The purpose of this handbook is to put at your fingertips practical information useful to your congregation as a member of the National Association of Congregational Christian Churches.

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Handbook for Congregational Churches A  N                      A                                      C                   ...
              A  HANDBOOK  FOR  CONGREGATIONAL  CHURCHES     IN  MEMBERSHIP  WITH  THE         NATIONAL  ASSOCIATION  OF  CONGREGATIONAL  CHRISTIAN   CHURCHES         Bringing  together  Congregational  Christian  Churches    for  mutual  care  and  outreach  to  our  world     in  the  name  of  Jesus  Christ                         Produced  by  the  Center  for  Congregational  Leadership,  NACCC   Rev.  Dr.  D.  Elizabeth  Mauro,  Dean     Serving  the  Churches  that  Serve  Christ  
                            A   HANDBOOK   FOR   CONGREGATIONAL   CHURCHES        IN   MEMBERSHIP   WITH   THE            ...
INTRODUCTION  TO  THE  HANDBOOK     Purpose       The  purpose  of  this  handbook  is  to  put  at  your  fingertips  practical  information  useful  to  your   congregation  as  a  member  of  the  National  Association  of  Congregational  Christian  Churches.       Use     This  handbook  is  divided  into  sections,  as  indexed  below.  It  is  designed  this  way  to  make   updating  easy  as  information  changes.    We  recommend  that  you  put  these  pages  in  a  three  ring   binder  and  keep  it  accessible  to  your  church  leaders  and  staff.         Contents     1.  CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  PARTNERSHIP   Section  1.1:       Churches  in  Partnership   Section  1.2:       Communicating  with  the  NACCC   NACCC  Membership  Requirements   Section  1.3:     Section  1.4:     Clergy  Standing   Section  1.5:     Clergy  and  Laity  Opportunities     2.  CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  ACTION   Section  2.1:       Congregational  Heritage   Section  2.2:     The  Congregationalist  Magazine   Section  2.3:       Annual  Meeting  and  Conference   Section  2.4:       Annual  Youth  Gathering     3.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  PRACTICE   Section  3.1:     Basic  Ethics  for  Churches  and  Clergy   Section  3.2:       Safe  Churches     Section  3.3:     Personnel  Policies   Section  3.4:     Churches  in  Conflict   Section  3.5:     Advisors  Available     4.  CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  SUPPORT   Section  4.1:       Resources  Available   Section  4.2:     Financial  Resources  Available     5.  CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  AFFILIATION   Section  5.1:       Regional  Associations   Section  5.2:       Affiliated  Organizations    
INTRODUCTION   TO   THE   HANDBOOK        Purpose            The   purpose   of   this   handbook   is   to   put   at   y...
  1.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  PARTNERSHIP   Section  1.1:    CHURCHES  IN  PARTNERSHIP     Association  not  Denomination     The  National  Association  of  Congregational  Christian  Churches  (NACCC)  is  as  its  title  says:    a   voluntary  association  of  churches  who  claim  a  heritage  and  practice  in  the  Congregational  Way.   Unlike  a  denomination,  we  do  not  create  hierarchies  that  oversee  local  churches.    As  an   association,  from  one  another,  we  gain  mutual  encouragement  and  support.    Ours  is  a  tradition   that  has  deep  convictions  based  upon  the  Word  of  God  as  each  person  interprets  that  Word   according  to  the  dictates  of  conscience,  under  the  enlightenment  of  the  Holy  Spirit.       Diversity  of  Congregations     Since  every  Congregationalist  possesses  full  liberty  of  conscience  in  interpreting  the  Gospel,  we   are  a  diverse  group  of  people  united  under  Christ.    Our  fellowship  of  churches  embraces  a   diversity  of  theological  viewpoints.         Primacy  of  the  Local  Church     Every  member  church  is  fully  self-­‐governing  and  spiritually  complete.    There  is  no  authority   outside  of  the  local  church  except  for  Christ.    There  is  no  other  ecclesiastical  authority  over  the   local  church,  including  the  NACCC.    Because  of  this,  the  Association  does  not:   • Require  member  churches  to  adhere  to  a  shared  creed  or  statement  of  faith  as  a   condition  of  membership   • Speak  for  all  the  member  churches  on  issues  of  theology,  politics  or  social  concerns   • Credential  clergy  to  ministerial  service   • Make  policies  binding  on  the  local  church  except  in  relation  to  NACCC  membership     NACCC  Websites     Learn  more  about  us  at  our  websites:   www.naccc.org   www.centerforcongregationalleadership.org   www.congregationalist.org     If  you  have  questions  about  anything  in  this  handbook,  please  do  not   hesitate  to  contact  your  NACCC  staff.    We  are  here  to  assist  you  in   your  ministries!   9/18/2013   1.    Congregationalism  in  Partnership   Section  1.1   Churches  in  Partnership   Page  1  of  1    
     1.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   PARTNERSHIP    Section   1.1       CHURCHES   IN   PARTNERSHIP        Association   ...
1.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  PARTNERSHIP   SECTION  1.2:    COMMUNICATING  WITH  THE  NACCC     Communication  is  Key     The  lifeblood  of  our  voluntary  association  is  communication  between  the  local  church  and  the   NACCC.     Communication  is  a  two-­‐way  street:    We  need  to  hear  from  you,  and  you  need  to  hear  from  us.   We  believe  that  communication  is  not  simply  a  process  of  transferring  information,  but  most   fundamentally  is  a  relationship  between  people—one  mind  touching  another  mind.     There  are  three  main  groups  of  people  who  handle  communication  within  our  association   throughout  the  year:    Year  Round  Delegates,  Ambassadors,  and  NACCC  Staff  Members.     Year  Round  Delegate     Each  member  church  is  entitled  and  strongly  encouraged  to  designate  a  Year  Round  Delegate   as  the  main  communication  link  between  your  church  and  the  NACCC.    While  others—pastor,   church  administrator,  moderator,  etc.—also  communicate  with  the  NACCC  in  important  ways,  it   is  the  primary  job  of  the  Year  Round  Delegate  to  keep  the  lines  of  communication  open  and   free-­‐flowing  to  support  our  partnership.     The  Year  Round  Delegate  should  be  willing  to:   • Be  the  primary  conduit  for  sharing  information  from  the  NACCC  to  the  congregation.   • Be  the  person  to  convey  the  views  and  ideas  of  the  congregation  to  the  NACCC.   • Be,  or  become,  computer  literate,  and  participate  effectively  in  online  exchanges.     To  designate  or  change  your  Year  Round  Delegate,  visit  www.naccc.org.  Complete  the  Year   Round  Delegate  Form  and  return  it  to  the  NACCC  office.         Ambassadors     NACCC  Ambassadors  are  trained  volunteers  around  the  country,  who  attend  church   ordinations,  installations  and  anniversary  celebrations,  bringing  greetings  from  the  NACCC;  help   churches  with  the  sometimes  arduous  process  of  searching  for  their  next  pastor;  and  respond   to  churches  considering  membership  in  the  NACCC.    If  you  would  like  an  ambassador  to  attend   your  church  event  or  to  help  your  church  with  a  pastoral  transition  or  with  the  process  of   joining  our  National  Association,  contact  the  Executive  Secretary  at  the  NACCC  office.             9/18/2013   1.  Congregationalism  in  Partnership   Section  1.2   Communicating  with  the  NACCC     Page  1  of  4  
1.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   PARTNERSHIP    SECTION   1.2       COMMUNICATING   WITH   THE   NACCC        Communicatio...
NACCC  Staff  Members  (Phone  1-­‐800-­‐262-­‐1620)     Rev.  Casey  VanderBent     Interim  Executive  Secretary   cvanderbent@naccc.org   Ext.  1611   Rev.  Dr.  D.  Elizabeth  Mauro   Dean,  Center  for  Congregational  Leadership   bmauro@naccc.org   Ext.  1613   Special  Church  Occasions   General  Counsel   Compliments  and  concerns   Church  Search  Committee  help Request  advisors  and  help   Seminary  education  scholarships   Personnel  guidance   Continuing  education     Carrie  Dahm   Assistant  to  Casey  VanderBent  and  Meeting   Planner   cdahm@naccc.org   Marie  Steele   Assistant  to  Betsey  Mauro   msteele@naccc.org   Ext.  1614   Ext.  1612   Information  on  the  Annual  Meeting  and  Conference   Church  membership Disclosure  protocol   Lay  Ministry  Training  program   Background  checks   Help  in  pastoral  searches Dan  Drea   Chief  Financial  Officer   ddrea@naccc.org   Ext.  1616         Rebecca  Moore     Accounting  Assistant  and  Tech  Coordinator   rmoore@naccc.org   Ext.  1617     Congregational  Investment  Trust     Receipts  and  Payments   Computer  and  Web-­‐related  issues   Linda  Miller   Administrator  for  Missions  and  Outreach   lmiller@naccc.org   Ext.  1618   Courtney  Schultz   Development  and  Marketing  Assistant   cshultz@naccc.org   Ext.  1615   Missions   Regional  Associations   Marketing  and  Mailing  concerns   Congregationalist  magazine  subscriptions       Larry  Sommers     Editor  of  The  Congregationalist       larryfsommers@gmail.com   608-­‐238-­‐7731               The  Congregationalist  Magazine   Articles,  letters,  advertisements                       9/18/2013   1.  Congregationalism  in  Partnership   Section  1.2   Communicating  with  the  NACCC     Page  2  of  4  
NACCC   Staff   Members    Phone   1-     800-     262-     1620          Rev.   Casey   VanderBent       Interim   Execut...
Information  Exchange       Communication  involves  an  exchange  of  information—the  content  of  communication—among   NACCC  churches,  as  well  as  between  local  churches  and  the  National  Association:     Your  Yearbook  Information     The  NACCC  maintains  an  online  Yearbook  at  www.naccc.org,  with  information  about  our   member  churches.    This  Yearbook  allows  Association  members,  leaders,  and  staff  to  know  key   facts  about  your  church.  You  have  control  over  your  Yearbook  information:  An  individual  you   designate  will  be  given  a  password  to  access  and  update  your  church’s  yearbook  information.   This  individual  may  be  the  church’s  administrative  assistant,  the  minister,  the  Year  Round   Delegate  or  anyone  else  charged  with  this  administrative  task.    Keeping  your  information  up-­‐to-­‐ date  is  easy  and  done  online.    Please  update  your  Yearbook  information  when  a  change   occurs.       If  your  designated  individual  does  not  have  an  NACCC  log-­‐in  (User  name  &  Password),  or  is   unsure  if  he  or  she  has  one,  please  call  the  NACCC  office  at  1-­‐800-­‐262-­‐1620  for  assistance.           If  you  have  an  NACCC  account  with  a  user  name  and  password:   Go  to  www.naccc.org.   Click  “Login”  in  the  upper  right  hand  corner.   Fill  in  your  user  name  and  password.   Click  on  “Church  Info”  tab  on  top.   Click  on  the  green  cross  next  to  your  church  name.   Fill  out  your  church  information.     If  you  do  not  see  “Church  Info”  or  the  correct  church  when  you  log  in,  call  the  NACCC  office  for   assistance.     Information  from  the  NACCC     There  are  a  variety  of  ways  the  NACCC  puts  information  in  your  hands:   • YRD  Links:    These  are  regular  e-­‐newsletters  from  the  NACCC  to  each  church’s  Year   Round  Delegate,  containing  important  information  to  be  shared  with  the  local  church,   or  questions  for  the  local  church’s  consideration,  or  necessary  information  about  the   Year  Round  Delegate  communication  process.   • NA  News:    Published  only  online,  six  times  a  year.  Contains  updates  on  current  NACCC   events,  Missions  and  Outreach  needs,  ordination  anniversaries,  and  other  vital   information.    An  e-­‐mail  is  sent  to  Year  Round  Delegates,  Ministers,  Moderators  and   current  NACCC  leadership  to  announce  the  posting  of  the  newest  issue.         9/18/2013   1.  Congregationalism  in  Partnership   Section  1.2   Communicating  with  the  NACCC     Page  3  of  4  
Information   Exchange            Communication   involves   an   exchange   of   information   the   content   of   commu...
• • • • The  Congregationalist:  Glossy  full-­‐color  magazine,  published  in  March,  June,  September   and  December;  also  available  online  at  www.congregationalist.org  and  on  Facebook.   The  Congregationalist  contains  articles  on  a  variety  of  topics  and  events  related  to   Congregationalism,  church  life  and  the  NACCC.  It  is  available  for  free  to  all  member   households  of  NACCC  churches  (though  donations  are  welcome  and  encouraged).  For   more  information,  see  Section  2.2.     NACCC  Website,  www.naccc.org:    A  treasure  trove  of  information  on  NACCC  programs,   opportunities,  publications,  membership,  church  support  and  many  other  things.     Center  for  Congregational  Leadership  Website,   www.centerforcongregationalleadership.org:    An  educational  ministry  of  the  NACCC,   the  Center  website  contains  links  to  useful  information  and  posts  sponsored  events  and   opportunities.  You  can  also  find  the  Center  on  Facebook.   All  Church  Mailings:  Sent  to  all  member  churches,  by  e-­‐mail  or  postal  mail,  five  times  per   year.    These  mailings  contain  information  on  events,  worship  aids,  opportunities  for   giving,  among  other  things.     Celebrating  and  Praying  with  and  for  You.     The  NACCC  staff  celebrates  with  you  significant  events  in  the  life  of  your  church.    We  also  pray   for  you,  especially  in  times  of  challenge  and  difficulty.    Please  inform  us  if  you  have  an   ordination  or  installation  of  a  pastor  at  your  church,  or  if  you  are  celebrating  a  significant   church  anniversary  or  other  event.    We  will  make  every  effort  to  have  an  NACCC  representative   present.    If  that  is  not  possible,  we  would  like  to  be  able  to  send  a  letter  of  greeting  and   congratulations.    Also,  if  you  are  facing  a  particular  hardship,  challenge  or  concern,  please  let  us   know  so  that  we  can  pray  for  your  strength,  guidance  and  comfort.    Did  you  know  that  one  of   our  NACCC  ministers  regularly  posts  to  Facebook  three  churches  and  a  mission  to  pray  for  that   day?  We  join  him  in  those  prayer  requests.           Also,  every  year  at  the  NACCC  Annual  Meeting  and  Conference,  we  remember  Congregational   leaders  from  our  member  churches  who  have  passed  on.  These  leaders  might  be  ministers  or   lay  people  active  at  the  state  and  national  levels.    Please  notify  us  when  such  luminaries  in  your   church  have  died.    Submit  that  person’s  name  to  the  Meeting  Planner  in  the  NACCC  office,  with   a  brief  description  of  his  or  her  contribution  to  your  church  and  the  Congregational  Way.    That   person  will  be  included  in  the  necrology  ceremony  at  the  meeting.                   9/18/2013   1.  Congregationalism  in  Partnership   Section  1.2   Communicating  with  the  NACCC     Page  4  of  4  
                   The   Congregationalist    Glossy   full-     color   magazine,   published   in   March,   June,   Sep...
