beth Brown Debra Brown Gregory Brownfield Michael Brown Ronald Brown Michal Calbert Tony Callahan Bettina Cameron Brian Cameron Darrell Carswell Velix Charles Andrew Clemons, Jr. Clarence Coleman Brian Contin Kenneth Conway Victor Corral Lisa Crosby Dawn Dickson Brandon Dooley Shaquita Dorsey Marty Edmond Trenda Edmond Stevie Estep Stephanie Floyd Jeffery Foster II Leslie Foster Robert Foster Stephen Fulcher Jeannette Fulmer Richard Fulmer Froylan Gallegos Antonio Gilbert Martina Gilbert Giuseppina Goldstein Peter Goldstein Carol Gordon Jacqueline Gordon Laramie Gordon Kristoffer Gregorich Rebecca Gregorich Cindy Grigsby Lonnie Grigsby Donnie Harden Nancy Harden Pamela Harmon James Haskett Jr Susan Haskett Jacquelyn Henthorn Carol Udas Donald Hollister Timothy Holleran Phillip Hunter Cammy Hyman Jeffrey Ives 8
May Mileage Bonus Recipients  Q2    15  Mileage Bonus Recipients 2nd Quarter 2015 Our Monthly Mileage Bonus is a tradition...
May Mileage Bonus Recipients Q2 ‘15 Mileage Bonus Recipients 2nd Quarter 2015 Our Monthly Mileage Bonus is a tradition and rewards excellence in the area of productivity. Teams who earn the Monthly Mileage Bonus receive an additional $0.04 per mile split between the team members on all the miles they ran during the month. This additional bonus often means teams earn an additional $6,000-$9,000 per year on top of regular wages and other bonuses. Congratulations to all the teams listed! We appreciate your hard work and thank you for your continued dedication. "This additional bonus often means teams earn an additional $6,000-$9,000 per year on top of regular wages and other bonuses." Recognition April Mileage Bonus Recipients Gregory Archer Jennifer Archer Gary Baugh Eric Bennett Nia Bergman Marcus Blue Dominic Cardoza Jason Chambers John Cooper Joy Cooper Victor Corral Lisa Crosby Adelle Daigneault Eddie Darnell Trisha Darnell Brandon Dooley Milinda Durden Randall Durden Marty Edmond Trenda Edmond Stevie Estep Stephanie Floyd Jeffery Foster II Leslie Foster Robert Foster Barbara Freeman Charles Freeman Justin Gladden Carol Gordon Mark Greer Cindy Grigsby Lonnie Grigsby Christopher Gussenhoven Anthony Hancock James Haskett Jr Susan Haskett Sherylyn Hill Carol Udas Donald Hollister Jason Hoy Tammy Hoy Judy Husfeld Marvin Husfeld Gary Jermalowicz Thomas Kilbride Brian Kochie Sharola Lambert Scott Lindsay Cheryl Long Thomas Long Anita Lowrey Dennis Lowrey Celeste McCaslin Mark McCaslin Mike McElhaney Peggy McElhaney Joe McGill Jr Marcus Metcalf Jason Meyer Michael Michetti Sandra Michetti Theresa Oliver Byron Payne Roy Payton Wayne Perry Deja Vu Roe Charles Runyon Tammy Runyon Doris Shenefield Kevin Shenefield Enoch Shippy Rosemarie Shippy Mark Skerritt Penny Skerritt Hazel Floyd Randall Snook Stella Spedden Robin Stevenson William Stevenson Scott Udas James Whiddon Paula Whiddon Cheryl Williams Jeremiah Workman Colin Young Mark Zywiczka Nancy Zywiczka Shaquita Dorsey Phillip Hunter Darjuan Jackson Angosom Adhanom Jeffrey Armstrong Acie Ates Lloyd Austin Michelle Austin Debra Elger Debra Ballard Ricky Ballard Kevin Benedict Betty Blackston Jackie Blackston Adrienne Bonne Valerie Hamilton-Bonne Daven Brown Gregory Brownfield Sheila Brown Michael Bruno Darrell Carswell Danny Chambers Kristi Chambers Velix Charles Edmund Chilcote Eddie Darnell Trisha Darnell Carol Jones Davis Glenn Deimler Deborah Dunton Michael Dunton Daryl Durant David Elger Mark Fox Barbara Freeman Charles Freeman Stephen Fulcher Pamela Garrett Justin Gladden Anthony Hancock Loretta Chilcote James Haskett Jr Susan Haskett Lennon Hawes Jr Sherylyn Hill Carol Udas Lisa Holmes Wayne Holmes Jovonn Horrice Christopher Horton Eric Howard Jason Hoy Tammy Hoy Thomas Huckeba Judy Husfeld Marvin Husfeld Christine Hysler Jeffrey Ives Teresa Wilson-Ives Tanicca Jackson Danny Jacobs Tanya Jacobs Latanya Jenkins Gary Jermalowicz Gale Kimble Brian Kochie Mason Lane Celesia Laymon Darnell Levy Geraldine Masters Victor McQueen Sheila Mitchell Alina Moore Frederick Moore Tara Myricks Jonathon Norrick Chris Patterson Roy Payton Douglas Randolph Adam Reutter Angela Rice James Rice Joshua Riser Janet Young Galen Sanborn Marquis Sapp Lois Schroeder Rebecca Scott Robert Scott Samuel Silver Mark Skerritt Penny Skerritt Junetta Cole-Stebbins Lloyd Stebbins Robert Stephens Kenneth Sullivan Chirea Thornton Eric Thornton Shawn Tucker Scott Udas Lawrence Walker Kandi Bruno George Wetzell William Wiley Jeremiah Workman Brian Young Teresa Wilson-Ives Paula James Deborah Jenkins Latanya Jenkins Terrell Johnson Babette Kramp Kevin Kronsagen Hope Laire Mason Lane Rose Lane Brenda Looney Curtis Looney Alfredo Lopez Anita Lowrey Dennis Lowrey Nathan Lutsic Michael May Eric Maynard Mike McElhaney Peggy McElhaney Victor McQueen Alina Moore Frederick Moore Toni Moya Tara Myricks Jonathon Norrick Dwight Perkins Susan Perkins Emily Teague-Quinlin Steven Quinlin Jr Tony Register Angela Rice James Rice Erika Royals Marquis Sapp Doris Shenefield Kevin Shenefield Enoch Shippy Rosemarie Shippy Earl Smith, Jr. Hazel Floyd Stella Spedden Jason Spies Robin Stevenson William Stevenson Sandor Toth Zsuzsanna Toth Shawn Tucker Kimberly Shire Scott Udas Christopher Vivelo Robert Waggoner Amy Wesley Franklin Wesley James Whiddon Paula Whiddon Jeremiah Workman Colin Young Nathanial Young Sonny Brazeale June Mileage Bonus Recipients Anthony Hancock Angosom Adhanom Dianna Arkell James Arkell Sherry Blackledge Marcus Blue Beth Brown Debra Brown Gregory Brownfield Michael Brown Ronald Brown Michal Calbert Tony Callahan Bettina Cameron Brian Cameron Darrell Carswell Velix Charles Andrew Clemons, Jr. Clarence Coleman Brian Contin Kenneth Conway Victor Corral Lisa Crosby Dawn Dickson Brandon Dooley Shaquita Dorsey Marty Edmond Trenda Edmond Stevie Estep Stephanie Floyd Jeffery Foster II Leslie Foster Robert Foster Stephen Fulcher Jeannette Fulmer Richard Fulmer Froylan Gallegos Antonio Gilbert Martina Gilbert Giuseppina Goldstein Peter Goldstein Carol Gordon Jacqueline Gordon Laramie Gordon Kristoffer Gregorich Rebecca Gregorich Cindy Grigsby Lonnie Grigsby Donnie Harden Nancy Harden Pamela Harmon James Haskett Jr Susan Haskett Jacquelyn Henthorn Carol Udas Donald Hollister Timothy Holleran Phillip Hunter Cammy Hyman Jeffrey Ives 8
May Mileage Bonus Recipients  Q2    15  Mileage Bonus Recipients 2nd Quarter 2015 Our Monthly Mileage Bonus is a tradition...
