simplebooklet thumbnail

1
Gunter Saunders October 2016
Options for Online Marking and Provision of Feedback Online
Contents
1. Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 2
2.1 Entering a mark for a Turnitin assignment ............................................................................... 5
2.2 Second marking (moderation) .................................................................................................. 6
2.3 Turnitin originality report ......................................................................................................... 6
3. Using Blackboard Assignment for online marking and feedback ............................................... 8
3.1 Entering a mark for a Blackboard Assignment ........................................................................ 13
3.2 Second marking (moderation) of a Blackboard Assignment .................................................. 14
3.3 Originality Checking on a Blackboard Assignment .................................................................. 14
4. Online feedback where marking is not done online ................................................................. 16
4.1 Creating a Grade Centre Column ............................................................................................ 16
5. Further Help and Support ......................................................................................................... 17
2
Gunter Saunders October 2016
1. Introduction
The University has two systems that can be used to collect coursework from students online, mark
the work online and provide feedback and provisional marks online. One system is called Turnitin
and the other is called Blackboard Assignment. Both systems also have a built in originality checking
(possible plagiarism) function. Both systems integrate with the Blackboard Grade Centre which
means that any feedback entered whilst marking coursework online will be accessible to students via
the Blackboard Grade Centre.
The University has two systems because each offers advantages over the other in certain
circumstances. For example, Blackboard Assignment has better workflows to manage submitted
group work and second marking (moderation). Turnitin on the other hand offers a feature that
facilitates provision of audio feedback.
Both Turnitin and Blackboard Assignment have apps that support marking of submitted work on
tablet devices.
The core features of each system are summarised in table 1 below.
If an coursework is marked online then all of the feedback entered, whether in-line (i.e. on the text
of the work) or general/summing up feedback or rubric based feedback (by completion of an online
rubric), is automatically recorded and accessible to students through the Blackboard Grade Centre
interface.
If coursework is marked on paper, or coursework is a performance or in-class presentation for
example, it is still possible to provide online feedback via the Blackboard Grade Centre if so desired.
This guide will provide an overview of online marking, including options for the provision of
feedback, in both the Turnitin and Blackboard Assignment systems. It will also provide advice on
how to provide online feedback to students if coursework is not marked online.
Turnitin
Blackboard Assignment
- Originality checking, online marking, in-line
and overall feedback option possible
- online rubrics option
- audio feedback option
- option for anonymous marking
- all feedback accessible via Blackboard
Grade Centre
- Originality checking, online marking, in-line
and overall feedback option possible
- online rubrics option
- group and e-portfolio assignment options
- workflows for anonymous and moderated
marking
- all feedback accessible via Blackboard
Grade Centre
Table 1 Summary of the different options available with Turnitin and Blackboard Assignment
Watch a video summarising the main features and differences of the coursework submission
systems at Westminster.
3
Gunter Saunders October 2016
2. Using Turnitin for online marking and feedback
Turnitin, whilst not a Blackboard product, is accessed via Blackboard. To start marking submitted
coursework go to the relevant Blackboard site and expand the Course Tools section of the site
Control Panel. Select Turnitin Assignments and then click on the name of the coursework. This will
bring up a list of all of the students due to complete the coursework (see figure 1 below).
Figure 1
To start marking click on the ‘pen icon’ by the name of the student concerned under the column
‘Grade’. This will open up the marking and feedback interface (see figure 2 below).
Figure 2
Clicking anywhere inside of the body of the coursework to be marked will bring up an in-line
comment box into which you can type a comment. Clicking save will add the comment to the essay.
When a student views the marked essay the comment will appear as a ‘blue bubble’ which when
clicked will reveal the full comment text. Over to the right of the screen are what are known as
‘Quickmarks’. These are pre-prepared comments which can be dragged and dropped anywhere onto
the work being marked.
Note that Turnitin comes with some standard banks of Quickmarks but that you can create your own
quickmark bank and add any comment you make when marking for the first time (or subsequently)
to your own Quickmark bank. The more you mark the more you are able to build up a bank of
‘personalised’ frequently used comments that you can just drag and drop onto a piece of work.
4
Gunter Saunders October 2016
Aside from in-line comments it is also possible to write some general comments or to record some
audio feedback for the student. And it is also possible to use a rubric to provide feedback to the
student, if a rubric has been set up and associated with the coursework assignment. These additional
ways to provide feedback are accessed via the small icons at the bottom right of the marking
interface (see figure 3 below).
Figure 3
Figure 4 below shows an example of a basic Turnitin rubric, accessed when clicking the rubric* icon.