  1.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  PARTNERSHIP   SECTION  1.3:    NACCC  MEMBERSHIP  REQUIREMENTS     Active  and  Inactive  Churches     A  voluntary  association  is  only  as  strong  as  its  members  are  active  and  contributing.    To  be   considered  an  active  member  of  the  NACCC  a  church  must  make  a  yearly  financial  contribution   to  the  Shared  Ministries  Fund  of  the  Association.    This  is  the  fund  that  supports  the   Administrative  expenses  of  the  NACCC.    Active  churches  are  also  strongly  encouraged  to  submit   an  annual  statistical  report  for  the  Yearbook  and  select  a  Year  Round  Delegate  (see  section  1.2).     A  member  church  which  does  not  make  a  yearly  financial  contribution  to  the  Shared  Ministries   Fund  of  the  Association  is  in  breach  of  fellowship  and  is  considered  to  be  an  inactive  member   Church.  A  Church  which  breaches  fellowship  shall  be  notified  by  the  Secretary  of  the   Association  that  it  has  been  placed  on  the  list  of  inactive  member  Churches.  An  inactive  Church   shall  be  automatically  restored  to  active  status  by  making  a  contribution  to  the  Shared   Ministries  Fund  of  the  Association.         If  a  member  Church  is  in  breach  of  fellowship  for  three  successive  years,  its  name  shall   automatically  be  removed  from  the  roll  of  member  Churches  and  the  name  of  its  minister   removed  from  the  list  of  ministers  in  the  Yearbook,  thereby  terminating  that  minister’s  access   to  MMBB  benefit  services.    Upon  notification  by  the  Secretary  of  the  Association,  a  church   removed  from  the  membership  rolls  for  this  reason  may  reactivate  its  membership  in  the   NACCC  (and  reinstate  it’s  pastor’s  name  to  the  list  of  ministers  and  MMBB  services)  by  fulfilling   all  of  the  following:  1)  take  a  vote  to  reactivate  membership  and,  should  that  vote  be  in  the   affirmative,  2)  send  to  the  NACCC  a  record  of  the  vote,  information  to  update  the  church’s   yearbook  entry,  name  and  contact  information  for  the  church’s  Year  Round  Delegate,  and  a   financial  contribution  to  the  Shared  Ministries  Fund.       Required  Contribution  to  the  Shared  Ministries  Fund     As  stated  above,  a  member  church  is  considered  active  by  its  contribution  to  the  Shared   Ministries  Fund.    This  contribution  is  recorded  in  the  NACCC  fiscal  year  in  which  it  was  received.     The  NACCC  fiscal  year  runs  April  1  –  March  31.       While  the  amount  of  this  contribution  is  decided  by  the  member  church,  a  target  contribution   of  “Fair  Share”  or  more  is  desirable.  The  “Fair  Share”  designation  is  a  per  member  amount  that   represents  the  contribution  it  would  take  to  meet  the  NACCC  budget  (a  budget  approved  by  the   member  churches  at  the  Annual  Meeting)  if  every  member  contributed  their  “fair  share.”       9/18/2013   1.    Congregationalism  in  Partnership   Section  1.3   NACCC  Membership  Requirements   Page  1  of  2    
     1.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   PARTNERSHIP    SECTION   1.3       NACCC   MEMBERSHIP   REQUIREMENTS        Active  ...
  The  current  “fair  share”  designation  is  $13.00  per  member.    A  church  is  considered  to  be  “fair   share  plus”  when  it  donates  $15.00  or  more  per  member.    You  do  not  need  to  contribute  at  the   Fair  Share  or  greater  level  to  remain  an  active  church,  but  you  must  contribute  something  to   the  Shared  Ministry  Fund.       Striving  to  be  a  Fair  Share  church     Many  churches  strive  to  be  a  Fair  Share  church  in  creative  ways.    Some  make  the  Fair  Share   contribution  part  of  their  annual  budgets.    Some  consider  it  to  be  part  of  their  Mission  giving.     Other  churches  ask  each  member  to  contribute  their  fair  share  directly  in  a  special  offering   taken  up  by  the  church  and  forwarded  to  the  NACCC.    Still  others  hold  special  fund  raising   events  (suppers,  car  washes,  fairs,  etc.)  to  raise  money  for  their  fair  share.    Some  churches  even   contribute  more  than  their  fair  share,  to  make  it  possible  for  some  of  our  struggling  member   churches  to  still  receive  the  benefits  of  NACCC  membership.       The  Blessing  of  Giving     Your  contribution  to  the  Shared  Ministries  Fund  supports  the  administration  of  a  wide  variety   of  programs  and  services  to  member  churches.    In  this  way,  your  church  tangibly  expresses  its   support  for  and  encouragement  of  every  other  member  church.    We  are  stronger  and  more   vibrant  together  than  we  are  alone.         Contributions  may  be  made  on  line  by  going  to  www.naccc.org  and  clicking  on  the  “Donate   Now”  button.    They  may  also  be  made  by  check,  payable  to  NACCC  Shared  Ministries  Fund  and   mailed  to:     NACCC   P.O.  Box  288   Oak  Creek,  WI    53154   9/18/2013   1.    Congregationalism  in  Partnership   Section  1.3   NACCC  Membership  Requirements   Page  2  of  2    
     The   current      fair   share      designation   is    13.00   per   member.      A   church   is   considered   to...
1.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  PARTNERSHIP   SECTION  1.4:    CLERGY  STANDING     The  NACCC  does  not  Confer  Standing     As  an  association  of  churches  rather  than  a  denomination  (see  section  1.1)  the  NACCC  does  not   confer  standing  on  ministers  serving  NACCC  member  churches.    Such  recognition  is  conferred   by  the  local  church  upon  its  call  to  that  person  to  be  their  minister.    A  minister  who  is  serving  an   active  member  church  or  who  is  retired  from  a  member  church  is  listed  in  the  NACCC  Yearbook.     Such  listing  only  reflects  your  information  given  to  us.    It  does  not  signify  NACCC  “standing.”     There  are  several  ecclesiastical  designations  conferred  to  individuals  by  the  church,  as  follows.     In  Care  Designation     The  “in  care”  designation  is  given  to  members  of  the  church  who  are  entering  seminary   preparing  to  enter  Congregational  ministry.    The  student  informs  the  minister  and  the  Board  of   Deacons  of  his  or  her  plans.    If  the  Deacons  see  in  this  person  the  gifts  for  ministry,  they   recommend  to  the  membership  that  the  church  vote  to  place  the  student  in  care,  supporting   the  student  with  prayers  and  leadership  opportunities.    Some  churches  support  the  student   financially  as  well,  but  this  is  optional.     Licensure     Licensure  represents  the  next  level  of  recognition  for  the  seminarian.    It  is  conferred  in  the   same  way  as  in  care  status  after  the  church  has  seen  obvious  growth  and  skill  in  the  training  for   and  practice  of  ministry.    It  confirms  that  preparation  is  proceeding  satisfactorily.    Moving  from   In  Care  to  Licensure  is  also  done  by  vote  of  the  church  and  allows  both  the  church  and  the   seminarian  to  acknowledge  and  rejoice  in  the  growing  wisdom  and  skill  of  the  seminarian.    With   Licensure,  the  church  now  grants  the  seminarian  the  privilege  of  conducting  weddings,  funerals   and  sacraments  on  behalf  of  the  church.     Licensure  may  also  be  extended  to  lay  ministers  in  the  congregation  or  to  clergy  who  may  be   members  of  the  church  but  not  employed  by  the  church.    Licensure  grants  permission  to   perform  all  ministerial  functions  on  behalf  of  the  church  and  is  extended  by  vote  of  the   congregation.    Steps  usually  include:   • A  recommendation  from  the  Deacons  to  the  congregation  to  license  a  person   • The  recommendation  is  brought  before  the  congregational  at  a  congregational  meeting,   including  the  reasons  why  the  Deacons  feel  this  is  an  appropriate  step   • A  vote  is  taken  by  the  congregation.     9/18/2013   1.    Congregationalism  in  Partnership   Section  1.4   Clergy  Standing   Page  1  of  3    
1.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   PARTNERSHIP    SECTION   1.4       CLERGY   STANDING        The   NACCC   does   not   Co...
 Licensure  should  be  reviewed  and  renewed  annually,  through  the  process  noted  above.     Ordination   • Local   o A  local  ordination  occurs  when  a  single  church  recognizes  the  gifts  for  ministry  in   a  person  they  wish  to  call  as  their  settled  minister  or  to  some  other  ministerial   position  in  the  church.    It  is  called  “local”  because  no  other  churches  are  asked   for  advice  and  guidance  in  the  process.    The  ordination  is  valid  as  long  as  that   person  remains  the  settled  minister  of  that  particular  church.    When  that  person   leaves,  the  status  of  his  or  her  ordination  is  void.    The  process  followed  for  local   ordination  is  similar  to  that  of  licensure  (see  above).    It  is  then  followed  by  a   service  that  includes  ordination  vows  and  and  ordination  prayer  with  the  laying   on  of  hands.     • Vicinage   o Often,  a  church  wishing  to  ordain  an  individual  to  the  ministry  seeks  the  counsel   and  advice  of  area  churches  as  to  the  wisdom  of  their  desire  to  ordain.    A   gathering  of  area  churches  for  such  a  purpose  is  called  an  Ecclesiastical  Council   of  the  Vicinage.    Ordination  that  occurs  after  an  Ecclesiastical  Council   recommends  that  the  local  church  proceed  to  ordination  is  a  more  widely   accepted  and  recognized  ecclesiastical  status.    While  the  ordination  often  takes   place  in  conjunction  with  a  call  to  a  church,  contemporary  practice  has  also  been   for  a  person’s  home  church  to  ordain  if  done  by  vicinage.    In  seeking  the   guidance  of  a  vicinage  council,  a  church  is  looking  for  confirmation  that  they   have  discerned  well  the  gifts  of  ministry  that  make  the  candidate  fit  for   ordination.    The  local  church  is  free  to  act  upon  the  advice  given  by  the  vicinage   council  or  not.    If  a  vicinage  council  recommends  that  the  church  not  ordain,  this   does  not  prevent  the  ordination  if  the  church  chooses  to  ignore  the  council’s   advice.    It  does,  however,  mean  that  the  ordination  is  a  local  one.    Ordinations   that  proceed  upon  positive  recognition  of  a  vicinage  council  are  recognized  by   other  churches  even  when  the  minister  has  left  the  church  that  ordained.         Lay  Ministers     Increasingly,  individuals  are  entering  ministry  without  seminary  education.    While  a  seminary   education  (M.Div.)  is  the  “gold  standard”  for  professional  ministry,  many  churches  are  simply   no  longer  able  to  afford  the  professional  salary  of  a  seminary  educated  minister.    Additionally,   many  people  who  feel  called  to  ministry  are  “second  career”  and  cannot  enter  into  the   traditional  educational  path  which  may  require  relinquishing  a  job,  creating  family  hardship.     Many  of  these  people  enter  a  course  of  study  with  a  mentor  to  be  lay  ministers.  (The  NACCC   9/18/2013   1.    Congregationalism  in  Partnership   Section  1.4   Clergy  Standing   Page  2  of  3    
   Licensure   should   be   reviewed   and   renewed   annually,   through   the   process   noted   above.         Ordin...
has  a  lay  ministry  program  available.)    Upon  completion  of  the  course  of  study,  many  churches   recognize  that  person  with  a  certificate  of  completion  and  invite  them  to  serve  as  a  minister  in   their  midst.    The  church  may  also  license  the  lay  minister  to  perform  ministerial  duties  (see   above  process).    In  rare  cases,  the  church  locally  ordains  that  person.     Resources     The  Congregational  Foundation  for  Theological  Studies  is  a  ministry  of  the  NACCC  that  provides   Congregational  education  and  scholarship  help  to  seminarians  studying  for  ministry  in   Congregational  churches.    If  you  have  a  person  in  your  church  who  is  considering  enrolling  in   seminary,  or  already  is  enrolled,  encourage  that  person  to  be  in  touch  with  the  NACCC  for   support  and  aid.       More  can  be  learned  about  ecclesiastical  standing  in  these  resources:       • From  Call  To  Settlement,  Lloyd  Hall   • The  Congregational  Worship  Book,  Henry  David  Gray   • How  to  Gather  and  Order  A  Congregational  Church,  A.  Vaughn  Abercrombie       All  may  be  found  online  at  the  Center’s  website,  www.centerforcongregationalleaderhip.org.       NACCC  advisors  can  help  you  through  the  process  of  conferring  ecclesiastical  standing.   9/18/2013   1.    Congregationalism  in  Partnership   Section  1.4   Clergy  Standing   Page  3  of  3    
has   a   lay   ministry   program   available.       Upon   completion   of   the   course   of   study,   many   churche...
1.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  PARTNERSHIP   SECTION  1.5:    CLERGY  AND  LAITY  OPPORTUNITIES     Convocation     Every  year,  the  NACCC  hosts  a  gathering  for  clergy  designed  to  provide  continuing  education,  spiritual   reflection  and  rest.    This  convocation  is  held  in  Mundelein,  Illinois  at  St.  Mary  of  the  Lake  seminary.    It   begins  on  the  second  Monday  after  Easter,  a  perfect  time  for  clergy  to  renew  themselves.    Many   churches  set  aside  money  to  send  their  pastor  to  this  event,  knowing  that  the  spiritual  rest  their  pastor   gains  benefits  the  church.    Providing  a  way  for  your  pastor  to  attend  the  convocation  is  not  only  a  show   of  support,  but  also  reminds  the  clergy  person  that  the  church  wants  and  needs  a  pastor  who  is  mindful   of  his  or  her  health  and  well-­‐being.    Ultimately,  it  is  the  church  that  benefits  from  their  clergy’s   experiences.     Regional  Retreats     Many  State  and  Regional  Associations  also  host  local  retreats  for  clergy.    These  gatherings  help  area   clergy  stay  connected  to  each  other,  sustaining  vital  collegial  relationships.    Supporting  your  minister  to   attend  regional  retreats  will  also  bless  the  church  with  a  happier,  healthier  pastor.     Congregational  History  and  Polity  Seminars     This  is  an  especially  important  seminar  if  the  minister  serving  your  church  has  come  to  you  from  a   tradition  that  is  not  Congregational.    Many  times,  a  pastor  from  another  tradition  unknowingly   misunderstands  the  Congregational  Way  because  they  do  not  have  adequate  knowledge  or  experience.     When  this  happens,  the  result  is  often  significant  conflict  in  the  church.    Many  churches  require  that   their  new  pastor  attend  one  of  the  History  and  Polity  seminars  in  the  first  year  he  or  she  assumes  the   pastorate,  writing  the  requirement  directly  into  the  terms  of  call.    Other  churches  encourage  their  pastor   to  attend  by  granting  paid  time  off  to  participate  and  providing  a  stipend  to  cover  or  offset  expenses.    If   your  pastor  is  from  a  tradition  other  than  Congregational,  the  investment  you  make  in  sending  her  or   him  to  this  seminar  could  save  you  heartache  down  the  road.         History  and  Polity  seminars  are  not  just  for  clergy  who  have  come  to  your  church  from  other  traditions.     Many  laity  attend  to  further  their  knowledge  of  and  appreciation  for  their  Congregational  Heritage.     Church  leaders  find  the  seminar  helps  them  become  more  confident  leaders.    Seminars  are  held  almost   annually  in  Boston  and  at  other  times  at  the  Center  for  Congregational  Leadership  in  Olivet,  Michigan  or   a  hosting  church  anywhere  in  the  country.       Information  about  upcoming  seminars  are  posted  on  the  Center’s  website,  and  advertised  in  other   places  and  ways.    Soon,  there  will  be  opportunities  for  people  to  enhance  their  education  on  line.     9/18/2013   1.    Congregationalism  in  Partnership   Section  1.5   Clergy  and  Laity  Opportunities   Page  1  of  4    
1.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   PARTNERSHIP    SECTION   1.5       CLERGY   AND   LAITY   OPPORTUNITIES        Convocatio...