Q2 ‘15 Quest Global Salutes Galen “Sandy” Sanborn Sandy has been a part of our family for over 10 years now. Before coming to join our team, Sandy served in the Navy from 1975 to 1996 – retiring after 20 years of dedicated service. In contrast to the high seas, he now lives in the mountains of North Georgia. We are highlighting him this edition in an ongoing effort to recognize the heroes in our family and show appreciation for his sacrifices and for those of his family. Over Sandy’s 20 years, he was stationed here in the United States in Charleston, SC, Norfolk, VA, Groton, CT and Patuxent River, MD. He was also stationed in areas of Spain, France, Turkey, England, Greece, Egypt, Norway, Romania, Singapore, South America and the Caribbean Islands. Sandy served during Desert Storm and Desert Shield as a Machinist Mate where he worked on 6-8 various ships. Our Veterans Our Heroes James Arkell Acie Ates Georgina Barnette Jon Barragan Jackie Blackston Marcus Blue Adrienne Bonne Valerie Hamilton-Bonne Joseph Breiling Gregory Brownfield Michael Brown Dominic Cardoza Jerry Clark John Cooper Robert Covert Jr Steven Crossman Hillarie Deavers Deborah Dunton Daryl Durant Robert Dygert David Elger Linda Farley Patrick Farley Allan Gage Willard Gibbs Carol Gordon Christopher Gussenhoven James Haskett Jr Sherylyn Hill Timothy Holleran Phillip Hunter Danny Jacobs Brandon James Deborah Jenkins James Jenkins Cleophas Jordan Lester Kiddy Kenneth Kimbrough Tony Leonard Darnell Levy Robert Long, Jr Jasmine Mays Joe McGill Jr James McAlhany William McMaster Terry Nichols Timothy Pennington Dwight Perkins Wayne Perry Richard Puetz Tony Register Angela Rice Joshua Riser Billy Roberson Galen Sanborn Kevin Shenefield Mark Skerritt Dennis Stock William Wallace Patricia Ward George White Tom Winkles While we value the work our employees do for Quest Global, we also think it’s important to honor our many team members who have served their country as members of the armed forces. We’re proud to pay tribute to all of our veterans and urge all our employees and friends to take the time to stop to honor those employees and retirees who have served their country. Recognition Note: The list above includes those who have noted their Military status in their employee file at the time of hire. We invite any Quest Global employee who would like to be included to contact their Primary Driver Manager or Supervisor and Human Resources will update your records accordingly. 10
Q2    15  Quest Global  Salutes Galen    Sandy    Sanborn Sandy has been a part of our family for over 10 years now. Befor...
Q2 ‘15 Quest Global Salutes Galen “Sandy” Sanborn Sandy has been a part of our family for over 10 years now. Before coming to join our team, Sandy served in the Navy from 1975 to 1996 – retiring after 20 years of dedicated service. In contrast to the high seas, he now lives in the mountains of North Georgia. We are highlighting him this edition in an ongoing effort to recognize the heroes in our family and show appreciation for his sacrifices and for those of his family. Over Sandy’s 20 years, he was stationed here in the United States in Charleston, SC, Norfolk, VA, Groton, CT and Patuxent River, MD. He was also stationed in areas of Spain, France, Turkey, England, Greece, Egypt, Norway, Romania, Singapore, South America and the Caribbean Islands. Sandy served during Desert Storm and Desert Shield as a Machinist Mate where he worked on 6-8 various ships. Our Veterans Our Heroes James Arkell Acie Ates Georgina Barnette Jon Barragan Jackie Blackston Marcus Blue Adrienne Bonne Valerie Hamilton-Bonne Joseph Breiling Gregory Brownfield Michael Brown Dominic Cardoza Jerry Clark John Cooper Robert Covert Jr Steven Crossman Hillarie Deavers Deborah Dunton Daryl Durant Robert Dygert David Elger Linda Farley Patrick Farley Allan Gage Willard Gibbs Carol Gordon Christopher Gussenhoven James Haskett Jr Sherylyn Hill Timothy Holleran Phillip Hunter Danny Jacobs Brandon James Deborah Jenkins James Jenkins Cleophas Jordan Lester Kiddy Kenneth Kimbrough Tony Leonard Darnell Levy Robert Long, Jr Jasmine Mays Joe McGill Jr James McAlhany William McMaster Terry Nichols Timothy Pennington Dwight Perkins Wayne Perry Richard Puetz Tony Register Angela Rice Joshua Riser Billy Roberson Galen Sanborn Kevin Shenefield Mark Skerritt Dennis Stock William Wallace Patricia Ward George White Tom Winkles While we value the work our employees do for Quest Global, we also think it’s important to honor our many team members who have served their country as members of the armed forces. We’re proud to pay tribute to all of our veterans and urge all our employees and friends to take the time to stop to honor those employees and retirees who have served their country. Recognition Note: The list above includes those who have noted their Military status in their employee file at the time of hire. We invite any Quest Global employee who would like to be included to contact their Primary Driver Manager or Supervisor and Human Resources will update your records accordingly. 10
Q2    15  Quest Global  Salutes Galen    Sandy    Sanborn Sandy has been a part of our family for over 10 years now. Befor...
Q2 ‘15 Aggressive Driving Who thought of the term “Aggressive Driving?” It was probably a so-called aggressive driver. Aggressive sounds good, doesn’t it? It refers to go-getters, movers and shakers, people who know what they want and know how to get it. So, aggressive driving doesn’t sound so bad. We have a better name for it. Reckless driving. Wait a minute. Reckless? There’s another friendly term! It should be called wreck-more or wreck-full driving. So what is aggressive driving? Have you ever seen a driver tailgate another driver so closely that the driver in front gets scared and moves out of the way? That’s aggressive driving, or, as we like to call it, reckless driving. How about this one? A driver who tailgates, just so no one can cut in front of him. That’s aggressive driving too. What about a driver who keeps quickly switching lanes? That’s very aggressive. It’s usually the same person doing all of the above. It might be an otherwise safe driver who happens to be on his way to the hospital, or it might be a person who always drives this way. Whatever the case, when you see an aggressive driver, give them room because they are coming anyway. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recently completed a nationwide survey about speeding and other unsafe driving actions. Here are some results: 62 36% 75% 33% 23% 50% 61% 52% Safety % Said the behavior of another driver has been a threat to them in the last year. Listed another driver cutting in front of them as a threatening behavior. Felt that it is important to do something about unsafe drivers. Reported that they feel driving is more dangerous now than a year ago. Reported driving ten miles per hour over the speed limit on an interstate in the past week. Were satisfied with enforcement of speed limits. To an aggressive driver, a turn signal (if they use it at all) means ready or not here I come. If you try to compete with an aggressive driver, you are being aggressive too. When two aggressive drivers are competing for the same space, it gets ugly - fast. That’s when it can turn into road rage. Somebody has to be smart enough not to let it escalate. There seems to be a lot of talk about aggressive driving these days, but it doesn’t really get to the point. All they seem to say is “everybody does it.” TV and radio ads, newspapers, and even comedians are talking about it. Everybody just laughs and says “yeah, I do it too,” as if it is normal behaviour to almost kill somebody. Well not everyone chooses to drive that way. It’s not funny when someone tailgates a slow driver in the left lane. Yes, he should be in the right lane, but is that a good reason to kill him? You’d think he wouldn’t dare step on the brakes right now, but what if he had to? What if he had a tire blowout right then? You never know - it can and does happen. "If you try to compete with aggressive driver, you are being aggressive too." The study also revealed that men are more likely than women to engage in unsafe driving behaviours and that young drivers commit more unsafe driving actions than older drivers (so much for the old people shouldn’t be driving theory). IT PAYS TO BE HAZMAT ENDORSED $ At least 24 states have established law enforcement programs that specifically target aggressive drivers. California, Arizona, Colorado, Massachusetts, and New York seem to be setting the standard with huge numbers of tickets issued per traffic stop. There is a fine line between making good time and aggressive driving. We all feel the need to hurry once in a while, but being aggressive with a vehicle is not the same thing as being in a hurry. When you’re in a hurry, all you can really do is not waste any more time. You cannot make time. Too often we hear drivers say, “I have to make some time,” as if defying the laws of nature and man, they can somehow roll back the clock to create a minute or two that was not there. You might be able to squeeze out more miles per hour by taking all kinds of risks, but it’s not worth it. One wrong move could mean a ticket, accident, or road rage incident. Then you’ll really be late. Said there was too little enforcement of tailgating The past week. Were satisfied with current amounts of police enforcement of red light running. For more information on aggressive driving visit: bigcitydriver.com/aggressivedriving GET ENDORSED Teams with their HAZMAT Endorsement earn between $10,000 and $15,000 more per year, on average, than teams without HAZMAT Endorsement. 12
Q2    15  Aggressive Driving Who thought of the term    Aggressive Driving     It was probably a so-called aggressive driv...