Watch a video demonstration of online marking
Watch a video on providing audio feedback
Watch a video on managing Quickmarks
* A rubric is a descriptive scoring (or marking) scheme developed by teachers (sometimes in consultation with students) to
guide judgements about the products or processes of students' learning through an assessment task. A rubric is often
presented as a type of matrix that provides scaled levels of achievement or performance for a set of criteria or dimensions
of quality for a particular assessment task, e.g., a paper, an oral presentation, use of teamwork skills or a work placement.
The descriptions of the possible levels of attainment for each of the criteria or dimensions of performance are described
fully enough to make them useful for judgment of, or reflection on, progress toward intended learning outcomes. In
simpler terms, a rubric is an extended two dimensional checklist of what is expected in an assessment response (criteria)
matched against descriptions of how well the work presents each criterion (levels of performance).
Click here to switch to screen to
provide general text and/or audio
feedback.
Click and type
Click here to record audio
5
Gunter Saunders October 2016
Figure 4
Remember that a rubric will only be available if a rubric was associated with the coursework when
the submission link was set up. Also note you do not have to use the rubric to calculate the overall
mark. The rubric can just be used to provide formative feedback.
2.1 Entering a mark for a Turnitin assignment
At the top right hand side of the marking interface there is a small box (see figure 5 below). into
which you can either manually enter a mark or allow the rubric selections to calculate and record a
mark. The mark entered (or recorded) in the box will effectively be passed back to the Blackboard
Grade Centre. A student can access the provisional mark via Blackboard (or Blackboard Mobile) and
also any associated inline, general text or audio feedback that was added to the coursework by the
marker.
Click here to switch to view
associated rubric
Click on this to use the selections
made on the rubric to calculate the
mark
Click here to select the mark range
for each marking criterion. (Note as
you hover over each mark range the
description of what has been
demonstrated for the criterion for
that mark range will appear in the
blue box below for you to view.
6
Gunter Saunders October 2016
Figure 5
2.2 Second marking (moderation)
There is currently no workflow for second marking (moderation) built in to Turnitin. To facilitate the
work of a moderator it is therefore good practice for the first marker to add their initials after any
inline feedback comments or general feedback comments that they make.
2.3 Turnitin originality report
The results of the text match checking that Turnitin performs on any submission can be accessed via
the assignment inbox (see figure 6). In the Inbox there is a column labelled ‘Similarity’ and clicking in
there for any submission will open the Turnitin originality report for that submission.
Mark is entered/recorded here
7
Gunter Saunders October 2016
Figure 6
An example originality report is shown in figure 7 below.
Figure 7
Watch a video about Turnitin originality reports
8
Gunter Saunders October 2016
3. Using Blackboard Assignment for online marking and feedback
To mark work that has been submitted to Blackboard Assignment, go to the relevant Blackboard site
and in the Control Panel area of the site (bottom left hand side of a Blackboard site) expand the
Grade Centre option, then select ‘Full Grade Centre’.
Move to the column in the Grade Centre for the assignment you are going to mark. Hover your
mouse pointer in the right hand corner of the Grade Centre cell in that column for any student who
has submitted work and click on the downward pointing arrow that you will then see, then select
‘Attempt’ from the menu that appears (see figure 8 below, circled in blue).
Figure 8
This will open the marking interface which will look like figure 9 below.
Figure 9
The body of the submitted work will appear on the left and on the right will be a ‘black and blue’
panel that you can use to record general feedback, complete a rubric (if one is associated with the
assignment) or attach a file and enter or record the mark (the latter if a calculated rubric is used).
Top left of the area where the submitted work is displayed is a button labelled ‘Comment’. Clicking
on that reveals a number of action buttons that allow you to add various types of inline annotations
9
Gunter Saunders October 2016
to the body of the submitted work. These include the option to add a comment box, to highlight a
part of the test, to draw on the document and to strike through text (see example marked up
submission in figure 10).
Figure 10
To the right of the submitted work, there is a black and blue panel with a space for entering or
recording the mark (recording again in the event that an online rubric is associated with the
submission). Click on the very small downward pointing arrow (circled in figure 11 below to expand
all of the feedback options.
Figure 11
10
Gunter Saunders October 2016
After expanding, the black and blue panel will look like the figure 12.
Figure 12
There are a couple of options from this point. If there is no rubric associated with the assignment
then you can use the ‘FEEDBACK TO LEARNER’ box to type some general feedback – you can also
attach a file using the ‘attach file’ action button bottom left of the feedback box (see figure 13).
Figure 13
11
Gunter Saunders October 2016
If there is a rubric associated with the assignment then this can be opened from within the black
and blue box. A link to the rubric will be visible just above the FEEDBACK TO LEARNER section
(circled red in figure 14 below).
Figure 14
Clicking the link to the rubric will open the rubric so that it can be completed (see figure 15 below).