Annual  Meeting  and  Conference     The  most  prominent  NACCC  event  for  laity  and  clergy  is  the  Annual  Meeting  and  Conference.  The  Annual   Meeting  is  an  important  expression  of  Congregationalism  where  churches  send  a  delegate  to  help   conduct  the  business  of  the  assembled  churches.    The  member  churches  are  the  National  Association   and  it  is  at  the  Annual  Meeting  that  churches  come  together  to  make  decisions  important  to  their   common  interests.    While  the  delegates  conduct  the  business,  there  is  plenty  for  others  to  do.    Many   people  who  are  not  official  delegates  attend  to  partake  in  the  fellowship  and  educational  opportunities   at  the  conference.    (See  more  about  the  Annual  Meeting  and  Conference  in  Section  2.3).     Silent  Retreats     Twice  a  year,  the  Society  of  Classical  Retreat  Guides  hosts  a  silent  retreat  and  invites  clergy  and  laity  to   attend  this  time  of  spiritual  reflection  and  renewal.    One  retreat  is  held  just  ahead  of  the  Annual   Meeting  and  Conference.    The  other,  which  usually  meets  for  a  longer  duration  of  at  least  2-­‐3  days,   typically  takes  place  in  the  autumn  and  may  occur  regionally.   Members  of  the  Society  are  available  to  lead  or  to  train  or  assist  others  to  lead  Classical  Silent  Retreats   for  local  churches  or  regional  associations.    There  are  offerings  of  varying  lengths.    Standard  to  all   Classical  Silent  Retreats  are  prayer,  devotional  reading,  and  work  in  the  quiet.     Continuing  Education  through  the  Center  for  Congregational  Leadership     The  Center  for  Congregational  Leadership  hosts  seminars  on  a  variety  of  other  topics  of  interest  to  the   church  and  its  leadership.    Often,  these  seminars  are  held  at  the  Center  and  are  webcast  around  the   country.    Past  topics  have  included:       • Stewardship   • Technology  in  Worship   • Web  Savvy  Ministry     The  Congregational  Symposium     Every  other  year,  for  the  past  16  years,  various  churches  around  the  country  have  hosted  the   Congregational  Symposium.    The  Symposium  brings  together  gifted  speakers  who  have  new  insights  in   the  basis  and  practice  of  Congregationalism.    The  Symposium  gives  clergy  and  laity  an  opportunity  to  be   stimulated  and  challenged  in  a  variety  of  ways.    It  also  allows  new  friendships  and  connections  to  form.     The  Symposium  is  not  a  function  of  the  NACCC  and  occurs  only  when  a  church  is  moved  to  host  the  next   one.    The  Center  for  Congregational  Leadership  provides  advice  and  support  to  any  church  wanting  to   host  the  Symposium.       9/18/2013   1.    Congregationalism  in  Partnership   Section  1.5   Clergy  and  Laity  Opportunities   Page  2  of  4    
Annual   Meeting   and   Conference         The   most   prominent   NACCC   event   for   laity   and   clergy   is   the...
The  Youth  Leader  Training       From  time  to  time,  youth  leaders  from  around  the  country  are  invited  and  encouraged  to  gather  to  hone   their  skills  and  discover  new  ideas  together.    These  opportunities  may  occur  in  conjunction  with  other   youth  events  or  they  may  be  promoted  as  opportunities  for  leaders  to  attend  national  youth  ministry   training  events.  The  networking  and  fellowship  that  come  from  these  gatherings  encourages  and   strengthens  those  who  are  dedicated  to  this  challenging  ministry  to  youth.     Service  on  Boards  and  Committees  of  the  NACCC     Because  the  NACCC  is  an  association  of  churches,  it  depends  on  representatives  from  member  churches   to  join  boards,  councils  and  committees  to  guide  the  work  and  ministry  of  the  NACCC.    Opportunities   abound!    Some  of  those  roles  are  filled  through  the  nomination  process  and  election  by  the  delegates  at   the  NACCC  Annual  Meeting  and  Conference.    They  include:   • Moderator  –  Serves  as  moderator  of  the  Leadership  Council  and  the  Annual  Meeting  and   Conference.   • Moderator-­‐elect  –  Serves  on  the  Board  of  Directors  and  typically  assumes  the  role  of  moderator   when  the  moderator’s  term  of  service  ends.   • Secretary  –  Keeps  a  record  of  the  proceedings  and  decisions  of  the  Leadership  Council,  the  Board   of  Directors  and  the  Annual  Meeting  and  Conference.    Serves  as  official  signatory  of  the   corporation.   • Treasurer  –  Keeps  a  record  of  the  financial  expenditures  of  the  corporation  and  reports  the  same   to  the  Association.   • Historian  –  Keeps  an  accounting  of  significant  proceedings  of  the  Association  and  tends  to  the   Association’s  archives.   • Board  of  Directors  –  Responsible  for  the  fiduciary  and  policy  oversight  of  the  corporation.   • Mission  Outreach  Ministry  Council  –  Responsible  for  the  advancement  of  domestic  and  foreign   missions  as  well  as  cultivating  relationships  with  Olivet  and  Piedmont  colleges,  the  International   Congregational  Fellowship,  the  American  Congregational  Association  and  ecumenical  groups  as   appropriate.   • Growth  Ministry  Council  –  Responsible  for  supporting  the  establishment  of  new  Congregational   churches,  encouraging  and  supporting  local  church  in  youth  programming,  providing  youth   programs  at  the  national  level,  encouraging  churches  in  their  use  of  technology  and  developing   worship  and  spiritual  growth  resources  for  churches.   • Vitality  Ministry  Council  –  Responsible  for  supporting  seminarians,  overseeing  advisory  services   for  member  churches,  promoting  knowledge  and  understanding  of  the  Congregational  Way,   providing  leadership  development  events  for  clergy  and  laity,  and  advancing  lay  ministry.   • Credentials  Committee  –  Tracks  and  reports  the  credentials  and  statistics  of  Annual  Meeting  and   Conference  representation.   • Nominating  Committee  –  Receives  and  puts  forth  nominations  for  elected  positions.    This   committee’s  members  are  nominated  and  elected  from  the  floor  of  the  Annual  Meeting  and   Conference.     9/18/2013   1.    Congregationalism  in  Partnership   Section  1.5   Clergy  and  Laity  Opportunities   Page  3  of  4    
The   Youth   Leader   Training            From   time   to   time,   youth   leaders   from   around   the   country   ar...
The  Leadership  Council  is  made  up  of  members  who  serve  by  virtue  of  holding  other  elected  or   appointed  positions  in  the  NACCC:     • Leadership  Council  –  Comprised  of  two  members  of  each  Ministry  Council  as  well  as  the   moderator,  moderator  elect  and  youth  representative,  this  Council  is  responsible  for  casting   vision  and  prioritizing  programs  and  services  of  the  NACCC,  overseeing  the  Annual  Meeting  and   Conference,  sustaining  the  relationship  with  the  Year  Round  Delegates,  tending  to  inquiring   churches  and  advancing  their  membership,  and  providing  ceremonial  and  ambassadorial   functions  to  the  churches.    The  Treasurer  and  Secretary  serve  with  voice  but  no  vote.     Some  positions  are  on  task  teams  and  are  appointed  directly  by  the  Councils.    These  include  all  task   teams  of  the  Ministry  Councils,  Leadership  Council,  and  Board  of  Directors  including  (to  name  just  a   few):   • Missions   • Congregational  Foundation  for  Theological  Studies   • Youth   • Annual  Meeting  and  Conference  Team     While  the  Councils  are  charged  with  oversight  of  program  areas,  the  Task  Teams  are  responsible  for  the   hands-­‐on  work  required  to  fulfill  program  objectives.     Ad  hoc  committee  opportunities  are  created  from  time  to  time,  depending  on  needs  and  circumstances.     Additionally,  the  NACCC  maintains  a  team  of  volunteer  ambassadors  who  represent  the  NACCC  at   ordinations,  installations,  church  anniversaries,  and  other  special  occasions.    They  also  help  guide   member  churches  through  the  search  process  for  a  minister  and  respond  to  inquiries  from  churches  who   are  considering  membership  in  the  NACCC.   Nominations  are  handled  through  the  Nominating  Committee  of  the  NACCC.    It  is  their  job  to  solicit  the   names  of  interested  people  and  put  selected  people  in  nomination  before  the  delegate  body  of  the   Annual  Meeting.  They  encourage  the  submission  of  nominations  all  year  long.    On  the  next  page,  you   will  find  a  nomination  form  you  may  copy  and  use.    All  year  long,  but  especially  when  you  receive   information  from  them,  please  consider  who  in  your  church  might  have  an  interest  in,  and  aptitude   for  any  of  the  numerous  opportunities  available.    The  NACCC  is  made  strong  and  effective  by  the  work   of  many  people.     Find  the  NACCC’s  Nomination  Form  at  www.naccc.org.  Send  completed  from  to  the  NACCC  office.       9/18/2013   1.    Congregationalism  in  Partnership   Section  1.5   Clergy  and  Laity  Opportunities   Page  4  of  4    
The   Leadership   Council   is   made   up   of   members   who   serve   by   virtue   of   holding   other   elected   ...
  2.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  ACTION   SECTION  2.1:    HERITAGE     Hallmarks  of  Congregationalism     Congregational  Churches  are  sometimes  known  as  the  “Church  of  the  Pilgrims”  after  the  small   congregations  of  the  early  1600’s.  The  people  of  these  congregations  moved  from  England,   some  by  way  of  Holland,  and  then  to  the  new  world  in  pursuit  of  religious  freedom.  From  them,   we  inherited  a  wonderful  spiritual  heritage  -­‐  one  that  is  uniquely  suited  to  our  contemporary   world.     This  is  a  tradition  that  has  deep  convictions  based  upon  the  Word  of  God  as  each  person   interprets  that  Word  according  to  the  dictates  of  conscience,  under  the  enlightenment  of  the   Holy  Spirit.  This  naturally  attracts  men  and  women  of  genuine  conviction,  of  adventurous  faith,   and  of  gracious  regard  for  each  other’s  sincerity  to  the  Congregational  Christian  fellowship.     Since  every  Congregationalist  possesses  full  liberty  of  conscience  in  interpreting  the  Gospel,  we   are  a  diverse  group  of  people  united  under  Christ.  We  believe  there  is  strength  in  diversity  and   by  it  there  are  unending  opportunities  to  learn  from  each  other  and  to  grow  in  faith.   • Christ  alone  is  the  head  of  the  church.   • All  church  members  are  spiritually  equal  and  called  to  the  work  of  ministry.   • Every  local  church  is  autonomous  and  complete.   • Each  local  church  is  called  into  wider  associations  of  fellowship.   • Believers  are  bound  one  to  another  in  voluntary  covenant.   • Every  Christian  possesses  full  liberty  of  conscience  in  interpreting  the  Gospel.   • The  Bible  is  fully  sufficient  as  our  guide  in  matters  of  faith  and  practice  and  will  inspire   individuals  and  direct  the  church  with  fresh  light  and  truth  for  every  generation.     History  Polity  Classes  (online)     Through  the  NACCC’s  Center  for  Congregational  Leadership,  your  church  members  may  learn   more  about  the  Congregational  Way  through  the  online  Congregational  History  and  Polity   course.    Designed  in  two  levels,  level  one  is  appropriate  for  general  membership,  membership   classes  and  confirmation  classes.    After  completing  level  one,  those  who  wish  to  know  more  can   proceed  to  the  in-­‐depth  level  two,  especially  appropriate  for  pastors  who  are  serving  member   churches  but  who  have  come  to  the  Congregational  Way  from  other  traditions.     9/18/2013   2.    Congregationalism  in  Action   Section  2.1   Heritage   Page  1  of  2    
     2.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   ACTION    SECTION   2.1       HERITAGE        Hallmarks   of   Congregationalism    ...
    Heritage  Sunday     Every  year  in  November,  churches  have  the  opportunity  to  celebrate  our  Congregational   Heritage  by  designating  one  Sunday  as  Heritage  Sunday.    By  lifting  up  our  heritage  in  the  month   that  also  celebrates  Thanksgiving,  we  remind  people  that  we  are  deeply  rooted  in  the   faithfulness  of  our  Pilgrim  and  Puritan  forebears  and  that  our  celebration  of  Thanksgiving  is  also   rooted  in  their  deep  and  abiding  faith  and  practice.     Heritage  Materials     To  help  you  in  your  celebration,  a  variety  of  Heritage  materials  for  worship  can  be  found  on  line   at  the  NACCC  and  Center  for  Congregational  Leadership  websites.       9/18/2013   2.    Congregationalism  in  Action   Section  2.1   Heritage   Page  2  of  2    
         Heritage   Sunday         Every   year   in   November,   churches   have   the   opportunity   to   celebrate   ...
2.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  ACTION   SECTION  2.2:    THE  CONGREGATIONALIST  MAGAZINE     Online  and  Hard  Copy     The  Congregationalist  Magazine,  of  the  Congregational  Way,  is  published  4  times  per  year  in   March,  June,  September,  and  December.    This  glossy,  full-­‐color  magazine  is  mailed  to   subscribers’  homes  and  may  also  be  seen  online  at  www.Congregationalist.org       This  award-­‐winning  magazine  engages  a  variety  of  lively  and  interesting  topics  and  issues  of   interest  to  Congregationalists.    Its  pages  are  open  to  all  relevant  and  articulate  contributions.       Editorial  Policy     Articles  and  editorials  in  The  Congregationalist  are  by  the  authority  of  the  editor  and  do  not   necessarily  reflect  policies  and  opinions  of  the  National  Association  of  Congregational  Christian   Churches  or  its  members.  The  NACCC  reserves  freedom  of  expression  to  its  editors  as  well  as   freedom  of  opinion  to  its  readers.    An  advisory  editorial  board  helps  steer  policy  and  ensure   editorial  independence.     Free  Subscriptions     Subscriptions  to  the  magazine  are  free  of  charge  and  make  an  especially  appropriate  welcome   gift  to  your  new  Church  members.             • One  subscription  is  provided  free  of  charge  to  each  individual  requestor  who  is  a   member  of  a  church  in  fellowship  with  the  NACCC.   • One  complimentary  “Newcomer  Copy”  will  be  sent  to  any  person,  one  time  only,  upon   request  by  a  church  in  fellowship  with  the  NACCC.   • One  subscription  to  The  Congregationalist  is  provided  free  of  charge  to  each  church  in   fellowship  with  the  NACCC.   • One  subscription  is  sent  to  each  accredited  theological  seminary  on  the  magazine’s   mailing  list.     Simply  contact  Courtney  Schultz  cschultz@naccc.org  to  begin  receiving  the  magazine.     Encourage  your  members  to  sign  up  for  their  own  copies  as  well.         9/18/2013   2.    Congregationalism  in  Action   Section  2.2   The  Congregationalist  Magazine   Page  1  of  2    
2.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   ACTION    SECTION   2.2       THE   CONGREGATIONALIST   MAGAZINE        Online   and   Ha...