Q2 ‘15 Aggressive Driving Who thought of the term “Aggressive Driving?” It was probably a so-called aggressive driver. Aggressive sounds good, doesn’t it? It refers to go-getters, movers and shakers, people who know what they want and know how to get it. So, aggressive driving doesn’t sound so bad. We have a better name for it. Reckless driving. Wait a minute. Reckless? There’s another friendly term! It should be called wreck-more or wreck-full driving. So what is aggressive driving? Have you ever seen a driver tailgate another driver so closely that the driver in front gets scared and moves out of the way? That’s aggressive driving, or, as we like to call it, reckless driving. How about this one? A driver who tailgates, just so no one can cut in front of him. That’s aggressive driving too. What about a driver who keeps quickly switching lanes? That’s very aggressive. It’s usually the same person doing all of the above. It might be an otherwise safe driver who happens to be on his way to the hospital, or it might be a person who always drives this way. Whatever the case, when you see an aggressive driver, give them room because they are coming anyway. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recently completed a nationwide survey about speeding and other unsafe driving actions. Here are some results: 62 36% 75% 33% 23% 50% 61% 52% Safety % Said the behavior of another driver has been a threat to them in the last year. Listed another driver cutting in front of them as a threatening behavior. Felt that it is important to do something about unsafe drivers. Reported that they feel driving is more dangerous now than a year ago. Reported driving ten miles per hour over the speed limit on an interstate in the past week. Were satisfied with enforcement of speed limits. To an aggressive driver, a turn signal (if they use it at all) means ready or not here I come. If you try to compete with an aggressive driver, you are being aggressive too. When two aggressive drivers are competing for the same space, it gets ugly - fast. That’s when it can turn into road rage. Somebody has to be smart enough not to let it escalate. There seems to be a lot of talk about aggressive driving these days, but it doesn’t really get to the point. All they seem to say is “everybody does it.” TV and radio ads, newspapers, and even comedians are talking about it. Everybody just laughs and says “yeah, I do it too,” as if it is normal behaviour to almost kill somebody. Well not everyone chooses to drive that way. It’s not funny when someone tailgates a slow driver in the left lane. Yes, he should be in the right lane, but is that a good reason to kill him? You’d think he wouldn’t dare step on the brakes right now, but what if he had to? What if he had a tire blowout right then? You never know - it can and does happen. "If you try to compete with aggressive driver, you are being aggressive too." The study also revealed that men are more likely than women to engage in unsafe driving behaviours and that young drivers commit more unsafe driving actions than older drivers (so much for the old people shouldn’t be driving theory). IT PAYS TO BE HAZMAT ENDORSED $ At least 24 states have established law enforcement programs that specifically target aggressive drivers. California, Arizona, Colorado, Massachusetts, and New York seem to be setting the standard with huge numbers of tickets issued per traffic stop. There is a fine line between making good time and aggressive driving. We all feel the need to hurry once in a while, but being aggressive with a vehicle is not the same thing as being in a hurry. When you’re in a hurry, all you can really do is not waste any more time. You cannot make time. Too often we hear drivers say, “I have to make some time,” as if defying the laws of nature and man, they can somehow roll back the clock to create a minute or two that was not there. You might be able to squeeze out more miles per hour by taking all kinds of risks, but it’s not worth it. One wrong move could mean a ticket, accident, or road rage incident. Then you’ll really be late. Said there was too little enforcement of tailgating The past week. Were satisfied with current amounts of police enforcement of red light running. For more information on aggressive driving visit: bigcitydriver.com/aggressivedriving GET ENDORSED Teams with their HAZMAT Endorsement earn between $10,000 and $15,000 more per year, on average, than teams without HAZMAT Endorsement. 12
Q2    15  Aggressive Driving Who thought of the term    Aggressive Driving     It was probably a so-called aggressive driv...
Q2 ‘15 Lane Change Awareness Of all the driving mistakes committed on the roadways, incorrect signaling and unsafe lane changes are the most common. Changing lanes can be a dangerous and difficult maneuverer, especially for a commercial vehicle. Vehicle size, no-zone lanes, traffic congestion, road construction, speed, weather conditions, and the attitudes of other drivers all play a role when you are attempting a lane change. Lane change collisions can result in serious injury and high property damage costs, especially at high speeds. Tips for Making a Safe Lane Change Dealing with Blind Spots 1. Check your surroundings. Look around, check your mirrors, and confirm that there is enough space for your vehicle to fit into the lane. Make sure other drivers around you are not planning to make the same lane change. Repeat this until you feel it is safe to make the lane change. The reality of driving large commercial vehicles is that you have significant areas around the vehicle where you cannot see other vehicles. These “blind spots “are referred to as the no-zone. The no-zone represents areas where crashes are more likely to occur. There are four no-zone areas that all drivers should be aware of: 2. Signal your intentions. Get into the habit of ALWAYS signaling, even when other vehicles are not around. Make sure you are sending clear information to the drivers around you and that the drivers have time to receive and understand your signal. 3. Check your blind spots. Turn your head and quickly glance over your shoulder to ensure there is nothing in your blind spot. 4. Check your surroundings again. The environment around your vehicle can change quickly. Take one more look around before maneuvering a lane change. 5. Move slowly and gradually. Do not make quick, abrupt movements, as this may startle other drivers. Keep your pace and slowly merge into the lane. • Side blind spots • Rear blind spots • Wide right turns • Backing up Remember that other drivers are probably not aware of no-zones and may not know the size of your truck’s blind spots. Be vigilant in watching out for vehicles in the no-zone. One-third of all crashes between large trucks and cars take place in the no-zone. Also if you receive an improper lane change violation it will go under Unsafe Driving on the CSA. Be alert and avoid a lane change accident. Safety The average driver will change lanes dozens of times during a short trip. Below are some reasons drivers may need to change lanes: • The driver’s lane is ending • The driver needs to make an upcoming right or left turn ahead • The driver is approaching a hazard or obstacle in their lane • The driver is approaching a lane with merging traffic • The vehicle in front of the driver is driving slower than the speed limit Although laws may vary from state to state, generally it is a rule of thumb that all of the following circumstances are against the law: • Changing lanes without the use of a signal • Causing other motorists to make evasive moves, such as swerving out of your way while changing lanes • Recklessly weaving in and out of traffic • Changing lanes while traveling through an intersection • Not moving over - most states have a “move over” law which means that all motorists must move out of the lane closest to an emergency situation/ incident on the side of the road, if possible • Changing lanes through double solid white lines 14
Q2    15  Lane Change Awareness Of all the driving mistakes committed on the roadways, incorrect signaling and unsafe lane...