Figure 15
12
Gunter Saunders October 2016
It is possible to display the rubric with the full descriptions for each ‘performance band’ within each
assessment criterion. This is done by clicking on ‘Show Descriptions’ at the top of the rubric. The
expanded rubric is shown below in figure 16.
Figure 16
At the bottom of the rubric there will be a box for you to enter any general feedback/overall
comment you wish to provide (see figure 17) and you will also see a note to the effect that students
will only see the feedback in that box if the rubric was set to allow students to see the score
calculated by the rubric. (Note this is normally done at the point that the coursework submission link
is set up and the rubric is attached to the submission link).
Note it is possible to use a rubric to provide purely formative feedback i.e. the rubric is not used to
automatically calculate the mark. In these circumstances any general feedback would need to be
recorded in the FEEDBACK TO LEARNER box shown in figure 12.
13
Gunter Saunders October 2016
Figure 17
3.1 Entering a mark for a Blackboard Assignment
At the top right of the black and blue box is a smaller box to hold the mark for the assignment
(circled in figure 18). If a calculated rubric is used then the mark will be automatically recorded in
that box. If no rubric is used or if the rubric is for formative purposes only then the mark would need
to be manually entered in that box. Note if you are using a calculated rubric that when you have
checked a box for all of the assessment criteria you need to click on ‘Save Rubric’ – this will place the
calculated score in the box as in figure 18.
Figure 18
Watch a video on online marking using Blackboard Assignment
Watch a video on using an online rubric with Blackboard Assignment
To complete the marking make sure
that you click the ‘Submit’ button at
the bottom right of the ‘black and
blue’ box. The mark will then be
recorded in the relevant cell in the
Grade Centre.
14
Gunter Saunders October 2016
3.2 Second marking (moderation) of a Blackboard Assignment
With Blackboard Assignment, when an instructor (lead instructor or possibly the module leader)
sets up a coursework submission link, they can assign specific instructors to grade particular sets of
student assignment submissions. The instructors who help the ‘lead instructor’ grade are
called delegated graders. Delegated graders follow the same grading steps that the lead instructor
does. However, the group of assignment attempts that they see are based on the options the ‘lead’
instructor chooses. After all delegated graders provide grades and feedback, one or more instructors
can review the grading to determine a final grade or reconcile it.
3.3 Originality Checking on a Blackboard Assignment
Blackboard Assignment integrates with a text match checking service called SafeAssign. When an
instructor sets up a Blackboard Assignment link they can elect to have the student submission
checked for text matches by the SafeAssign system. SafeAssign reports for the submitted work can
be accessed via the black and blue box in the online marking interface (see figure 19 below).
Figure 19
Clicking on the SafeAssign link will give an option to view the originality report an example of which
is shown in figure 20.
15
Gunter Saunders October 2016
Figure 20
Watch a video on Blackboard SafeAssign originality reports
16
Gunter Saunders October 2016
4. Online feedback where marking is not done online
If no marking is done online it is still possible to return some feedback to students via the Blackboard
Grade Centre.
When a coursework submission link is created in Blackboard (either for a Turnitin submission or a
Blackboard Assignment submission) a column is automatically created in the Blackboard Grade
centre to hold the provisional mark and/or provide an access location for any feedback.
If work has not been submitted online (and therefore no submission link was created) but the desire
is to provide some online feedback, it is necessary first to create a Grade Centre column to upload
the feedback to.
4.1 Creating a Grade Centre Column
Go to the relevant Blackboard site and in the Control Panel area for the site expand the Grade
Centre area and click on ‘Full Grade Centre’. Once in the Grade Centre click on ‘Create Column’ (see
figure 21).
Figure 21
Enter a name for the column, the number of points possible for the assignment and associate a
rubric with the assignment if desired (see later).
Once the column is visible in the Grade Centre to start entering marks and/or feedback hover in the
right hand corner of the cell in the column for a single student and select ‘View Grade details’ from
the menu options that you see. A page like figure 22 will open.
17
Gunter Saunders October 2016
Figure 22
In the area with the yellow highlight you can type (or copy and paste) feedback to the student. You
can also use the action buttons along the top to format what you type and use the Insert file option
(circled red in figure 22) to attach a file.
In the blue circled area you can enter a provisional mark (if you wish) and you can also access, open
and complete the rubric for the assignment (if a rubric was associated with the Grade Centre column
when the Grade Centre column was created).
Once you click ‘Submit’ any provisional mark entered, completed rubric or feedback entered into the
‘Feedback to Learner’ box shown above will be accessible to the student concerned via the
Blackboard Grade Centre.
5. Further Help and Support
For further help contact a member of the Education Technology Support team.