Gift  Subscriptions  &  Additional  Copies     Do  you  know  someone  who  is  not  a  member  of  a  Congregational  Church  but  who  might  enjoy   the  magazine?    You  can  purchase  a  gift  subscription  for  only  $15  per  year.      Churches  that  want  more  than  the  single  free  copy  mailed  to  the  church  may  purchase  a   bundle  of  six  copies  for  $75  sent  to  one  address.    Single  copies  may  be  purchased  from  the   NACCC  office  for  $3.75  plus  $3.20  to  cover  shipping  and  handling.     Advertising     Searching  for  a  pastor?  Churches  seeking  pastors  receive  a  free  notice  of  their  pulpit  vacancy  in   The  Congregationalist  automatically  upon  submitting  their  Church  Information  Form  to  the   NACCC.    Many  raise  their  visibility  by  purchasing  a  small  display  ad.    We  will  help  you  design  a   professional-­‐looking  ad  at  no  extra  design  charge;  or  you  can  submit  your  own  camera-­‐ready   professional  ad.         Other  advertising  opportunities  are  available.    For  more  information  contact  Carrie  Dahm   cdahm@naccc.org  or  1-­‐800-­‐262-­‐1620  x1612.     Supporting  The  Congregationalist     You  can  support  the  mission  of  The  Congregationalist  and  help  keep  the  magazine  in  print  with   a  gift  of  any  size.         Editor’s  Round  Table   Donors  become  members  of  the  Editor’s  Round  Table  with  a  gift  of  $100  or  more.     • Supporting  Members  ($100  or  more)     • Elias  Smith  Connexion  ($250  or  more),  the     • Edward  Beecher  Society  ($500  or  more),  or  the     • Henry  Martyn  Dexter  Society  ($1000  or  more).     Editor’s  Round  Table  members  receive  the  editor’s  personal  thanks,  an  annual  written  report,   and  an  in-­‐person  oral  report,  with  questions  and  answers,  during  the  Annual  Meeting  and   Conference.     Joseph  B.  Polhemus  Fund     While  gifts  through  the  Editor’s  Round  Table  support  the  current  operations  of  the  magazine,   sustaining  gifts  may  be  made  to  the  Joseph  B.  Polhemus  Fund,  named  for  a  beloved  former   editor  of  the  magazine.    The  building  of  this  endowment  will  ensure  the  continued  financial   strength  of  The  Congregationalist  in  the  years  to  come.   9/18/2013   2.    Congregationalism  in  Action   Section  2.2   The  Congregationalist  Magazine   Page  2  of  2    
Gift   Subscriptions       Additional   Copies         Do   you   know   someone   who   is   not   a   member   of   a   ...
2.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  ACTION   SECTION  2.3:    ANNUAL  MEETING  AND  CONFERENCE     What  It  Is       As  indicated  in  Section  1.5,  the  Annual  Meeting  and  Conference  is  an  important  expression  of   Congregationalism  where  churches  send  a  delegate  to  help  conduct  the  business  of  the   assembled  churches.    The  member  churches  are  the  National  Association  and  it  is  at  the  Annual   Meeting  that  churches  come  together  to  make  decisions  important  to  their  common  interests.     While  the  delegates  conduct  the  business,  there  is  plenty  for  others  to  do.    Many  people  attend   who  are  not  official  delegates  to  partake  in  the  fellowship  and  educational  opportunities  at  the   conference.       The  Annual  Meeting  and  Conference  begins  on  a  Saturday  in  late  June  and  continues  through   the  evening  of  the  following  Tuesday.    Various  churches  and  associations  around  the  country   host  the  event.     Why  Attend     There  are  many  reasons  to  attend  the  Annual  Meeting  and  Conference.    Enduring  friendships   are  made  there  as  well  as  useful  connections  with  Congregational  churches  around  the  country.     Seminars  and  workshops  provide  continuing  education  of  interest  to  churches  and  church   leadership.    Multiple  receptions  and  excursions  provide  fellowship  opportunities  and  a  chance   to  see  different  parts  of  the  United  States  as  the  meeting  is  held  in  various  locations.     Additionally,  the  vital  business  of  the  NACCC  is  transacted  in  support  of  our  common  aims,   goals,  and  ministries.    The  Annual  Meeting  is  essential  to  our  collective  fellowship  and  identity   as  an  association  of  autonomous  churches.     Who  May  Attend       • Delegates   o Anyone  may  attend  the  Annual  Meeting  and  Conference  but  it  is  especially   important  for  churches  to  be  represented  by  a  delegate.    The  delegate  is  the   person  designated  to  represent  the  church  in  the  business  proceedings  of  the   meeting.    An  official  delegate  registration  card  is  filed  with  the  NACCC  ahead  of   the  meeting  in  order  to  qualify  the  delegate  to  conduct  business  on  the  floor  of   the  meeting.     o A  church  that  cannot  send  a  member  from  its  church  may  ask  another  church’s   delegate  to  represent  their  vote  at  the  meeting.    One  delegate  may  represent   9/18/2013   2.    Congregationalism  in  Action   Section  2.3   Annual  Meeting  and  Conference   Page  1  of  2    
2.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   ACTION    SECTION   2.3       ANNUAL   MEETING   AND   CONFERENCE        What   It   Is  ...
up  to  three  churches.    Inquire  within  your  local  association  as  to  who  may  be   attending  and  willing  to  represent  you.         • Alternates   o Many  churches  also  designate  and  register  an  alternate  delegate.    This  person  is   qualified  to  conduct  business  from  the  floor  of  the  meeting  in  the  absence  of  the   delegate.    They  also  serve  as  a  collaboration  partner  to  the  delegate  when   making  decisions  about  how  to  cast  a  vote.     • Others   o Of  course,  other  attendees  are  always  welcome.    There  is  always  plenty  to  see   and  do.       9/18/2013   2.    Congregationalism  in  Action   Section  2.3   Annual  Meeting  and  Conference   Page  2  of  2    
up   to   three   churches.      Inquire   within   your   local   association   as   to   who   may   be    attending   a...
2.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  ACTION   SECTION  2.4:    ANNUAL  YOUTH  GATHERING     NAPF  (National  Association  of  Pilgrim  Fellowship)  and  HOPE  (Heritage   of  Pilgrim  Endeavor)     Held  annually  (and  sometimes  in  conjunction  with  the  Annual  Meeting  and  Conference),  high   school  (NAPF)  and  college  age  (HOPE)  youth  meet  for  fellowship,  spiritual  growth  and   inspiration,  and  for  mission  work.    The  bonds  of  friendship  that  form  endure  for  many  years   over  many  miles.    Many  participating  youth  go  on  to  ministry  in  a  variety  of  ways.     You  do  not  need  to  have  a  youth  group  in  your  church  to  send  someone  to  NAPF  or  HOPE.    You   need  only  encourage  youth  you  know  would  benefit  from  such  an  experience  to  attend.      (See   Section  4.2  for  more  information  on  the  Youth  Fund  for  scholarships.)     NAPF  (National  Association  of  Pilgrim  Fellowship)      NAPF  is  for  youth  who  are  entering  9th  through  12th  grade.  NAPF  allows  teens  to  meet  and   bond  with  other  Christians  from  throughout  the  country  and  to  share  their  faith  in  a  fun-­‐filled   atmosphere.  Small  groups  are  led  by  dedicated  adult  counselors,  many  of  whom  volunteer  and   use  vacation  time  to  attend.  In  conjunction  with  tremendous  worship  music,  worship  times  may   be  led  by  members  of  the  Commission  on  Youth  Ministries  or  other  adult  leaders  as  well  as  by   local  church  youth  groups  who  have  been  asked  to  prepare  and  lead  morning  and  evening   devotionals.  Opportunities  to  express  faith  through  acts  of  service  are  always  a  highlight  of  the   conference.  Any  time  a  group  of  young  people  is  gathered,  there  is  always  plenty  of  fun!     HOPE  (Heritage  of  Pilgrim  Endeavor)       HOPE  offers  young  adults  post  high  school  through  age  26  a  great  opportunity  to  further  grow   in  faith  with  peers  in  an  environment  similar  to  NAPF.  While  still  including  worship,  speakers,   small  group  time,  and  mission  work,  HOPE  promotes  closer  connection  with  peers  and  deeper   discussion  about  faith  through  peer-­‐led  small  groups.  The  experiences  and  perspectives  that   each  person  brings  to  their  small  group  are  valued  and  can  enrich  discussions  about  faith  in   remarkable  ways.  In  addition,  HOPE  provides  more  opportunities  for  leadership  involvement   through  prayer  team,  small  group  leader,  or  CYM  (Commission  on  Youth  Ministries)   representative  positions.  HOPE  creates  a  genuine,  meaningful,  and  fun  atmosphere  to  grow  in   faith  while  creating  new  friendships!       9/18/2013   2.    Congregationalism  in  Action   Section  2.4   Annual  Youth  Gathering   Page  1  of  2    
2.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   ACTION    SECTION   2.4       ANNUAL   YOUTH   GATHERING        NAPF    National   Associ...
Both  programs  have  one  thing  in  common  –  a  place,  time  and  friends,  with  which  to  share  their   faith.  The  leadership  team,  counselors  and  participants  come  back  year  after  year.     If  a  yearly  conference  were  all  the  youth  programs  consisted  of,  it  would  be  wonderful  enough.   However,  it  is  only  part  of  the  youth  program.  The  camaraderie  and  closeness  are  established   by  individuals  for  a  lifetime.  They  cannot  wait  for  only  once  a  year  to  contact  each  other.  They   stay  connected  through  three  Facebook  pages  (NAPF  –  National  Association  of  Pilgrim   Fellowship,  H.O.P.E,  and  NAPF/HOPE  Alumni),  emails,  Skype  and  individual  communication.     You  Can  Help     Many  youth  around  the  country  spend  time  raising  funds  to  attend  NAPF  and  H.O.P.E.,  but  not   all  youth  can  afford  to  attend.    You  can  make  a  contribution  to  the  youth  assistance  fund   through  the  NACCC.    You  will  have  the  satisfaction  of  helping  to  bring  our  youth  closer  to  Christ   through  this  exciting  gathering  of  Congregational  Christian  youth.  (See  Section  4.2  for  more   information  on  the  Youth  Fund  for  scholarships.)       9/18/2013   2.    Congregationalism  in  Action   Section  2.4   Annual  Youth  Gathering   Page  2  of  2    
Both   programs   have   one   thing   in   common         a   place,   time   and   friends,   with   which   to   share ...
3.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  PRACTICE       SECTION  3.1:    BASIC  ETHICS     Boundaries  are  Important     The  relationship  between  the  pastor  and  his  or  her  congregation  is  a  special  one.    Pastors  have   the  privilege  of  walking  with  the  people  of  God  through  all  of  life’s  joys,  challenges  and   transitions.    Good  pastorates  and  good  churches  build  trustworthy  relationships  together.     Trust  happens  when  all  are  clear  about  what  to  expect  from  the  relationships.    This  doesn’t   mean  that  hurts  and  conflict  won’t  happen  in  the  life  of  the  church,  but  trustworthy   relationships  weather  the  differences  and  difficulties  and  create  stronger  bonds  in  the  process.     An  understanding  of  basic  ethics  will  help  create  trustworthy  relationships.     Bylaws  are  Important     Your  Articles  and  Bylaws  are  the  primary  articulation  of  who  you  are  together.    Compliance  with   your  bylaws  and  procedures  is  foundational  in  practicing  trustworthiness.    If  your  bylaws  no   longer  fit  your  congregation,  you  may  consider  amending  them  so  that  all  will  know  what  to   expect  in  your  corporate  identity  and  process.     Confidentiality  is  Important     You  may  expect  your  pastor  to  act  with  professional  confidentiality.    Professional  confidentiality   means  that  your  pastor  will  not  gossip  about  parishioners,  disclose  their  difficulties  to  others   without  permission,  or  divulge  what  is  learned  in  pastoral  care/counseling  sessions  or  health   care  settings.         However,  there  are  limits  to  confidentiality.    Often,  pastors  will  receive  people  in  pastoral   care/counseling  only  when  there  is  another  person  in  the  building.  This  is  a  good  practice  and   should  be  followed  whenever  possible.    Additionally,  the  pastor’s  office  may  have  a  window   (advisable)  or,  if  not,  the  session  may  be  carried  on  with  the  door  open.    The  fact  that  a  person   came  in  for  a  session  with  the  pastor  is  not  confidential.    What  is  said  within  the  session  is.       Sometimes,  by  virtue  of  the  need  to  coordinate  schedules,  events,  and  pastoral  care,  other   church  staff  may  become  privy  to  pastoral  concerns  and  needs.    Church  staff  members  are  also   under  the  ethical  mandate  not  to  gossip  about  parishioners,  disclose  their  difficulties  to  others   without  permission,  or  divulge  when  someone  has  come  for  pastoral  care/counseling  sessions   or  accessed  health  care  services.     9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.1   Basic  Ethics   Page  1  of  5    
3.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   PRACTICE          SECTION   3.1       BASIC   ETHICS        Boundaries   are   Important ...
Clergy  are  often  mandated  reporters.  This  means  the  state  requires  a  minister  contact  state   agencies  when  there  is  a  disclosure  or  reasonable  suspicion  of  child  abuse  or  neglect.    Proof  of   such  a  claim  is  not  required.    This  is  often  true  for  disclosure  or  reasonable  suspicion  of  elder   abuse  as  well.    State  laws  vary,  so  it  is  imperative  that  the  church  leaders  and  clergy  know  your   state’s  laws.  (see  Section  3.2)    When  in  doubt,  a  clergy  person  should  assume  he  or  she  is  a   mandated  reporter.     A  Pastor’s  Relationships  in  the  Church     The  pastor’s  role  in  a  church  is  outwardly  a  highly  social  one.    Relationships  are  important.     From  interactions  at  board  meetings,  to  hospital  bedsides,  to  counseling  and  pastoral  care,  to   home  visits,  to  coffee  hour  chit  chat,  a  pastor’s  presence  is  part  of  the  spiritual  richness  of  the   church  community.    However,  the  burdens  of  the  pastorate  can  put  an  internal  strain  on  the   pastor.    Burdens  such  as  conflicting  personalities,  carrying  confidential  knowledge,  and  unduly   high  expectations  of  the  pastoral  role  by  parishioners  can  create  a  sense  of  isolation  and   loneliness  for  many  pastors.    Because  of  these  typical  dynamics,  there  are  some  general   guidelines  that  help  maintain  healthy  relationships  in  the  church  for  parishioners  and  clergy   alike.       Concerning  Friendships:    Because  the  church  is  its  people,  the  church  is  a  social  place.     Friendships  of  all  kinds  and  of  all  levels  are  formed  there.    The  pastor  is  no  exception.    Pastoral   friendships  will  develop  over  time  and  with  personal  experience.    Like  all  people,  a  pastor  will   find  personal  compatibilities  with  some,  but  not  with  others.    Still,  the  pastor  must  accord  all   parishioners  respect,  acceptance  of  differences,  and  opportunity  to  spiritually  grow.    Deeply   personal  and  exclusive  relationships  between  a  pastor  and  a  parishioner  can  be  problematic.     Such  relationships  can  cause  other  parishioners  to  feel  resentment  or  accuse  the  pastor  of   “cronyism.”    They  can  tempt  the  pastor  to  speak  too  frankly  about  church  difficulties  and   frustrations,  potentially  placing  the  parishioner-­‐friend  in  an  awkward  position  as  a  parish   member.    They  can  compromise  the  pastorate  in  many  unintended  ways,  especially  when  one   or  the  other  becomes  disappointed  in  the  friendship  and  the  “special”  status  accorded  by  it.     This  is  not  to  say  friendships  don’t  form,  but  that  they  can  only  go  “so  far.”    Friendships  whose   depth  and  transparency  compromise  the  pastor-­‐parishioner  relationship  are  “too  far.”    For   these  and  many  other  good  reasons,  a  pastor  must  form  deep  friendships  outside  of  the   congregation.    These  friendships  are  necessary  for  a  pastor  to  remain  healthy  and  balanced  in   his  or  her  pastoral  role.    A  congregation  can  encourage  their  clergy  person  to  form  outside   relationships  by  allowing  time  to  serve  on  community  boards  and  attend  community  functions,   and  giving  the  pastor  adequate  time  off  away  from  the  church  duties.     Dating  in  the  Church:    In  the  “old  days,”  when  the  single,  male  pastor  came  to  town,  many   people  wanted  to  introduce  him  to  somebody  they  thought  would  be  a  good  spouse.    With   today’s  interpersonal  complexities,  this  quaint  notion  is  just  that  .  .  .  a  quaint  notion.    For  many   9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.1   Basic  Ethics   Page  2  of  5    
Clergy   are   often   mandated   reporters.   This   means   the   state   requires   a   minister   contact   state    a...