Q2 ‘15 Lane Change Awareness Of all the driving mistakes committed on the roadways, incorrect signaling and unsafe lane changes are the most common. Changing lanes can be a dangerous and difficult maneuverer, especially for a commercial vehicle. Vehicle size, no-zone lanes, traffic congestion, road construction, speed, weather conditions, and the attitudes of other drivers all play a role when you are attempting a lane change. Lane change collisions can result in serious injury and high property damage costs, especially at high speeds. Tips for Making a Safe Lane Change Dealing with Blind Spots 1. Check your surroundings. Look around, check your mirrors, and confirm that there is enough space for your vehicle to fit into the lane. Make sure other drivers around you are not planning to make the same lane change. Repeat this until you feel it is safe to make the lane change. The reality of driving large commercial vehicles is that you have significant areas around the vehicle where you cannot see other vehicles. These “blind spots “are referred to as the no-zone. The no-zone represents areas where crashes are more likely to occur. There are four no-zone areas that all drivers should be aware of: 2. Signal your intentions. Get into the habit of ALWAYS signaling, even when other vehicles are not around. Make sure you are sending clear information to the drivers around you and that the drivers have time to receive and understand your signal. 3. Check your blind spots. Turn your head and quickly glance over your shoulder to ensure there is nothing in your blind spot. 4. Check your surroundings again. The environment around your vehicle can change quickly. Take one more look around before maneuvering a lane change. 5. Move slowly and gradually. Do not make quick, abrupt movements, as this may startle other drivers. Keep your pace and slowly merge into the lane. • Side blind spots • Rear blind spots • Wide right turns • Backing up Remember that other drivers are probably not aware of no-zones and may not know the size of your truck’s blind spots. Be vigilant in watching out for vehicles in the no-zone. One-third of all crashes between large trucks and cars take place in the no-zone. Also if you receive an improper lane change violation it will go under Unsafe Driving on the CSA. Be alert and avoid a lane change accident. Safety The average driver will change lanes dozens of times during a short trip. Below are some reasons drivers may need to change lanes: • The driver’s lane is ending • The driver needs to make an upcoming right or left turn ahead • The driver is approaching a hazard or obstacle in their lane • The driver is approaching a lane with merging traffic • The vehicle in front of the driver is driving slower than the speed limit Although laws may vary from state to state, generally it is a rule of thumb that all of the following circumstances are against the law: • Changing lanes without the use of a signal • Causing other motorists to make evasive moves, such as swerving out of your way while changing lanes • Recklessly weaving in and out of traffic • Changing lanes while traveling through an intersection • Not moving over - most states have a “move over” law which means that all motorists must move out of the lane closest to an emergency situation/ incident on the side of the road, if possible • Changing lanes through double solid white lines 14
Q2    15  Lane Change Awareness Of all the driving mistakes committed on the roadways, incorrect signaling and unsafe lane...
Q2 ‘15 Red Lights and Stop Signs WANTED TEAM DRIVERS According to the insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), each year more than 900 people die and nearly 200,000 are injured in crashes that involve red light running. About half of the deaths are pedestrians and occupants in other vehicle who are hit by the red light runners. Additionally, stop sign violations are associated with approximately 200 fatal crashes and 17,000 non-fatal injury crashes according to National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) statistics. "Overall, 55.8 percent of Americans admit to running red lights." ? Running red lights and rolling through stop signs has grown measurably in the past few years. Since this unsafe behavior generally goes unchecked, the behavior becomes habitual and acceptable in many areas of the U.S. According to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), “Overall, 55.8 percent of Americans admit to running red lights. Yet ninetysix percent of drivers fear they will be hit by a red light runner when they enter an intersection.” Interestingly: • One in three people claim they personally know someone who has been injured or killed in a red-light-running-crash—similar to the percentage of people who know someone who was killed or injured by a drunk driver. • Only 15.8 percent of respondents cited those reasons (“frustration” and “roadrage”), while nearly half 47.8 percent admitted to being prompted by nothing more complicated than being in a hurry. • Red light runners do not conform to a set demographic - the dangerous practice reaches across drivers of all ages, economic groups and gender. • The perpetrators are everyday people, professionals, blue-collar workers, unemployed, homemakers, parents, and young adults Many cities and states have begun installing cameras at key intersections to photograph vehicles that run red lights. The studies that have been done show a dramatic decrease in collisions. More cameras will likely be installed every year. If one of your neighbors continued to run stop signs in your neighborhood where your kids play, how would you feel? $5,000 Safety REWARD in 90 DAYS For more information, call Janice Poole at (770) 771-6968 Payout Schedule: How can you change this behavior? Follow these simple tips each time you travel. • Saving a few seconds per intersection (very few minutes over the course of a day) is just not worth endangering the lives of yourself and others. • Always look ahead to anticipate light changes: both sudden acceleration to make a light or hard breaking to stop short can lead to trouble. • Driving too fast for conditions is sometimes the cause of running a red light/stop sign so modify how you drive in poor weather or when you are late. • Remember that the person that you endanger by running that light is someone’s loved one. Always put Safety First. ? $1,000 when the team referred completes orientation. • • • • • • • $2,000 when the team referred completes 45 days of employment. $2,000 when the team referred completes 90 days of employment. All employees are eligible for the referral bonus To receive the full amount, the team referred must be employed at the time of each payment Additionally, the team receiving the bonus must be employed at the time of payment. Solo referrals are not eligible - teams only please and thank you. Referrals for a driver to be your team partner don’t count either. Teams employed with us in the previous six months don’t qualify as “referred” either. Teams referred must attend orientation between May 8th and June 30th, 2016. 16
Q2    15  Red Lights and Stop Signs  WANTED TEAM DRIVERS  According to the insurance Institute for Highway Safety  IIHS , ...
Q2 ‘15 Red Lights and Stop Signs WANTED TEAM DRIVERS According to the insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), each year more than 900 people die and nearly 200,000 are injured in crashes that involve red light running. About half of the deaths are pedestrians and occupants in other vehicle who are hit by the red light runners. Additionally, stop sign violations are associated with approximately 200 fatal crashes and 17,000 non-fatal injury crashes according to National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) statistics. "Overall, 55.8 percent of Americans admit to running red lights." ? Running red lights and rolling through stop signs has grown measurably in the past few years. Since this unsafe behavior generally goes unchecked, the behavior becomes habitual and acceptable in many areas of the U.S. According to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), “Overall, 55.8 percent of Americans admit to running red lights. Yet ninetysix percent of drivers fear they will be hit by a red light runner when they enter an intersection.” Interestingly: • One in three people claim they personally know someone who has been injured or killed in a red-light-running-crash—similar to the percentage of people who know someone who was killed or injured by a drunk driver. • Only 15.8 percent of respondents cited those reasons (“frustration” and “roadrage”), while nearly half 47.8 percent admitted to being prompted by nothing more complicated than being in a hurry. • Red light runners do not conform to a set demographic - the dangerous practice reaches across drivers of all ages, economic groups and gender. • The perpetrators are everyday people, professionals, blue-collar workers, unemployed, homemakers, parents, and young adults Many cities and states have begun installing cameras at key intersections to photograph vehicles that run red lights. The studies that have been done show a dramatic decrease in collisions. More cameras will likely be installed every year. If one of your neighbors continued to run stop signs in your neighborhood where your kids play, how would you feel? $5,000 Safety REWARD in 90 DAYS For more information, call Janice Poole at (770) 771-6968 Payout Schedule: How can you change this behavior? Follow these simple tips each time you travel. • Saving a few seconds per intersection (very few minutes over the course of a day) is just not worth endangering the lives of yourself and others. • Always look ahead to anticipate light changes: both sudden acceleration to make a light or hard breaking to stop short can lead to trouble. • Driving too fast for conditions is sometimes the cause of running a red light/stop sign so modify how you drive in poor weather or when you are late. • Remember that the person that you endanger by running that light is someone’s loved one. Always put Safety First. ? $1,000 when the team referred completes orientation. • • • • • • • $2,000 when the team referred completes 45 days of employment. $2,000 when the team referred completes 90 days of employment. All employees are eligible for the referral bonus To receive the full amount, the team referred must be employed at the time of each payment Additionally, the team receiving the bonus must be employed at the time of payment. Solo referrals are not eligible - teams only please and thank you. Referrals for a driver to be your team partner don’t count either. Teams employed with us in the previous six months don’t qualify as “referred” either. Teams referred must attend orientation between May 8th and June 30th, 2016. 16
Q2    15  Red Lights and Stop Signs  WANTED TEAM DRIVERS  According to the insurance Institute for Highway Safety  IIHS , ...
