An introduction to meatless meat eating.

The Compassionate Choice The Meatless-meat Book Seitan-Tofu-TVP®-Tempeh Setting the Table A Compassionate Choice Léopold Leblanc
The Compassionate Choice  The Meatless-meat Book Seitan-Tofu-TVP  -Tempeh  Setting the Table  A Compassionate Choice  L  o...
The Compassionate Choice Discovering Wheat Meat A couple of years ago, my wife and I decided to reduce our consumption of meat, especially red at the time, because of the many health hazards that accompany its ingestion: antibiotics, hormones, pesticides, fertilizers, steroids, dyes, tranquilizers, and the rest that we know of. We felt that if our food had to be treated with such a panoply of ingredients so foreign to our bodies, then it was no longer food for our bodies, and though we didn’t consult our bodies we felt they wouldn’t want to be imposed such a diet. On moral and other grounds, we had not eaten pork in about 15 years and we felt that if we could forego pork then we could do the same for any other meat. Part of our decision also had to do with our desire to cut down on our fat intake and assume responsibility for the cholesterol level in our bodies. But most of all, we came to admit, our decision rested on moral grounds. It was more and more difficult to remain impassive to the sufferings animals were subjected to all over the world and especially in our own country. Few people who eat meat or products made from meat are aware of how the animals are killed and how they suffer at the moment of death no matter how tightly we shut our eyes and ears. Canada's Legislative and Voluntary Animal Welfare Standards sets standards for the confinement and handling of animals, requiring that cages "provide sufficient space to allow each animal to make normal postural and social adjustments with adequate freedom of movement..." This part of the act, however, exempts animals used for food and does not really address the suffering of animals we use for food nor does it ensure the humane handling and especially their confinement.. It is not the purpose of these pages to rehash this debilitating issue. Suffice it to say that our food animals are submitted to such conditions that it is necessary to inject them with antibiotics, hormones, tranquilizers and, afterwards, their flesh dyed and coloured with Iron Oxide to make them more seemingly palatable to the consumer. That, however, does not in any way make it more palatable to the conscientious consumer. On another level, the fact that 7 pounds of plant protein are required to produce 1 pound of beef that gives 17% protein or less than 3 oz. of protein. That is not sustainable farming. And so it was at this point in our reflections that my daughter, who is a hard core vegan, introduced us to tofurkey and seitan cutlets. How delicious and nourishing it all was and what an incredible discovery which led me to seitan, tofu, miso and tempeh and agar agar and all the those wonderful ingredients that enable us to eat and live in harmony with the other animal species of this earth, and in conformity with the needs of our planet, our home in the universe. Somehow, man has not yet come to accept that we are but inhabitants of this earth and not its rulers. Starvation is the daily and sad lot of many people in our world. And when the statistics of meat production are carefully and honestly viewed, you wonder how such an unsustainable 2
The Compassionate Choice  Discovering Wheat Meat A couple of years ago, my wife and I decided to reduce our consumption of...
The Compassionate Choice practice as raising and eating meat, notwithstanding the pain inflicted on the animals, can be pursued. Meat is in fact a greatly anti-economic food and the most devastating to the planet and its people. Wherever cattle are bred huge tracts of land must be reserved for the production of fodder. Reserved for the production of cereals and legumes, the same land would produce 16 times the amount of vegetable protein. It is also estimated that fodder production requires 8 times more water. What a useless waste of land and water resources. Using the world’s plant and water resource in conformity with their intended use instead of for the gratification of uncaring and unthinking hoards, we could eliminate a great part of the world’s starvation and under-nourishment. These facts, to me, indicate clearly the road that lies ahead. I need not a master’s degree in humanity to see how my small efforts, multiplied by the millions who might make the same small efforts, could alleviate the pain of starvation and deflate the swollen bellies of still other millions of the earth’s undernourished children. Perhaps, then, it is not an exaggeration to say that a meatless diet—and what remains is a vegetarian diet—could be the solution to world starvation. The plant reaches into the soil for its inorganic elements. The sun sends out its light, and its reaction with those inorganic elements causes photosynthesis which transforms those elements into organic elements. The animal eats the plant whose protein creates the animal’s muscle, fat and tissues. We eat the animal which gives us 80% less protein. That is a choice we make. We