reasons,  it  is  unadvisable  for  a  single  pastor  to  date  parishioners.    In  some  states,  it  is  even   illegal  for  a  clergy  person  to  become  romantically  or  sexually  involved  with  a  member  of  the   church.    One  reason  has  already  been  covered  in  the  previous  section  on  friendships,  but  other   reasons  exist.    For  instance,  in  the  course  of  dating,  if  misunderstandings  arise  or  the   relationship  turns  out  to  be  an  incompatible  one,  the  break  up  can  cause  emotional  and   spiritual  wounds  to  the  individuals  and,  with  its  ripple  effects,  to  the  congregation.    Another   important  reason  is  the  perceived  power  in  the  role  of  the  pastor.    Many  times,  people  project   onto  the  pastor  qualities  of  morality,  reason,  and  virtue  that  aren’t  always  earned  and  may  not   be  present  in  the  individual.    This  can  cause  someone  to  feel  “love”  for  the  pastor  out  of   proportion  to  their  knowledge  or  experience  of  the  pastor  (this  can  be  true  if  the  pastor  is   single  or  married).    If  the  pastor  begins  dating  a  person  who  has  these  feelings  and  the   relationship  doesn’t  work  out,  it  is  easy  for  that  person  to  feel  led  on  or  deeply  rejected  by  the   pastor.  He  or  she  may  believe  their  feelings  have  been  exploited  by  the  pastor.  Again,  the   effects  of  the  disillusionment  can  adversely  affect  the  entire  congregation.    This  is  not  to  say   that  dating  in  the  church  doesn’t  happen  and  that  it  can’t  lead  to  happy  endings,  but  that  the   complications  of  relationships  that  don’t  work  out  make  it  risky  business,  and  best  to  be   avoided.  If  such  feelings  develop  between  single,  consenting  adults,  it  is  important  that  one  of   the  couple  leave  the  church  for  a  time  so  that  the  relationship  can  develop  outside  of  the   complexities  of  church  relationships.     Relationships  that  Transgress  Boundaries:    Under  no  circumstances  should  a  pastor  initiate  or   respond  to  an  overture  that  is  flirtatious,  sexually  suggestive  or  sexually  involved  with  anyone   in  the  parish,  male,  female,  single,  married,  young,  old.    Such  relationships  violate  the  trust  of   the  congregation  and  may  result  in  dismissal.    If  sexual  engagement  or  erotic  behavior  occurs   with  someone  who  is  not  yet  an  adult,  it  is  illegal  and  needs  to  be  reported  to  authorities.     Check  your  state’s  statutes  regarding  mandated  reporting.    If  in  doubt,  consult  an  attorney.         Please  See  section  3.2  on  Safe  Churches.    There,  you  are  urged  to  adopt  policies  and   procedures  that  promote  good,  healthy  and  trustworthy  relationships  in  the  congregation.  We   direct  you  to  the  website  of  Church  Mutual  Insurance  Company  where  you  may  find  free,   helpful,  safety  resources.  www.churchmutual.com.    If  allegations  are  substantiated,  be  sure  to   inform  the  NACCC.     When  a  Minister  Leaves     All  pastorates  come  to  an  end.  The  reasons  why  they  end  vary,  but  each  ending  changes  the   relationship  of  the  pastor  to  the  congregation.  The  general  rule  is  that  when  a  pastor  leaves,  he   or  she  relinquishes  all  pastoral  duties  and  interests,  and  leaves  the  congregation  at  least  for  a   designated  period  of  time.  The  primary  reason  for  this  is  to  help  the  congregation  receive  and   bond  with  their  new  minister,  whether  that  person  is  an  interim  or  a  newly  called  and  settled   minister.    If  your  former  pastor  doesn’t  return  your  phone  calls,  or  when  contacted  gently  but   9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.1   Basic  Ethics   Page  3  of  5    
reasons,   it   is   unadvisable   for   a   single   pastor   to   date   parishioners.      In   some   states,   it   i...
firmly  redirects  you  to  your  current  pastor,  it  is  not  that  she  or  he  doesn’t  care  for  you.    Your   former  pastor  cares  so  much  for  you  that  he  or  she  wants  you  to  have  the  best  possible   relationship  with  the  new  pastor  that  you  can  have  and  not  stand  in  the  way  of  that.    The  goal   of  any  former  pastor  should  be  the  unqualified  success  of  the  new  pastor.    The  goal  of  any   church  should  be  the  same.         Keeping  the  “Interim”  in  Interim  Minister     The  time  between  settled  pastors  is  called  the  interim  period.    This  time  of  change  often   provokes  congregational  anxiety.    The  pastor  called  to  help  the  congregation  through  this  time   is  called  an  Interim  Minister  or  an  Intentional  Transitional  Minister  (see  the  NACCC  website  for   more  information).    Often,  a  church  is  comforted  by  the  presence  of  the  interim  and  enjoys  the   good  skills  and  gifts  the  interim  minister  brings  to  this  time  of  congregational  change.    The   natural  inclination  in  such  circumstances  is  to  want  the  interim  to  stay  on  as  the  settled   minister.         However,  the  tradition  and  wisdom  is  that  it  is  unethical  for  an  interim  minister  to  place  his  or   her  name  in  candidacy  as  the  settled  pastor.    This  rule  ensures  that  an  interim  minister  does  not   interfere  with  the  search  process  or  the  church  in  their  discernment  of  new  leadership.    This   ethical  rule  helps  the  church  stay  true  to  its  task  rather  than  be  tempted  by  a  potential  “quick   fix”  to  their  need  and  relief  of  their  anxiety.    This  is  a  time  of  vulnerability  for  churches.    A  good   interim  knows  this,  respects  this  and  does  not  position  himself  or  herself  to  take  advantage  of   that  vulnerability  by  candidating  for  the  settled  position.     Upon  conclusion  of  an  interim  ministry,  the  same  rules  for  when  a  pastor  leaves  (above)  apply.     Basics  for  Pastoral  Discretionary  Funds     Many  churches  have  discretionary  funds  for  pastors  to  distribute  to  those  in  need.    Often,  use   of  these  funds  is  confidential,  protecting  the  dignity  of  those  who  come  asking  for  help.     However,  certain  safe  guards  should  be  put  in  place  to  reduce  the  temptation  to  misuse  or   misappropriate  these  funds.    Some  simple  policies  will  help.    First,  a  pastor  should  keep  a   balance  sheet  of  the  fund  and  record  the  type  of  help  given  (e.g.  gas,  $20.00).    The  pastor   should  generate  a  monthly  report  to  the  trustees  or  deacons  or  other  appropriate  groups   showing  the  beginning  balance  of  the  fund,  monthly  expenditures  and  the  remaining  balance.     If  you  collect  discretionary  funds  through  a  special  offering,  the  treasurer  should  be  responsible   for  counting  and  depositing  the  offering,  and  then  informing  the  pastor  of  the  deposit  and  fund   balance.    Also,  the  treasurer  should  balance  the  account  as  appropriate.         Sometimes,  a  person  wants  to  help  an  individual  by  passing  money  through  the  discretionary   fund,  thereby  ensuring  a  tax  deduction  for  their  help.    This  is  never  a  good  practice  unless  there   9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.1   Basic  Ethics   Page  4  of  5    
firmly   redirects   you   to   your   current   pastor,   it   is   not   that   she   or   he   doesn   t   care   for  ...
is  a  church  wide  appeal  for  a  specific  cause  and  clear  communication  that  all  funds  received  for   that  purpose  will  be  used  for  that  purpose.    Sometimes,  an  appeal  will  generate  more  income   than  needed.    Be  sure  to  state  in  your  appeal  how  overages  will  be  used.   9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.1   Basic  Ethics   Page  5  of  5    
is   a   church   wide   appeal   for   a   specific   cause   and   clear   communication   that   all   funds   received...
3.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  PRACTICE   SECTION  3.2:    SAFE  CHURCHES     Disclosure  Process     The  NACCC  requires  that  all  ministers  seeking  a  church  call  through  the  NACCC  search  process   create  a  disclosure  file  for  church  inspection.    This  is  a  service  the  NACCC  provides  to  our   member  churches  to  support  you  in  making  informed  choices  for  pastoral  leadership  without   breaching  your  autonomy  to  discern  who  the  Spirit  is  calling  to  ministry  in  your  church.             Use  of  NACCC  services  for  the  purposes  of  seeking  a  pastoral  position  is  considered  a  privilege   and  not  a  right.  We  believe  that  healthy  relationships  between  a  pastor  and  parish  are  built  not   just  with  attention  to  ethical  confidentiality  but  also  with  appropriate  transparency.  The  NACCC   disclosure  policy  creates  a  reasonable  standard  for  the  privilege  of  using  the  NACCC  network   when  a  minister  is  seeking  a  pulpit.  It  is  a  tool  for  member  churches  that,  when  used,  helps  a   church  make  healthy  decisions  when  looking  for  new  pastoral  leadership.  This  process  provides   an  avenue  for  self-­‐disclosure  with  dignity  and  for  documentation  of  reconciliation.  It  allows   appropriate  communication  of  group  findings  so  that  an  abusive  personality  exposed  in  an   NACCC  church  in  one  region  can’t  easily  go  to  another  region  and  repeat  the  harmful  behaviors.   This  policy  is  established  as  a  service  to  member  churches.  This  is  not  a  “credentialing”  policy.   The  NACCC  does  not  guarantee  the  accuracy  or  veracity  of  the  file  contents.         Child  Protection  Policies     The  NACCC  strongly  encourages  its  churches  to  adopt  child  protection  policies.    To  that  end,  we   direct  you  to  our  website  for  sample  policies  other  churches  have  used  or  are  using.    We  also   direct  you  to  the  website  of  Church  Mutual  Insurance  Company  where  you  may  find  free,   helpful,  safety  resources.  www.churchmutual.com.  All  churches  should  have  glass  in  all   classroom  and  youth  room  doors.    Special  attention  to  chaperone  policies  is  also  essential,   including,  but  certainly  not  limited  to:   • No  youth  leader  will  be  alone  with  a  minor,  especially  in  a  car,  unless  there  is  an   emergency   • All  youth  group  gatherings  will  have  at  least  two  chaperones  in  attendance,  one  of  each   gender  if  it  is  a  mixed  gender  group   • Overnight  youth  functions  of  any  kind  will  also  have  at  least  two  chaperones  in   attendance,  one  of  each  gender  if  it  is  a  mixed  gender  group   • Background  checks  on  all  volunteers   Again,  we  cannot  emphasize  enough  your  responsibility  to  create  safe  space  and  engender  trust   through  child  protection  policies.     9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.2   Safe  Churches   Page  1  of  3    
3.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   PRACTICE    SECTION   3.2       SAFE   CHURCHES        Disclosure   Process         The  ...
    Background  Checks     The  NACCC  is  proud  to  announce  its  partnership  with  Intellicorp,  a  company  that  does   background  checks  of  clergy,  staff  and  volunteers  for  the  NACCC  and  its  churches.  Intellicorp   delivers  trustworthy,  inexpensive,  and  timely  assistance  for  such  things  as  pastoral  searches,   newly  hired  church  staff,  and  volunteers  in  any  number  of  church  ministries  and  programs   (such  as  youth  workers,  Christian  education  workers,  church  day  care  workers,  etc.)       More  Information     More  information  on  the  disclosure  process,  child  protection  policies  and  background  checks   can  be  found  on  our  website  at  www.naccc.org       Dealing  with  Scandal  and  the  Media       Churches  occasionally  find  themselves  embroiled  in  situations  where  their  minister  or  other   high-­‐profile  individual  associated  with  the  church  is  accused  of  improprieties  or  criminal   behaviors.    Sometimes,  the  nature  of  the  accusation(s)  attracts  unwanted  media  attention  that   must  be  managed  by  the  church.    In  such  cases,  it  is  important  that  the  church  appoint  one  and   only  one  spokesperson  to  receive  media  requests  for  information  and  statements.    There   should  be  no  comment  made  by  any  other  staff  person,  officer,  or  member  of  the  church.     Additionally,  if  deemed  appropriate,  that  person  should  have  access  to  legal  counsel  and  confer   with  one  other  designated  person  for  guidance  before  issuing  any  statement(s).  If  the   allegations  are  criminal  in  nature,  please  inform  the  Executive  Secretary  of  the  NACCC.    We  are   available  to  support  you  through  these  difficult  times.     Healing  from  Trauma     Congregations  that  suffer  trauma  of  any  kind  need  skills  and  time  to  heal.    Sometimes,  that  skill   and  help  can  come  from  the  church’s  pastor.    Other  times,  especially  when  the  pastor  is  the   source  of  the  trauma,  outside  help  is  needed.    There  is  no  handbook  that  can  provide  a  step-­‐by-­‐ step  response  to  experiences  of  betrayal  and  bullying.    But  there  are  several  resources  a  church   can  call  upon  for  help.    The  experience  of  the  NACCC  staff  is  a  good  place  to  begin.    Because   betrayals  of  trust  have  deep  repercussions  in  a  congregation,  it  is  often  a  good  idea  to  bring  in   an  outside  advisor  to  help  people  sort  through  their  feelings  and  begin  the  conversations  and   actions  that  can  bring  healing.    At  times,  it  is  appropriate  to  turn  to  community  experts  such  as   counselors,  social  workers,  psychologists,  doctors,  attorneys  and  other  clergy  who  may  have   9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.2   Safe  Churches   Page  2  of  3    
         Background   Checks         The   NACCC   is   proud   to   announce   its   partnership   with   Intellicorp,   ...
experience  in  leading  a  congregation  through  difficult  times.    Services  and  liturgies  of  grieving   can  be  of  great  help  in  acknowledging  the  reality  of  the  circumstances  while  also  opening  the   door  to  hope  and,  sometimes,  reconciliation.    Prayer  is  always  needed.    It  is  important  to  know   that  you  do  not  have  to  go  through  difficult  times  alone  or  without  the  reminder  that  God’s   grace  is  present  even  in  the  midst  of  hurt.   9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.2   Safe  Churches   Page  3  of  3    
experience   in   leading   a   congregation   through   difficult   times.      Services   and   liturgies   of   grievin...