Q2 ‘15 Stress on the Road Twelve hour shifts, eleven hours driving, ten hours for sleeping and anything else you’d like to do. Oh, and did I mention that the bed moves? We get thirty minutes to eat and fifteen minutes to shower. Let’s face it; trucking is tough. We spend our days and nights dodging cars and animals, dealing with homesickness and fighting not only the weather, but also the clock. There’s road rage, frustrations, agitation and that’s just the tip of the iceberg. With the blowout on an already hot load, the 5th wheel that always decides to stick when you’re in the pouring rain – and how about those new cars that apparently don’t come equipped with blinkers or the truck that can’t go over 45 mph until you start to pass? So why don’t we just throw in the towel? We don’t call it quits because trucking isn’t’ just a job; it’s a way of life. It’s who we are – truckers! We chose this career or maybe it chose us. Either way, we are in it for the long haul and the stress is here to stay too. So since you are the professional, and it is up to you to stay safe, maintain the truck and arrive on time, let’s look at some ways to lower stress. • Be Professional: More is expected of you, so be prepared and patient. • Expect the Unexpected: …from every car and tractor you see. Imagine every car you see is being driven by a 16 year old. That will keep you ready for anything! • Plan Ahead: Try to avoid heavily trafficked areas during peak times. Run steady – we all know some loads just have no time, but as a general rule, the more consistent we run, the more time we accumulate for unexpected problems. • Use Stops to Your Advantage: If it’s 1530 and you are coming into Nashville, it’s probably better to get through town then stop for a shower. On the flip side, if it is 1630 it’s a good time to make that stop (load permitting, of course). Wellness • Use Your 30-Minute Breaks: Use this time to GET OUT! Take the dog or yourself for a walk, or maybe even do some stretches. If you stay in your seat, try to read a magazine or book. Avoid things like games on your phone or social media simply because they keep your eyes and mind engaged and that keeps you tense. • Exercise: Find the time, either at a shipper or waiting for your next load info. • Find the Right Work Balance: Find the right length of time out. If eight weeks is just too stressful, try six weeks of maybe four weeks. Once you are home, relax and unwind. Do the things you love and forget about work and enjoy time with family and friends. • Listen to Music: It calms the savage beast. It can put you on a sunny beach or fishing on the boat. It can really relieve stress much better than a talk radio topic that makes your blood boil and adds to your irritation. • Keep it Clean: Struggling to find what you need in a cluttered truck or having empty bottles rolling around under your feet is not only stressful, but also dangerous! A great tip is to clean your truck before you leave for home time. Then you start your next run with a fresh, clean truck. "There’s road rage, frustrations, agitation and that’s just the tip of the iceberg." • Schedule: Find what works for you. Stay in your 12 and 12. Use your bunk time for more than just sleep. Read a book or watch a show. 18
Q2    15  Stress on the Road Twelve hour shifts, eleven hours driving, ten hours for sleeping and anything else you   d li...
Q2 ‘15 Stress on the Road Twelve hour shifts, eleven hours driving, ten hours for sleeping and anything else you’d like to do. Oh, and did I mention that the bed moves? We get thirty minutes to eat and fifteen minutes to shower. Let’s face it; trucking is tough. We spend our days and nights dodging cars and animals, dealing with homesickness and fighting not only the weather, but also the clock. There’s road rage, frustrations, agitation and that’s just the tip of the iceberg. With the blowout on an already hot load, the 5th wheel that always decides to stick when you’re in the pouring rain – and how about those new cars that apparently don’t come equipped with blinkers or the truck that can’t go over 45 mph until you start to pass? So why don’t we just throw in the towel? We don’t call it quits because trucking isn’t’ just a job; it’s a way of life. It’s who we are – truckers! We chose this career or maybe it chose us. Either way, we are in it for the long haul and the stress is here to stay too. So since you are the professional, and it is up to you to stay safe, maintain the truck and arrive on time, let’s look at some ways to lower stress. • Be Professional: More is expected of you, so be prepared and patient. • Expect the Unexpected: …from every car and tractor you see. Imagine every car you see is being driven by a 16 year old. That will keep you ready for anything! • Plan Ahead: Try to avoid heavily trafficked areas during peak times. Run steady – we all know some loads just have no time, but as a general rule, the more consistent we run, the more time we accumulate for unexpected problems. • Use Stops to Your Advantage: If it’s 1530 and you are coming into Nashville, it’s probably better to get through town then stop for a shower. On the flip side, if it is 1630 it’s a good time to make that stop (load permitting, of course). Wellness • Use Your 30-Minute Breaks: Use this time to GET OUT! Take the dog or yourself for a walk, or maybe even do some stretches. If you stay in your seat, try to read a magazine or book. Avoid things like games on your phone or social media simply because they keep your eyes and mind engaged and that keeps you tense. • Exercise: Find the time, either at a shipper or waiting for your next load info. • Find the Right Work Balance: Find the right length of time out. If eight weeks is just too stressful, try six weeks of maybe four weeks. Once you are home, relax and unwind. Do the things you love and forget about work and enjoy time with family and friends. • Listen to Music: It calms the savage beast. It can put you on a sunny beach or fishing on the boat. It can really relieve stress much better than a talk radio topic that makes your blood boil and adds to your irritation. • Keep it Clean: Struggling to find what you need in a cluttered truck or having empty bottles rolling around under your feet is not only stressful, but also dangerous! A great tip is to clean your truck before you leave for home time. Then you start your next run with a fresh, clean truck. "There’s road rage, frustrations, agitation and that’s just the tip of the iceberg." • Schedule: Find what works for you. Stay in your 12 and 12. Use your bunk time for more than just sleep. Read a book or watch a show. 18
Q2    15  Stress on the Road Twelve hour shifts, eleven hours driving, ten hours for sleeping and anything else you   d li...
Q2 ‘15 Don’t Get Animal Instinct LOST Wherever there are people, there will be conflict. Count on it. Expect it.1 Sooner or later, you will find that reptile part of your brain triggered by someone you work with. You know the part that makes you go off on a rampage. You’ve heard it called the “reptile mode.” Maybe the person will offend or otherwise “wrong” you in some way. Perhaps you’ll feel that he or she has inappropriately interfered with your plans and activities, or it could be that a difference of opinion about a workplace issue will grow into a strong and emotionally charged disagreement. 2 We are wired instinctively to protect our needs, wants, values and beliefs, which are seldom the same as everyone else’s. Have you noticed when you are in reptile mode that your focus gets interrupted? You don’t see the big picture as clearly. You zoom in on what you perceive as the problem and everything else fades into the background. You’re only human. You can only take so much before you go off on someone. You’re emotionally poised to go for the kill. That’s right, you are human, and the defining difference is that humans can choose when and how to respond. You can choose to give yourself time to get everything back into the groove. Just stop, breathe deeply and feel the oxygen go through your body, several times if you have to. What to do when Conflict Happens, Eric Harvey and Steve Ventura Communicating Non-Defensively, CRM Learning In the Endless Financial Sea, Now that you’re breathing, grasshopper, start with the theories that: 1) Your own competence is not in question 2) Other people aren’t personally attacking you Even if these theories end up being wrong, it will be easier for you to stay cool, calm and collected in resolving any conflict. Remember the story about Ronald Reagan when he saw some people from the crowd giving him the bird finger. Reagan says, “Hey look, we’re number 1.” It’s always a win for you. Keeping the above two theories in mind, calmly ask questions that will allow you to learn more about the issues and completing the task. While it is also important to honestly and directly state your own needs, don’t start mentally formulating your response while the other person is talking to you. That’s like missing the exit sign. You can take it home from here. The more you practice it, the better you will get. As Miyagi says, “Wax on, wax off.” You get the picture. Stay cool and together. Keep More of your Hard Earned TREASURE 1 Human Resources 2 Sign up for your 401(k) today! To participate in the Quest Global, Inc. 401(k) Plan, visit our Drivers Lounge or Human Resources Department to receive a card. Once completed, place it in an envelope (to ensure confidentiality), and then drop it in the Paperwork box located in the Driver’s Lounge, addressed to Human Resources. 20
Q2    15  Don   t Get  Animal Instinct  LOST  Wherever there are people, there will be conflict. Count on it. Expect it.1 ...