could choose to eat the plant that makes the animal healthy. But we chose to eat the animal, which makes us sick. That is the story of mankind. On a more personal level, however, meat in the diet is the chemist that creates acid ashes in the body. When foods are broken down in the digestive process, two things remain: energy and ashes. Depending on the food eaten, the ashes will be acid or alkaline. By nature, our bodies are 3/4 alkaline and 1/4 acid. These proportions determine exactly how much alkaline food we need to maintain the balance: 75% to 80% , and how much acid food: 20% to 25%. The alkaline/acid term used to define metabolic ashes does not refer to the acid or alkaline nature of the foods themselves but rather to the food’s ability to form alkaline or acid ashes. To give an example, a lemon is a very acid fruit, approximately 1.5 on the 14 point pH scale. The body’s pH is 7.365, approximately in the middle of the scale. That 7.365% must be maintained within 1 or 2% points either way, or disease (many degenerative diseases such as arthritis, for example) or death ensues. Therefore, even though the lemon is a very acid fruit, the body recognizes its alkaline nature and the ashes it produces when metabolized are alkaline. Acid rain is an effect that is today well documented, and though we are familiar with the term in a general manner, we fail to realize just how toxic it is for the entire planet. Acid rain is itself a product of toxic emissions in the environment. It damages the leaves, trees, reduces a tree’s ability to withstand cold, drought, disease and pests, and reduces or prevents plant reproduction. Trees must then combat the acidity thus created in their environment by pulling important alkalizing nutrients like calcium and magnesium from the soil. 3
The Compassionate Choice  practice as raising and eating meat, notwithstanding the pain inflicted on the animals, can be p...
The Compassionate Choice An acid-forming diet and lifestyle is like acid rain in our bodies. Like our planet, of which we are microcosmic copies, our body must react to acidity in whatever protective manner is available to it. Though we are aware that we are polluting the planet, we do not seem to realize that we are subjecting our bodies to similar acid waste. When we consume mostly acidic foods, our body—including the blood, other fluids of which the saliva—tries to restore the alkaline/acid balance, just like the trees of the rain forest. To achieve this balance, the system draws upon essential minerals already stored in our body: calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, etc. Eventually, if our diet continues to be acid, our mineral reserves become depleted. All meats, many oils, all dairy products, alcohols such as beer, spirits, hard liquor and wine, and many condiments such as catsup, coffee, vinegar, mustard, pepper and most soft drinks are acid forming and must therefore be consumed cautiously and with a mind to the body’s use of them. In my Food Combining days it was considered a sine-qua-non condition of the diet to keep the proportion of 25% meat or pasta to 75% vegetables on the plate. Indeed, most restaurants and the best steak houses make it a point to advertize their 16 oz porterhouse. 12 oz more than the maximum required to maintain the pH balance at that meal. In this respect, and it is not our intention to cast aspersions at the dairy industry, vegans are absolutely right not to consume dairy products. Omni dieters should, however, consider their intake of milk, cheese and ice cream together with their meat at any one meal, so as not to exceed the 25% intake of acid forming food and heed the alkaline/acid rule for minimum health. Populations where lactose intolerance is the norm have demonstrated health levels similar to westerners’ or better health. There is a marketing and economic mess and strategy to be unraveled here, as it is statistically true that Asian populations for whom dairy products are not part of their food culture do not present decreased health and sometimes present above average health. One more for my vegan daughter. So on to the real purpose of this book. People from all walks of life and nationalities are now becoming vegetarians. As a matter of fact, the use of Wheat Meat is increasing very rapidly. It is a good source of protein, 100% vegetarian, and is a means of eating nutritious food without killing animals. Wheat Meat, just like meat, absorbs the tastes and flavours of the ingredients it is cooked with. And because of its texture and taste, it is easily used in the preparation of dishes requiring meat. Prior to my daughter’s meddling in my life of quiet and ignorant bliss, I had spent five years doing food combining and had resolved many of my health problems. I was now flirting with vegetarianism to be sure but more than being vegetarian my desire was to eliminate meat from my diet, at least to a great extent. But here is a point that might be helpful to ponder and which is not usually taken into account when converting to Wheat Meat. 4
The Compassionate Choice An acid-forming diet and lifestyle is like acid rain in our bodies. Like our planet, of which we ...