3.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  PRACTICE   SECTION  3.3:    PERSONNEL  CONSIDERATIONS  AND  POLICIES     Importance     A  healthy  church  has  policies  and  procedures  by  which  the  church  and  the  minister  can   dialogue  effectively  about  job  expectations  and  performance.    Because  the  relationship   between  pastor  and  people  is  a  partnership,  it  is  vital  that  each  tends  to  the  health  of  the   relationship.    A  supportive  pastoral  review  process  is  a  way  to  do  this.    Unfortunately,  too  many   churches  try  to  implement  the  process  as  a  reaction  to  growing  dissatisfaction  or  conflict.    A   healthy  process  is  one  that,  when  in  place,  can  avoid  conflict  to  begin  with.  The  review  is  not,   and  never  should  be  a  punitive  process.     Review  Process     There  are  many  fine  resources  for  adopting  good  review  processes.    The  NACCC  has  some   resources  on  its  website.    The  Center  for  Congregational  Leadership  has  many  helpful  books   referenced  on  its  web  site.    If  you  choose,  an  advisor  can  help  you  establish  and  implement   personnel  reviews  for  church  staff,  paid  and  unpaid.    A  healthy  and  fruitful  process  will  allow   for  mutual  dialogue  between  church  representatives  and  employees.    A  good  and  fair  review   will  be  based  on  a  person’s  job  description  rather  than  vague  “feelings.”  It  will  help  set  mutual   expectations  for  the  upcoming  year  and  allow  the  employee  to  express  how  the  church   leadership  might  help  promote  successful  goals.  It  may  also  protect  the  pastor  from  a  future   disgruntled  member.    Ultimately  the  review  process  is  an  opportunity  to  work  together  in   ministry  for  the  glory  of  Christ.         Pastor/Parish  Relations  Committee     Many  churches  follow  a  model  of  pastoral  support  through  a  pastor/parish  relations   committee.    This  committee  often  acts  as  a  supportive  “sounding  board”  for  the  pastor  and   occasionally  is  called  upon  to  mediate  disputes  with  the  pastor  that  may  arise  from  the   congregation.    While  this  committee  can  be  of  help  to  a  pastor,  it  is  not  the  same  as  a  personnel   committee  that  is  responsible  for  staffing  policies  and  performance  reviews  and  should  not  be   used  as  such.     Call  and  Employment     Because  of  the  unique  nature  of  ministry  that  presumes  a  person  does  not  choose  to  be  a   pastor  but  is  called  by  God  to  be  one,  there  is  often  hesitancy  to  treat  the  pastor  as  a  church   employee  who  is  subject  to  accountability.    Indeed,  many  lay  people  feel  uncomfortable   9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.3   Personnel  Considerations  and  Policies   Page  1  of  5    
3.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   PRACTICE    SECTION   3.3       PERSONNEL   CONSIDERATIONS   AND   POLICIES        Import...
reviewing  their  pastor  given  their  reverence  and  respect  for  the  office.    There  are  even  some   pastors  who  will  claim  that  their  unique  profession  places  them  outside  the  accountability  of   personnel  reviews.         However,  in  spite  of  the  unique  aspect  of  call  in  ministry,  the  pastor  is  still  collecting  a  pay   check  from  an  employer,  who  happens  to  be  the  church.    Personnel  reviews  are  perfectly   appropriate  and  highly  desirable,  promoting  transparency  and  healthy  ministries.    A  church  can   acknowledge  and  even  celebrate  a  person’s  call  to  ministry,  the  anniversary  date  of  being  called   to  that  church,  an  ordination  date  and  other  pastoral  milestones.    (October  is  Pastor   Appreciation  month).    However,  a  pastor  who  is  also  an  employee  should  never  be  exempt   from  personnel  reviews.     Compensation     It  is  important  for  churches  to  provide  the  pastor  with  compensation  and  benefits  appropriate   for  the  duties  the  church  expects  of  their  pastor.    A  person  with  a  Master  of  Divinity  degree   should  be  compensated  at  a  level  equivalent  to  other,  similarly  degreed  professionals  (for   instance,  teachers  in  your  community.)    A  person  with  a  doctorate  (D.  Min.  or  Ph.D.)  should  be   similarly  compensated  (school  superintendent  is  a  good  parallel  here.)     Full  time  lay  ministers  can  expect  a  lower  compensation  than  someone  with  a  seminary   education.    Part  time  ministers  can  expect  compensation  based  on  the  number  of  hours  the   church  asks  for.    Regional,  urban  and  rural  areas,  church  size  and  economics  all  play  a  part  in   determining  a  compensation  package.     A  good  resource  is  the  Compensation  Handbook  for  Church  Staff  available  at   www.yourchurchresources.com  and  also  on  the  website  of  the  Minister’s  and  Missionary’s   Benefit  Board  (MMBB)  at  http://mmbb.org/search/results/?q=compensation+levels       Part  Time  Ministry  and  Tentmakers     Tentmakers  (so  called  because  the  apostle  Paul  made  tents  while  also  engaging  in  itinerant   ministry)  are  people  who  work  full  or  part  time  at  a  job  while  also  serving  a  church.    Necessarily,   the  church  work  is  part  time  and  is  secondary  to  the  person’s  other  job.    In  part  time  ministry,  it   is  essential  that  the  expectations  of  the  church  and  their  minister  be  clearly  set  forth  in  a  job   description.    The  contract  of  engagement  should  be  reviewed  at  least  annually.    Churches  with   part  time  ministers  often  must  have  strong  lay  leadership  to  “fill  in  the  gaps”  of  ministry.         9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.3   Personnel  Considerations  and  Policies   Page  2  of  5    
reviewing   their   pastor   given   their   reverence   and   respect   for   the   office.      There   are   even   som...
Compensation  is  More  than  Money     • Vacation  Time   o Because  a  full  time  pastor  puts  in  50  to  60  hours  of  work  per  week,  is  on  call   24/7,  spends  many  evenings  away  from  home  in  church  meetings  and  rarely  has   two  days  off  in  a  row,  vacation  time  is  essential.    The  “industry  standard”  for  full   time  ministers  is  four  weeks  off.    Many  churches  add  another  week  for  so  much   time  served  up  to  a  certain  amount  (for  example,  an  extra  week  off  for  every  3   years  served  up  to  six  weeks  off).    Some  churches  grant  additional  “light  duty”   weeks  after  Christmas  and  Easter.     • Compensatory  Time   o Because  the  nature  of  ministry  creates  unpredictable  schedules,  many  churches   encourage  pastors  to  take  “comp  time”  when  a  week  has  been  extraordinarily   demanding  of  a  pastor’s  time  or  emotional  and  spiritual  resources.  Because  this   flexibility  is  based  on  trust  that  the  opportunity  will  not  be  misused,  it  is   important  that  the  pastor  be  able  to  explain  exercising  the  privilege  if  asked.           • Continuing  Education  Time   o The  demands  and  rapid  changes  of  ministry  make  continuing  education  a   necessity  for  pastors  and  churches.    A  pastor  who  engages  in  no  continuing   education  often  becomes  a  less  effective  pastor  for  the  church  than  those  who   do.    Many  churches  recognize  this  and  grant  two  weeks  off  for  continuing   education  beyond  vacation  time.    Continuing  education  time  may  be  used  for   attendance  at  the  Convocation  (see  Section  1.5),  at  a  retreat  or  at  a  seminar.     Continuing  education  keeps  a  pastor’s  skills  sharp  and  their  attitudes  fresh  and   positive.     • Sabbatical  Time   o Along  with  vacation  time  and  continuing  education  time,  many  churches  grant   their  pastor  three  months  off,  with  pay,  after  every  7  years  of  service.    This  is  a   time  for  the  pastor  to  engage  in  a  time  of  intensive  study  or  to  take  on  a   professional  project  that  requires  more  focus  and  attention  than  can  be   otherwise  had.    Sabbatical  planning  is  usually  undertaken  in  an  intentional  way   by  both  the  church  and  the  pastor.    While  the  idea  of  the  pastor  being  away  for   such  a  length  of  time  is  often  intimidating  to  a  church,  by  its  conclusion,  both  the   church  and  the  pastor  have  found  new  strength,  resiliency  and  discernment.     When  done  with  intentionality,  it  is  a  positive  experience  for  everyone.    If  you   would  like  to  speak  with  churches  who  have  taken  this  step,  the  NACCC  can  put   you  in  touch  with  them.     9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.3   Personnel  Considerations  and  Policies   Page  3  of  5    
Compensation   is   More   than   Money             Vacation   Time    o Because   a   full   time   pastor   puts   in   ...
• Benefits   o Just  like  the  families  in  your  church,  clergy  families  need  and  deserve  access  to   and  help  with  health  insurance,  retirement  savings  and  disability  insurance.    The   NACCC  has  an  agreement  with  MMBB  to  provide  opportunities  for  these  things.     When  coupled  with  other  compensation,  the  benefits  provided  by  MMBB   provide  protection  and  peace  of  mind  for  your  pastor  and  his  or  her  family.    You   may  contact  MMBB  directly  for  the  name  of  a  representative  in  your  area.    You   may  find  more  information  at  their  website,  www.mmbb.org       Compensation  Packages     Many  churches  set  a  total  for  monetary  compensation  and  then  allow  the  minister  to  designate   the  dollars  as  he  or  she  sees  fit.    There  are  many  clergy  tax  advantages  to  doing  so.    Clergy  may   divide  their  monetary  compensation  into  categories  of:   • Salary  –  given  directly  to  the  pastor  as  taxable  income   • Housing  Allowance  –  given  directly  to  the  pastor,  but  the  IRS  considers  this  to  be   nontaxable  income   • FICA  –  is  usually  fully  paid  by  the  minister  unless  the  church  and  minister  agree  that  the   church  pays  ½   • Health  Insurance  –  paid  directly  to  the  health  insurance  provider  by  the  church   • Disability  Insurance  -­‐  paid  directly  to  the  disability  insurance  provider  by  the  church   • Retirement  Savings  -­‐  paid  directly  into  an  established  retirement  account  in  the  pastor’s   name  by  the  church   • Books  –  reimbursed  by  the  church  to  the  pastor  upon  submission  of  receipts   • Auto  Mileage  Reimbursement  –  reimbursed  by  the  church  to  the  pastor  upon   submission  of  mileage  log   • Continuing  education  –  reimbursed  by  the  church  to  the  pastor  upon  submission  of   receipts  or  paid  directly  by  the  church     Clergy  and  churches  can  be  guided  through  this  process  with  the  Church  Law  and  Tax  Report   and  Guide  for  Church-­‐related  Employers  available  on  the  MMBB  website.  www.mmbb.org     On  Members  being  Employees     A  final  word  is  in  order  on  the  difficult  issue  of  church  members  as  employees  of  the  church.    In   Congregational  practice,  the  settled  minister  becomes  a  member  of  the  church.    In  common   practice,  many  church  employees  are  also  members  of  the  church.    Perhaps  it  is  the  organist,  or   the  Sunday  School  Superintendent,  or  the  Parish  Nurse.    No  matter  what  the  position,  the   supervision  of  employees  who  are  church  members  is  often  difficult,  yet  especially  necessary  in   these  circumstances.    Needing  to  terminate  an  employee  who  is  also  a  member  often  creates   conflict  in  the  church.    For  this  very  good  reason,  many  churches  have  policies  in  place  that   9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.3   Personnel  Considerations  and  Policies   Page  4  of  5    
    Benefits    o Just   like   the   families   in   your   church,   clergy   families   need   and   deserve   access  ...
prohibit  members  from  becoming  employees,  with  the  exception  of  the  pastor.    Since  such  a   policy  isn’t  always  practical,  here  are  a  few  guidelines  that  can  help  navigate  these  choppy   waters.    That  person:     • Is  always  an  employee  first  and  a  member  second.    This  means  there  is  no  separating   what  one  does  as  a  member  from  how  one  behaves  or  what  one  says  as  an  employee.     The  employee  designation  trumps  the  member  designation.    (Such  is  true  for  the  pastor   as  well).     • Is  subject  to  the  same  review  process  and  personnel  policies  as  all  other  employees.     • Must  respect  his  or  her  supervisor  and  act  accordingly.    This  includes  being  subject  to   termination  if  the  supervisor  is  charged  with  that  authority.    If  the  supervisor  does  hold   that  authority,  then  the  church  leadership  must  support  the  decision  of  the  supervisor   even  if  they  don’t  agree  with  it.    The  time  to  question  the  decision  is  in  the  supervisor’s   review  process,  not  in  the  “court  of  the  congregation.”     9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.3   Personnel  Considerations  and  Policies   Page  5  of  5    
prohibit   members   from   becoming   employees,   with   the   exception   of   the   pastor.      Since   such   a    p...
3.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  PRACTICE   SECTION  3.4:    CHURCHES  IN  CONFLICT     Conflict  Happens     Conflict  in  a  church,  while  never  welcome,  is  to  be  expected.    We  come  together  as  people  at   different  stages  in  our  faith  journey  and  with  different  ideas  to  contribute  to  the  community.       Naturally,  opinions  can  differ,  one  from  another.    Conflict  can  be  both  healthy  and  destructive   to  the  church  depending  on  the  circumstances,  the  leadership,  the  personalities  involved  and   any  number  of  other  diverse  factors.    It  can  be  brought  out  by  major  decisions  to  be  made,  by   an  acute  and  precipitating  incident  in  the  church,  by  disagreement  over  purpose  and/or  over   how  to  resource  the  church’s  ministries  or  other  events.    Destructive  conflict  left  unaddressed   will  cause  great  harm  to  the  body  of  Christ  and  calls  for  the  engagement  of  an  outside  advisor   to  help  you  navigate  the  turbulent  waters.    In  cases  of  destructive  conflict,  an  advisor,  as  an   outside  voice,  is  a  must  and  is  a  most  worthwhile  investment  in  the  health  of  the  church.    A   church  might  also  employ  an  advisor  to  help  avoid  conflict,  for  instance  to  help  manage  a   difficult  discussion  coming  up  or  to  help  a  congregation  recover  from  a  significant  trauma.     How  the  NACCC  Can  Help     The  NACCC  has  advisors  to  help  you  navigate  the  waters  of  conflict.    Knowledgeable  in  the   dynamics  of  conflict  and  skilled  at  listening,  advisors  help  you  examine  your  challenges,  identify   your  opportunities  and  discern  your  options  for  personal  healing  and  institutional  health.       The  NACCC  will  introduce  you  to  an  advisor  based  on  your  initial  contact  with  us.    After  that,   the  advisor  and  the  church  contract  together  the  terms,  scope  and  compensation  of  the   engagement.    Each  advisor  is  independent  of  the  NACCC.    The  NACCC  simply  acts  as  a  referring   agent.         To  Engage  a  Conflict  Advisor     The  beginning  of  the  advising  engagement  is  initiated  by  a  telephone  call  to  the  NACCC.      A  call   for  information  may  be  initiated  by  anyone  in  the  church.    However,  if  a  church  wants  a   referral,  a  call  must  be  initiated  by  the  pastor,  moderator,  or  chair  of  a  committee  or  board.       Each  advising  engagement  will  be  tailored  to  the  specific  circumstances  of  the  church.    In   general,  the  advisor,  in  an  initial  phone  call,  will  gather  basic  facts  from  the  pastor  or  lay  leader   who  is  designated  as  the  “contact  person”  for  the  church  in  this  process.     9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.4   Churches  in  Conflict   Page  1  of  2    
3.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   PRACTICE    SECTION   3.4       CHURCHES   IN   CONFLICT        Conflict   Happens       ...
  In  some  cases,  but  not  all,  a  formal  agreement  will  be  drafted  to  promote  clarity,  trust,  and   understanding  among  all  parties.    Signed  by  a  representative  of  the  Church  governing  board   (moderator,  clerk,  president,  etc.)  and  with  the  knowledge  (and  sometimes  the  signature)  of   the  pastor,  it  will  include,  among  other  things:   • the  scope  of  the  engagement   • articulation  of  goals  for  the  engagement   • the  time  frame  for  agreed  upon  activities  and  goals   • how  the  arrangement  will  be  publicized  to  the  church   • agreed  upon  fees  for  both  on  site  and  off  site  labors     In  engaging  an  advisor,  the  church  agrees  to   • commit  itself  to  the  process  and  do  the  work  required  to  create  successful  and  positive   outcomes   • be  open  with  the  congregation  about  the  arrangement,  the  process,  and  reason  a   consultant  has  been  engaged   • facilitate  and  schedule  the  gatherings  with  publicity,  notifications  and  other  appropriate   means   • publically  disseminate  the  consultant’s  final  report  to  the  congregation  or  engaging   board  or  committee   • depending  on  the  duration  and  scope  of  the  engagement,  reimburse  the  advisor  for  all   expenses  related  to  it,  i.e.  transportation  costs,  accommodations,  and  any   materials  needed.  A  fee  may  be  negotiated  for  longer  term  consultations     Note:    if  your  church’s  financial  circumstances  make  it  unable  to  pay  for  an  advisor,  please   enquire  of  the  Dean  of  the  Center  for  Congregational  Leadership  about  the  availability  of   grants.     9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.4   Churches  in  Conflict   Page  2  of  2    
    In   some   cases,   but   not   all,   a   formal   agreement   will   be   drafted   to   promote   clarity,   trust...