Q2 ‘15 Don’t Get Animal Instinct LOST Wherever there are people, there will be conflict. Count on it. Expect it.1 Sooner or later, you will find that reptile part of your brain triggered by someone you work with. You know the part that makes you go off on a rampage. You’ve heard it called the “reptile mode.” Maybe the person will offend or otherwise “wrong” you in some way. Perhaps you’ll feel that he or she has inappropriately interfered with your plans and activities, or it could be that a difference of opinion about a workplace issue will grow into a strong and emotionally charged disagreement. 2 We are wired instinctively to protect our needs, wants, values and beliefs, which are seldom the same as everyone else’s. Have you noticed when you are in reptile mode that your focus gets interrupted? You don’t see the big picture as clearly. You zoom in on what you perceive as the problem and everything else fades into the background. You’re only human. You can only take so much before you go off on someone. You’re emotionally poised to go for the kill. That’s right, you are human, and the defining difference is that humans can choose when and how to respond. You can choose to give yourself time to get everything back into the groove. Just stop, breathe deeply and feel the oxygen go through your body, several times if you have to. What to do when Conflict Happens, Eric Harvey and Steve Ventura Communicating Non-Defensively, CRM Learning In the Endless Financial Sea, Now that you’re breathing, grasshopper, start with the theories that: 1) Your own competence is not in question 2) Other people aren’t personally attacking you Even if these theories end up being wrong, it will be easier for you to stay cool, calm and collected in resolving any conflict. Remember the story about Ronald Reagan when he saw some people from the crowd giving him the bird finger. Reagan says, “Hey look, we’re number 1.” It’s always a win for you. Keeping the above two theories in mind, calmly ask questions that will allow you to learn more about the issues and completing the task. While it is also important to honestly and directly state your own needs, don’t start mentally formulating your response while the other person is talking to you. That’s like missing the exit sign. You can take it home from here. The more you practice it, the better you will get. As Miyagi says, “Wax on, wax off.” You get the picture. Stay cool and together. Keep More of your Hard Earned TREASURE 1 Human Resources 2 Sign up for your 401(k) today! To participate in the Quest Global, Inc. 401(k) Plan, visit our Drivers Lounge or Human Resources Department to receive a card. Once completed, place it in an envelope (to ensure confidentiality), and then drop it in the Paperwork box located in the Driver’s Lounge, addressed to Human Resources. 20
Q2    15  Don   t Get  Animal Instinct  LOST  Wherever there are people, there will be conflict. Count on it. Expect it.1 ...
Q2 ‘15 The History of When someone says “trucker,” many stereotypes come to mind. A bearded Kris Kristofferson or a hollering Jerry Reed are just a couple of the mental images associated with the word. Traditionally, trucking has been an industry dominated by men. However, that is changing - and those perceptions of what a trucker should look like might change with it. Today, out of an estimated three million drivers, only about 200,000 are women, or roughly 6 %. As companies are now encouraging women to apply and hire on, that number is sure to rise. With the equal pay and female friendly attitudes of the industry today, it is easy to forget the many struggles women before us endured to pave the way. As we read these stories, we can’t help but see the changes in our industry. It’s amazing how far we have come. Do we still face struggles? Of course we do, but just like the women before us, we will face those issues head on. I would encourage my fellow women truckers to consider one thing - just as you have read and learned about these six women, also take the time to learn about each other. There are amazing women out here, who every day do their job and support their families, doing what we love - trucking. Luella Bates Coates Adriesue “Bitsy” Gomez Out of an estimated three million drivers, only about 200,000 are women. Rusty Dow Driver Services 1919 Luella Bates Coates was the first female CDL holder on record. She was hired during WWI, by Four Wheel Drive Auto Co., driving a B model truck. After the war when many of the women were returned to the kitchen, Luella remained as a demonstrator and driver. Luella later represented the New York Safety First Campaign. She was also a great mechanic, doing all of her own truck maintenance. In 1922 she married, which ended her career. 1929 Lillie Drennan received her CDL in 1929, when the Railroad Commission began regulating the motor-freight business. Lillie drove a Model T, and with 24 years behind the wheel, never had an accident. She ran her own company, Drennan Truck lines, where she trained every driver she hired. She overcame the unfair practices and sexist opposition of her competitors, and continued to drive throughout her life. Through three marriages and divorces she never left her true love, trucking. 1940’s Rusty Dow, originally hailing from Texas, became the first woman to drive the Alaskan Highway during WWII. She drove a Studebaker 6x6, on an undeveloped road system, in dangerous weather conditions. Rusty’s truck had no working gauges, and she carried extra parts to do roadside repairs herself. Once after breaking her leg, she simply went home, cut off the cast, and went back to work the same day. Rusty gave up her job to pursue what she called “homesteading” with her new husband. 1960 Adriesue “Bitsy” Gomez and the 1970’s Coalition of Women Truck Drivers, a 150 member group that organized to fight the discrimination and sexual misconduct in the trucking industry, paved the way to modern day recruitment campaigns that encourage women to apply for trucking jobs. Bitsy drove in an era where the sleeper test and forced male co-drivers were the norm. While docks had “MEN ONLY” signs and most truck stops refused to let women shower, Bitzy refused to give up her lifelong passion for trucking. She fought for equal rights until she passed in 2015. 1994 Quest’s very own Pamela Garrett, in truck #629, started driving in 1994. Pamela was unemployed, divorced, and had three kids. After seeing an ad for trucking on TV, she gave it a try. She has been an owneroperator, a trainer, running both team and solo. Pamela has faced first-hand sexual harassment, recalling how in orientation at one company, the male trainers came in to “look over” the women. Even in 1994, the sleeper test was still common. As a trainer for 11 years, she too helped pave the way for today’s woman truckers. Pamela still successfully supports her family doing what she loves, trucking. 2009 Quest employee, Denise Gaylord, truck #504, started driving in 2009. Denise decided to become a trucker for the fair pay between the sexes. According to Denise, “as long as she ran she could get paid the same as a man.” She was a flat bedder, LTL, and a trainer. She quickly realized most women drove at night to remain invisible and avoid the sexist attitudes of fellow drivers. Denise can see how times have changed for women truckers. “Today,” she says, “the biggest struggle female drivers face, is lack of confidence in their abilities.” Denise continues to help women as she makes her living doing what she loves, trucking. 22
Q2    15  The History of  When someone says    trucker,    many stereotypes come to mind. A bearded Kris Kristofferson or ...