The Compassionate Choice Eating meat is as much a cultural phenomenon as any other aspect of a culture. Meat, in meat eating countries, is eaten mainly because the smell and the look and the texture of meat brings comfort and pleasant memories. It is the atavistic idea of meat that is programmed into the person that makes him or her want, and perhaps need, to eat meat. So what one must accept of Wheat Meat is that Wheat meat should not be construed as some kind of mock, bogus meat intended to placate the meat lover’s longing. It should rather be seen as a new and innovative proteic, versatile food full of goodness and health. And stand on its own, rather than compared to meat. So, then, I began researching the subject of non-meat, mock-meat: Wheat Meat, and especially how to make my own. On a consumer basis, there was not much saving in buying non-meat preparations and sometimes I even spent more than I would have on a conventional meat diet. But the health benefits I found to be immeasurably greater. I no longer left the table bloated and feeling uncomfortable, and I found my energy level to be greater after every such a meal. The savings, I imagined, would come with making my own, and so I began to investigate Wheat Meat more closely. Here is what I have found. Cost. Considering the cost of flour, the cost of Wheat Meat is much less than either chicken, beef, lamb, and even pork which is notoriously cheap. Nutrition. Fresh Seitan: 100 g of seitan contains 36,1 pared with 100 g of meat ’’ 18,8 g of protein and 0,4 g of fat c o m ’’ 15,4 g of fat It is obviously much more nutritious than meat. Of course today, as a result of commercial beef farming, beef contains approximately 5 to 7 times more fat than it did when I was a child, and steak eaters generally look for the marbled steak. Wheat Meat contains almost no fat and none of the toxic agents mentioned above. It is actually an excellent and important source of protein, amino acids, the most important vitamins and minerals and contains no cholesterol. Consuming Wheat Meat also enhances the absorption of calcium rather than deplete the body’s store of that mineral as does eating meat. Not only is seitan high in protein and essential amino acids, seitan made with whole wheat flour and cooked in a kombu and soy sauce broth is a good source of some vitamins and minerals. A four-ounce serving of seitan supplies between 6 and 10 percent of the U.S Reference Daily Intake of vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and iron. However, most of the commercially prepared seitan contains a considerable amount of sodium (up to 100 mg. per ounce). If you choose to deep-fry the gluten, the fat content will jump from virtually zero to the number of grams contained in whatever oil it has absorbed (at 4.5 grams per teaspoon). Taste. From the point of view of taste, Wheat Meat can be made not only to achieve various tastes as a result of the seasonings used but also various textures. It can be ground, sliced, shredded, cubed or slivered according to your recipes’ needs. Once the Wheat Meat has been incorporated into one of your recipes, it sometimes becomes very difficult to distinguish from 5
The Compassionate Choice Eating meat is as much a cultural phenomenon as any other aspect of a culture. Meat, in meat eati...
The Compassionate Choice the original meat. Time. The actual physical time required to prepare Wheat Meat is negligible if using Vital Wheat Gluten and quite manageable when preparing large batches from scratch. Since Wheat Meat can be frozen for extensive periods of time, and quickly thawed, the time required to incorporate it into recipes is also negligible. 6
The Compassionate Choice the original meat. Time. The actual physical time required to prepare Wheat Meat is negligible if...
The Compassionate Choice What then is Wheat Meat and how do you get there? History. Wheat Meat is believed to have originated in ancient China as a meat substitute for adherents of Buddhism, who are strict vegetarians. As the Buddhist monks were staunch vegetarians, they began researching ways to supplement the taste and flavours of previous traditional Chinese cuisine and introduce into their vegetarian diet the required and important protein of the Chinese omni diet. After its long trip through centuries and countries, it was first used in America by the Mormons. It is, today, gaining increasing popularity in America, where more and more people are becoming conscious of its great nutritional value and the ease with which it can be adapted to traditional North American fare and honourably ease their conscience. In Asia, it is now most commonly found on the menus of restaurants, and always at those restaurants catering primarily to Buddhist customers who do not eat meat. In America, the China Town section of most cities sells various canned fried wheat gluten called vegetarian meat, such as Mock-Duck. 7
The Compassionate Choice  What then is Wheat Meat and how do you get there   History. Wheat Meat is believed to have origi...