3.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  PRACTICE   SECTION  3.5:    ADVISORS  AVAILABLE  TO  CHURCHES     What  Are  Advisors?     The  NACCC  networks  with  a  number  of  skilled  individuals  who  are  willing  and  able  to  help   churches  in  a  variety  of  ways.    These  advisors  are  people  who  have  significant  experience  in   Congregationalism  and  church  life.    They  are  also  willing  to  make  themselves  available  to   churches  who  wish  to  engage  in  conversations  that  enhance  church  vitality.         Why  Choose  an  Advisor?     A  church,  for  a  variety  of  reasons  might  choose  to  engage  an  outside  facilitator  to  meet  with  its   leadership  groups  and  concerned  individuals.       Generally,  churches  engage  an  advisor  when  they  want  to:   • Ensure  good  practices  of  Congregationalism   • Determine  vision  and  purpose   • Chart  out  steps  for  the  future   • Understand  challenges   • Manage  conflict   • Promote  healing     Advising  topics  include:   • Finding  your  next  minister     • Celebrating  ordinations  and  installations  in  the  Congregational  Way   • Creating  a  healthy  culture  for  church  vitality   • Creating  a  culture  of  generosity  for  year  round  stewardship   • Charting  your  course  with  strategic  planning   • Updating  your  church’s  structure  and  governance   • Reviewing  your  pastor  and  other  church  staff  and  volunteers   • Managing  conflict   • Church  revitalization     • Closing  Churches     9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.5   Advisors  Available  to  Churches   Page  1  of  4    
3.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   PRACTICE    SECTION   3.5       ADVISORS   AVAILABLE   TO   CHURCHES        What   Are   ...
  Resources  are  Available  on  Line     Before  deciding  to  engage  an  individual  you  will  want  to  check  out  our  resources  and   suggestions  on  line  at  www.naccc.org  and  www.centerforcongregationalleadership.org.  Under   the  Advising  topics,  you  will  find  useful  information  and  a  variety  of  resources  to  guide  you.     After  reviewing  these  materials,  you  may  decide  to  engage  an  advisor  to  help  you  take  the  next   steps.         An  advisor  can  help  a  church  make  healthy  decisions  when  responding  to  current  challenges.     Delivery  of  consulting  services  varies  based  on  the  type  of  services  needed  and  the   circumstances  of  the  request.    Services  may  be  delivered  by  telephone,  by  computer  or  in   person,  or  a  combination  of  all  three.    The  costs  for  services  also  varies  based  on  delivery   method  and  length  of  involvement  in  the  consulting  process.     Our  advisors  come  from  around  the  country,  with  a  variety  of  backgrounds  (clergy,  laity,  NACCC   staff).    The  type  of  advising,  the  depth  of  involvement  and  the  follow-­‐up  will  vary  depending   upon  your  circumstances.  In  every  case,  the  NACCC  works  with  you  to  ensure  you  are  receiving   high  quality,  appropriate  help  to  address  your  needs.    Each  advisor  is  independent  of  the   NACCC.    The  NACCC  simply  acts  as  a  referring  agent.    To  find  an  advisor  best  suited  to  your   circumstances  and  needs,  call  the  NACCC  office  and  speak  with  Betsey  Mauro,  Dean  of  the   Center  for  Congregational  Leadership,  1-­‐800-­‐262-­‐1620  x1613.     9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.5   Advisors  Available  to  Churches   Page  2  of  4    
    Resources   are   Available   on   Line         Before   deciding   to   engage   an   individual   you   will   want ...
  Advising  at  a  Glance     Formal   agreement   needed?   Vote  of   Congregation   or  governing   board   needed?   Web  Link   Length  of   Engagement   Methods  of   Engagement   Costs  and   reimburse-­‐ ments     Finding  your   Next  Minister     Short  term   Web   resources   Telephone   Webinar     In  person   No  fee   No  fee   No  fee     Travel   expenses   No   No   http://www.naccc.org/Churches/Find ingAMinister.aspx     Ordinations,   Installations   and   Anniversaries     Short  term   Web   resources   Telephone   No  fee   No  fee   No   No     Church   Vitality   Moderate   term   Web   resources   In  person   No  fee   Travel   expenses   Yes   Yes     Generous   Stewardship   Short  term   Web   Resources   In  person   No  Fee   Travel   expenses   No   No     Strategic   Planning   Moderate   term   In  person   Travel   expenses   and   stipend*   Yes   Yes     Moderate   term   Web   resources   In  person   No  fee   Travel   expenses   Only  if   travel   involved   Yes   http://www.centerforcongregationall eadership.org/governance.html   Moderate   term   Web   resources   Webinar   In  person   No  fee   Travel   expenses   Only  if   travel   involved   Yes     In  person   Travel   expenses   and   stipend*   Yes   Yes         Church   Structure  and   Governance     Reviewing   Pastor,  Staff   and   Volunteers   Managing   Conflict   Long  term     *based  on  a  sliding  scale  and  ability  to  pay       9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.5   Advisors  Available  to  Churches   Page  3  of  4    
    Advising   at   a   Glance        Formal      agreement      needed        Vote     of      Congregation      or     g...
    Making  the  Hardest  Decisions  of  All     Advisors  can  help  churches  engage  in  a  number  of  discussions  and  decisions  that  can  help   create  and  maintain  church  vitality.    However,  not  all  churches  can  sustain  themselves.    Today,   less  people  are  practicing  their  spirituality  in  an  organized  church  and  an  increasing  number  of   people  in  American  society  consider  themselves  to  have  no  religious  identity  or  affiliation.    The   result  of  these  contemporary  trends  is  that  many  of  our  churches  are  experiencing  declining   membership  numbers,  increasing  average  age  of  members  and  loss  of  youth  in  the  church.     Sometimes,  churches  find  they  have  become  too  small  and  aged  to  continue  as  a  self-­‐sufficient   community.    There  are  many  options  for  a  church  facing  these  circumstances.    Some  options   include:   • Federating  with  another  church   • Merging  with  another  church   • Starting  over  in  a  different  way   • Dissolving,  liquidating  and  distributing  assets  to:   o Missions   o the  NACCC’s  “Remembered  Churches  Fund”  for  Church  Vitality   o the  NACCC  Shared  Ministries  Fund  Endowment   o the  Center  for  Congregational  Leadership  Endowment   o any  number  of  other  worthy  Christian  endeavors     Before  making  any  decision,  an  NACCC  advisor  can  help  you  look  at  options  for  revitalization   and  lead  you  in  the  difficult  and  sometimes  contentious  discussions  that  come  about  in  times  of   extreme  challenge  and  when  facing  momentous  decisions.    Call  the  NACCC  to  discuss  options   for  advising  and  other  considerations  at  times  such  as  these.    A  cautionary  note:    sometimes,  a   “maverick”  minister  with  a  small  but  significant  following  will  come  to  a  struggling  church   offering  to  “grow”  the  church  by  bringing  his  or  her  flock  into  the  fold  and  becoming  the   minister  of  the  entire  group.    At  first  glance,  it  seems  to  be  an  opportunity  to  keep  the  church   open  and  going.    In  our  experience,  these  “opportunities”  usually  have  very  unhappy  endings   for  the  original  Congregationalist  members  and  the  beloved  Congregational  church  with  its   assets  becomes  the  property  of  another  group.    Again,  before  making  any  decisions,  call  the   NACCC  for  support  and  information.       9/18/2013   3.    Congregationalism  in  Practice   Section  3.5   Advisors  Available  to  Churches   Page  4  of  4    
        Making   the   Hardest   Decisions   of   All         Advisors   can   help   churches   engage   in   a   number ...
4.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  SUPPORT   SECTION  4.1:    RESOURCES  AVAILABLE     Where  to  Find  Some  Good  Resources     There  are  many  resources  at  your  fingertips  at  www.naccc.org  and   www.centerforcongregationalleadership.org.    Taking  some  time  to  explore  these  sites  can  lead   you  to  books,  pamphlets,  brochures  and  other  information  that  can  be  of  use  to  your  church   and  your  members.    In  addition  to  finding  information  on  Congregationalism,  you  can  access   the  NACCC  Yearbook  which  contains  information  concerning  member  churches,  clergy,  NACCC   structure  and  personnel,  both  paid  and  volunteer.    You  will  also  find  information  about  NACCC   supported  Missions,  the  CFTS  program  for  seminarians,  help  in  starting  new  churches  and  many   other  things.    Enjoy  exploring!     Pastoral  Search  Process     One  of  the  most  important  transitions  in  the  life  of  any  church  is  when  one  pastor  leaves  and   the  church  embarks  on  a  search  for  their  next  pastor.    The  process  can  seem  daunting.    The   NACCC  provides  many  good  resources  to  help  you.    The  first  place  to  start  is  on  the  website  at   www.naccc.org  under  Churches,  Finding  a  Minister.    The  Pastoral  Search  Handbook  and  The   Guide  to  Best  Practices  offer  invaluable  guidance.    Additional  help  is  just  a  phone  call  away  at   the  NACCC  office.    Additionally,  NACCC  advisors  in  your  area  are  available  to  meet  with  you.     Missions     Church  involvement  in  Mission  Outreach  is  vitally  important  to  church  health  and  ministry.     However,  it  is  often  difficult  to  determine  which  missions  are  in  genuine  need  of  help  and  if   your  contributions  are  being  used  for  their  intended  purposes.    The  NACCC  maintains  critical   partnerships  with  a  number  of  international  and  national  missions,  ensuring  the  integrity  of   these  missions.    When  you  give  to  missions  through  the  NACCC,  you  may  be  assured  that  your   contributions  are  being  appropriately  used  to  forward  these  exciting  ministries.    Every  dollar   given  to  missions  goes  to  missions.     Devotionals     The  devotional  life  is  one  that  deepens  faith  when  practiced  regularly.    There  are  many  fine   devotional  materials  to  be  found.    The  NACCC  produces  devotionals  for  both  the  season  of   Advent  and  the  season  of  Lent.    The  devotions  found  in  these  annually  issued  booklets  are   written  by  Congregationalists  around  the  country  and  are  rich  in  diversity.       9/18/2013   4.    Congregationalism  in  Support   Section  4.1   Resources  Available   Page  1  of  3    
4.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   SUPPORT    SECTION   4.1       RESOURCES   AVAILABLE        Where   to   Find   Some   Go...
Presenting  the  NACCC  to  your  members     Many  times,  individual  church  members  ask  of  their  leadership,  “Why  are  we  a  member  of  the   NACCC?    What  is  it  they  do  for  us?”    To  help  you  answer  that  question,  the  NACCC  has  available   a  helpful  brochure  simply  explaining  this  partnership  and  the  benefits  of  membership.    You  may   order  these  brochures  by  calling  the  NACCC  at  1-­‐800-­‐262-­‐1620  and  asking  for  the  brochure   “Serving  the  Churches  that  Serve  Christ”.     What  it  Means  to  be  a  Member  of  a  Congregational  Christian  Church     The  classic  booklet  by  Rev.  Henry  David  Gray  and  updated  by  his  son,  Rev.  David  Gray  and   grandson,  Rev.  Doug  Gray  is  a  handy  summary  of  exactly  what  its  title  says.    Measuring  6  ¾   inches  by  3  ¾  inches,  it  is  a  perfect  size  to  include  in  a  letter  or  place  in  the  hymnal  rack  in  the   pew.    Booklets  may  be  ordered  from  the  NACCC  office  for  a  nominal  cost.     Principles  and  Practices:    The  Congregational  Way  of  the  Churches  of   the  National  Association     This  12  page  booklet  by  Lloyd  Hall,  Jr.,  and  Karl  D.  Schimpf  articulates  the  foundational   principles  of  Congregationalism  and  the  values  embraced  by  the  NACCC.     The  Congregational  Way  Series     This  series  of  six,  colorful,  trifold  brochures  by  various  authors  present  some  fundamental   understandings  of  Congregationalism.    They  include:   • The  Biblical  Basis  of  Congregationalism  by  Harry  R.  Butman   • The  Congregational  Way  by  Steven  H.  Ware  Bailey   • New  Testament  Tests  for  Congregationalism  by  Henry  David  Gray   • The  Congregational  Christian  Way  of  Life  by  Phil  R.  Jackson   • The  Meaning  of  the  Meeting  House  by  Arthur  A.  Rouner,  Jr.   • With  One  Sound  of  the  Heart  by  Howard  J.  Conn     A  perfect  complement  to  this  series  is  the  trifold  brochure  What  Do  Congregational  Christians   Believe?  by  Steven  A.  Peay.     All  of  these  brochures  may  be  found  in  digital  format  on  the  website  of  the  Center  for   Congregational  Leadership,  www.centerforcongregationalleadership.org  or  may  be  ordered   from  the  NACCC  office.       9/18/2013   4.    Congregationalism  in  Support   Section  4.1   Resources  Available   Page  2  of  3    
Presenting   the   NACCC   to   your   members         Many   times,   individual   church   members   ask   of   their   ...
Other  Resources     There  are  many  other  fine  resources  available,  too  numerous  to  include  here.    Be  sure  to  visit   our  websites  and  explore  the  treasure  trove  of  information  available.   9/18/2013   4.    Congregationalism  in  Support   Section  4.1   Resources  Available   Page  3  of  3    
Other   Resources         There   are   many   other   fine   resources   available,   too   numerous   to   include   her...
4.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  SUPPORT   SECTION  4.2:    FINANCIAL  RESOURCES  AVAILABLE     The  Congregational  Investment  Trust  (CIT)     The  CIT  was  created  in  1991  as  an  endowment  trust  for  donor  gifts  and  contributions  to  the   National  Association  of  Congregational  Christian  Churches.    It  is  also  offered  as  an  investment   tool  that  member  churches  can  use  for  their  own  endowment  gifts.    When  member  churches   deposit  their  endowments  in  the  CIT,  their  assets  are  pooled  with  the  deposits  of  other   investors,  allowing  greater  cumulative  purchasing  power  of  all  CIT  participants  than  a  church   alone  might  realize.    The  trust  should  not  be  used  as  a  short-­‐term  or  money  market  vehicle  as   principal  values  will  fluctuate.     Building  and  Loan  Fund     The  Building  and  Load  Fund’s  purpose  is  to  promote,  encourage,  assist,  and,  in  any  manner,  aid   the  establishment,  building,  remodeling,  maintenance,  repair,  location  and/or  relocation  of   Congregational  Christian  Churches  which  are  members  of  the  NACCC.  Churches  may  apply  for   low  interest  loans.    The  NACCC  seeks  and  encourages  contributions  to  the  fund  so  that  it  may   extend  assistance  to  an  increasing  number  of  Churches.     John  Richard  Fund     John  Richard  was  an  avid  and  gifted  musician  whose  appreciation  for  the  musical  arts  was  a   source  of  inspiration  for  many.    The  John  Calvin  Richard  Fund  was  established  by  his  family  as  a   loving  and  living  memorial  to  him.  His  love  for  music  and  theater  performance  was  a  large  part   of  his  talented  but  short  life.      The  Fund  awards  annual  grants  of  up  to  $500.00  to  National  Association  member  Churches  of   200  members  or  less  which  are  planning  a  Fine  or  Performing  Arts  event  in  their  Church.     Application  deadline  is  April  1  and  funds  must  be  used  by  the  following  April  1.     Providence  Fund       The  Providence  Fund  was  established  and  funded  by  the  host  committee  of  the  2004  Annual   Meeting  and  Conference,  and  continues  to  grow  through  gifts  from  benevolent  individuals  who   wish  to  help  Churches  who  might  not  otherwise  be  able  to  send  delegates  to  the  NACCC’s   Annual  Meeting  and  Conference.     9/18/2013   4.    Congregationalism  in  Support   Section  4.2   Financial  Resources  Available   Page  1  of  3    
4.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   SUPPORT    SECTION   4.2       FINANCIAL   RESOURCES   AVAILABLE        The   Congregatio...