Q2 ‘15 The History of When someone says “trucker,” many stereotypes come to mind. A bearded Kris Kristofferson or a hollering Jerry Reed are just a couple of the mental images associated with the word. Traditionally, trucking has been an industry dominated by men. However, that is changing - and those perceptions of what a trucker should look like might change with it. Today, out of an estimated three million drivers, only about 200,000 are women, or roughly 6 %. As companies are now encouraging women to apply and hire on, that number is sure to rise. With the equal pay and female friendly attitudes of the industry today, it is easy to forget the many struggles women before us endured to pave the way. As we read these stories, we can’t help but see the changes in our industry. It’s amazing how far we have come. Do we still face struggles? Of course we do, but just like the women before us, we will face those issues head on. I would encourage my fellow women truckers to consider one thing - just as you have read and learned about these six women, also take the time to learn about each other. There are amazing women out here, who every day do their job and support their families, doing what we love - trucking. Luella Bates Coates Adriesue “Bitsy” Gomez Out of an estimated three million drivers, only about 200,000 are women. Rusty Dow Driver Services 1919 Luella Bates Coates was the first female CDL holder on record. She was hired during WWI, by Four Wheel Drive Auto Co., driving a B model truck. After the war when many of the women were returned to the kitchen, Luella remained as a demonstrator and driver. Luella later represented the New York Safety First Campaign. She was also a great mechanic, doing all of her own truck maintenance. In 1922 she married, which ended her career. 1929 Lillie Drennan received her CDL in 1929, when the Railroad Commission began regulating the motor-freight business. Lillie drove a Model T, and with 24 years behind the wheel, never had an accident. She ran her own company, Drennan Truck lines, where she trained every driver she hired. She overcame the unfair practices and sexist opposition of her competitors, and continued to drive throughout her life. Through three marriages and divorces she never left her true love, trucking. 1940’s Rusty Dow, originally hailing from Texas, became the first woman to drive the Alaskan Highway during WWII. She drove a Studebaker 6x6, on an undeveloped road system, in dangerous weather conditions. Rusty’s truck had no working gauges, and she carried extra parts to do roadside repairs herself. Once after breaking her leg, she simply went home, cut off the cast, and went back to work the same day. Rusty gave up her job to pursue what she called “homesteading” with her new husband. 1960 Adriesue “Bitsy” Gomez and the 1970’s Coalition of Women Truck Drivers, a 150 member group that organized to fight the discrimination and sexual misconduct in the trucking industry, paved the way to modern day recruitment campaigns that encourage women to apply for trucking jobs. Bitsy drove in an era where the sleeper test and forced male co-drivers were the norm. While docks had “MEN ONLY” signs and most truck stops refused to let women shower, Bitzy refused to give up her lifelong passion for trucking. She fought for equal rights until she passed in 2015. 1994 Quest’s very own Pamela Garrett, in truck #629, started driving in 1994. Pamela was unemployed, divorced, and had three kids. After seeing an ad for trucking on TV, she gave it a try. She has been an owneroperator, a trainer, running both team and solo. Pamela has faced first-hand sexual harassment, recalling how in orientation at one company, the male trainers came in to “look over” the women. Even in 1994, the sleeper test was still common. As a trainer for 11 years, she too helped pave the way for today’s woman truckers. Pamela still successfully supports her family doing what she loves, trucking. 2009 Quest employee, Denise Gaylord, truck #504, started driving in 2009. Denise decided to become a trucker for the fair pay between the sexes. According to Denise, “as long as she ran she could get paid the same as a man.” She was a flat bedder, LTL, and a trainer. She quickly realized most women drove at night to remain invisible and avoid the sexist attitudes of fellow drivers. Denise can see how times have changed for women truckers. “Today,” she says, “the biggest struggle female drivers face, is lack of confidence in their abilities.” Denise continues to help women as she makes her living doing what she loves, trucking. 22
Q2    15  The History of  When someone says    trucker,    many stereotypes come to mind. A bearded Kris Kristofferson or ...
Driver Services Q2 ‘15 Overlooking Las Cruces, New Mexico from the west mesa is a sculpture called The Roadrunner. This sculpture is 20 feet tall and 40 feet long, and is made completely of recycled materials. The Roadrunner began life as part of a recycling and education project by artists Olin Calk and Dan Smith in 1993. The big bird’s first home was outside the Las Cruces Foothills Landfill until 2001, when it was relocated to the scenic overlook rest area on I-10 at mile marker 134. The roadrunner remained there until 2012, when it was removed for refurbishing, and eventually returned in 2014. 24
Driver Services  Q2    15  Overlooking Las Cruces, New Mexico from the west mesa is a sculpture called The Roadrunner. Thi...
Driver Services Q2 ‘15 Overlooking Las Cruces, New Mexico from the west mesa is a sculpture called The Roadrunner. This sculpture is 20 feet tall and 40 feet long, and is made completely of recycled materials. The Roadrunner began life as part of a recycling and education project by artists Olin Calk and Dan Smith in 1993. The big bird’s first home was outside the Las Cruces Foothills Landfill until 2001, when it was relocated to the scenic overlook rest area on I-10 at mile marker 134. The roadrunner remained there until 2012, when it was removed for refurbishing, and eventually returned in 2014. 24
Driver Services  Q2    15  Overlooking Las Cruces, New Mexico from the west mesa is a sculpture called The Roadrunner. Thi...
Q2 ‘15 Load Planners Puzzle Masters Driver Services Sometimes, load planning can be a bit of a mystery. These individuals known as Load Planners spend their entire day dishing out loads and connecting the dots. Many don’t understand all that goes into this position and why accurate information is so important, so the best way to explain it is... Have you ever sat down with a challenging, tedious, 5000 piece puzzle that takes hours and hours to put together? If so, then you should be able to relate to the job of a Load Planner. They are master puzzle solvers! enter the loads accurately and timely in the system, and the Sales department to provide current contractual obligations on each customer in order to know how many customer pieces are in the puzzle. The pieces spread out on the table are hours of service, home time requests, driver illnesses, truck breakdowns, drivers’ personal needs, truck preventative maintenance services, deadhead miles, miles for the month, contractual obligations, projected time of availability (PTA’s), expected time of arrivals (ETA’s), committed loads, and those smoking hot loads that we sometimes squeeze in because we love being the hero that saves our customer’s day. After the planners have gathered all the pieces, they are ready to start putting the puzzle together. Easy, breezy right? No way! It is an extremely challenging job because while putting together the puzzle, the pieces change. Just when the puzzle is almost complete, PTA’s change, loads cancel, new breakdowns occur. Tough job? You bet! Daily, Load Planners depend on the Driver Managers to provide accurate information on the drivers’ needs and situations, so they know how many truck pieces are in the puzzle. The Planners also depend on customers to provide their load numbers, the Customer Service Representatives to Tommy Burgess Winner • July 2015 Snap Post Win Take the best shot of your rig, your environment... or both! Post your image on Quest’s Facebook or Instagram page, by the last day of the month. Win awesome Quest Apparel and more! Winners will be announced via FB and IG. Legal Stuff: By submitting images entrants grant permission to Quest Global, Inc. to use your photographs as royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual, non-exclusive license to display, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works of the entries, in whole or in part, in any media now existing or subsequently developed, for any internal and external marketing and advertising purposes which includes print, web and digital usage. Published images by Quest Global, Inc will receive proper credit. To make certain our customers are satisfied and our drivers’ have the ability to thrive in their careers here at Quest Global, we have a group of the most qualified, experienced, professional, puzzle mastering Load Planners you will find in the transportation industry today. They are here to help and take pride in a job well done at the end of each of their days. 26
Q2    15  Load Planners Puzzle Masters  Driver Services  Sometimes, load planning can be a bit of a mystery. These individ...
Q2 ‘15 Load Planners Puzzle Masters Driver Services Sometimes, load planning can be a bit of a mystery. These individuals known as Load Planners spend their entire day dishing out loads and connecting the dots. Many don’t understand all that goes into this position and why accurate information is so important, so the best way to explain it is... Have you ever sat down with a challenging, tedious, 5000 piece puzzle that takes hours and hours to put together? If so, then you should be able to relate to the job of a Load Planner. They are master puzzle solvers! enter the loads accurately and timely in the system, and the Sales department to provide current contractual obligations on each customer in order to know how many customer pieces are in the puzzle. The pieces spread out on the table are hours of service, home time requests, driver illnesses, truck breakdowns, drivers’ personal needs, truck preventative maintenance services, deadhead miles, miles for the month, contractual obligations, projected time of availability (PTA’s), expected time of arrivals (ETA’s), committed loads, and those smoking hot loads that we sometimes squeeze in because we love being the hero that saves our customer’s day. After the planners have gathered all the pieces, they are ready to start putting the puzzle together. Easy, breezy right? No way! It is an extremely challenging job because while putting together the puzzle, the pieces change. Just when the puzzle is almost complete, PTA’s change, loads cancel, new breakdowns occur. Tough job? You bet! Daily, Load Planners depend on the Driver Managers to provide accurate information on the drivers’ needs and situations, so they know how many truck pieces are in the puzzle. The Planners also depend on customers to provide their load numbers, the Customer Service Representatives to Tommy Burgess Winner • July 2015 Snap Post Win Take the best shot of your rig, your environment... or both! Post your image on Quest’s Facebook or Instagram page, by the last day of the month. Win awesome Quest Apparel and more! Winners will be announced via FB and IG. Legal Stuff: By submitting images entrants grant permission to Quest Global, Inc. to use your photographs as royalty-free, worldwide, perpetual, non-exclusive license to display, distribute, reproduce and create derivative works of the entries, in whole or in part, in any media now existing or subsequently developed, for any internal and external marketing and advertising purposes which includes print, web and digital usage. Published images by Quest Global, Inc will receive proper credit. To make certain our customers are satisfied and our drivers’ have the ability to thrive in their careers here at Quest Global, we have a group of the most qualified, experienced, professional, puzzle mastering Load Planners you will find in the transportation industry today. They are here to help and take pride in a job well done at the end of each of their days. 26
Q2    15  Load Planners Puzzle Masters  Driver Services  Sometimes, load planning can be a bit of a mystery. These individ...
Q2 ‘15 Getting to Know Truck 493 Let’s get to know Jack Winkleman and Norma Avery! When it comes to your four-legged family, Driver Services Over 20 years ago, Jack decided he needed a new career, and became a driver. Norma came from a family of truckers, and started driving herself 15 years ago. It has been a little over four years since they made the decision to join the Quest Global family. They love the runs with Quest, particularly the run to California, as they enjoy the weather there. While on the road, they have their three Chihuahuas riding with them. When it comes to eating, Jack and Norma try to cook breakfast and lunch in the truck. Then, if time allows, they like to stop and have dinner out. Passing the time while driving consists of Sirius radio and audio books. Fox news and Jay Thomas along with Fern Michaels and Lee Childs top their list of favourites. One of their best OTR memories took place in St. Louis, MO., where they found themselves with a little extra time and were able to stop downtown and take a horse and carriage ride to the U.S. Treasury Department. When they are on home time they like to unwind by spending time with their family and grandchildren. “It’s just so nice to be able to have time off!” says Norma. “We love camping, fishing, boating, and riding on our Harley.” "Quest is an awesome place to work and we’ve met some awesome people here!" What makes you a successful team at Quest Global? “We are dependable, honest, and work well with others.” replies Jack. “Helping each other in times of need, and how well we work as team players.”Jack and Norma like meeting other teams, and sum up their experience at Quest Global by saying, “Quest is an awesome place to work and we’ve met some awesome people here!” So if you see Jack and Norma out there say hello to truck #493 WE GET IT. Being out on the road means being away from our furry companions for long periods of time. As a company built by drivers, for drivers, we know that’s a part of the deal nobody likes - so we’re not making it part of ours. Quest Global drivers are welcome to bring their four-legged friends along for the ride. What better way to share everything we have to offer? • UNLIMITED HOME TIME - Ask us how we do it! • Outstanding weekly OTR miles, with bonus pay for HazMat teams on every mile • $5,000 referral bonus paid out over 90 days – no endless payouts! • Pets welcome! • Exclusive, one-on-one support from a company run by former drivers and dedicated staff We’ve been down the road before. When it comes to life behind the wheel - WE GET IT. Call to speak to our recruiter today: 888.730.9981 or visit questdrivers.com *Team opportunities always available! 28
Q2    15  Getting to Know Truck 493 Let   s get to know Jack Winkleman and Norma Avery   When it comes to your four-legged...
218 W. Jackson St. Thomasvill, GA 31792 www.myidealdoctor.com MYidealDOCTOR™ offers 24/7 access to US licensed physicians who can consult, diagnose or prescribe medications by phone or web video for short term illnesses. Quest Global, Inc in 5 Dear Member, If you are sick and need help call the number below to create your account and get started. Regardless of time and location, you can connect with a network physician to review your medical records, discuss symtoms, prescribe medications and review treatment plans. 1-855-879-4332 DON’T BE THE 1. ∞ Call back guaranteed under 3 hours, often under 30 minutes MYIDR411 will be diagnosed with skin cancer. MYidealDOCTOR™ Benefits Group Number ∞ Speak to a doctor at work, traveling, or at home www.myidealdoctor.com Prevent. Detect. Live. ∞ 24/7-365 access to a physician by phone or web-video ∞ Save money by avoiding expensive ER or Urgent Care visits When to Call MYidealDOCTOR™ ∞ If you need short term prescription refills ∞ When you need immediate care ∞ You are considering going to the ER or urgent care for a non-emergency issue ∞ When you are on the road and need care It’s easy to prevent and detect skin cancer. Learn more at www.SpotSkinCancer.org . © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology. Use of this poster does not imply product or service endorsement by the American Academy of Dermatology. ©2012 MYideaIDOCTOR, llc Americans
218 W. Jackson St. Thomasvill, GA 31792 www.myidealdoctor.com MYidealDOCTOR    offers 24 7 access to US licensed physician...
Q2 ‘15 Getting to Know Truck 493 Let’s get to know Jack Winkleman and Norma Avery! When it comes to your four-legged family, Driver Services Over 20 years ago, Jack decided he needed a new career, and became a driver. Norma came from a family of truckers, and started driving herself 15 years ago. It has been a little over four years since they made the decision to join the Quest Global family. They love the runs with Quest, particularly the run to California, as they enjoy the weather there. While on the road, they have their three Chihuahuas riding with them. When it comes to eating, Jack and Norma try to cook breakfast and lunch in the truck. Then, if time allows, they like to stop and have dinner out. Passing the time while driving consists of Sirius radio and audio books. Fox news and Jay Thomas along with Fern Michaels and Lee Childs top their list of favourites. One of their best OTR memories took place in St. Louis, MO., where they found themselves with a little extra time and were able to stop downtown and take a horse and carriage ride to the U.S. Treasury Department. When they are on home time they like to unwind by spending time with their family and grandchildren. “It’s just so nice to be able to have time off!” says Norma. “We love camping, fishing, boating, and riding on our Harley.” "Quest is an awesome place to work and we’ve met some awesome people here!" What makes you a successful team at Quest Global? “We are dependable, honest, and work well with others.” replies Jack. “Helping each other in times of need, and how well we work as team players.”Jack and Norma like meeting other teams, and sum up their experience at Quest Global by saying, “Quest is an awesome place to work and we’ve met some awesome people here!” So if you see Jack and Norma out there say hello to truck #493 WE GET IT. Being out on the road means being away from our furry companions for long periods of time. As a company built by drivers, for drivers, we know that’s a part of the deal nobody likes - so we’re not making it part of ours. Quest Global drivers are welcome to bring their four-legged friends along for the ride. What better way to share everything we have to offer? • UNLIMITED HOME TIME - Ask us how we do it! • Outstanding weekly OTR miles, with bonus pay for HazMat teams on every mile • $5,000 referral bonus paid out over 90 days – no endless payouts! • Pets welcome! • Exclusive, one-on-one support from a company run by former drivers and dedicated staff We’ve been down the road before. When it comes to life behind the wheel - WE GET IT. Call to speak to our recruiter today: 888.730.9981 or visit questdrivers.com *Team opportunities always available! 28
Q2    15  Getting to Know Truck 493 Let   s get to know Jack Winkleman and Norma Avery   When it comes to your four-legged...
218 W. Jackson St. Thomasvill, GA 31792 www.myidealdoctor.com MYidealDOCTOR™ offers 24/7 access to US licensed physicians who can consult, diagnose or prescribe medications by phone or web video for short term illnesses. Quest Global, Inc in 5 Dear Member, If you are sick and need help call the number below to create your account and get started. Regardless of time and location, you can connect with a network physician to review your medical records, discuss symtoms, prescribe medications and review treatment plans. 1-855-879-4332 DON’T BE THE 1. ∞ Call back guaranteed under 3 hours, often under 30 minutes MYIDR411 will be diagnosed with skin cancer. MYidealDOCTOR™ Benefits Group Number ∞ Speak to a doctor at work, traveling, or at home www.myidealdoctor.com Prevent. Detect. Live. ∞ 24/7-365 access to a physician by phone or web-video ∞ Save money by avoiding expensive ER or Urgent Care visits When to Call MYidealDOCTOR™ ∞ If you need short term prescription refills ∞ When you need immediate care ∞ You are considering going to the ER or urgent care for a non-emergency issue ∞ When you are on the road and need care It’s easy to prevent and detect skin cancer. Learn more at www.SpotSkinCancer.org . © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology. Use of this poster does not imply product or service endorsement by the American Academy of Dermatology. ©2012 MYideaIDOCTOR, llc Americans
218 W. Jackson St. Thomasvill, GA 31792 www.myidealdoctor.com MYidealDOCTOR    offers 24 7 access to US licensed physician...