The  Providence  Fund  provides  needs-­‐based  grants  to  churches  to  enable  their  representation  at   the  Annual  Meeting  and  Conference  by  offsetting  associated  expenses.    Grants  of  up  to  $500.00   may  be  applied  to  registration  and  housing  costs  of  the  Annual  Meeting  and  Conference.     Deadline  to  apply  is  April  1st.    Details  for  eligibility  may  be  found  at  www.naccc.org  under  the   donations  tab,  Congregational  Foundation,  Funds.     Youth  Fund     GENERAL  NAPF  AND  HOPE  SCHOLARSHIP     The  NACCC  Commission  on  Youth  Ministries  has  scholarships  available  to  provide  assistance  to   reduce  the  cost  of  the  registration  to  the  NACCC  annual  youth  conference  NAPF  or  HOPE.  These   include  one  (1)  full  scholarship  and  as  many  part  scholarships  as  deemed  appropriate  from   available  funds  in  a  given  year.    Be  sure,  also,  to  check  with  your  state  or  regional  association   for  scholarships  that  might  be  available  for  NAPF  and  HOPE  scholarships  as  well  as  for  Mission   trips.     MEMORIAL  DAY  FRIENDS  SCHOLARSHIP     A  special  scholarship  in  conjunction  with  the  National  Association  of  Congregational  Christian   Churches  Commission  on  Youth  Ministries  and  the  Memorial  Day  Friends  group  is  being  set  up   to  provide  full-­‐payment  of  one  (1)  registration  to  the  NACCC  annual  youth  conference  NAPF  or   HOPE.  The  Memorial  Day  Friends  group  is  comprised  of  several  past  members  of  NAPF  and   HOPE.     Both  scholarships  provide  assistance  to  anyone  wishing  to  attend  NAPF  or  HOPE  who  has   financial  need  and  has  shown  outstanding  development  in  any  or  all  of  the  following  areas:   • Christian  character   • Participation  in  local  church  youth  programs   • Community  service     Scholarship  applications  shall  be  available  to  all  who  are  affiliated  with  a  church  that  maintains   membership  in  the  National  Association  of  Congregational  Christian  Churches.  More   information  can  be  found  at  www.naccc.org  under  Churches,  Services  for  Churches     Seminary  Scholarships     Through  the  Congregational  Foundation  for  Theological  Studies  (CFTS)  program,  several   scholarships  are  available  to  seminarians  who  are  also  enrolled  in  CFTS.    These  scholarships   offset  the  high  cost  of  a  seminary  education.    Many  individuals  and  many  churches  set  up   ongoing  scholarships  in  their  own  names  or  in  honor  of  others.   9/18/2013   4.    Congregationalism  in  Support   Section  4.2   Financial  Resources  Available   Page  2  of  3    
The   Providence   Fund   provides   needs-     based   grants   to   churches   to   enable   their   representation   at...
    Ministerial  Assistance  and  Enrichment  Fund          This  fund  provides  two  kinds  of  assistance.     1.  From  time  to  time,  clergy  are  faced  with  personal  emergencies  and  need  modest  help   to  meet  their  challenges.    The  Ministerial  Assistance  portion  provides  emergency   financial  assistance  to  ministers,  both  active  and  retired.  Through  this  fund,  dedicated   care-­‐givers  can  also  receive  support  in  times  of  need.   2. The  Enrichment  portion  of  the  fund  is  used  as  financial  supplemental  support  for  a   variety  of  continuing  education  opportunities  including  the  Minister’s  Convocation,   continuing  education,  and  sabbatical  leaves.    This  fund  is  not  endowed  and  relies  on   contributions  from  individuals  and  churches  for  continuing  support.   All  help  is  strictly  confidential.    Inquiries  may  be  made  to  the  Executive  Secretary  of  the  NACCC.     The  Retired  Ministers  Fund     This  fund  was  established  by  the  Rev.  Dr.  Max  Strang,  a  long-­‐time  Congregational  minister,  and   Mr.  Fred  Hoerner,  a  Congregational  layman,  to  recognize  the  value  of  the  service  rendered  by   retired  Congregational  ministers  and  their  spouses.  This  endowed  fund  has  been  supported   generously  by  the  churches  and  individuals  of  the  NACCC  and  provides  a  modest  annual  gift  to   all  retired  ministers  who  have  served  NACCC  churches.       Contributions  Accepted     We  welcome  and  encourage  churches  and  individuals  to  make  donations  to  these  funds  and   scholarships  so  that  these  ministries  may  continue.    If  you  would  like  to  know  more  about  any   of  these  funds,  please  contact  the  NACCC  office.     Contributions  may  be  made  on  line  by  going  to  www.naccc.org  and  clicking  on  the  “Donate   Now”  button.    They  may  also  be  made  by  check,  payable  to  NACCC  and  mailed  to:     NACCC   P.O.  Box  288   Oak  Creek,  WI    53154     9/18/2013   4.    Congregationalism  in  Support   Section  4.2   Financial  Resources  Available   Page  3  of  3    
        Ministerial   Assistance   and   Enrichment   Fund                  This   fund   provides   two   kinds   of   as...
  5.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  AFFILIATION   SECTION  5.1:    REGIONAL  ASSOCIATIONS     Congregational  Fellowship     A  vital  part  of  Congregationalism  is  for  churches  to  be  in  fellowship  with  one  another.    Around   the  country  churches  gather  themselves  into  state  and  regional  associations  for  the  purposes  of   mutual  support  and  encouragement,  to  strengthen  relationships  and  help  in  understanding  and   responding  to  regional  needs  and  issues.    Often  these  are  opportunities  for  education  and   program  development,  helping  churches  gain  new  ideas  and  skills.    The  NACCC  encourages  all   of  its  member  churches  to  participate  fully  in  State/Regional  Associations,  whenever  possible.         Moderators’  Quarterly  Conference  Calls     The  NACCC  encourages  communication  among  the  state  and  regional  associations  and  with  the   NACCC.    To  that  end,  the  NACCC  hosts  quarterly  conference  calls  with  State  and  Regional   Association  moderators  for  purposes  of  sharing  ideas  and  information.    There  is  no  charge  to   you  for  these  quarterly  calls.     NACCC  Support     The  NACCC  makes  available  to  State  and  Regional  Associations  access  to  our  conference  call   provider  so  that  you  can  teleconference  within  your  region  for  your  particular  work  together.     The  NACCC  issues  you  a  participant  code  and  once  the  bill  for  your  call  is  received  by  the   NACCC,  it  is  forwarded  to  you  for  payment.  Remember,  charges  do  not  apply  to  the  quarterly   calls  the  NACCC  hosts  for  regional  and  state  moderators,  only  to  your  own  conference  calls  if   you  wish  to  use  our  system.     Also,  you  may  have  access  to  the  list  of  Year  Round  Delegates  for  your  region  as  a  conduit  for   communication  for  your  activities.     Helpful  Information  for  the  NACCC  from  State  and  Regional   Associations     To  facilitate  good  communication,  it  would  be  very  helpful  if  State  and  Regional  Associations   would  inform  us  of:   • Regional  meetings   o Send  us  your  meeting  announcements  and  agendas   o If  you  schedule  your  spring  meeting  in  the  fall,  let  us  know  so  we  can  put  your   spring  meeting  on  our  calendar  well  in  advance   9/18/2013   4.    Congregationalism  in  Affiliation   Section  5.1   Regional  Associations   Page  1  of  2    
     5.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   AFFILIATION    SECTION   5.1       REGIONAL   ASSOCIATIONS        Congregational   F...
  • • o Let  us  know  if  we  can  provide  any  information  or  personnel  for  your  meeting   Vicinage  councils,  ordinations  and  installations   o Let  us  know  if  you  have  vicinage  councils  coming  up  so  we  might  pray  for  your   discernment  and  wisdom  in  the  process  and  send  letters  of  greeting  and   encouragement   Moderators  and  Officers   o Tell  us  when  a  new  moderator  is  elected  so  we  can  include  that  person  on  our   conference  calls   o Tell  us  who  your  officers  are  so  we  may  publish  that  information  on  our  NACCC   website     For  all  of  the  above,  contact  Linda  Miller,  lmiller@naccc.org  or  1-­‐800-­‐262-­‐1620  x1618.     9/18/2013   4.    Congregationalism  in  Affiliation   Section  5.1   Regional  Associations   Page  2  of  2    
               o Let   us   know   if   we   can   provide   any   information   or   personnel   for   your   meeting    ...
5.    CONGREGATIONALISM  IN  AFFILIATION   SECTION  5.2:    AFFILIATED  ORGANIZATIONS     Colleges     Because  they  respected  learning  and  felt  the  need  to  have  educated  ministers,  the  early  New   England  Congregationalists  founded  the  first  colleges  and  universities  in  our  country,  including   Harvard,  Yale,  Dartmouth,  Williams,  Bowdoin,  Middlebury  and  Amherst.  The  Congregationalists   who  founded  these  and  many  other  institutions  took  care  to  make  them  self-­‐perpetuating   colleges  with  their  own  boards  of  trustees,  not  church-­‐sponsored  institutions  like  their  English   counterparts.     Today,  there  are  no  strictly  Congregational  Christian  colleges  or  seminaries.  Those  called  to   ministry  in  the  Congregational  Way  study  at  many  institutions,  including  those  sponsored  by   other  denominations.  They  can  also  benefit  from  special  study  programs  under  the  aegis  of  the   Congregational  Foundation  for  Theological  Studies,  a  division  of  the  NACCC.       Olivet  College,  Olivet  Michigan     Founded  by  Congregationalists,  Olivet  College  is  a  private  liberal  arts  college  located  in  south-­‐ central  Michigan.  The  college  was  the  first  in  the  country  by  charter  to  accept  women  and   persons  of  color.  Its  more  than  900  students  participate  in  a  unique  educational  experience   known  as  the  Olivet  Plan.  As  part  of  this  effort,  students  are  engaged  in  both  classroom  and   practical  programs  incorporating  real  world  experiences  with  lectures  and  service  learning.    The   College's  commitment  to  providing  access  to  a  comprehensive  and  diverse  learning   environment  is  reflected  in  all  aspects  of  the  Olivet  Plan.  The  aspirations  of  Olivet  College  are   advanced  in  the  College's  vision:  Education  for  Individual  and  Social  Responsibility.       Piedmont  College,  Demorest,  Georgia     Piedmont  is  a  private  liberal  arts  college  founded  by  Congregationalists  and  based  upon  the   Judeo-­‐Christian  tradition.    The  Judeo-­‐Christian  tradition  comprises  the  humane  values  upon   which  Western  Civilization  is  based.  It  promotes  concern  for  others  and  the  acceptance  for   individual  responsibility  that  are  essential  for  ethical  conduct  and  citizenship.  Through  fostering   understanding  and  acceptance  of  this  tradition,  Piedmont  College  strives  to  further  develop  the   individual's  personal  growth  through  self-­‐understanding  and  the  ability  to  lead  and  work   effectively  with  others.         9/18/2013   4.    Congregationalism  in  Affiliation   Section  5.2   Affiliated  Organizations   Page  1  of  3    
5.      CONGREGATIONALISM   IN   AFFILIATION    SECTION   5.2       AFFILIATED   ORGANIZATIONS        Colleges         Bec...
Research  and  History     American  Congregational  Association  (Congregational  Library  and  Archives),  Boston,   Massachusetts     “The  Congregational  Library  and  Archives  are  administered  by  the  American  Congregational   Association,  a  non-­‐profit  organization  founded  May  25,  1853.  The  1853  ACA  charter  stated  that   the  organization  was  incorporated  "for  the  purpose  of  establishing  and  perpetuating  a  library  of   religious  history  and  literature  of  New  England,  and  for  the  erection  of  a  suitable  building  for   the  accommodation  of  the  same,  and  for  the  use  of  charitable  societies."  It  was  felt  that  the   latter  should  be  done  or  the  original  Puritan  literature  would  be  lost.    The  Congregational   Library  now  holds  225,000  items  documenting  the  history  of  one  of  the  nation's  oldest  and   most  influential  religious  traditions.”  (from  their  website,  www.14beacon.org  )     International  Associations     International  Congregational  Fellowship     “The  International  Congregational  Fellowship  is  a  vibrant  global  expression  of  a  multiplicity  of   local  Congregational  churches  and  associational  bodies  across  the  world.    For   Congregationalists,  how  our  churches  are  organized  and  run  have  to  reflect  the  principles  and   values  that  Jesus  taught,  and  the  pattern  we  find  for  church  life  and  Christian  leadership  in  the   Bible.     Congregational  churches  do  not  exist  in  isolation  but  have  traditionally  formed  free  associations   or  networks.    ICF  provides  a  global  identity  and  a  valuable  opportunity  for  Congregationalists   from  all  over  the  world  to  enjoy  fellowship  with  one  another.”       (from  their  website:    www.intercong.org).         ICF  holds  a  conference  every  four  years.     American  Committee  of  the  International  Congregational  Fellowship  (AMCO)     This  organization  is  comprised  of  Congregationalists,  representing  the  North  America  region  of   the  International  Congregational  Fellowship.    Members  who  attend  the  Annual  Meeting  and   Conference  often  meet  together  and  invite  all  to  join  them  in  this  vibrant  fellowship.           9/18/2013   4.    Congregationalism  in  Affiliation   Section  5.2   Affiliated  Organizations   Page  2  of  3    
Research   and   History         American   Congregational   Association    Congregational   Library   and   Archives ,   ...
Societies     Washington  Gladden  Society     The  purpose  of  the  Washington  Gladden  Society  is  to  honor  Washington  Gladden’s  memory  by   applying  the  insights  of  the  Social  Gospel  Movement  to  the  important,  controversial  ethical  and   theological  issues  of  our  own  times,  and  serving  as  a  forum  for  discussion  among  Christians  and   local  Churches  in  the  Congregational  tradition.       This  Society  was  born  out  of  the  needs  expressed  by  laity  and  clergy  who  felt  it  worthwhile  to   expand  the  witness  of  the  NACCC,  while  keeping  their  decisions,  actions,  and  resolutions   independent  of  the  Association’s  business.    Meetings  are  held  at  the  time  of  the  Annual   Meeting  and  Conference.     For  more  information,  please  go  to  the  website:  www.washingtongladdensociety.org     The  Congregational  Society  for  Classical  Retreat  Guides     This  Society’s  mission  is  to  offer  silent  retreats,  days  of  prayer,  and  other  useful  means  of  lifting   up  the  power  of  individual  and  corporate  prayer  life.    See  Section  1.5  for  more  information  on   retreat  opportunities  for  clergy  and  laity.       9/18/2013   4.    Congregationalism  in  Affiliation   Section  5.2   Affiliated  Organizations   Page  3  of  3    
Societies         Washington   Gladden   Society         The   purpose   of   the   Washington   Gladden   Society   is   ...